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Station Building for Much Murkle - Scratchbuilding. - More Practical Help - Your Model Railway Club
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 Posted: Sat Jan 9th, 2010 06:48 pm
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pnwood
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Petermac wrote:
That sure is a labour of love Nick but will be well worth it in the end.

You said early on that you cut the sides and openings out "very carefully" - how thick is the plasticard ?  If it's more than an odd mm thick, it really must have been "very carefully" !!

The slats look really effective and, once the "sharpness" has been dulled by painting, will look very prototypical I think. :pathead


Hi Peter,

The plasticard is 1mm thick and I've found that the "evergreen" seems to grab the knife blade more than some old slaters plasticard that I have making it more difficult to get a good cut.

I'm getting very close to wielding the paintbrushes on the walls so we'll see if you are right ;-)



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 Posted: Sat Jan 9th, 2010 06:51 pm
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pnwood
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Robert wrote:
A bit late in the day but if the glazing is an exact fit across the frames at the moment then what about shaving some off the glazing then use a thin layer of PVA along the bare edge of the card. Then sandwich them together.

Bob, as you say a bit late in the day but that's an interesting option and one that I hadn't thought of :thumbs I will give that a try next time I have to do some glazed doors.



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 Posted: Sun Jan 10th, 2010 06:14 am
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Chubber
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Nick, I've never used the Humbrol stuff, in truth I don't use real MEK, but rather the same stuff in a 1/2 litre tin sold in builders merchants for cleaning plastic pipe-work prior to assembly with plastic welding solution. The acrylic seems to work well for small window panes and door glazing, though I wouldn't like to have to use it for big windows like Dave B's modern image stuff.

Doug



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 Posted: Sun Jan 10th, 2010 07:19 am
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pnwood
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dooferdog wrote: Nick, I've never used the Humbrol stuff, in truth I don't use real MEK, but rather the same stuff in a 1/2 litre tin sold in builders merchants for cleaning plastic pipe-work prior to assembly with plastic welding solution. The acrylic seems to work well for small window panes and door glazing, though I wouldn't like to have to use it for big windows like Dave B's modern image stuff.

Doug


Doug, do you have a brand name for that as I expect it is probably the same price for 1/2 litre that you pay for about 50ml of the modelling stuff?

 



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 Posted: Sun Jan 10th, 2010 07:28 am
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pnwood
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I managed to finish the doors last night. After painting the door faces (front and back) and the area where the bottom door panel shows on the clear acrlic sheet the door faces were stuck onto one side of the double sided tape.




 The next job was to cut around the openings to remove the tape just leaving it on the frames. Mate the two door faces either side of the clear acrylic and after a few attempts you end up with following.




Quite pleased with the result and I'm now ready to start the next stage of painting the walls.



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 Posted: Sun Jan 10th, 2010 08:15 am
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Petermac
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dooferdog wrote: Nick, I've never used the Humbrol stuff, in truth I don't use real MEK, but rather the same stuff in a 1/2 litre tin sold in builders merchants for cleaning plastic pipe-work prior to assembly with plastic welding solution. The acrylic seems to work well for small window panes and door glazing, though I wouldn't like to have to use it for big windows like Dave B's modern image stuff.

Doug


I presume that's available in France Doug. :roll::roll::roll:  As Nick said, do you have a name ?

I'm obviously aware of the actual PVC plastic-weld glue for sticking the pipes together but didn't know there was also a solvent type cleaner.



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 Posted: Sun Jan 10th, 2010 10:31 am
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'Ere we go, shipmates


'Plastica  pipe and fitting cleaner for use with ABS and PVC pipes and fittings'

Plastica Ltd

Hastings
E. Sussex

01424 436887

If I remember correctly, about £3 for  250ml tin.

Here, for example 

http://www.kiowa.co.uk/Products/Pipe_Fittings/PVC_-_ABS_Solvents_&_Cleaners/MEK_Cleaner

In France, it's 'Decapant' plastique.


Doug



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 Posted: Sun Jan 10th, 2010 11:32 am
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Petermac
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dooferdog wrote: '............................................................

In France, it's 'Decapant' plastique.


Doug

From the likes of Mr Bricolage or Point P etc ?



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 Posted: Sun Jan 10th, 2010 11:41 am
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georgejacksongenius
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Love the idea for painting those panelled doors!!! Very neat.

Cheers,John.B.:thumbs

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 Posted: Sun Jan 10th, 2010 01:07 pm
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Yup, Peter, but beware to those who try this route, it evaporates very quickly and needs care in use as it can melt detail. I use a little brush in a tiny bottle for bench use indoors.

