Recent Topics      
YMR logo

You are here:  Your Model Railway Club > Reference Area. > Hints & Tips > Hints and Tips - The first 499 To bottom of page
                 

 Moderated by: Spurno Page:  First Page Previous Page  1  2   
Start New Topic Reply Printer Friendly

Hints and Tips - The first 499 - Hints & Tips - Reference Area. - Your Model Railway Club
AuthorPost
 Posted: Fri Dec 24th, 2021 08:11 am
PMQuoteReply
link to this 21st post
xdford
Member
 

Joined: Tue Aug 11th, 2009
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 3446
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Hints & Tips No.37
Wagon loads or uncouplers
By Roy Thompson
The long wooden stirrers you get in McDonalds or Starbucks etc. make excellent plank loads when cut up.

Or you can cut and attach a square piece of scrap plastic sized to fit between your vehicle ends to one end of the stirrer and you have a wagon uncoupler. Simply place between the vehicle under the "striker" bars and lift when the couplers are slack.


Hints & Tips No.38
Making Hedges
By Trevor Gibbs


You can simulate a lot of hedges using green steel wool scourers cut into appropriate strips and glued vertically. This works fairly well. You could sprinkle the outer surfaces with ground foam such as Woodland Scenics to give a bit more texture closer to viewing distance.  If you really want to do it for next to nothing, you could grind up your own appropriately coloured foam

Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Mon Dec 27th, 2021 05:14 am
PMQuoteReply
link to this 22nd post
xdford
Member
 

Joined: Tue Aug 11th, 2009
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 3446
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Hints & Tips No.39
Kit Assembly Hint No.1
By Donald Hess 

Putting tape on really small parts keeps them from flying when cutting them off the plastic tree or sprue.  Rail nippers are best at removing parts.

However in tight small spaces a sharp Exacto #11 blade or its equivalent is your friend. Use a cutting motion and never bear down as this might snap small parts.

Hints & Tips No.40
Weighting Model Wagons
by David Chappell


For improved running of model 00 wagons, I weight them all to about 50 grams. I have a small set of scales which covers the range. Where you put the extra weight (usually anywhere between 10 and 20gm) is up to you! In a wagon with a load, it can go under or in the load and van roofs often come off. Open wagons with no load are the worst problem, and one has to use 'liquid lead' (tiny lead pellets) glued in the underfame, however, it is well worth the effort. The local car tyre fitter will have small weights at 5gm and 10 gm (for tyre use) and will part with some for a donation to their tea tin! Their weights are self adhesive, too! Incidentally, I also weight kit built coaches to 150gm.

Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Thu Dec 30th, 2021 04:03 am
PMQuoteReply
link to this 23rd post
xdford
Member
 

Joined: Tue Aug 11th, 2009
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 3446
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Hints & Tips No.41
Using Superglue With Clear plastic
by John Poland

For many situations, using 'superglue' (CyanoAcrylate) with clear plastic is not a good idea as the plastic can craze. However, there are some situations which arise that the best option is to use 'superglue' to fix in windows.


First dip the windows in 'Future', or a similar brand floor wax (it's a trick I learned from building scale aeroplanes). The floor wax creates a barrier and prevents the fumes from crazing the 'glass', and you'll be amazed at how crystal clear your windows will be.


Hints & Tips No.42
Kit Assembly Hint No.2
By Donald Hess 
Skewers and Toothpicks make excellent tools for painting and glue applications. Not only can you stir paints with them, but you can apply really tiny amounts of paint and glue accurately with the sharp tip.

Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Sun Jan 2nd, 2022 11:54 am
PMQuoteReply
link to this 24th post
xdford
Member
 

Joined: Tue Aug 11th, 2009
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 3446
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Hints & Tips No.43
"Scrap Metal Loads"
By Trevor Gibbs 

Ever wondered if you could recycle your washed aluminium foil or foil chocolate wrapper? Roll your foil into tight balls about 1/2" or so diameter then take a pair of slip joint pliers and using the jaws mould them into cubes.


