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An engine shed for a GWR branch-line. - General Model Railway Discussion. - Other Areas. - Your Model Railway Club
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 Posted: Tue Aug 30th, 2011 08:32 am
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Chubber
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Reference to the above in Paul Karau 'The Wallingford Branch' shows four tall chimneys to exhaust steam/smoke from the shed. Somewhere between building and 1937 they lost their curved sheet metal covers and a 1960's picture shows them missing completely, their positions marked by breaks in the roofline. I am unable to determine what materials were used in their construction.

Given that they were supported above the smoke trough on probably relatively insubstantial supports, I do not think they were built of brick.

I am guessing, from the pictures I have that they were constructed from vertical planks of wood, the joints over-planted with narrower strips.

I'd be grateful for any assistance anyone can give me in this matter,

Doug



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 Posted: Tue Aug 30th, 2011 09:31 am
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Wheeltapper
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I dont know anything about Wallingford specifically but I think some sheds had the outlets made of very lightweight steel sheeting , in effect being a rather bigger version of a chimney cowling..

It may be worth asking either the Cholsey & Wallingford Railway Society of the Engine Shed Society for details of the actual shed.



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 Posted: Tue Aug 30th, 2011 10:00 am
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pnwood
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or possibly flat asbestos sheeting on a light metal frame ?????



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 Posted: Tue Aug 30th, 2011 11:03 am
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Chubber
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Thank you, gentlemen for your suggestions.......

Richard, thank you, there is no engine house there now, and messages left 'contact us' remain unanswered. I have the probable manufacturers name, principal dimensions etc but later, clearer pictures show a distinct absence of 'chimbleys'.

Woody, the 1900s pictures show a substantial curved metal canopy fitted to some solid looking brackets running around the circumference of the top, I don't think such a structure would have supported them. Later 1930s pictures suggest a vertical 'striped' effect, hence my hypothesis about 'planks'.

Nil desperandum.....


Doug




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 Posted: Tue Aug 30th, 2011 11:40 am
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ddolfelin
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This pic. seems to show multiple chimneys too but not well enough to see construction.
It's dated 1951 but looks older.

http://www.cholsey-wallingford-railway.com/images/HistStation.jpg



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 Posted: Tue Aug 30th, 2011 02:15 pm
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Chubber
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Thank you for that, they do seem to be quite substantial and solid looking structures, but the photograph I have of the entrance leads me to believe they are about 4'-6" wide [in the view you have posted the link to] and about 12" deep [in length along the roof line]. The 4'-6" would appear to be made up of 6 vertical sections separated/joined by 2" strips.

Intriguing!

Doug



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 Posted: Tue Aug 30th, 2011 02:22 pm
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Chubber
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Well, I live and learn, here's an extract from the Didcot site blurb....

The most striking features inside the shed are the smoke hoods running above the tracks and designed to carry all the smoke from the locomotives out through the wooden chimneys on the roof.......

http://www.didcotrailwaycentre.org.uk/guide/engineshed.html


and the branch-line book mentions a 'full length smoke trough'.....

Onward and upwards!


Lernin' Doofer



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 Posted: Thu Sep 1st, 2011 12:12 am
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Doug, I've looked through the GWR 'picture' books I have but none show this particular engine shed  well enough to answer your question. There are, of course, many more.

But I do recall a Wild Swan book specifically dealing with GWR engine sheds, and whilst it might not answer your particular inquiry it is bound to have some illustrations etc that would assist. I know I've seen interior pictures of sheds showing the smoke troughs that presumably are probably all more or less of the same nature, but as yet have not laid my hands on them. Same with the chimneys.



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 Posted: Thu Sep 1st, 2011 07:23 am
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John and Doug

Thats Spooky !!!   :shock:

I bought that GWR Sheds book on Amazon a couple of days ago , its on its way to me as I write so will make checking for info a priority when it arrives ( which if its on todays delivery should be in the next few minutes .)



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 Posted: Thu Sep 1st, 2011 08:20 am
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Chubber
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Wheeltapper wrote: John and Doug

Thats Spooky !!!   :shock:

I bought that GWR Sheds book on Amazon a couple of days ago , its on its way to me as I write so will make checking for info a priority when it arrives ( which if its on todays delivery should be in the next few minutes .)


Wow! Thanks, both for your assistance.

I have a photograph of an 'O' gauge model by Alan Downes showing 'upright wood', but will as they will be made further down the line I am happy to wait as necessary!

Progress so far......It's only 40 odd foot long, will just hold a 45XX.







Doug



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'You may share the labours of the great, but you will not share the spoil...' Aesop's Fables

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 Posted: Thu Sep 1st, 2011 05:46 pm
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John Flann
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Doug, I spent a pleasant hour after lunch going through a collection of old editions of 'Back Track' looking for illustrations that might help you.

