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Chubber
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Hopefully, a few of my card and paper adventures with as little plastic as possible....

Chubber
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I'm not sure if I'm supposed to stick to YMR only stuff, but this is my kitbash of the Scalescenes cottage row.

http://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/topic/83509-a-village-shop-from-a-scalescenes-cottage-row/#entry1383675

If not acceptable, mods please delete link and PM me.

D

PS There is a reference to problems involved in scratching glazing material when lifting the self adhesive lable paper used for window frames. I have now decided the best, least deletarious method is to use sharpened 2B pencil tip. No scrathes, any markes wipe off with a cotton-bud and eraser. I have since realised the raised panel on the shop door is over thick, but I am 'frit to try altering it. I might try sticking a newspaper headline poster and some fine wire mesh on it to make it look intentional.
D

Last edited on Sun Jul 26th, 2020 06:33 pm by Chubber

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Hello Doug,
                  I find the tip of a wooden toothpick is ideal for removing the self-adhesive label to reveal the window pane beneath.  No scratching of the window surface.

Regards,

Terry

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Superb work on the shop and cottages. Im a fan of Scalescenes and your detailing really has made them stand out and they are very realistic.

Chubber
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Thank you, Ian, the credit must go to John's textures though.
D

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A few thoughts on 'Slates'.




Herewith a photo I took on the W.S.R. some time ago, showing how thin the slates were. The rough edges lead me to believe they are older hand trimmed slates, probably from over the water in Welsh Wales.



It's possible to do a reasonable likeness [below] using Scalescenes TX 18, laid to give a sqaure appearance, like these below, where a line has been cut with a Stanley knife between each slate and then the whole treated with scraped black artists' pastel which I rubbed in with a short stippling brush to [a] generate a nice shine and to colour the edges of the cut paper and [c] brush away any excess PritStik adhesive The same trick can be used with an appropriately coloured pastel on red tile roofs. I find it much less messy than trying to colour the egdes of a single thickness of paper with the much vaunted felt tip pen.




Laying with less overlap gives the impression of longer 'Queen' tiles like my old Plymouth terrace in St Budeaux, shown below in an 'in-build' station roof for the old Bear's End, I believe a style primarily used on more steeply pitched roofs.





Here, a double row of slates was used under the ridge, to support the weight of the decorative ridge tiles, shown on an in-build copy of Wallingford engine shed. Note the odd slipped slate, all adds to credibility.
.



To be sure that your strips of slates can be well stuck, you need a strong supporting layer to which they may be  firmly pressed once they have been smeared with stick adhesive.



A viable alternative is to print the slate texture onto self adhesive label paper [SALP], then stick that whole sheet to another sheet of SALP befor cutting the strips [see the gable end below] giving a thinner edge appearance as in the gable end below.

You can also leave a thinner look at the edges by laying single thickness slates slates on a piece of thin card [Packeto Cornoflako] to show the narrow thickness like the edges of the lean-to roof below.




Finally, two tips I think are worth repeating, [1] Consider printing slate papers in grey-scale rather than colour, so that you can use your own weathering tones if you wish. [2] Cut all the  horizontal lines of  sheet of TX 18, leaving the left hand side of the rows attached to the sheet, then cut off the right hand border of the sheet down the edge of the slates, before snipping off the strips one at a time. This ensures that the bond and the printed 'weathering' pattern stay aligned and consistant as they are applied.

I hope that this has been of interest to some members, and that the old salts amongst you will not think I am trying to teach you suck eggs!

Douglas

Last edited on Mon Jul 27th, 2020 05:52 pm by Chubber

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Ultra Low relief backscene downloads


I found these two whilst searching for something else, and thought they might be of interest.....

By clicking on the PDF file link below, you can download a printable version of this picture, ready scaled to reproduce it in 4mm - 1/76th scale.




The pictures of windows and doors are designed to be cut out around their white window frames and sills and stuck onto a suitable brick patterned texture paper, for my example below I have chosen Scalescenes TXO3 Cream Brick.