Being Scrap metal, they would be discoloured so paint them with a rusty orange/brown colour. A number of cubes and you therefore have a load of scrap metal for that otherwise unemployed open wagon... and you can enjoy your way on two fronts to make them!


Hints & Tips No.44
A Revised Way Of Cleaning Wheels
By Ted Allan 


I use cotton cloths such as Chux with white spirit. This has a couple of advantages over using paper towels in that the surface is microscopically rougher so than it cleans the wheels better, the cloth lasts much longer so there is less mess and are capable of providing contact in the case of powered wheels through the holes to the rails.


(Note from Trevor - The paper towels were a very good idea when I first learned it... and this version from Ted becomes an even better idea!)

Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Wed Jan 5th, 2022 07:52 am
PMQuoteReply
link to this 25th post
xdford
Member
 

Joined: Tue Aug 11th, 2009
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 3446
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Hints & Tips No.45
Kit Assembly Hints No.1
By John Schaeffer
When making up full size structures, where it is possible, build only the two sides of a building that you are going to see from the normal viewing positions.

You can then use the other sides as raw materials for other projects, and possibly expand the number of buildings shown on the layout.


Hints & Tips No.46
Cheap Brick Surfaces
By Trevor Gibbs

Need some cheap brick surfaces in smaller areas? I got some from recycled plastic plates with the grooved "tread" on them. In fact, as an exercise I built a loco shed in N scale for a club exhibition layout I was helping restore and used the plates surface on the outside, coloured a deepish brick red so the line work regularity was not quite so painfully obvious. If you are really keen, you can paint over with white paint and wipe the excess off to fill in the mortar cracks.


So wash your otherwise disposable party plates mates! Like a lot of other things I do, cost virtually zilch!


Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Sat Jan 8th, 2022 06:41 am
PMQuoteReply
link to this 26th post
xdford
Member
 

Joined: Tue Aug 11th, 2009
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 3446
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Hints & Tips No.47
Kit Assembly Hints No.2
By John Schaeffer
When cutting thin wood for scratch building, put some masking tape on the back side of the cut. This will assist in preventing the wood from splintering.


Hints & Tips No.48
High Quality Brush Painting
By John Challenor
On the question of painting without expensive spraying equipment, many years ago I asked a car body restorer how he got such a good paint finish with brush application. The answer was to use several coats and to rub down between each one.

Each successive coat had a little more thinner added, and gradually finer grade wet/dry paper and rubbing compound was used.
It is best to buy decent wet/dry paper, this is not particularly expensive but the finer the grade the finer the finish. Rubbing compounds, various household / car products can be employed. Otherwise you can practice with almost any left over paint / scrap materials.



Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Tue Jan 11th, 2022 07:54 am
PMQuoteReply
link to this 27th post
xdford
Member
 

Joined: Tue Aug 11th, 2009
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 3446
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Hints & Tips No.49
Scale Looking Rail In N Scale... Not Quite So Cheaply!
By Trevor Gibbs, (Australia)
I saw an article many years ago, I think in Model Railroader about a modeller who had taken his N scale code 80 track and lowered it into his baseboard. What he had done is cut his track pattern into the top of his plywood with a router suitably adjusted and "sunk" his track plan into the plywood. The track was laid and ballasted over and the effect for the late 60s or early 70s was terrific and would probably still withstand scrutiny today! Why? Because not only is the height of the rail an issue but also the thickness of the sleepers in standard Peco N scale track.

While I cannot remember if he had done so, he may also have painted the rail side to lessen the effect visually of the height, similarly to what I suggested in Hints and Tips No.35. Taking this hint one stage further, you could use a router to cut out a very shallow base area for your buildings so that you do not get the modellers bane of having one corner of the building standing “proud” of your baseboard... after all buildings sit on foundations in the ground, not on top of it. Fill in your scenery up to the building and it will look as though it is meant to be there.


Routers and other power tools are becoming progressively cheaper and this may be an option for you... hope these ideas help you!