I found none of the interior of GWR sheds but one of the ex MR roundhouse shed at Gloucester Barnwood, in it one can just see an overhead smoke trough, it looks like of cast iron or heavy steel and appears suspended, by chains, presumably off the roof trusses.  They ran I presume, with this information, either the length of the shed over the running rails when the chimneys would bisect the ridge, or transversely and so positioned over where a loco's funnel is likely to be and the chimneys then in the roof faces. The troughs venting into these.

This seems logical. It also fits in with the pictures one sees and, as at Wallingford.

It's not a good picture and I can't scan and post it here because of copyright, but if you pm me with your email address I'd be happy to send it you.



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 Posted: Fri Sep 2nd, 2011 02:55 pm
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Chubber
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Just to say I have replied to the lovely John by PM.

Doug



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 Posted: Sat Sep 3rd, 2011 12:17 am
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Wheeltapper
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Sorry Doof but the Post Office have not delivered that book as yet but will check  for info as soon as it gets here'



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 Posted: Sat Sep 3rd, 2011 02:46 am
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Chubber
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Murky Buckets :thumbs


D



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'You may share the labours of the great, but you will not share the spoil...' Aesop's Fables

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 Posted: Sat Sep 3rd, 2011 11:52 am
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Just a suggestion, try David Bigcheeseplant as he has made a model of Aylesbury Engine shed which has the same roof stacks.
Mike

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 Posted: Sat Sep 3rd, 2011 12:02 pm
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Chubber
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Thanks, Mike, will do!

Doug



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 Posted: Mon Sep 5th, 2011 05:09 am
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Wheeltapper
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Well the book arrived this morning and I have only just put it down as its absolutely fascinating covering every GWR engine shed in existance in 1947 ( end of the GWR and start of Nationalisation) with a brief description , opening and closing dates and track and building layouts for every location plus more details of the component parts of the standardised constructed sheds .

However although I knew the majority of GWR sheds were made up of standardised sections that Swindon made to only a couple of designs but which could be joined in all sorts of configurations to suit the individual site and number of locos that would be using it sods law dictates that Wallingford is one of the few exceptions to the rule.

The description reads :

A brick built depot with a slated roof and small lean-to office at the gable end. A coaling platform stood adjacent to the shed , and a water tower , probably a GWR addition, was provided.

The line was opened in 1866 as the Wallingford and Watlington Railway , but never went further than Wallingford from Cholsey. The shed could have been built at this period . Further research , however indicates that it could have been an 1890 replacement of an original shed built in 1866. This would have made the depot of GWR origin as the W & W Railway was absorbed by the GWR in 1872. The depot measured 50 feet x 20 feet overall.

On 31/12/1947 the one locomotive allocated to the shed was 0-4-2 Tank 1447

The Depot Closed in February 1956 . It was a sub shed to Didcot

The accompanying photo doesnt help much as it was taken on what appears to have been a wet miserable day and although all four stacks are in place no detail can be seen . It cannot have been long before closure as the shed track has been lifted.  A14XX no 1444 is stood at the platform.

Elsewhere in the book are plenty of illustrations showing both smoke troughs and smoke hoods . Most of the roofs seem to have been very lightweight construction using metal purlins and the troughs seem to be suspended from these using small diameter steel rods which are attached to the bottom of the trough . The vertical trunking attaching the trough to the outlet in the roof only appears to be attached to the outer edge of the hole in the roof leading to the stack and to the top of the trunking so cannot be that heavy. Where there is anything heavy in use like an overhead gantry crane the side walls are brick and all the weight is taken on them and the result is that nothing is attached to the roof.

The only other shed I have spotted so far with similar ventilators seems to be Leominster and that is not too clear but looks to be vertical boards , there may be others but I need to get a magnifying glass  on some to check.



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 Posted: Mon Sep 5th, 2011 06:30 am
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Chubber
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Thank you for taking the time to do this for me, Richard, I'm very grateful. The 'Law of Sods' seems to haunt me!

I'm leaning towards vertical planks forming a trunk fitted to the roof exterior and a thin card troughto represent sheet steel.

I shall endeavour then to make the roof, trough and chimneys as a lift-off unit so as to be able to access the interior.

Dimensions quoted in the P.Karau book are 16ft x 40'-2" [interior], with an added 10'-6" lean-to office at the end, and housed an inspection pit with another outside from the it's predecessor.

Doug



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 Posted: Mon Sep 5th, 2011 06:40 am
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ddolfelin
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Very good, Doug.
Pity it will be hidden from view most of the time.



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 Posted: Mon Sep 5th, 2011 06:51 am
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Thats coming along nicely Doug .

I guess the dimensions difference in shed length is accounted for by the lean-to as the measurement in my book includes it but Karau doesnt . However it seems to suggest the side walls are two feet thick which I suppose may be true but does seem a lot unless its brick cladding on rough stone  which does tend to be chunky.



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