Have a close look at your sheet of texture paper, it may have a course of 'soldier' bricks, aline of bricks printed standing on their ends. Cut out and pasted to card as a separate layer they can add a subtle touch to your model, see below



You will need an 80mm wide strip of thin card, as long as your chosen size of building covered with texture paper. If you are using 'Cornoflako Paketo' then glue your paper to the dull side, the glossy printed side will help resist the tendency of the card to curl as the glue dries. I prefer to use 'Pritt-stik'. Allow to dry, preferably under a heavy flat weight.

Whilst your glue is drying, cut out as many doors and windows as you need, roughly cut out the blue roof strips and glue these to the same sort of thin card. If you choose to incorporate a soldier course underneath your roof overlays, cut and paste these at the same time and allow to dry thoroughly before you attempt to cut them out. If you try to cut the strips whilst the glue is damp there is a very good chance that you could tear and drag the soft paper.

Arrange your windows and doors in a pleasing fashion. Mark their positions lightly with a soft lead pencil, or, use Post-it notes to  mark the particular line of bricks they are to be placed on. Soft [2B-4B] pencil lines can be erased with a soft rubber. It is worth buying a Windsor and Newton Medium Kneaded Putty Rubber for this sort of job, it also cleans fingerprints and grubby marks off of paper without being too aggressive, and can be used to 'dull down' papers to help them regress into the background.

When all glue is dry, you may consider adding telephone wires on the face of the wall with a sharp grey/black pencil, burglar alarms etc and weathering the paper. Consider drawing a fine black line under each window sill to accentuate the shadow and add to the 3D effect.

Good Luck!

Doug


Attachment: Forum freebieamanded1.pdf (Downloaded 163 times)



With a bit of luck, the next attached file should print out as elements to make an older fashioned building 'Flat-scene', exactly the same way as the one above.

I think this would look good pasted up onto Scalescenes TXO1 red brick or TXO6 aged red brick.

I'd cut out the opening for the roller doors to whatever size or height you fancy [or leave them this size], then cut out the doors to match, glue them to a separate piece of card and stick that behind the wall opening. The small doors and windows I'd stick straight on.

Enjoy!




Attachment: oldfactory roofand doors1amended.pdf

Here's one done by Stubby...was it really 10 years ago????




Doug



Last edited on Mon Jul 27th, 2020 05:51 pm by Chubber

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Weathering with Watercolours







Following a request to explain how I weather Scalescenes papers with watercolours, I have decided to show how I have weathered a kit-bashed version of John's arched bridge. Much easier to build now, the latest version includes a fully printed arch which obviated the tiresome and difficult method of cutting a strip of individual bricks before 'bending' it around the opening.
 
I shall show some weathered-out soft bricks that plants have gained a foothold in, some lime washing down from the mortar, some mould and green partly obscuring the lower bricks and some dented bricks done by lousy drivers. My aim is to make it look 'dirty' yet still transparent, something watercolours does admirably.
 
WARNING - I am using genuine Epson 'DuraBrite' inks which have a reasonable resistance to water, the printed paper is wetable, but the inks don't run. Before you try this on your masterpiece, have a little trial splash somewhere out of sight. All is not lost if you are using cheapy inks, a VERY light spray with Lidl waterproofing spray, sold for suede shoes and anoraks [O.K. here then...] may help, but too much will make it too impermeable for these techniques.

The colours I am using are Windsor and Newton 'Cotman' colours, very reasonably priced and available in a huge range of colours. I've chosen Burnt Sienna [a brown], Ivory Black [a less inky black colour], Cadmium Yellow and Paynes Grey. The latter, though a 'grey' is based on a very dark mix of blues, as you will see, when mixed with yellow, it makes...yes, green!
 
You'll need two brushes, a Number 6 soft for splashing on watery mixes, and a Number 1 for putting little blobs of colour here and there. Synthetic are fine, but neither will cost more than £2-£3 for a really good one, and well looked after will last years and years.
 
