Recent Topics      
YMR logo

You are here:  Your Model Railway Club > Model Railway Layouts. > Members Personal Layouts. > 00 Gauge - Pig Hill Yard To bottom of page
                 

 Moderated by: Spurno  
AuthorPost
emmess
Full Member


Joined: Mon Jul 15th, 2013
Location: Burley In Wharfedale, United Kingdom
Posts: 399
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

2- and 4- year old hands are not good with N-Gauge models, and I started to realise that if Tedderton was to survive, those hands would need to have something a little larger to poke. So I've started this week on building a small 00 Gauge layout for the boys' Christmas present

The thinking is four-fold: 

1. It will give them something of their own to "play" with under supervision;

2. It will involve Big Sister who is 8 and is interested in building, painting, sticking;

3. Teach me skills which I can use on my main N-Gauge layout (Tedderton), and;

4. Be small enough for me to make good progress and not get put off by a larger project.

So, here is the track plan:







It is 170cm from end to end. It's a simple three-siding Inglenook design for shunting, with a little kick-back to place a small shed. The three sidings and headshunt are proportioned as suggested by the Inglenook puzzle.

In the spirit of aim number 2 above, Big Sister chose the name.

I've started baseboard construction (using plywood throughout for the first time).

Comments welcome - will this work!?

Spurno
Owner/Webmaster.


Joined: Tue Aug 14th, 2012
Location: Torquay, United Kingdom
Posts: 4342
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Ideal for youngsters Michael and great that they can all take part.

pnwood
DON'T SHOUT my hearing is fine


Joined: Tue Sep 15th, 2009
Location: Newbury, United Kingdom
Posts: 1346
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

The inglenook itself is sound but I can't see the point (no pun intended) in having a kick back siding as it can't be used if anything else is standing on the other siding. Without a run round any wagons shunted to and from the kick back will be at the wrong end of the loco. If it is just for a loco shed then the siding feeding the kick back will have to be kept clear to run a loco in and out.

If you want the extra siding providing it is for a loco shed, my suggestion would be to have the kick back before the first point from the left and not off one of the sidings.

emmess
Full Member


Joined: Mon Jul 15th, 2013
Location: Burley In Wharfedale, United Kingdom
Posts: 399
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Thanks Nick, I did think about that siding, and my thoughts were along these lines: I want a loco shed because I like the new Scalescenes Diesel shed. I like the look of a kickback. I wanted it towards the middle of the board so I have space for the single track to go over a river. And I thought it may add a bit to the puzzle element to have to clear the top siding to get the loco back to the shed at the end. I accept that it is not prototypical, but I think that having it where it is males it right for me.

Will I regret this though? Now is the time to change it, as I haven't even bought the track yet!

emmess
Full Member


Joined: Mon Jul 15th, 2013
Location: Burley In Wharfedale, United Kingdom
Posts: 399
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Here it is without the kickback. It still meets all my requirements apart from not looking as good aesthetically. (I really do think kickback look great!) What do you think?




Mike.

Marty
Enjoying the Journey


Joined: Sun Oct 14th, 2007
Location: Perth, Western Australia, Australia
Posts: 6213
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

A better place for the shed in my opinion. The lads will get a lot of joy rolling out of the shed and then backing up onto stock in the sidings... and you still get room for a bridge?

Marty

Last edited on Sun Mar 30th, 2014 01:34 pm by Marty

pnwood
DON'T SHOUT my hearing is fine


Joined: Tue Sep 15th, 2009
Location: Newbury, United Kingdom
Posts: 1346
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Marty wrote:
A better place for the shed in my opinion. The lads will get a lot of joy rolling out of the shed and then backing up onto stock in the sidings... and you still get room for a bridge?

Marty


Agreed, much better :thumbs

emmess
Full Member


Joined: Mon Jul 15th, 2013
Location: Burley In Wharfedale, United Kingdom
Posts: 399
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

I've been busy this week - we now have a baseboard for Pighill. Carpentry is definitely not a skill I possess, but I'm quite pleased with this one made from ply cut up to my template by the local timber merchant. It's wonky in places underneath, but the top is sturdy, level, and smooth, so I'm chuffed with it!




And the final plan for Pighill. No kick back, and a slight (3 degrees) curve in the sidings which I think adds a bit of interest as well as getting the sidings over towards the back a little bit.


 

Picture shows the sidings going right to the back scene. I won't go all this way with the actual track - just far enough to get the longest train of 5 or 3 wagons onto the siding whilst not being long enough for 6 or 4 as per the Inglenook rules. (I have a handy Excel spread sheet that tells you the min and max size of each siding and headshunt based on the lengths of the 8 wagons you enter).

Need to put the base of the bridge and embankment in place now then give the whole thing a coat of primer and paint.

emmess
Full Member


Joined: Mon Jul 15th, 2013
Location: Burley In Wharfedale, United Kingdom
Posts: 399
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Time goes by quickly, doesn't it!? I hope that I can actually get this done in time to give to the boys for Christmas!

A quick update. Progress has been slow this week.

