Recent Topics      
YMR logo

You are here:  Your Model Railway Club > Getting You Started. > Hints, Tips & Smaller Projects. > Making styrene slates in any gauge. To bottom of page
                 

 Moderated by: Spurno Page:    1  2  Next Page Last Page  
Start New Topic Reply Printer Friendly

Making styrene slates in any gauge. - Hints, Tips & Smaller Projects. - Getting You Started. - Your Model Railway Club
AuthorPost
 Posted: Thu Mar 3rd, 2011 04:52 am
PMQuoteReply
link to this 1st post
ddolfelin
Straight man to the stars.


Joined: Thu Sep 10th, 2009
Location: Denbighshire, United Kingdom
Posts: 5544
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

This is just the way I usually do it.

a) Use pieces of styrene sheet to form the basis of your roof. No need for an overhang - the slates will do this.

b) Decide on the scale size of your slates, allowing for the overlapping as on a real life roof.

c) Using styrene sheet of a suitable thickness, measure and score as shown in the diagram. The width of the cut sheet should be in excess of the width of your roof. The length should be over-estimated to give some spare slates - don't forget the overlaps.

d) It is not necessary to snap off individual slates. Your score marks will indicate where they butt up to each other. Snap off rows of slates widthways.

e) Unless you are very lucky or have measured precisely, you will probably end up with a narrower slate. Make use of this if big enough by flipping horizontally on alternate rows to provide the 'stagger'.

f) Use imagination and paint to make the roof less 'perfect' (eg loose slates etc.,).

Simples.



____________________
http://dddioramas.webs.com/

11 + 2 = 12 + 1
Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Thu Mar 3rd, 2011 05:33 am
PMQuoteReply
link to this 2nd post
Robert
Legacy Member


Joined: Sat Oct 13th, 2007
Location: Benidorm, Alicante, Spain
Posts: 12264
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Another one for the Forum Index, cheers DD.



____________________

Barchester
Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Thu Mar 3rd, 2011 08:46 am
PMQuoteReply
link to this 3rd post
Wheeltapper
Legacy Member


Joined: Tue Aug 11th, 2009
Location: Rural Worcestershire, United Kingdom
Posts: 1191
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Ok silly question time. One for any builders out there.

Are rows of slates always staggered horizontally or does it depend on the age of the building and when reroofed ?

The reason I ask is that I was  half watching an edition of Grand Designs the other evening  whilst doing something else , I think it was a new build in France but I am almost positive the slates were placed in matching rows both across and down the roof . It may have been the amateur builder didnt know what he was doing or it was a design feature but I did wonder if staggered slates was in fact a constructional requirement ?

 



____________________

Richard. A sorely missed member who lost a brave battle in 2012.

Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Thu Mar 3rd, 2011 08:54 am
PMQuoteReply
link to this 4th post
ddolfelin
Straight man to the stars.


Joined: Thu Sep 10th, 2009
Location: Denbighshire, United Kingdom
Posts: 5544
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Yes, the slates have to be staggered to make the roof waterproof.
One slate covers the join in two slates underneath.
... and beneath them a further slate directs water downwards.



____________________
http://dddioramas.webs.com/

11 + 2 = 12 + 1
Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Thu Mar 3rd, 2011 09:02 am
PMQuoteReply
link to this 5th post
ddolfelin
Straight man to the stars.


Joined: Thu Sep 10th, 2009
Location: Denbighshire, United Kingdom
Posts: 5544
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Like so ...



____________________
http://dddioramas.webs.com/

11 + 2 = 12 + 1
Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Thu Mar 3rd, 2011 09:07 am
PMQuoteReply
link to this 6th post
Wheeltapper
Legacy Member


Joined: Tue Aug 11th, 2009
Location: Rural Worcestershire, United Kingdom
Posts: 1191
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

 

Thinking about it he may have been using tiles not slates - I always get that confused .

So is that a different technique ?



____________________

Richard. A sorely missed member who lost a brave battle in 2012.

Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Thu Mar 3rd, 2011 09:17 am
PMQuoteReply
link to this 7th post
ddolfelin
Straight man to the stars.


Joined: Thu Sep 10th, 2009
Location: Denbighshire, United Kingdom
Posts: 5544
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Not really - the same principle applies usually.
Having said that, there are products which rely more on the waterproofing below - for example the concrete tiles that hook over a batten.
Then there are the 'tiles' that comprise a strip of heavy material cut in the shape of a row of tiles - much as I've shown in my slate epic.