Don't mix up a great dollop of whatever colour you think you need, put two colours alongside each other on a white surface like the inside of a margarine tub lid or an old saucer, and 'draw' them together with a moist brush. Then, each time you go back for more you'll get a natural, subtle difference in your colours.







You'll also need some tiny scraps of foliage stuff, I keep all my waste bits......and some PVA




Right! Cut out some brick shapes...




and with the side of your larger brush dipped in clear water wet the cut-out area and the whole distance from there to the 'ground' . Everything else happens while the paper is still visibly wet, so with the little brush, blob some white paint into the cut-outs and quickly draw it down the wet stripe to the ground.










Mix some blacky-brown and dab a little in the wet white cut-out, add a tiny bit of PVA and stick on the plant material of your choice...




Now for the dirty area at the bottom where earth slashed up has gone greenish [this works all round buildings, too] wet up about 1/4"- 6mm




and as we are adding a 'bushy thing' which in turn will attract moisture and dirt, do a big splash, add a dollop of your green and watch it spread out naturally without any unrealistic brush marks.





Add some more 'bush' and allow to dry.
 
The finished result is a subtly dirtied finish with no deliberate brush marks. The original printing shows through, and the Chinese white has sedimented on top of the paper like efflorescing salts really do. All the white stains have been applied 'wet-in-wet' as a watercolour artisit would say, and looking at the joins of the wing walls and pillars the dark staining has been added in the join by the same technique.
 
Clumsy drivers have dented the arrises either side of the entrance, shown by pressing the edge of a steel rule against them into the underlying card. The width markers were in fact made from steel strip in the pre-plastic age and as such show rust marking where the fastenings go through them. The signage is chipped as little boys knew very well that they gave a satisfying 'clang' when hit with a stone from a catapult.....tee-hee!



I hope this will encourage some of you to try watercolours as a means of weathering texture papers,

Douglas




Last edited on Mon Jul 27th, 2020 06:19 pm by Chubber

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Douglas

On the subject of slates, I have just found out (as part of my planning application) that a slate roof should be set at a minimum of 18 degrees whereas clay tiles can be set onto a 15 degree slope.

Minor factoid for slate roof users.

Barry

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I've found the laser cut tiles by York Models to look the best, - self adhesive strips which you lay overlapping. Plain tiles and decorative, various colours

N gauge https://yorkmodelrail.com/shop/n-scale/tiles-slates-and-ridges/n-tiles01-slates-tiles-choice-of-4-colours/

00 gauge https://yorkmodelrail.com/product-category/00-scale-ho-scale/tiles-slates-and-ridges-00-scale-ho-scale/

0 gauge https://yorkmodelrail.com/product-category/0-scale/tiles-slates-and-ridges-0-scale/

Chubber
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Dorsetmike wrote: I've found the laser cut tiles by York Models to look the best, - self adhesive strips which you lay overlapping. Plain tiles and decorative, various colours
00 gauge https://yorkmodelrail.com/product-category/00-scale-ho-scale/tiles-slates-and-ridges-00-scale-ho-scale/
Very nice, Mike, but 'AAAaaagh!' The prices... they bite deeply into the S.L.W. fund....

Doug

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rail-scale-models.com over here do OO scale tiles (shingles) in many designs/shapes and colors (yes, OO)..
Even slate adhesive-backed laxer-cut ones (2 sheets of 4.5 x 12 inches). $8.95. Gives 45 square inches of coverage with 50% overlap.

Nigel


Chubber
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Thanks Nigel, looks interesting, esp in OO! Duly saved.
D

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Low relief industrial building - A 'How to'

See

http://yourmodelrailway.net/view_topic.php?id=3290&forum_id=14

D

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This is a great "How to" and one I have referred back to many times because it is full of great tips.  It is really helpful having these in a single thread, will make my search times much quicker!
Michael

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Minor point, I too use Scalescenes papers, but I print them onto A4 size labels which are adhesive backed, I also use a plotter cutter which saves a lot of time and cuts more accurately than my aging fingers and eyes can, however I'm working in N gauge so use lighter weight card than Doug.

