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Newton Regis, it'll never be finished, hopefully! - Members Personal Layouts. - Model Railway Layouts. - Your Model Railway Club
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 Posted: Mon Apr 25th, 2022 12:06 am
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peterm
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"Embarrassingly long waiting list."  You should see my waiting list to get on the waiting list of things of things to do.

That partly built kit looks good and seems to have a Romford worm?



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 Posted: Mon Apr 25th, 2022 12:15 am
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BCDR
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I've bought a few completed K's models, usually stuck together with a liberal application of 2 part epoxy. Which means a dunk in paint stripper for a few weeks to dissolve the now crystalline epoxy.

The K's 14xx is actually a good model body-wise, more accurate than the Hornby one. Their models of various GWR autocoaches leave a lot to be desired however, and their GWR diesel railcar is only good for weights in wagons.

Now Kay's white metal models of narrow gauge locomotives were a different beast, chalk and cheese.

I normally replace the wheels with Markits products, new gearbox and motor.

Bill is that a Buffalo? I was looking at the chassis, from memory Wills meant their body kits to go on an Airfix or similar frame and motor. I would imagine the start current of that motor to be more than most DCC decoders would tolerate. I have dark memories of a Wills Collett Goods on an Airfix/Triang chassis gently smoking as the decoder melt down.

Nigel



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 Posted: Mon Apr 25th, 2022 06:46 am
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Phil.c
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Actually invented in 1942, came on the market in 1958, I remember it as not like any other glue at the time, my brother sold the kit a few years ago which was still solidly stuck together :)



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 Posted: Mon Apr 25th, 2022 08:03 am
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Longchap
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BCDR wrote: I've bought a few completed K's models, usually stuck together with a liberal application of 2 part epoxy. Which means a dunk in paint stripper for a few weeks to dissolve the now crystalline epoxy.

The K's 14xx is actually a good model body-wise, more accurate than the Hornby one. Their models of various GWR autocoaches leave a lot to be desired however, and their GWR diesel railcar is only good for weights in wagons.

Now Kay's white metal models of narrow gauge locomotives were a different beast, chalk and cheese.

I normally replace the wheels with Markits products, new gearbox and motor.

Bill is that a Buffalo? I was looking at the chassis, from memory Wills meant their body kits to go on an Airfix or similar frame and motor. I would imagine the start current of that motor to be more than most DCC decoders would tolerate. I have dark memories of a Wills Collett Goods on an Airfix/Triang chassis gently smoking as the decoder melt down.

Nigel

Hi Nigel,
 
It’s an 1804 Class, not a Buffalo 1076 (outside frames), although I have a new Alan Gibson kit for a Pannier 1076, but want to build a few others before the more sophisticated Gibson kits, as I have an 850 Class as well, sans instructions, which shouldn’t be an issue.
 
I’ll measure the stall power for that open frame motor and see if I have a chip which can cope, otherwise I’ll pop in a newer motor from stock. Once I have the layout boards operational, I hope to have my kit building gear back from the UK and am looking forward to gaining useful experience with loco kits. My nemesis seems to be folding up tiny High Level etched hornblocks, but I’m determined to succeed!
 
My first loco kit was the Wills ex Taff Vale U1 which sits on the Triang 0-6-0 chassis and was a terrible runner. It will eventually need a new chassis and as you said, Markits gearbox and wheels.
 
Best,
 
Bill



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At 6'4'', Bill is a tall chap, then again, when horizontal he is rather long and people often used to trip over him! . . . and so a nickname was born :)

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 Posted: Mon Apr 25th, 2022 08:06 am
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Longchap
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peterm wrote: "Embarrassingly long waiting list."  You should see my waiting list to get on the waiting list of things of things to do.

That partly built kit looks good and seems to have a Romford worm?

The only way to get round the kit stockpile was to stop buying stock Pete, as the time left to build all the kits may be more than I have available!

Onwards!

