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Playing Dirty - Weathering - Getting You Started. - Your Model Railway Club
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 Posted: Mon Nov 3rd, 2014 11:02 am
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Gary
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Hi Rick,

Rather than painting a yellow line, why not paint or print a piece of clear decal sheet yellow, then cut the required strip and place on the model... Might be easier than the paint brush !

Another altenative is to purchase yellow lining decals. Should be available in any decent hobby shop that retails Australian outline models, ie Casula Hobbies have them for the NSWGR coaching stock and locos.

Cheers, Gary.



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 Posted: Thu Nov 6th, 2014 03:04 am
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Gwiwer
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SRman wrote:
Plymouth Laira shed also gained quite a reputation for its harsh washing plant that tended to remove a lot of paint on both green and blue locomotives.


Illustrating that point perfectly is a photo on p.28 of "Warships in Colour" (John Dennison / Irwell Press).

Most photos in that book are of indifferent quality and dubious reproduction but the one in question shows class 42 Warship D826 in the remains of BR blue livery with large areas of red oxide undercoat, patches of rust and bare metal and even the cream relief band from its former green livery plainly visible.

OK it's an 8xx not a 63xx but the point is well made. A good many locos appeared in traffic in disgraceful states for a number of years until the problem was resolved. Classes 22, 35, 42, 45 and 52 were particularly affected. I recall some Hymeks which could not really be described as wearing a livery - they were just a mess.



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 Posted: Thu Nov 6th, 2014 03:34 am
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Brossard
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Gary wrote: Hi Rick,

Rather than painting a yellow line, why not paint or print a piece of clear decal sheet yellow, then cut the required strip and place on the model... Might be easier than the paint brush !

Another altenative is to purchase yellow lining decals. Should be available in any decent hobby shop that retails Australian outline models, ie Casula Hobbies have them for the NSWGR coaching stock and locos.

Cheers, Gary.



Gary and Rick, that's a method used by some I think (Ian Rathbone?) for boiler bands for example.

I had a notion to try that a few weeks ago using a Staedtler bow pen that I've had for more than 30 years.  However, hard as I tried I couldn't get a clean thin line on the transfer sheet.  Anyone that can use a bowpen to get 0.25mm lines has my undying admiration.  I usually end up cheating and using transfers.  I just applied the double yellow to the top of my Stove R using Modelmaster lining transfers - it worked well.

Ref:  Modelmaster sheet 4458, yellow cantrail stripes for first class.

John



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 Posted: Thu Nov 6th, 2014 09:22 am
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shunter1
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Thanks for your answers to my powder question and fixing the stuff Rick and Gary.All good reference for the future.

Cheers,
Derek.

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 Posted: Fri Nov 14th, 2014 02:00 am
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Gwiwer
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Oooohhh ..... a new loco!

Actually not that new as it arrived back in July just as I was about to leave for three months away. It also had electrical problems which I traced to a cross-wiring of the pickups on one bogie and rectified.

But now a third green class 22 can join the ranks. This one is fitted with the early style of marker discs rather than a 4-character headcode panel as they gained later.

Dapol has also re-engineered aspects of these models since Dave Jones, who originally developed them, left the company. Newer bodies do not fit on older chassis as the design and lighting arrangements differ.

This loco displays white lights through the white discs when running forwards and red at the bottom centre as a tail marker. Rather clever and very effective.

Weathered to represent the type in service and with marker discs set differently at the two ends. This loco will be one of the "runs both ways" fleet with a coupling at each end allowing it to run in either direction, shunt or run in multiple. The leading end has the requisite two drivers and has been fitted with trimmed pipework to clear the coupling









Finally posed "on shed" with one of the earlier arrivals in the later headcode-fitted configuration and which also does not have a front-end coupler making it a "one-way" loco but with full length plumbing.



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 Posted: Fri Nov 14th, 2014 05:20 am
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Gary
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Dirty looking 22 Rick, very nice. :thumbs 

I have recently down loaded a few colour pics of 'dirty' 22s' for my own weathering purposes. Your pics give me some encouragement to weather my 22. Maybe this weekend...

Cheers, Gary.



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 Posted: Fri Nov 14th, 2014 08:48 am
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Hi Rick,

Very nicely done. I too have some class 22's that will require some filth added.

I'm also awaiting the release of the class 29's which is meant to be December. Mmmmm.

Good stuff

Toto

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 Posted: Wed Jan 21st, 2015 06:48 am
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Gwiwer
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A few images the first of which is by my good friend Mick (who older members might remember as Mickelaar during his brief stay here) hence his watermark but used with permission.

First some spots of oil and rust added to a factory-weathered class 52 "Western"



Based on personal observation and the photographic record a couple of my class 42 "Warship" locos have been quite heavily weathered. D806 is featured in John Dennison's "Warships in Colour" (Irwell Press 2011 p.31) rather begrimed and streaked. Here is my interpretation of that with freelance use of grey included on the model of the same loco



Also apparently the victim of a spill or overflow of some sort Hymek D7097 leads a rake of weathered maroon coaches.



Smaller details which add to the realism include smoke staining to the restaurant car where someone may have over-done the toast! This I think looks much better when the train is seen in motion rather than in cruel close up



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 Posted: Wed Jan 21st, 2015 07:05 am
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toto
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Hi Rick,

More fantastic photos. Thanks for sharing. I think unweathered loco's look out of place now. Far to shiny. A bit pressure to sort that out in mine as I have a lot of fresh out of the wrapper stock.:hmm ......... Just no time to do anything about that at the moment as the build dictates otherwise........ Not to mention the small matter of know how.:mutley

More of the same please.