For corner strengthening I  use off cuts of plastic angle and often also fit "floors and ceilings" to keep things square.

Chubber
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Well I'm going to have a go at designing and building as an 'Owididt' a small cottage to fit in a particular space on Ursa Resurgit. The premise is that it started out in 1760 as a two two-roomed rubblestone cottages for labourers built on a small plot by the Monastery of Saint Grissel, the Patron Saint of black pudding makers. Later it was sold off, knocked into one house, a bay window and a clapboard scullery added.

So....[that'll annoy Gastwo :lol:] here goes. First a few sketches, the a plan to scale from which to take off sizes straright onto the card, 2mm Finnboard, with dividers. As a cheap rubblestone building, sharp corners have no place, so the exposed corners window and door reveals are sanded over deliberately roughly.
In order to make a seamless wrap with Scalescenes Limewashed stone TX 50 on the viewing sides, the front is glued to the texture paper then the end walls glued on leaving a succinct fold gap so that the front and end walls can be laid out flat for working up, and installation of the bay window. The windows will be glazed with leaded glass, made by printing a simple 1.8mm grid onto O.H.P. sheet.







Aligning end and front walls using the texture paper. The join between the wall elements remain unglued at this stage, as seen below.




Showing how the rounded corners are covered by the single wrap.




This allows the walls to be opened flat to allow the fitting of the bay window,  some flashing to add in due course.





Next I'll have try at putting in the other windows.



Last edited on Sat Jan 30th, 2021 07:10 pm by Chubber

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They are coming on very nicely. 

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More great tips!   The bay window looks great, and very neatly done.
Michael

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Chris, Michael, Thank you!!

Before I show you the windows, here's my top tip for accurately cutting window reveals. If you have a window opening or any other opening you want to fit with a parallel edged 'liner' then place the required material underneath the opening, and run a pencil around the inside edges. Obvious? Well, if as in this case I want a 1mm wide inside edge to represent the wooden frames, I place the tip of my pencil lead in a spacer, in this case a 1mm nut, and draw around the inside. The line can't help but follow the exact outline of the opening. The same method can be used to mark a border edge for a wavy component, or when you are DIYing, using a penny washer and a big pencil to scribe a worktop to fit exactly the profile of a less than straight wall....

Simples!




Windows below



When the window sill glue is well and truly set I'll beast over the lower edge to  ensure the card is well and truly pressed in to represent a beam of wood.

Door is next, need to find a good example to model. Poop-poop!

Last edited on Sat Jan 30th, 2021 09:34 pm by Chubber

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Great work, and good tips as usual Doug!
I think you are already aware of http://www.textures.com, but they are worth a mention for those who are in need of images of doors, windows, walls, and well, really, textures...

Keep up the good work,
Shaun.

It might be:  https://www.textures.com/

Last edited on Sun Jan 31st, 2021 09:28 am by gastwo

Chubber
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That's the badger! Thanks Sean.

So, I'm mainly doing doors today [teehee]

D

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LOL!!

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Doug, you and I seem to approach scratch building from the 2 extremes, you appear to do everything yourself, whereas I don't mind spending a bit more cash to reach a similar end result.
My cutting mat is, for the most part, my plotter cutter, somewhat quicker and more accurate than my efforts at cutting out by 86 year old hand; I buy my card in packs of A4 sheets, I buy etched brass windows and doors and cast chimneys, I've also bought cast bay windows and dormers. I also use Scalescenes brick and stone, print them to A4 self adhesive label stock, one advantage of N gauge, I can get more buildings on an A4 sheet than 00 modellers can, e.g. 2 x 6 house terraces (or 4 if low relief)
I must admit to bashing a few Metcalfe kits, in fact very few things that I buy go on the layout as bought, locos get at least renumbered or some get modified.
I do enjoy reading your exploits, picked up a few ideas too, thanks.

Chubber
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Thanks for the reply, Mike, ignore that Gastwo, he's a reactionary...
We are all just trying to do what we can to make miniature things look as real as possible.