I have put in the base of the bridge. This took ages. As I said before, wood and I don't get on, so it took a long time to get the shape right and the height right. But it's seamless from the main baseboard across the valley and onto the embankment at the end.



Rightly or wrongly (I am sure you'll correct me if the latter), I am going to put the bridge abutments and the bridge itself on before I lay the track. I want to get the landscape formed before laying the track itself, and I want to form the slope around the abutments so they appear embedded within them. This seems like it would be a more sensible way round, and it also means I can put off spending more money for a few weeks!

Anyway, here is my first effort, part complete. Abutments are from Scalescenes, and the plate girders are a Wills kit with Plastruct H beams underneath the deck. This is the first time I've tried to paint anything with rust, and I erred on the 'less is more' approach when dry brushing. It's not perfect, but I am happy with the result.



Next, I will varnish the baseboard and then form the valley and embankment before laying the track.

As for the track, it will be Peco code 75. Do I need to add a cork base? I think if I don't then the ballast track bed will seem too flat, but I think opinion is split on this...?

Till the next update...

Mike.

Gary
Inactive Member


Joined: Mon May 21st, 2012
Location: Sydney, Australia
Posts: 3835
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Hi Mike,

Generaaly you'll find that most branchline railway yards or BLTs won't necessarily have a shoulder of ballast under the track. Perhaps the area left of the bridge may have a shouldered ballast profile, but the yard/station area is generally flat, using loco ash and clinker as the form of ballast. You would normally just see the tops of the sleepers and the rails above the ballast level. 

I would recommend covering the board with cork the full width of the station/yard area. The section of track left of the bridge, I would only use a strip of cork, no wider than the sleepers, to allow for the shouldered effect.



Cheers, Gary.

ps, great looking bridge ! :thumbs



Last edited on Tue Apr 8th, 2014 12:07 pm by Gary

Bob K
Member


Joined: Sun Oct 14th, 2007
Location: Bedfordshire, United Kingdom
Posts: 2746
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

I like the bridge with a nice balance of weathering. Great choice of colour too.

Bob

emmess
Full Member


Joined: Mon Jul 15th, 2013
Location: Burley In Wharfedale, United Kingdom
Posts: 399
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Thanks Gary, Bob. I will use that recommendation for the ballast Gary, thank you. I'm always impressed by the level of guidance that's given on this forum. As a complete novice, it's always more than welcome.

Mike.

toto
Former Member
 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Hi Mike,

The bridge looks great. Nice work.

Cheers. Toto

emmess
Full Member


Joined: Mon Jul 15th, 2013
Location: Burley In Wharfedale, United Kingdom
Posts: 399
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Toto - thanks... I am pleased with how it has come out.

Been busy tonight. The boys' big sister helped lay the cork on the baseboard - gladly holding things and spreading PVA all over. She is excited seeing progress and is enjoying the experience.

Once she went to bed, I set to with the new Scalescenes Diesel Shed kit. It's taken four hours to get the two long walls complete. They look fabulous, and they are really sturdy. This is the first time I've made a Scalescenes kit in 00, and I have to say I found it a much more pleasant experience, despite the extra cutting.

A good half hour was spent cutting out these bad boys:




These combs sit under a layer of cladding to make it look corrugated. It's an excellent (if subtle) effect, but it was bloomin hard work cutting out those combs. You can see the effect at the top right of the next photo.

Anyway - here's a quick look at the walls:




Work on Pig Hill will stop for a week now as we're out and about at the weekend and I am away with work next week.

Till next time...

toto
Former Member
 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Hi Mike,

I can just see the results of the corrugated cladding there and it looks convincing. Could you post another picture of it when you get a moment as I am going to be using similar to my recycling plant and possibly elsewhere as well.

I'll look forward to seeing how things progress on the above when you reconvene.

Keep up the good work

Cheers

Toto

emmess
Full Member


Joined: Mon Jul 15th, 2013
Location: Burley In Wharfedale, United Kingdom
Posts: 399
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

toto wrote: Could you post another picture of it when you get a moment as I am going to be using similar to my recycling plant and possibly elsewhere as well.





Here you go, Toto. I think it works quite well. It's certainly subtle, but I think it's better for it.

I think one mistake I made was gluing the whole thing down first with Rocket glue and then pushing into the gaps with my fingers. By the time I got to the far end, the glue was solid and there wasn't enough 'give' for it to go into the gaps. I think I would have been better gluing a few at a time and working along that way. I will try this approach when I get onto the shed ends.

toto
Former Member
 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Hi Mike,

Many thanks. It is good, as you say subtle ........ But effective. The whole build looks like a winner.

I'll keep this one in the bottom drawer as it looks great and I think that I could tackle that. Thanks for the photo.

Cheers for now

Toto

emmess
Full Member


Joined: Mon Jul 15th, 2013
Location: Burley In Wharfedale, United Kingdom
Posts: 399
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

I popped over to Haworth on Sunday with the boys to get some pictures of the track work in the KWVR's yard. I am going to try to base Pig Hill's track and ballast on this. It's very dark, very dirty, and very fine. In places the muck is above the sleepers, and greenery is starting to encroach. I don't know how I'll manage this look, but here are the pictures that will be inspiring me...