____________________
http://dddioramas.webs.com/

11 + 2 = 12 + 1
Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Thu Mar 3rd, 2011 02:07 pm
PMQuoteReply
link to this 8th post
Chubber
Casseroled Badger


Joined: Thu Oct 2nd, 2008
Location: Ivybridge, United Kingdom
Posts: 4889
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Wheeltapper wrote: Ok silly question time. One for any builders out there.

Are rows of slates always staggered horizontally or does it depend on the age of the building and when reroofed ?

The reason I ask is that I was  half watching an edition of Grand Designs the other evening  whilst doing something else , I think it was a new build in France but I am almost positive the slates were placed in matching rows both across and down the roof . It may have been the amateur builder didnt know what he was doing or it was a design feature but I did wonder if staggered slates was in fact a constructional requirement ?

 


There are such things as 'Mechanical Tiles' which have a curved interlocking  'half-lap' profile at their sides and need no stagger. They are generally thicker than ordinary tiles perhaps up to 22mm and present a smooth outer face. This may be what you have seen?


Hope this helps  :thumbs







Doug



____________________
'You may share the labours of the great, but you will not share the spoil...' Aesop's Fables

"Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy" - Benjamin Franklin


In the land of the slap-dash and implausible, mediocrity is king
Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Fri Mar 4th, 2011 01:13 pm
PMQuoteReply
link to this 9th post
diablo
Full Member
 

Joined: Thu Aug 12th, 2010
Location: Bradford, United Kingdom
Posts: 78
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Using concrete type tiles that contain their own 'overlap' mechanism, whilst 'half' tiles can be cut, the proffesional way to do it is a 'tile and a half' on alternate rows, and maintain the half tile overlap horizontally.

Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Sun Mar 13th, 2011 07:25 pm
PMQuoteReply
link to this 10th post
Petermac
Admin


Joined: Sat Oct 13th, 2007
Location: Nr Bergerac, France
Posts: 19130
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Slates are always laid as DD has described Richard but tiled roofs are sometimes laid overlapping and offset whilst traditional French pantiles run in straight lines and rows as you described.

As the programme you saw was in France, it's more than likely that's what the roof was tiled with.

This is the roof on our gite.  A new roof but with modern "copy" pantiles known as "Roman tiles":




Here's a shot of similar tiles on my brother's house in Yorkshire - these are flat pantiles and called "French tiles":




And our own roof here in France with "proper" pantiles:

 



____________________
'Petermac
Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Mon Mar 14th, 2011 03:39 am
PMQuoteReply
link to this 11th post
ddolfelin
Straight man to the stars.


Joined: Thu Sep 10th, 2009
Location: Denbighshire, United Kingdom
Posts: 5544
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

.... where wine is, apparently, served by the pint.



____________________
http://dddioramas.webs.com/

11 + 2 = 12 + 1
Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Mon Mar 14th, 2011 07:50 am
PMQuoteReply
link to this 12th post
Robert
Legacy Member


Joined: Sat Oct 13th, 2007
Location: Benidorm, Alicante, Spain
Posts: 12264
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Lovely photographs Peter and beautiful surroundings.



____________________

Barchester
Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Mon Mar 14th, 2011 01:16 pm
PMQuoteReply
link to this 13th post
Petermac
Admin


Joined: Sat Oct 13th, 2007
Location: Nr Bergerac, France
Posts: 19130
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Robert wrote: Lovely photographs Peter and beautiful surroundings.
Thanks Bob.

DD - that's a glass of coke - honest !!! :roll:



____________________
'Petermac
Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Tue Mar 15th, 2011 05:13 am
PMQuoteReply
link to this 14th post
ddolfelin
Straight man to the stars.


Joined: Thu Sep 10th, 2009
Location: Denbighshire, United Kingdom
Posts: 5544
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

I believe you, Peter.

Nice cat, too.



____________________
http://dddioramas.webs.com/

11 + 2 = 12 + 1
Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Tue Mar 15th, 2011 07:00 am
PMQuoteReply
link to this 15th post
Petermac
Admin


Joined: Sat Oct 13th, 2007
Location: Nr Bergerac, France
Posts: 19130
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

:mutley:mutley:mutley



____________________
'Petermac
Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Tue Mar 15th, 2011 07:13 am
PMQuoteReply
link to this 16th post
ddolfelin
Straight man to the stars.


Joined: Thu Sep 10th, 2009
Location: Denbighshire, United Kingdom
Posts: 5544
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Agree with Bob, marvellous place to live.



