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Town Cross - Scratchbuilding. - More Practical Help - Your Model Railway Club
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 Posted: Tue Sep 23rd, 2008 02:45 pm
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Perry
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Whilst time was being allowed for glue, etc., to dry on the layout, I thought I would start on a smallish scratchbuild project - just to keep my eye in, so to speak.

As I have a fairly large area available for a 'townscape' I thought I would make a start on something for that.

At this stage I must point out that this isn't really a railway-related project. As such, if the members decide it is out of place here, I will discontinue the post. Let me know if you object.

As I like to model actual buildings I thought I would try to build a model of my local town 'cross'. I don't know why it's called a cross, but it is! It has a long history, some of which I may mention as I go along.

Here is montage created from three photos showing the structure as it stands today:





However, I intend to model it as it was quite a few years ago, when the roof was rather different. You'll see what I mean as I go along. There are some old photos available in local publications, but they are all copyrighted so I will have to make a few enquiries to see if I can use one here.

Right then!


Town Cross Project - Part 1.

A quick measure up of the prototype gave me the basic dimensions from which everything else can be calculated or estimated.

As the structure is fairly tall but not very wide, I first considered the stability of the model when I started to design it. To this end, I decided to use a scrap piece of 12mm MDF for the base. I drew out an octagon with sides the correct scale length; 34mm, and cut it out with an electric jig-saw. A strip of English Bond embossed plastikard was fixed around the edge using double-sided adhesive tape leaving the top edge slightly proud of the MDF. This was then filed down to the level of the top.





Using 2.5mm x 4mm strips of styrene (Evergreen), I cut eight lengths with angled ends to form the timbers that sit on top the base walls. These were cemented in place with EMA Plastic Weld.



As the prototype timbers are very worn, I will round off the sharp edges as work proceeds to make them look less 'new'.

That lot now needs to set hard before I can start tackling the vertical timbers.

Perry

 




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 Posted: Tue Sep 23rd, 2008 03:06 pm
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Robert
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There's going to be no stopping him now he's back, you mark my words. :cool wink



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 Posted: Tue Sep 23rd, 2008 03:11 pm
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owen69
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as if we would want to.:Happy:lol::lol::lol::cool:

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 Posted: Tue Sep 23rd, 2008 03:50 pm
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Christrerise
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I am sure that there was nothing to say it had to be a railway building, and even if there was we can change the rules anyway!

Good start Perry, I know you have said Plastikard brick - is it actually Plastikard or is it Wills?  I am still unsure which way to go with mine...

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 Posted: Tue Sep 23rd, 2008 04:02 pm
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Perry
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The embossed brickwork is a Slater's Plastikard product, Chris.



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 Posted: Tue Sep 23rd, 2008 04:12 pm
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Matt
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here we go again, fasten your seat belts:Happy

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 Posted: Tue Sep 23rd, 2008 08:40 pm
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Wayne Williams
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ALL RIGHT PERRY!!!!

Great Start! Your off and running. :pedal :pedal :pedal

And I will be watching carefully. Especially since I'm out of the scratchbuilding profession for at least the next two weeks. :twisted: :twisted: :twisted:

Wayne



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 Posted: Wed Sep 24th, 2008 02:46 am
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phill
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Well the King is back and what did he say if we don't want this non railway topic we can get rid, as if. Its Perry doing what he knows best, SCRATCH-BUILDING. Welcome back to the master, as always he makes it look so easy :thud. Looking forward to the rest of the build.

I asked my dad many a year ago about why towns call these cross's and he says, (now if its true i don't know but it sounds as thou it could be), The towns roads all used to cross each other at this point, hence the name cross, even if no cross is really built, as in Perry's build.

Sorry i am pinching your thread Perry :oops:.

Phill

 

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 Posted: Wed Sep 24th, 2008 04:47 am
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Perry
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phill wrote: ...............he makes it look so easy . I asked my dad many a year ago about why towns call these cross's and he says, (now if its true i don't know but it sounds as thou it could be), The towns roads all used to cross each other at this point, hence the name cross, even if no cross is really built, as in Perry's build.

Sorry i am pinching your thread Perry :oops:.

Phill

 


Without wishing to go over too much old ground, Phill, it IS easy. Anyone can do it - honestly.

The 'secret', if there is one (or even two), is to plan properly and break the project down into small tasks. Looking at a building in the first instance, I try to see it broken down into logical blocks. Most buildings are, at their simplest level, only a series of box-shapes joined together. It just the little details that bring them to life. This Town Cross project breaks down into four octagonal 'boxes' held apart by pieces of timber.

I'm hoping to take some photos of the prototype either today or tomorrow. They will provide me with useful modelling information and the forum with some idea of this, my latest crazy scheme. :thumbs

 
Perry



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 Posted: Wed Sep 24th, 2008 05:36 am
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Bob K
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Perry

I like the way you have done the corners on the base. I find this is quite tricky to get a decent edge. Can you explain how you did it with such a perfect joint?