 








emmess
Full Member


Joined: Mon Jul 15th, 2013
Location: Burley In Wharfedale, United Kingdom
Posts: 399
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

I'm stuck in some anonymous hotel in some anonymous town with work tonight, so have little to do. I've therefore completed the Pig Hill control panel front using the technique I mentioned earlier this week.

It's simplicity itself - three switches to control the three Cobalt point motors, and four LEDs: one of which will be lit depending on which way the points are facing from the headshunt.

The actual track plan was exported as a high-resolution PNG file from AnyRail (PNG uses lossless compression so for diagrams like this it's much better than JPEG) and imported into Visio. The text and the drill-out holes for the LED clips and switches were then be drawn on at the exact right dimensions.

The front of the baseboard is 4mm plywood, so I plan on mounting the diagram on the front facia, with the switches self-contained, along with a panel-mount controller.  I think I'll mount the diagram directly to the layout baseboard facia with Pritt Stick and then just varnish over it. Will this work?

I've just ordered the bits from Rapid. I had a 15% discount code, so it's all possible for just over a fiver including postage. I've included a 4p diode in my order to protect the headshunt - it goes right up to the back scene without buffers, so I plan on electrically isolating it in the right-to-left direction as 2- and 4- year olds aren't known for their fine motor skills at stopping an expensive loco running into a solid wall at speed.

Notice the track plan is a bit more curved than it was. My mistake was starting baseboard construction before trackplan completion. The removal of the kick-back into the shed has meant much less space. Combined with another mistake which was not accounting for the 5cm length of buffers when calculating siding length for the Inglenook puzzle made it a bit of a squeeze to get everything onto the space I'd committed to. Sigh. Ah well - I think it looks good still, even though it's going to be far more cramped than originally planned. Lesson learnt.

Siding at top right will vanish into a Scalescenes factory/warehouse building which will continue on ultra-low-relief towards the left, and possibly down the right-hand side too.



col.stephens
Full Member
 

Joined: Tue Feb 7th, 2012
Location: Kent, United Kingdom
Posts: 2609
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Mike. I've just come across this thread - superb!  How big is the layout?  Very nice pictures of the track at Haworth.
Re sticking your trackplan to the facia with Pritt-Stick.  I don't think that it will be up to the job of holding it in place for long.  I would go for something more powerful.  Looking forward to seeing your layout develop.

Terry

Sol
A modelling Moderator.


Joined: Mon Nov 28th, 2011
Location: Evanston Gardens, South Aust, Australia
Posts: 4438
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Mmm looks nice



than the older version of the Kit.

see my efforts   http://yourmodelrailway.net/view_topic.php?id=7614&forum_id=101&page=1#p206073

emmess
Full Member


Joined: Mon Jul 15th, 2013
Location: Burley In Wharfedale, United Kingdom
Posts: 399
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

col.stephens wrote: Mike. I've just come across this thread - superb!  How big is the layout?  Very nice pictures of the track at Haworth.
Re sticking your trackplan to the facia with Pritt-Stick.  I don't think that it will be up to the job of holding it in place for long.  I would go for something more powerful.  Looking forward to seeing your layout develop.

Terry


Thanks Terry - very kind. Thank you for the tip re the panel image - I will bear that in mind and use something more hefty.

The layout it 170x25cm, which is about 5'7" by 10".

I'm lucky to live so close to Hawarth, it makes it easy and quick to get somewhere to research.

emmess
Full Member


Joined: Mon Jul 15th, 2013
Location: Burley In Wharfedale, United Kingdom
Posts: 399
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Sol wrote: Mmm looks nice



than the older version of the Kit.

see my efforts   http://yourmodelrailway.net/view_topic.php?id=7614&forum_id=101&page=1#p206073

It's changed a bit Ron, but yours looks a beauty. I didn't realise that the older kit had even more of those blasted combs to cut out. I am quite happy with the result, but question the effort. The tip embedded in your post re using the interior of washing powder boxes comes just a little too late!

Gary
Inactive Member


Joined: Mon May 21st, 2012
Location: Sydney, Australia
Posts: 3835
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Hi Mike,

Two ways you can get around the in-filled sleepers...

1. the use of a runny plaster poured between the sleepers and then wiped clean before drfing solid.

2. Using Das Clay, pummeld into.between the sleepers.

As a matter of interest, for corrugated asbestos, similar to thescale used on the engine shed, I use corrugated card which I obtained from a craft/scrapbooking supplies, for only 0.75c a sheet. The corrugations are 6" and it does look ok. I have used it on my provendors shed.



and seen here on the roof of my shed...

http://yourmodelrailway.net/view_topic.php?id=11956&forum_id=14&page=2#p210167

Cheers, Gary.



 

emmess
Full Member


Joined: Mon Jul 15th, 2013
Location: Burley In Wharfedale, United Kingdom
Posts: 399
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Thanks as usual, Gary! That shed roof looks great, there's such a wealth of knowledge on this forum - it's great.