____________________
http://dddioramas.webs.com/

11 + 2 = 12 + 1
Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Tue Mar 15th, 2011 11:47 am
PMQuoteReply
link to this 17th post
jim s-w
Member


Joined: Wed Jun 17th, 2009
Location: Solihull/Brierley Hill , United Kingdom
Posts: 1250
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Hang on a Minute!

Are these pictures fake Peter? I mean retriever and a swimming pool but the retriever is neither swimming or wet! Never seen the like!

Cheers

Jim

PS - whats a Gite? Posh shed?



____________________
Jim Smith-Wright

Rule 1 - Model what you really see and not what you think you know!
http://www.p4newstreet.com
Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Tue Mar 15th, 2011 02:41 pm
PMQuoteReply
link to this 18th post
georgejacksongenius
Kettle Watcher


Joined: Thu Feb 28th, 2008
Location: Hyde,Cheshire, United Kingdom
Posts: 2488
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

To further complicate matters,I was watching a programme the other week with Tommy Walsh doing a roof,and the bottom layer of tiles just above the guttering were layed "landscape format",while all those above were layed "portrait format"as per Ddolfin's diagram.
:hmm

Cheers,John.B.:thumbs

Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Tue Mar 15th, 2011 06:04 pm
PMQuoteReply
link to this 19th post
ddolfelin
Straight man to the stars.


Joined: Thu Sep 10th, 2009
Location: Denbighshire, United Kingdom
Posts: 5544
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Yes John.
Sometimes that is done to set the fall of the slates.
If one thinks about it, the second row of slates is tilted up at the bottom edge and all higher rows follow that same tilt.
Sometimes, especially with larger slates, it would involve a considerable gap under the second row and so the width is used instead of the length.
With that method, there still mustn't be an unprotected join.



____________________
http://dddioramas.webs.com/

11 + 2 = 12 + 1
Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Wed Mar 16th, 2011 03:55 am
PMQuoteReply
link to this 20th post
Petermac
Admin


Joined: Sat Oct 13th, 2007
Location: Nr Bergerac, France
Posts: 19130
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

That's a very "normal" way of tiling/slating a roof.

Ther extra tile thickness at the bottom "kicks up" the lower edge of the roof and creates a "ski jump" thereby slowing the speed of the run off.  This makes it more likely that rain will land in the guttering rather than simply cascade over the top.

Naturally, in torrential rain - like we often get here - much of it still misses the gutters but it work well under normal conditions. 

Additionally, if you notice the pitch on roofs varies considerably depending on where your house is built.  Near the Mediterranean, roofs have very little pitch - down to as low as 15 degrees whereas in northern climes, they can be very steep indeed.  This is because of the anticipated snowfall in the area.  Snow is heavy so must either slide off a steep roof or the downward pressure must be relieved by steepening the pitch otherwise the roof would collapse.

There's a lot more to designing roofs than simply laying a few bits of wood and covering it ................  :roll::roll:



____________________
'Petermac
Back To Top PMQuoteReply

This is topic ID = 8247     Current time is 10:34 am Page:    1  2  Next Page Last Page    
You are here:  Your Model Railway Club > Getting You Started. > Hints, Tips & Smaller Projects. > Making styrene slates in any gauge.
You can type a quick reply to this topic here. Click in the box below to begin.

Or to reply to an individual post, or to include images, attachments and formatted text,
click the Quote or Reply buttons on each post above.

To start a new topic in this forum, click the Start New Topic button below.
To start a new topic in a different forum, click the Forum Jump drop-down list below.
Start New Topic

Back to top of page

           
15 Most Recent Topic

Problems with this web site? Please contact the Webmaster.

All material submitted to this web site is the responsibility of the respective contributor. By submitting material to this web site you acknowledge that you accept full responsibility for the material submitted.
Unless stated otherwise, all the material displayed on this web site, including all text, photographs, drawings and other images, is copyright and the property of the respective contributor. Registered members are welcome to use it for their own personal non-commercial modelmaking purposes. It must not be reproduced or re-published elsewhere in any form, or used commercially, without first obtaining the owner's express permission.
The owner of this web site may edit, modify or remove any content at any time without giving notice or reason.    © 2008

                 

Recent Topics Back to top of page

Powered by UltraBB 1.15 Copyright © 2007-2011 by Jim Hale and Data 1 Systems. Page design copyright © 2008-2013 Martin Wynne. Photo gallery copyright © 2009 David Williams.