I quickly passed over that word 'spending', it makes feel faint.

D

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Door and doorstep, black cartridge paper for hinges.



I did try a darker coloured door, but it all started to look 'samey'. Now the bit I'm not looking forward to, making it 3D instead of flat, hope it folds up square.

Doug

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That door looks fab and I think the colour is great.
If it was me, I'd add a little bit of a dark wash at the bottom of door to show years of use in the rain!

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Good call, Chris, thank you 👍

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Just a bit of self-indulgence, Corner Cottage posed up in situ 'cos I don't want to start the roof and scullery extension today...



For the first time since I can't remember when I had a lay-in until 0930! In front of the bank is apiece of bark that I intend to slice carefully to act as 'rock' texture. You can't beat Nature for looking natural, after all.

Douglas the Sloth

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That is a wonderful position for the cottage - it will look great.  I used bark at the Faversham Creek too - only needed a bit of highlighting to have that old bare rock look.  
Michael

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Thanks Michael. I used a bit or two on the old Bear's End.

Doug

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The cottage looks superb in that setting Doug. I rather suspect it wasnt just plonked there........I am intrigued about the amount of pre-planning you put in......do you do a lot sketches and mock ups?.

I do like your bye-lines.....particularly the last one!

Keep well

Chubber
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Thank you John,
I do a few sketches and birds' eye views, but having spent a long time doing watercolours I try to look for a 'view' when I can. The [low] height of the building with gap in the trees is there to frame the distant houses on the backscene and hopefully increase the recession. Don't think for one minute I plan everything, suffering from FAFFA Syndrome that path leads to procrastination and madness!
A departure from the norm for me, the rear wall of the cottage is completely blank!

Douglas

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Only just caught this thread Doug.  Looking good.  I like the tip about using a nut or washer for the window frames.Following with interest.

Terry

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Hullo again, herewith a posed-up tryout of the scullery extension to Corner Cottage, hopefully there will be roofs applied to both soon. I don't know whether to use slates on the extension, or 6" Wave asbestos sheeting.

I remember the outside privvy we had at Milland, it was horribly noisy in the rain as it was roofed with corrugated iron so I thought I'd spare the resident, a Slavic refugee lady, Mrs Gerda Brijj, from that discomfort..



Poop-poop!

Douglas

Last edited on Sat Feb 13th, 2021 01:17 pm by Chubber

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That's looking excellent Doug - as one would expect from you ................. :roll:

I love the way the backscene blends in so well.

I think one would generally find that these lean-to buildings had corrugated iron rooves ( or roofs if you prefer !) - either "wriggly tin" or possibly Roman tiles (where I came from).  Slates were not common in East Yorkshire - too far from Welsh Wales I'd guess.

By coincidence, I almost had a Gerda Brijj at Maxmill until you recommended a certain Beau Stryng - I wonder if it was the same Ms Brijj ......................... :hmm


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Tee-hee!
D

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Well! You might have thought I was joking when I mentioned the 'Chubber Stamp Test' but here is proof of its existence, I got fed up with Corner Cottage Mk1., nothing I did could make me love it, so it was subjectd to the test, and clearly failed.



So, [as the bright young things say now, seemingly before every every utterence], I present Corner Cottage Mk. 2.






All just posed up for now as I'm undecided on the ridge capping, flashing and lean-to roof material as yet, but hey-ho, normal service will be resumed ASAP.

Douglas


Last edited on Mon Mar 15th, 2021 11:00 am by Chubber

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:shock: :shock:  :shock:. He didn't did he ??  He did !! He bloomin did !!!  :shock: :shock: :shock:
Well ok although PERSONALLY I couldn't see much wrong with the first one !? ( I would have been perficly happy if I had built it  :)). I must admit, I DO like the Mark two version. . . Proper Job  :thumbs
 
(Oye where's the blow by blow build then !! ).    :cool wink

Cheers

Matt

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Matt!
   Thanks for posting in my thread, herewith a few more pictures, sorry, no 'blow-by-blow' as I think I could induce catalepsy by waffling on, but I'd be pleased to answer any 'Owdidyu' questions, naturally.
  