Being away from home for a night, I spent some time drawing up what the overall look of Pig Hill Yard will be. The main constraint I have is that it needs to have a hill on it, and it needs to be populated with pigs. That's the rules as laid down by the boys' Big Sister.

So I am thinking this at the moment, will all buildings being from Scalescenes as I enjoy building them so much...




I thought about joining two sides of the Hill with an occupation bridge with farm track over it to give a good visual entrance to the yard proper. Not sure if I'm attempting too much though with the space available. The buildings are drawn to scale.

As ever, the comments are welcome, please don't hold back.

With luck, track laying will begin tomorrow or Thursday... :)

Marty
Enjoying the Journey


Joined: Sun Oct 14th, 2007
Location: Perth, Western Australia, Australia
Posts: 6213
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

I think that the occupation bridge will work well. Remember to cut the front fascia board to the shape of the hill and valley and it will look fab.
Lovely job on the river bridge too.
cheersMarty

Last edited on Wed Apr 16th, 2014 04:06 am by Marty

col.stephens
Full Member
 

Joined: Tue Feb 7th, 2012
Location: Kent, United Kingdom
Posts: 2609
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Mike, Looking very good.  How did you produce your coloured trackplan in your last post, and how did you produce the full-size trackplan in your 8th post?

Terry

MaxSouthOz
Admin


Joined: Sat Aug 23rd, 2008
Location: Adelaide , Australia
Posts: 12331
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Looking good, Mike - especially the bridge!  :thumbs

You can get that black look by using coal dust which you can get from the model shops.  I've supplemented that with grimy black weathering powder and flat black acrylic paint as well.

emmess
Full Member


Joined: Mon Jul 15th, 2013
Location: Burley In Wharfedale, United Kingdom
Posts: 399
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Marty - thanks. If it comes out a quarter as good as your excellent work, I will consider myself very satisfied indeed. Your layout has been an inspiration to me.

Terry - thanks for the encouragement! The track plan was drawn in the AnyRail software (http://www.anyrail.com/). It has all the track geometry in it and makes laying out a track plan a breeze. You can use it to create exact radii smooth curves, and can print out at a scale of 1:1 which is going to help immensely when laying the track. As you can see, you can also add shapes to represent landscape and buildings. The buildings are represented by simple rectangles, but which are measured to the exact dimensions given on the Scalescenes website. I have spent so long "fiddling" with the software, I love it.

Max - thanks. I've picked up some Woodland Scenics 'fine cinders' to mix with the fine light grey ballast, and I intend to increase the proportion as we move into the yard from the head shunt. Re the flat black paint - do you apply washes with it watered down, or slap it on neat?

emmess
Full Member


Joined: Mon Jul 15th, 2013
Location: Burley In Wharfedale, United Kingdom
Posts: 399
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

BACKSCENE ADDED

We had a productive evening yesterday on Pig Hill Yard. Big Sister was on full sticking duty as we applied 11 A4 sheets of grey clouds to the back scene. The picture was downloaded from the internet, blurred a little and then arranged to the exact size and printed 1:1 from Visio.

I wanted something simple and not blue sky, so went for how the sky usually looks round here.



The joins look quite conspicuous on this picture but they're not too bad in the flesh. I'm going to spray varnish it and then trim the edges around the top.

We also transferred the track plan onto the cork ready for track laying. We did this by fixing the 1:1 trackplan to the top with sticky tape and then banging panel pins through the centreline. Remove the plan and then join the dots with a big pen.

Seems to have worked alright, and we're ready for track laying to commence!


 

toto
Former Member
 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Hi Emmess,

Coming along a treat so far. The overall plan looks great with plenty to keep the eye roving. Looking forward to seeing more as it develops.

Cheers

Toto

emmess
Full Member


Joined: Mon Jul 15th, 2013
Location: Burley In Wharfedale, United Kingdom
Posts: 399
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

FIRST TRACK LAYING



A quick progress report: Pig Hill now has track! It's more or less complete. Only one of the three Cobalt's is installed (2 still to arrive from Hattons) and the shed road is not in. This is waiting for the shed's inspection pit to be completed so that I can cut the baseboard to accommodate it.



I've used small screws to hold the track down, like Marty did - nice tip as it makes fine adjustment easy. I will remove them once the track is stuck down.



The bottom siding is alarmingly close to the edge at one point - a compromise in the plan. But I will include a small lip on the facia here to prevent accidents, I hope.








Last edited on Sat Apr 19th, 2014 06:28 am by emmess

col.stephens
Full Member
 

Joined: Tue Feb 7th, 2012
Location: Kent, United Kingdom
Posts: 2609
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Looks good Mike. :thumbs

Terry

Gary
Inactive Member


Joined: Mon May 21st, 2012
Location: Sydney, Australia
Posts: 3835
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Looking good Mike. :thumbs Out of curiousity, what size are the points you are using on the Pig Hill Yard ?

Cheers, Gary.

toto
Former Member
 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Looking good and coming on at a pace. I'm sure I have a piece of leftover ply just about that size. :mutley

And before anyone suggests it ......... No.

