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Chubber
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Joined: Thu Oct 2nd, 2008
Location: Ivybridge, United Kingdom
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Hopefully this link, though to a 'clunky' site [clearly built by a departmental IT Dept rather than a gifted designer] should help planning a farmyard site in 'Yourland'.

I've downloaded the glossary too, contains plenty of reference photos, seems to have been assembled to give 'townies with degrees' some idea of what they are pretending to know about.....


http://www.farmsteadstoolkit.co.uk/national_farmsteads.html


Straw-sucking Doofer in the shipon.

John Dew
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Where I came from there were two p's in shippon .....the never ending difference between North and South I guess :lol:

Chubber
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Tee-hee, plenty more than two pees in a shippppon!
D

Petermac
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An interesting site Doug. :thumbs

It certainly highlights the regional and functional differences in farmsteads depending on production - cereals or livestock or mixed farms.

When I were a lad, a stackyard was exactly that - a yard where sheaves of corn/cereals or hay ("corn" nowadays is maize which wasn't grown in UK in the 50's) were made into stacks "thatched" with the cleanings sickled from ditch sides and light "hedge brushings" - ditches were cleaned and hedges cut every year.  The thatched stacks were ultimately covered with string netting to keep them both wind and waterproof until winter threshing days. 

Only when "square bales" really took over with the advent of combined harvesters and the demise of the threshing machine, did dutch barns make an appearance - square bales being much more difficult to waterproof in an outdoor stack.  Nowadays, they often simply leave the big round bales in the fields because water only penetrates a few centimetres.  Straw from threshing machines was loosely "trussed" and stacked in the brick barns (too unstable for freestanding stacks).  Chaff (cereal "husks") from the threshing operation was either blown along pipes, or carried by a "lad" in huge hessian "chaff sheets" into another part of the brick barn ready to be mixed with chopped turnips (or, after Christmas, mangold worzels) as winter cattle feed in the fold yards.

Barley and oats (the latter rarely grown in Yorkshire as horses disappeared) were usually used on the farm as animal feed so were just piled in an upstairs granary, but wheat, since WW2, had to be sold off the farm to obtain the subsidy payments.  It was bagged into 16 stone (2 cwt) sacks - usually hired from the railways by the week.  I remember going off to the local station with a tractor and trailer to collect our pre-booked sacks prior to a threshing day.   During winter a box van full of sacks was usually kept in a siding so all the farmers could draw on them as and when required.  The Station Master organised the hire notes as necessary.  When the wheat was sold off the farm, a "sack transfer note" was signed by the buyer who then took on the hire fees in much the same way as pallets work today.


                 

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