Afternote - I see now :oops:  A single strip bent around the angles very clever!

Bob(K)

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 Posted: Wed Sep 24th, 2008 06:34 am
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Perry
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Novice wrote: Perry

I like the way you have done the corners on the base. I find this is quite tricky to get a decent edge. Can you explain how you did it with such a perfect joint?

Afternote - I see now :oops:  A single strip bent around the angles very clever!

Bob(K)


The corners on the prototype brickwork actually appear to 'bend' round like that - which is the reason I chose this method rather than cutting individual walls. I wasn't cheating - honest! There are no sharp corners on the real thing. :???:

Perry



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 Posted: Wed Sep 24th, 2008 06:39 am
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Perry
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Despite the darkening skies mid-morning I managed to grab a few quick photos. No doubt I will need to take a few more before the job is finished but these will hopefully give you some idea of what I want the model to look like.

The base level:



The upper level:



The weathervane:



...and some of the 'woodwork':







Now I can carry on with working out some more dimensions and maybe do a little more assembly.  :thumbs

Perry



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 Posted: Wed Sep 24th, 2008 06:49 am
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Robert
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You never fail do you Perry. When you said a cross I envisioned some kind of plinth with a stone cross standing on it. Oh no though, not at all. Here you have a full scale construction project on the go. Everyone is going to love this.



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 Posted: Wed Sep 24th, 2008 08:03 am
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Perry
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It's only a little project, Bob; not quite on the scale of the infamous goods shed! :It's a no no

I think I may simplify the framing in the 'roof' of the lower level though, because it won't be visible when the model is complete.

Perry



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 Posted: Wed Sep 24th, 2008 08:15 am
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Sod the "railway" theme - when Perry does "a scratchbuild", the world stops turning, trains run late and even Big Ben may stop !!!

Keep at it Perry - this is the kind of thing we love and it's going to be brilliant stuff with you at the helm.

Interesting to see all the timbering in the roof - reminds me of some of the "market halls" here in France - they have almost unbelievable timbering.

Really looking forward to seeing what gems you come up with for the pagoda type roof :shock::shock:

Already looking forward to the next installment.  I wonder if it will be up to the standard of my "coal depot" :oops::oops::oops::oops::oops:



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 Posted: Wed Sep 24th, 2008 08:57 am
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Perry
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The base 'uprights' need to be exactly that; upright.

I cut eight 34mm lengths of 4.8 x 4.8 mm styrene strip using a razor saw - this stuff is a bit hefty for a craft knife. I then set the first four in place at the cardinal points; N, S, E & W. Doing these first make it easier (for me) to line them up by eye.

They were glued in place with tube polystyrene cement. For this task, the slower setting and greater strength outweighs the convenience of the liquid solvent. Having glued the first one and turned it to face the right way, I used a square to ensure that it was truly vertical. This was repeated for the other three.



When the first four have set hard, the remaining four can be added.



I have also cut a piece of .040" (1mm) plastikard for the bottom of the roof section. It looks as though this has an overhang of about 4 feet on the prototype, so I drew around the base I have already made and added another 16mm all around. You can just see part of this octagonal shape in the photo.

Being such an old structure, symmetry doesn't need to be as precise as it would have to be in a modern building. The timbers weren't produced on a machine but cut to shape by craftsmen using handtools.

Perry




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 Posted: Wed Sep 24th, 2008 10:45 am
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Perry
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I thought it would be nice to try to use a little of the way the structure was actually built, so I cut some halving joints to install the main roof supporting beams. It's interesting to see how one massive timber was used to go all the way across the prototype, whereas all the rest stop around the octagonal frame near the centre.

One thing the men who built it couldn't do was turn it upside down to test fit the pieces!



I'll get these main members glued up then I'll leave it to set hard overnight before I add some of the smaller ones.

Perry



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 Posted: Wed Sep 24th, 2008 06:37 pm
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Wayne Williams
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Coming along just fine Perry!

Tube Polystyrene cement? Guess I'd better go shopping again!

Wayne



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 Posted: Thu Sep 25th, 2008 01:40 am
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georgejacksongenius
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Perry,
       Some great photos...what a lovely structure!I can see this becoming another Perry masterpiece.It'll be really interesting to see how you "finish" it off.
:thud
Cheers,John.B.

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 Posted: Thu Sep 25th, 2008 02:52 am
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Perry
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I have edited the first post in this thread to include a montage showing the whole structure as it is today. It shows rather more detail that the link I included initially.

Work has continued on installing the timbers that support the upper levels. So far I have not needed to simplify it too much. When the photos are studied it becomes easier to see how it was built and how it all fits together. I find this aspect of researching and building models fascinating.

This is how the 'timbering' is coming along:



Bear in mind that this view is the underside. I've had a quick count up of the parts made so far, and including the piece of MDF, it comes to 70, so be warned; make something octagonal and everything has to be done 8 times over!!!! :brickwall

Perry



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