Cheers

Toto

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 Posted: Sun Feb 1st, 2015 11:14 am
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Gwiwer
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45053 is a fairly recent Bachmann loco and represents the largest of the three classes generically knowns as "Peaks". Class 45 was split into 45/0 and 45/1 according to whether or not they had electric train heating fitted and within both sub-classes there was a lot of variety; body panels and headcode variations were among the more obvious differences. The 45/0 ended up on freights and summer relief trains once electric heating became standard.

46045 is a much older Mainline-badged loco issued as one of Bachmann's first UK releases. It represents the final development of the type which began with class 44 (originally numbered D1 - D10 and carrying names of England's ten highest peaks, hence the nickname) and finally numbered 193 broadly similar locomotives across classes 44, 45 and 46. Class 44 was regarded as non-standard and were withdrawn well ahead of all the rest.

Despite being younger class 46 didn't last as long in traffic as some class 45 locos and in their later days could sometimes be seen in quite woebegone condition. Those allocated to the Western Region also suffered from paint erosion in the mechanical wash plants just as their hydraulic contemporaries did and, like some of them, could be seen in faded, patched and almost stripped paint at times.











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 Posted: Sun Feb 1st, 2015 04:40 pm
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Myansome
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Nice to see you are weathering well, Rick! Looks good stuff ... Penlee Quarry, Newlyn, by any chance? :pedal



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 Posted: Sat Sep 5th, 2015 08:44 am
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Gwiwer
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I haven't been here for a while have I?

Some of the weathering and detail work done in the past few months has appeared in my Penhayle Bay and Boghouses layout topics.

The arrival of Bachmann's class 43 Warships has prompted me to revisit this area as the first pair are now detailed, weathered, fitted with Fox etched nameplates and have entered traffic.

First a comparison of the final release of class 42 (left) with the new class 43 (right), both of which carry my own weathering. The new loco is fractionally larger so definitely not a retooling but an all-new product. The difference is small enough that the two can be run side by side (or double-heading) without any real issues.



D865 "Zealous" in her weathered glory



Another comparison with class 43 to the left and class 42 to the right; the size and shape differences are visible but to my eyes don't produce an incompatible clash. In any case the two types should not be worked in multiple and when used on adjacent tracks the difference is even less apparent.



Here's D835 "Pegasus" displaying some of that streaking which the class often featured from the lower edge of the windscreen and the grab-rails. Also showing the detail applied from the pack which includes those minuscule roof lifting rings.



At both ends as well; this is the "inner" end with the coupler fitted rather than the plumbing



And in traffic showing the effect of the Fox nameplate standing out from the bodyside panels.



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 Posted: Sat Sep 5th, 2015 09:51 am
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Ed
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I've always thought Warships look nice, but in an ugly sort of way.

Certainly look good slightly dirty Rick :thumbs


Ed



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 Posted: Tue Sep 8th, 2015 12:38 pm
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Gwiwer
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I looked around the traps for advice on removal of tampo print without harming body paintwork. I asked in the model shop which lives in the basement at work (it's better than it sounds, actually!). Most suggestions involved Modelstrip or T-cut.

So I came home and placed some hot water in a bowl with a little washing up liquid, took out a cotton bud and crossed my fingers .....

Tampo and etch side by side showing the need to remove the former



Rubbity-rub with just moderate pressure and hey presto!



99.95% gone - there's a very faint outline visible if you really look hard.



And the etched plate is in place.



Apologies for the image quality. These were taken using the phone at the workbench for record purposes only.

And after taking the tampo off with soap and water what did I stick the etch down with? PVA. It gives a little more "wriggle time" than superglue, doesn't harm the paintwork if it leaks and can be easily removed from the edges if it does.



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 Posted: Wed Sep 9th, 2015 04:39 am
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Gwiwer
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Finally 842 "Royal Oak" paid a visit to the weathering bench and has received a light blathering of road-grime. The intention is to present this loco as being much closer to "ex-works" condition, though not spanking new, so there's rather less dirt than on some of the others.





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 Posted: Wed Oct 28th, 2015 10:48 am
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Gwiwer
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I believe in the power of KISS - Keep It Simple, Stupid.

So when I wanted to weather some milk churns, which are all of 8mm tall and a bit tricky to hold in the tweezers, I took an easy way which others can use for similar projects without losing sleep over how to weather.

Step 1. Take a pack of Bachmann milk churns

Step 2. Snip off the top so as to leave an open bag with the churns still inside

Step 3. Sprinkle in some AIM dark rust weathering powder

Step 4. Shake.

And the result? Rusting milk churns that surely anyone can manage. Though I don't fancy the milk if they've been sitting around for that long!!!



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 Posted: Wed Oct 28th, 2015 03:38 pm
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Mmmm, should milk churns go rusty?  The early conical shape ones were made from Galvanised Iron, but the ones you have there were made from aluminium....

:hmm



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 Posted: Thu Oct 29th, 2015 02:06 pm
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Gwiwer
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Under Rule 1 milk churns which have been left out in the open for a long time go rusty ;-)

While that may not be strictly correct in all cases it certainly adds a little something to the platform scene and despite a couple of comments about the non-rusting properties of galvanised metal churns there's a lot of very positive response around the social media.

At least they're not plonked straight out of the packet and looking like silver-painted plastic!



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 Posted: Thu Oct 29th, 2015 07:23 pm
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toto
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Nothing wrong with a little break from reality. Now excuse me ......I have got to go ........ I've got a date with Kate Winslett. Don't want to keep her waiting.

Looking good Rick.

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 Posted: Fri Oct 30th, 2015 02:10 pm
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Campaman
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Maybe its not rust, maybe is the dirt from the milking shed, cows do leave a lot of cow waste around.

:mutley



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