Madame Brijj is very pleased with her new car, bought with the realisation of several tranches of War Bonds.




Feel free to ask any questions [that is if you canstay awake long enough!]

Chubber


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Lovely attention to detail Doug.
Fabulous door, wooden beam lintel over the downstairs window, tiny glazing bars in the upstairs window, outward sloping stones on the bottom course, recessed window frame on the lean to, interesting chimney.... it just goes on. Characterful and masterful.


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Thank you, Marty, it just seemed to happen! Working on a 4mm scale hand pump now..

D

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A quartet of posed up pictures to see how its coming on, building to be bedded down, matting spray needed, some more 'gardening' and some clutter/woodpile perhaps, driveway to gravel and grass. I have bent over the roadside fence a little, it all looked a bit too straight.

I'm going to get at it with some static grass, hopefully, then move on to the retaining wall where the big white bit is, and build up some fencing/stone walls along the road.




I noticed the evening sunlight effect on my neighbours trees, so I've had a go with a piece of mirror, reflecting the sunlight from the skylight, I quite like it but it is a bit over exposed.although it dhows up the roses.









Hope you haven't fallen asleep,

Keep safe, poop-poop!

Doug

Last edited on Mon Apr 5th, 2021 06:41 pm by Chubber

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Super job Doug, its really coming to life and I love the way the road  'disappears' behind  :thumbs
Cheers

Matt

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A brilliant job and a lesson not only in modelling but also placement and design.  The disappearing road is just perfect and the cottage looks like it has always been there.  I love the little details too, like the stones and pump.  Lovely modelling.
Michael

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Superb modelling. I can still remember scenes like that from my childhood. No I wasn't around in the 30's, but in those days the scenery and cars etc didn't change too much. You've got the balance between the layout scenery and the back scene just right.

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Matt, Michael, Peter, thank you! Sometimes it is difficult to know if you're getting there,

Doug

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Headmaster wrote: A brilliant job and a lesson not only in modelling but also placement and design.  The disappearing road is just perfect and the cottage looks like it has always been there.  I love the little details too, like the stones and pump.  Lovely modelling.
Michael

Michael says it all! You have managed to make the road 'disappear' quite convincing.

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Chubber wrote: Matt, Michael, Peter, thank you! Sometimes it is difficult to know if you're getting there,

Doug
You're definitely getting there.

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Chubber wrote: Matt, Michael, Peter, thank you! Sometimes it is difficult to know if you're getting there,

Doug

Hi Doug,
 
It’s not a case of just getting there, more that you have arrived and been resident for some considerable time.
 
Wishing you continued happy modelling and with many thanks for your inspiration and showing us what we never thought possible.
 
Very best.
 
Bill

Last edited on Tue Apr 6th, 2021 07:52 am by Longchap

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Thats exquisite Doug .....Michael has said it all.

I must confess I quite liked the Mark 1 model, before it failed the stamp test but this is a quantum leap :thumbs

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Gentlemen,

Thank you for your generous appreciation, despite having just given myself a very short haircut with the Bisto clippers I shall soon have to get a bigger cap!!

Doug

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Superb stuff Doug. Really classic Chubber work (I was going to say Wow! but I refuse to use the word.)
Wow! anyway.

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Brilliant Doug.  :thumbs
Terry

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So! Shaun! You used the 'W' word you little tinker...

Terry, thank you.

Doug

Ps, I don't seem to get any notifications lately, peeps must think I'm being rude.

D

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Still getting them here Doug, hence my reply, might be worth checking your spam folder ? Every now and then mine suddenly start getting dumped in there
Mind you, if your NOT. Getting notifications then . . . . .  :tongue :tongue :tongue :tongue :tongue.   :mutley

Cheers

Matt

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Today I made a little [30mm x 18mm] woodstore for the cottage, based on that we had when we lived at Milland, W. Sussex.