Bill



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At 6'4'', Bill is a tall chap, then again, when horizontal he is rather long and people often used to trip over him! . . . and so a nickname was born :)

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 Posted: Mon Apr 25th, 2022 08:10 am
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Longchap
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Phil.c wrote: Actually invented in 1942, came on the market in 1958, I remember it as not like any other glue at the time, my brother sold the kit a few years ago which was still solidly stuck together :)

My ex Taff Vale U1 and the saddle tank above was epoxied together Phil and seem robust enough for further service, although I'd now use low melt solder.

I remember the waiting time for the 24 hour (or thereabouts) epoxy to go off made for extended construction times, but also made you careful with assembly!

Bill



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At 6'4'', Bill is a tall chap, then again, when horizontal he is rather long and people often used to trip over him! . . . and so a nickname was born :)

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 Posted: Mon Apr 25th, 2022 08:29 am
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Phil.c
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With 24 hours hardening for each part, it would take two years to build :mutley

Low melt solder though is the way to go with white metal :)



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 Posted: Mon Apr 25th, 2022 09:21 am
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Petermac
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I certainly remember the K's kits, along with many other makes and even then, wished I had the skill to build a locomotive.  Then, on my return to railway modelling half a lifetime later, RTR standards had moved on so far that kits simply didn't seem worth either the effort or the cost.

Recently, things may well have changed and kits could be entering a second life.

Having said that, my skill levels are still in the old life so I can't see me tackling a locomotive kit any time soon.  I do however, follow those who do posess the necessary skill with great admiration.



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 Posted: Mon Apr 25th, 2022 09:30 am
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Phil.c
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I've built a few kits in my time, white metal and etchec brass, but it's time consuming and for good kits, can be expensive with the add ons like chassis, motor etc, I won't be taking on any more these days :shock:



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 Posted: Mon Apr 25th, 2022 12:28 pm
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BCDR
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Hi Bill,

Good looking model though. Checked the photo, it's on the box.


I started out in the black art of soldering putting some Langley white metal OO9 models together, then moved on to On30 narrow gauge ones. K's kits are sometimes more like welding than soldering. I think the original instructions For K's call for "a good adhesive" or solder.

Good quality low temp. solder is now expensive and increasingly hard to find. 

Nigel



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 Posted: Mon Apr 25th, 2022 04:59 pm
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Longchap
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Hi Nigel,

I've always sourced my low melt solder from DCC Concepts (100 deg), but just checked the current price against what I paid just a few years ago and it's 50% more expensive!

Little seems immune to high price increases nowadays.

Best,

Bill



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At 6'4'', Bill is a tall chap, then again, when horizontal he is rather long and people often used to trip over him! . . . and so a nickname was born :)

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 Posted: Mon Apr 25th, 2022 05:25 pm
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Phil.c
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Whether there’s shortages or not, it seems like a good time for people to put prices up.:hmm



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 Posted: Mon Apr 25th, 2022 06:10 pm
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Longchap
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We’re just about to declare our holiday cottages open again this season, following two and a half years of covid closure, but I can’t really see us hiking our rates up by 50%!
 
The world is getting stranger and more crazy, as people worry more about the future, forget how to make love, not war and try to make as much money as possible.

Little good that will do them in the long run.

Be good everyone and don't worry, be happy,

Bill 
:cheers



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At 6'4'', Bill is a tall chap, then again, when horizontal he is rather long and people often used to trip over him! . . . and so a nickname was born :)

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 Posted: Mon Apr 25th, 2022 07:17 pm
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BCDR
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"Carrs C1044 100 degree solder; tin/lead/bismuth mix for white metal. Has several advantages over the 70 degree solder in that soldering white metal to brass requires no tinning of the latter and it "creeps" into joints better than 70 degree. $16.95". Plus shipping from California. Usually another $9.95. Same price as DCCConcepts but probably less shipping.



I've used the Carrs range extensively, I tried the DCCConcepts range a few years ago. No advantage that I could see.



Nigel



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