Keep up the good work.

Toto

emmess
Full Member


Joined: Mon Jul 15th, 2013
Location: Burley In Wharfedale, United Kingdom
Posts: 399
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Gary, track is Peco code 75 and the points are the small radius electrofrog ones. Hoping that this was the right decision!

Toto - nonsense - go for it. You know you want to! :-)

emmess
Full Member


Joined: Mon Jul 15th, 2013
Location: Burley In Wharfedale, United Kingdom
Posts: 399
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

TRACK PAINTING

So the track is laid and tested. The three Cobalt's all work (that's another story - one needed resistors to stop it from clicking at the end of its throw, and one sounds like a tractor - I had to loosen its body screws a little to get it to throw) and all of the wiring is complete. Time to paint the track! Track glued down and screws removed.

There seems to be about as many approaches to weathering the track as there are modellers, so I'll document how I do it in case it comes in handy as a 'how not to do it'.

I masked off the backscene with newspaper and covered the point blades and hinges with masking tape. I have wired the electrofrog points properly so they don't rely on the blades for electrical continuity, but I wasn't confident that the paint wouldn't stick the moving parts together. I will patch in the shiny bits with a brush later. The long strip of masking tape covers the diesel shed's inspection pit.




The whole track was then given a couple of coats of Humbrol dark brown spray paint (one pointing towards the backscene and going left-to-right, and one pointing towards the headshunt and going top-to-bottom to ensure all the sleeper edges are covered). This is just an undercoat, but it already looks so much better. It's a lovely dark matt and makes such a difference... Here is the aftermath of the first coat:



And that's it for now. I will be weathering the sleepers and the rails later on.

In the meantime I mocked up the occupation bridge that will join both side of Pig Hill in Cornflake box from the dimensions on the Scalescenes website. I am not sure whether it's too large for the space available, and wanted to check what kind of gradient Pig Hill itself would have as it descends from bridge height down to the level of the river in the valley. I'm still not one hundred percent, but I think it's going to be fine. This shot shows how the entrance to the yard will look as it comes in under the bridge... 



And despite checking not once but twice, the paint managed to find a crack in the masking and has left a lovely brown mark down the cloudy backscene. It's in a location where I can hide it with a tree, so I'm not that bothered, but I am a bit annoyed. I am swaying towards a better backscene anyway, but I'd rather not have the expense at the moment.

That's it for now. I need my tea.

emmess
Full Member


Joined: Mon Jul 15th, 2013
Location: Burley In Wharfedale, United Kingdom
Posts: 399
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

I worked all evening on the track yesterday, and I thought that it was almost at a point that I'd consider it complete. In the cruel light of morning though, I can see my first major mistake - trying to paint under inadequate lighting. What all looked perfectly blended last night looks frightening this morning in daylight. Ho hum - some retouching needed. First though is a trip to a shop to buy some better light bulbs.

Anyway...

Working from some pictures I took of the rails at Haworth, I started to mix paints. In this case a selection of Tamyia acrylics:




I wanted the tracks at the yard entrance to be a browner colour than the dark tracks in the yard proper, and an almost black down the shed road. So I mixed in a couple of drops of darker colours little by little as I painted, essentially mixing the paint with the brush as I painted the sleepers.

With the sleepers done, I mixed a different concoction, a more rusty shade (no orange), and applied the paint to the rail sides, again making the shade darker in the areas I wanted. Here we are part-way through:




I then very lightly drybrushed some lighter shades over the sleepers just to bring out a little highlighting on the edges and the grain. Nothing over the top, and again varying the shades on each track. I carefully filled in the gaps left by the masking earlier, and was careful to keep switching the points from time to time to prevent sticking.

The main issue this morning is that I realise I have not painted the faces of the sleepers down to the baseboard. They looked fine last night but stick out badly this morning. I poured a little dry ballast into the gaps though to see how it looked, and thankfully it doesn't look too bad, so I think I will be fine.

What do you think?



Last edited on Wed Apr 23rd, 2014 06:41 am by emmess

toto
Former Member
 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Hi Mike,

The sleeper and the rail colours look pretty convincing to me. You've done a great job. I wouldn't worry about the sides of the sleepers, as you say, the ballast takes care of that.

Great stuff.

Cheers

Toto

emmess
Full Member


Joined: Mon Jul 15th, 2013
Location: Burley In Wharfedale, United Kingdom
Posts: 399
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Thanks Toto. It took four hours. I would hate to think how long your layout would take! :-O

Barneybuffer
Full Member


Joined: Wed Nov 28th, 2012
Location: Gosport, United Kingdom
Posts: 1026
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Hi Mike, those tracks look pretty darn good to me. Infact the whole layout looks to coming along very nicely. I do like the work on the track though.
 

Gary
Inactive Member


Joined: Mon May 21st, 2012
Location: Sydney, Australia
Posts: 3835
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Hi Mike,

If I read this right, you are painting the rails by brush/hand ?? If yes, that's a damn fine effort ! :thumbs The colour you have chosen for the rails looks pretty good as well. Question, are you just painting the visible side of the rails, or are you painting both sides ??