Hints & Tips No.50
Kit Assembly Hints No.3
By John Schaeffer


Use Windex or similar Window cleaners to thin acrylic latex paints for the airbrush.  It dries faster and cleans up easier. However be aware that some versions of this type of product may contain ammonia which is not kind to some plastics so do a test section first!

Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Fri Jan 14th, 2022 06:52 am
PMQuoteReply
link to this 28th post
xdford
Member
 

Joined: Tue Aug 11th, 2009
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 3446
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Hints & Tips No.51
Using and Reusing Thinners.
By John Challenor


A tip from my local model shop (!), common or garden white spirit is a lot cheaper than some of the "named" brand equivalent thinners. In nearly all cases it is just as effective.

And to save the pennies even further, save all the dirty thinners you have used washing out your brushes etc., in a clean lidded glass jar. Leave. Gradually the paint sinks to the bottom and the relatively clean thinners above can be decanted off and re-used for cleaning. This seems to work for all types of thinners.

Hints & Tips No.52
Hi Rise Buildings
By Trevor Gibbs, (Australia)

I saw a layout at an exhibition with a couple of very tall (for a layout) model buildings in a city scene which from normal viewing distance looked very effective. Looking closely I presume that they were a plywood box with normal building tiles glued around them, consistently one colour such as deep blue which gave the window effect.
Such a tile system could work very well on a backdrop to give a low relief depth but give the impression of more. Seeing a tile dealer for a remnant would be your cheapest option! You might even fool people at first about the detail and depth in your windows with moving characters in the office areas that look like the people admiring your work!

Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Mon Jan 17th, 2022 07:36 am
PMQuoteReply
link to this 29th post
xdford
Member
 

Joined: Tue Aug 11th, 2009
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 3446
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Hints & Tips No.53
Fitting Handrails And Grab Iron Details Easily
By Donald Hess (PA USA)

A little CA (Super glue), MEK or related glue when sliding grab irons through holes makes them go through easier. When wet it acts like a lubricant. Reaming the small holes with one turn of an Exacto No.11 blade also really helps.


Hints & Tips No.54
Animation
By Rob Smith (Labrador Queensland)


Although I work in larger scales, any movement or hint of movement can add that "something" to your village in any scale. Most often it is done by the train moving through your scene.


There are also many other ways to induce movement regardless of scale. Small electric/battery motors can be mounted below the base board, above a fisherman can cast his line, an axe man can cut logs, a painter can paint a wall.....Simply moving a figurine left and right by having the shaft of the motor glued to the base of the figure will give the impression of life in the village.
More intricate animation can involve boats moving on their anchors in the breeze to cars moving on roads. It is up to your imagination and your ability to see a small motor or gear and think of an alternate use in your scene.

Back To Top PMQuoteReply

This is topic ID = 16890     Current time is 07:02 am Page:  First Page Previous Page  1  2     
You are here:  Your Model Railway Club > Reference Area. > Hints & Tips > Hints and Tips - The first 499
You can type a quick reply to this topic here. Click in the box below to begin.

Or to reply to an individual post, or to include images, attachments and formatted text,
click the Quote or Reply buttons on each post above.

To start a new topic in this forum, click the Start New Topic button below.
To start a new topic in a different forum, click the Forum Jump drop-down list below.
Start New Topic

Back to top of page

           
15 Most Recent Topic

Problems with this web site? Please contact the Webmaster.

All material submitted to this web site is the responsibility of the respective contributor. By submitting material to this web site you acknowledge that you accept full responsibility for the material submitted.
Unless stated otherwise, all the material displayed on this web site, including all text, photographs, drawings and other images, is copyright and the property of the respective contributor. Registered members are welcome to use it for their own personal non-commercial modelmaking purposes. It must not be reproduced or re-published elsewhere in any form, or used commercially, without first obtaining the owner's express permission.
The owner of this web site may edit, modify or remove any content at any time without giving notice or reason.    © 2008

                 

Recent Topics Back to top of page

Powered by UltraBB 1.15 Copyright © 2007-2011 by Jim Hale and Data 1 Systems. Page design copyright © 2008-2013 Martin Wynne. Photo gallery copyright © 2009 David Williams.