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Foam packing from white goods - The Landscape - Getting You Started. - Your Model Railway Club
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 Posted: Tue Mar 29th, 2022 11:48 am
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Longchap
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Petermac wrote: Yes, cardboard is certainly easy and, once you've eaten the contents, totally free however, I have always used chicken wire for all the reasons Colin mentioned.

I do have access to free supplies which I suppose makes a difference but I think it's easier to form those subtle bumps and hollows found on the real thing.  In my case, I covered it with home made plaster bandage - "J cloth" material soaked in a plaster soup.  Papier mache is certainly cheaper and more readily available. 

Yep, there are many takes on the theme of paper mâché and different people use them for individual valid reasons. However, we need to bear in mind that the OP is easily able to follow the advice to complete his project.
 
My overriding intention for particularly championing Terry’s method is that Kevin should be perfectly capable of building his embankment without need to use materials he doesn’t have, as well as limit any risk of injury.
 
Kevin, I hope you give the embankment a try. I would suggest you simply cut up some vertical cardboard formers and stick them down with some UHU to the baseboard (fold over a tab at the bottom of the profile in a right angle for form a base to fix to the board) and then stick a few horizontal strips along the profiles, as shown in Terry’s photos and see if you like what you have.

If you do, you can then get some old newspaper and glue several layers over the cardboard with PVA and a 2” paintbrush and see how it looks. Leave overnight to dry hard, then paint in your choice of green(s) and add static grass or flock powders and ‘Hey Presto’, you have a completed embankment. Give yourself a pat on the back.
 
Have fun,
 
Bill



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 Posted: Tue Mar 29th, 2022 02:39 pm
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BCDR
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Old school - cheap, functional and no expensive equipment required (hot wire cutters are not cheap). Plus you get to read various snippets of news.

One way to get the formers in place is to use a wad of newspaper soaked in PVA either side of the cardboard formers. Scrunched up paper gives a nice 3D surface. That said, a hot glue gun anchors the formers immediately. Heavy duty corrugated cardboard formers work a treat.


Nigel




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 Posted: Tue Mar 29th, 2022 06:31 pm
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col.stephens
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Longchap wrote: Thank you for reminding us all of this Terry, as it seems to represent an optimum solution for forming undulating terrain and as far as Kevin is concerned, it’s perfectly within his capabilities and posses no danger from carving knives or indeed excessive mess!
 
I’ve copied this excellent post into my layout construction database for use on my own layout.
 
Will you be considering exhibiting Farleigh at some stage, as it deserves to be popular and instructional, representing great attention to detail and superb modelling.
 
Best,
 
Bill
Hello Bill.  Thank you for your kind words.  I have considered exhibiting Farleigh although there is further work to do as regards detailing the goods shed end of the layout. I also need to adapt couplings on the rolling stock to the Kirby Coupling.  Some stock also requires weathering.  The real fly in the ointment is that during construction I didn't always give due consideration as to how the layout would be dismantled and transported.  To this end I must totally dismantle the layout and re-assemble it, making alterations as necessary. Whether I can fit the whole layout into a Citroen C1 will be interesting!
Best wishes,

Terry 

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 Posted: Tue Mar 29th, 2022 06:45 pm
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Hi Nigel.  Thank you for your reply. Your mention of a glue gun online, trouble is the one that I purchased didn’t come up to my expectations. I don’t know if I should keep at it or purchase a bigger one. Best wishes Kevin 



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 Posted: Tue Mar 29th, 2022 07:13 pm
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Well Kevin, you have certainly started something off here, and I am not sure all of our "advice" is making it any easier for you to get started.  If you don't want mess, do not use the white packing foam - when you cut into it, it goes everywhere.  If you want to keep coasts down, have a look at the cardboard methods (did you keep the box that had the polystyrene in?!) but if you want to splash a bit of cash, the other foams are ideal.  I would say, choose one and give it a go.  Better to get started than spend weeks deciding which method to use.  At the worst, you will have to rip things up and start again, but none of the methods suggested cause any damage, and at best, it will all work a treat!
Michael



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 Posted: Tue Mar 29th, 2022 08:51 pm
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robberdoc
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I am hesitant to row in but papier mache has huge advantages it is easily available(old news
papers yellow pages etc etc) is light and conforms to whatever underlayer you may use any thing from crumpled paper bits of tissue etc to wire and wood formers. flour and water paste is equally cheap and easily made.

the downside is the time it takes to dry and it is difficult to work once dried. It will however take any paint at all
and is seriously light. above all if its rong its easily lifted and done again.Various foams are ok but have defects like dissolving with some spray paints.


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 Posted: Wed Mar 30th, 2022 10:45 am
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Petermac
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I certainly wouldn't argue with any of that Rob - cheap and easy although all scenic work creates it's own bit of mess which has to be cleaned up.  Maybe papier maché is the easiest to clean up after........... :hmm


I still think the chicken wire offers the best sub base in terms of versatility - you can bend it where you want it to go and it stays put.  My preference for plaster bandage landform is more to do with drying time.  As you say, papier maché can take half a lifetime to thoroughly dry in winter ...................but then, there's no such thing as a free lunch !  :roll:



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 Posted: Thu Mar 31st, 2022 02:50 pm
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Hi Michael.   Thank you again, I always intend to keep all my correspondence in my own thread, but, I can never figure out how to reply to any suggestions without getting the address mixed up, as it is much easier to click on the avatar . Best wishes Kevin 



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 Posted: Thu Mar 31st, 2022 03:18 pm
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BCDR
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The "Reply" button......

Nigel



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 Posted: Thu Mar 31st, 2022 06:40 pm
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Yes       But when I did that before someone got “ narky “with me because I trod on his toes . Kevin 



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