Keep up the great work.

Cheers, Gary.

toto
Former Member
 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Hi Mike,

My layout will be very much a phased affair. One area at a time. I'm still light years away from any kind of ground cover or scenics yet.

One day......

Cheers

Toto

emmess
Full Member


Joined: Mon Jul 15th, 2013
Location: Burley In Wharfedale, United Kingdom
Posts: 399
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Thanks Barney, Gary.

The track was sprayed with a couple of coats of dark brown first then finished by hand with a brush. The sleepers with a 7mm wide one, and the sides of the rails with a smaller one. That way I could keep the colour variations working nicely. I only brush-painted the rails sides facing outwards Gary. The other side does have a coat of the spray on it. I took a test photo with my phone pointing outwards from the back scene and it looked OK should a future photograph catch that side of the rail.

col.stephens
Full Member
 

Joined: Tue Feb 7th, 2012
Location: Kent, United Kingdom
Posts: 2609
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Looks good Mike. :thumbs  However, you might consider cleaning the paint from the rail top surface before it dries really hard.

Terry

emmess
Full Member


Joined: Mon Jul 15th, 2013
Location: Burley In Wharfedale, United Kingdom
Posts: 399
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Thank you Terry. Thankfully, I removed all the track-top paint with a light brush from a Peco track rubber just after taking the photo.

Not tested it yet mind...

emmess
Full Member


Joined: Mon Jul 15th, 2013
Location: Burley In Wharfedale, United Kingdom
Posts: 399
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

BUILDING THE EMBANKMENT (242 days until Christmas)

I had a busy night last night constructing the embankment at the left side of the layout, and incorporating the girder bridge constructed earlier. I've used no technique that's not been described in depth elsewhere on this forum, but here are some pictures anyway...




The first thing was to glue triangles to the side of the trackbed, and down from the ground level to the river bed level. I glued the bridge to the underside of the trackbed and worked downwards from there:




I glued strips of standard A4 white paper to the triangles to give some support.




Near the baseboard edges I used an additional support of screwed up newspaper so that the next layer doesn't sag at the edges.

Then my favourite bit - the messy gloop.

I mixed white PVA glue with water in about 50/50 proportion, but there was no measuring involved. I added a generous squirt of Woodland Scenics' Dark Earth Undercoat too. This turned the mixture an alarming dark green colour when I was expecting brown, but it is OK as an undercoat:




Next I tore up kitchen roll into strips. These were dipped into the green mixture and stuck onto the framework. The kitchen roll keeps its strength when wet and is really absorbent, so it's ideal to smooth out with fingers or a brush. As I progressed I realised that it was easier and gave a smoother result if I applied the dry strips to the layout and then brushed on the gloop with a well-loaded brush.



After an hour or so the whole embankment on the left was finished. I used a screwed up roll of newspaper along the riverbed to give a defined edge to the riverbank, which is just visible in the picture above.

A final view from under the bridge:




toto
Former Member
 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Hi Mike,

Looks really good. I like the cardboard triangular support fillet idea. I'll need to do some of the same myself eventually but I have bought a load of plaster bandage to use instead of the PVA and kitchen towel. I guess I'll just add some household emulsion to the water before dipping the later bandage in. Same thing really.

The only thing is, some of my embankment area's are really small so could be fiddely and a bit awkward. The plaster bandage sets quite quick as well. I think you can accelerate the setting time by raising the temperature of the water that you soak it in. Either way, I'm the same as you ......... Looking forward to getting messy.

The colour is irrelevant as long as it is natural ..... Green or brown I would say. The ground covering will blend in with either. Keep up the good work.

Cheers for now

Toto

emmess
Full Member


Joined: Mon Jul 15th, 2013
Location: Burley In Wharfedale, United Kingdom
Posts: 399
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Hi Toto,

I know what you mean. The back embankment is quite close to the backscene and quite fiddly. I ended up placing the fillets with tweezers. That's when I realised that it was easier to drop on the kitchen roll dry and then slop the gloop on with a brush. It ended up being quite easy. I don't know how successful it has been yet as 36 hours later it is still wet. I have a feeling I didn't put enough gloop on with the brush but we'll see. I don't know how any of that will translate for use with plaster bandage!

Gary
Inactive Member


Joined: Mon May 21st, 2012
Location: Sydney, Australia
Posts: 3835
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Hi Mike,

The scenic fun has just begun ! Looking good already. I wouldn't worry too much about the colour as you can always throw a brown wash of acryllic over the top where you need it. Another option on the paper clothe is the 'Chicopee J Clothe', (commonly known as Chux Superwipes in Oz).

Looking foward to more !

Cheers, Gary.

Spurno
Owner/Webmaster.


Joined: Tue Aug 14th, 2012
Location: Torquay, United Kingdom
Posts: 4342
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Looking fantastic Mike.When it's finished with all the ground cover and bushes etc it will look the mutt's nuts.:thumbs

emmess
Full Member


Joined: Mon Jul 15th, 2013
Location: Burley In Wharfedale, United Kingdom
Posts: 399
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

CUTTING CONSTRUCTION (241 days until Christmas)

Spurred on by how much I enjoyed getting all gloopy (the hill is still not fully dry, 48 hours later...) I spent the spare weekend hours getting on with the cutting through Pig Hill.