I got the 'corrugated' from the packing that a Nokia 'phone was packed in, soaked it well and peeled off the fine inner layer, it's about the thickness of a Rizla paper so deformed nicely for the roof.



I thought I'd show you the inside now as when it's in place it won't be visible. Miss Gerda Brijj's odd-job man  makes sure there is a ready supply of correctly sized wood inside for both the fire and kitchen range.


Doug

Last edited on Mon May 3rd, 2021 07:04 am by Chubber

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Very nice Doug.  :thumbs
Terry

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Thank you, Terry. At the rate things are progressing I will have to adopt Longchaps adage, (I hope it will never be finished)

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Well it’s all about smart time management and while little and often usually keeps me happy, I managed three rows of roof slates on the goods shed today.  However, we also started our French tax returns this morning, which rather took us over.
 
Mind you, If I’d produced that gem of a log store in a few days, I’d feel pretty pleased with myself.
 
Well done Doug and as usual, thank you for sharing.
 
Best,
 
Bill

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Thank you, Bill, I too remember the annual torture of the Impot..

D

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A brilliant little log shed Doug - dry too so it will comply with the new "log regulations" ............

You've mentioned using the corrugated leaves of cardboard in the past and I did try it once - with appalling results !  Do you soak it in water or do you add a few drops of "softener" and do you soak it until the leaves separate themselves or before ?

I think Miss Gerda Brijj's odd-job man needs to get busy with the bitumen paint whilst there's still some "wriggly tin" left to paint ............. :cheers

Any sign of the big choo-choo opening up after the new "unlock" dates were announced ?

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Crikey! Sorry Peter, didn't see this reply as I still can't get notifications and been a bit busy at the big railway, four 0800-1630 days have taken it out of me and my post prandial snooze turned into a 3 hours snore-fest!

Same again this week as they want to run a complete [buffet carriage included] train Friday 14th lunchtime as a snagex prior to the 17th public opening and only three of seven covid dividing screens are in place as I type.

Anway, corrugated. Extreme care over a choice of card is needed, clearly the finer the better and preferably with one face covered with a shiny water resistant finish, my old favourite being the Lidl dishwasher tablet boxes, but keep an eye out, the box my new Nokia 'phone came in has even finer corrugations.

See http://yourmodelrailway.net/view_topic.php?id=15699&forum_id=11&highlight=corrugated+lidl

I'll check that has come out..

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Hi Doug, let me know if you get a notification about this post ? And might be worth checking in your spam folder ( If you dont already ?)  :thumbs
Cheers

Matt

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Yuppppp!GOT IT!

Thank you 

Doug 






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Good stuff  :thumbs. Let me know if there are any others you think you should be getting notifications about but arent. In fact before you tell me, scroll down to the bottom of the offending topic, just below the quick reply box on the left and see if the the button there says 'Watch Topic' or 'Unwatch Topic'  
 If it says 'Watch Topic' then you ain't watchin it and wont get notified  :cool wink
Cheers

Matt

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Noted

D

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   Yup! That's worked. It is possible with great care and the right card to further peel away the wrinkled layer to get scale[ish] thickness corugated sheets but you need Uhu spirit based [smelly] glue to stick it as it goes flat very quickly if waterbased glue is used, and as for a stick glue....
   I generally just do a few tiny dabs of Uhu on the surface to be covered and place the mini shets with tweezers. To get an inside and outside corrugated, simply do two layers back to back as in the wood store.

Scroll to the end of this link for a lamp hut using the Lidl card [Post 11]

http://yourmodelrailway.net/view_topic.php?id=15644&forum_id=14&highlight=corrugated+lidl

NB the corrugated extension roofs in the cottage scene above it [Post 5] are not textured, they are Scalescene agedcorrugated iron T29, pretty convincing, I thought.
  

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I think that the Scalesscenes T29 is as far as I'm going to go in watchmakers scale.
Fabulous as always and the link to the cottages was a lovely blast from the past. Where did the cottages end up?


                 

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