Doug



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 Posted: Wed Jan 13th, 2010 05:23 am
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pnwood
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pnwood wrote: Petermac wrote:
That sure is a labour of love Nick but will be well worth it in the end.

You said early on that you cut the sides and openings out "very carefully" - how thick is the plasticard ?  If it's more than an odd mm thick, it really must have been "very carefully" !!

The slats look really effective and, once the "sharpness" has been dulled by painting, will look very prototypical I think. :pathead


Hi Peter,

The plasticard is 1mm thick and I've found that the "evergreen" seems to grab the knife blade more than some old slaters plasticard that I have making it more difficult to get a good cut.

I'm getting very close to wielding the paintbrushes on the walls so we'll see if you are right ;-)


The paintbrushes have been out and I'm quite pleased how the slats have 'blended in'




The odd white slats showing are due to glare rather than lack of paint, well that's my story and I'm sticking to it :roll:

Now to make some bracing for the walls to prevent warping and then stick them together. I can then get started on the roof and awning. I'm undecided whether to detail the inside at this stage as I'd rather get the building structure finished and on the layout. So long as I make the roof removeable maybe that can come later.



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 Posted: Wed Jan 13th, 2010 05:50 am
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owen69
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Nick the paint job has really made it look good,can`t wait to see it installed on the railway.

:doublethumb:lol::cool:

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 Posted: Thu Jan 14th, 2010 11:48 am
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pnwood
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Just thought I would show you last night's handiwork. Apologies for the standard of the photography

The main structure has been assembled.....




and the roof formed




You can now get a good idea of what the finished structure will look like. I'm not immediately going to detail the interior so will have to do something about temporarily blocking the light coming through from side to side. 

Tonight's job is tiling the roof.    



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 Posted: Thu Jan 14th, 2010 02:26 pm
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Go, Nick! Go.....



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 Posted: Thu Jan 14th, 2010 05:55 pm
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pnwood
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The roof tiling is complete, but I was pondering on how to produce some convincing ridge and hip tiles and hit on the idea which I'll explain below. I'm quite pleased with the result but it needs a little practice.

First take a ridge tile strip from a Scalescenes roof sheet, some double sided tape and a piece of wire, thickeness to suit your application. It shouldn't matter if it is plastic coated or not, nor if it is flexible or stiff, so long as it can be pulled or laid straight. I used some scrap wire that I had available.




Lay the wire close to the edge of the double sided tape




and then once stuck on the edge remove the tape backing and roll the tape around the wire


 

Next lay one end of the wire in the middle of the back of the ridge tile strip and squeeze and roll together through your fingers.




Gradually work your way along the strip ensuring that the wire stays in the middle of the strip until you end up with something like this



Next take another strip of tiles and apply a thin strip of pva glue along the centre like so. (Sorry for the shaky picture but you try taking one with your left hand using macro setting whilst applying glue:lol:) The applicator by the way is a fine tip pva applicator, one of the best modelling tools I have ever bought and gives a tiny drop or thin line of glue about 0.5mm thick just where it's needed)



And lay the rolled strip on top ensuring that the joint line is on the bottom. Set aside to dry. I didn't weight it down whilst drying but it wouldn't do any harm to.




Once dry you can trim to length, I use a pair of Xacto track cutters, bend the edges down apply a liberal quantity of pva to the underside, slap it on the roof ridge and stand back and admire your handiwork :lol::lol::lol:




Sorry for the length of this post but thought it might be of some help to someone and you never know it might prompt someone to think of another use for the technique which even though on this ocassion I came up with it myself is probably used by others already ;-)

 


 



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 Posted: Thu Jan 14th, 2010 06:10 pm
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Now that Nick ,is a good idea, worthy of the Index I think.

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 Posted: Thu Jan 14th, 2010 06:12 pm
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That is first rate Nick and is going straight in the Forum Index as a tutorial.



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 Posted: Thu Jan 14th, 2010 06:20 pm
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When you do posts like that Nick, you need never worry about how long they are.  A great post that tells us EXACTLY how to do it. :thumbs:thumbs



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 Posted: Thu Jan 14th, 2010 06:28 pm
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HUZZAH! Even 'Poop-poop!'


Doug



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 Posted: Thu Jan 14th, 2010 06:29 pm
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pnwood
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:wow The League of Honorary Gentlemen (2 mods and the administrator) like it :mutley:mutley:mutley

Many thanks for the comments and I'm honoured that it's going in the index.

I'll post up some pics of the completed roof tomorrow but for now, thank you and goodnight.

:cheers



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