First off was to construct the bridge itself. A nice Scalescenes Arched Bridge without the wing walls. The camera is cruel. I've just noticed it's not stuck properly around the top of the arch. How come I didn't notice before!?




I have spent a long while looking at bridges and cuttings. Because I have so little space, I thought I would use a small retaining wall at the base of the cuttings to give me that little extra height. I found a couple of good prototype pictures from a dismantled line near Wakefield that fit perfectly.

So, I made a couple of 1.5m-high retaining walls and constructed the sides of the bridge in card and Scalescenes' paper. I then started building the profile of the cutting in card the same way as before:



Once the main structure was in place, I packed with newspaper around the edges and stuck a latticework of bog standard A4 printer paper on top:

 



This was then covered with The Gloop, but with more paint and PVA in the mix this time. I don't think that last time's is going to be hard enough, so I gave it an additional layer to be sure.

This time I added four layers of kitchen roll, alternating the direction of the grain between each layer.

Here are the results...

The two bridges in situ:




And a look into Pig Hill Yard from the girder bridge...



emmess
Full Member


Joined: Mon Jul 15th, 2013
Location: Burley In Wharfedale, United Kingdom
Posts: 399
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Spurno wrote: Looking fantastic Mike.When it's finished with all the ground cover and bushes etc it will look the mutt's nuts.:thumbs

:mrgreen: Thanks! I have to admit to feeling no small amount of trepidation when it comes to the scenics. There are so may examples of near perfection on this forum, I am a bit scared! I will need some guidance when the time comes; that's for sure! :)

Last edited on Sun Apr 27th, 2014 08:31 pm by emmess

toto
Former Member
 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Hi Mike,

If these bridges are anything to go by, you won't be needing any help. These bridges are superb , Very well integrated into the landscape as well.

I like the retaining walls as well. Very well thought out. Looking forward to seeing the rest of this uncover. Excellent work.

Cheers

Toto

Gary
Inactive Member


Joined: Mon May 21st, 2012
Location: Sydney, Australia
Posts: 3835
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Hi Mike,

This is coming along fine. The retaining walls look the business, well done there ! :thumbs I'm positive you will be fine when it comes to scenics. You just have to model what you see... Simple ! :roll:

Just out of curiousity, when you do the far side of the bridge (Pig Hill Yard) with the paper lattice and goop, I would try just using the goop without the paint to see if it dries quicker. I recall mixing black paint with plaster to form roads etc and it took almost a week to cure...

Cheers, Gary.

 

emmess
Full Member


Joined: Mon Jul 15th, 2013
Location: Burley In Wharfedale, United Kingdom
Posts: 399
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

LANDSCAPE FINISHED AND A FACIA ADDED (237 days until Christmas)

Part three of the landscaping was finished last night, using the same techniques as the other two parts. One of the 'musts' for the layout, as dictated by my 'helper', the boys' Big Sister, is that there needs to be pigs on Pig Hill. So I needed a patch of somewhat gentler sloping land. To this effect I built a higher retaining wall on the other side of the bridge to give me a small area of flatter land. The diesel shed will sit beside the wall and I thought it would look great to see the field (and its pigs) through the grimy shed windows.

Some of the card 'ribs' are showing a little on the hills I did last week, so this time I placed the ribs closer together and packed them all with newspaper just to give a little more solid a foundation.




Gary wrote:
Just out of curiousity, when you do the far side of the bridge (Pig Hill Yard) with the paper lattice and goop, I would try just using the goop without the paint to see if it dries quicker. I recall mixing black paint with plaster to form roads etc and it took almost a week to cure...  


Good idea Gary, as it is taking that long for me. However, I still had some of the mixture left over, so just carried on with it regardless. The first bits done though are starting to set quite hard, which is a relief. I carried the gloop and kitchen paper covering around the occupation bridge's abutments (which, the camera tells me, are slightly out of alignment - grrr. They look fine to my eyes - perhaps I have wonky eyes) and over the bridge itself. This is to try to make it look completely embedded in the environment. I will eventually put a rutted tractor track over this, complete with puddles.




I also cut a facia to size. Having no woodwork ability and only one giant saw, this was a bit of a challenge. However, the 4mm ply can be cut with a big craft knife, so this worked out OK. As Marty suggested in a post earlier, the facia follows the landscape and really finishes it all off. It will look brilliant when painted.

The switches for the points will be added directly to the front facia. Since the layout will be stored upright in my office, I added a strip of 2cm square wood along the bottom. This will protrude further than the switches and thus protect them from getting knocked when being stored. The strip will then double as a 'shelf' to hold the cards I will be making for the Inglenook shunting puzzle element of the layout to make operating it fun for the boys.




Next is to finish the diesel shed and then crack on with either grassing the banks or ballasting the track. I'm erring towards the grass as that came first in nature, but not sure - what would you do?

MaxSouthOz
Admin


Joined: Sat Aug 23rd, 2008
Location: Adelaide , Australia
Posts: 12331
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

I've just had time to have a good read of this story.

It's looking great, Mike.  :thumbs

Spurno
Owner/Webmaster.


Joined: Tue Aug 14th, 2012
Location: Torquay, United Kingdom
Posts: 4342
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

It all looks very natural Mike.You have an excellent eye for detail.

col.stephens
Full Member
 

Joined: Tue Feb 7th, 2012
Location: Kent, United Kingdom
Posts: 2609
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Brilliant Mike! :thumbs  I would deal with the ballast before the grass as ballasting can be a bit messier and it would be a shame to ruin the grass.

Terry

toto
Former Member
 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

I had been thinking about the " what comes first issue, the ballast or the grass " and it's quite an awkward one as any grass shown as coming through the ballast may not grab the real effect if the ballast goes down first.
There is a danger that the grass will look as though it is on top of the ballast. I suppose it will be down to a good technique and experience. Most of the efforts I've seen so far have looked spot on. Maybe some tips on technique from someone would be a good thing ?

Terry, Gary, Paul if you don't mind me singling you out. :mutley

When the job is done correctly it has a very convincing effect.

Cheers

Toto

Last edited on Fri May 2nd, 2014 07:16 am by

Spurno
Owner/Webmaster.


Joined: Tue Aug 14th, 2012
Location: Torquay, United Kingdom
Posts: 4342
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Carrying on from Tom's post i would consider doing the ballast first because if you lay the ballast in the normal way and fix with the pva/water/washing up liquid method it won't mix with the grass once dry whereas the other way round it may.Either way you can mask off one or the other.

toto
Former Member
 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Hi Alan,

I'm more concerned about where the grass is situated in the middle of the ballast, ie more like weeds coming through.

The main area's of grass could as you say be masked of whilst you lay the main ballast area.

I've noted on some layouts the main ballast bed has weeds coming up through maybe between the sleepers or in the main general ballast track ed area, not at the side on the grass verge.

Don't know if I'm explaining myself too great here . Apologies.

Cheers toto

emmess
Full Member


Joined: Mon Jul 15th, 2013
Location: Burley In Wharfedale, United Kingdom
Posts: 399
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Thanks everyone for your encouragement and ideas regarding the ballast and the grass. I was meaning the general section really - the embankment and the cutting, river valley etc. For this, I will follow suggestions to put the ballast down first.



Toto - that is a really good point. You are a couple of steps ahead of me. I hadn't even started thinking about my "weedy yard" so your comments have started me thinking. I will perhaps do some more investigation regarding that topic.



So the plan is: finish the diesel shed; ballast from the headshunt down to just the other side of the occupation bridge; grass the embankment and the cutting.



I have decided to treat the left and right side of the bridge as two separate sections and I am going to "finish" the left, including all the grassy areas, before moving on to complete the yard itself. This gives me plenty of time to decide on how best to achieve the neglected trackbed look.



Thanks again everyone for your encouragement and constructive comments.

Last edited on Fri May 2nd, 2014 08:23 am by emmess

Gary
Inactive Member


Joined: Mon May 21st, 2012
Location: Sydney, Australia
Posts: 3835
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Hi Mike,

I tend to glue down some fine soil first as a base coat on the whole scenic area, followed by ballast then the grass, weeds etc. See here ; http://yourmodelrailway.net/view_topic.php?id=12116&forum_id=21&page=2#p213052

I myself, would do all the grass in one go, on both sides of the bridge. This will create some consistency with the ground coverings/turf. Just put down the first layer of grasses first, as extras such as small shrubs, heavy weeds can be put down afterwards. Don't just stick to one colour either. As in the real world, grass comes in many shades of green, straw, gold, brown etc. I use three or four colours of static grass to show the different growth stages of the grass and where it is growing. As you would imagine, where there are low lying areas, hollows dips etc, the grass would be greener and taller as these depressions trap water. Along side roads or the railway line, the grass may yellow off, due to dust, heat, and less water available. Around buildings, sheds and reataining walls, the grass will typically be greener as there is a concentration of water run-off.

Are you going to use static grass or just flocks/course turf ?? Generally, a combination of both works the best. Spreading some course turf in patches can represent weeds such as clover. Once this is down, static grass can be applied over the top. This is what I have done ; http://yourmodelrailway.net/view_topic.php?id=12116&forum_id=21&page=3#p213090 As can be seeen in the link, I have applied a strip of yellow grass first along the edges of the road and railway line, then painted in more PVA and applied a mix of static grasses, including course turf.

Once all the course turfs and static grasses are complete, then you can put in the different features that will define either side of the bridge. As for weeds amongst the rails, place a small amount of course turf in place and use an eye dropper with a 50/50 mix of PVA and water to wet it down. Job done !

I hope this makes some sense ! :shock:

Cheers, Gary.

gormo
Full Member


Joined: Fri Dec 21st, 2012
Location: Sydney, Australia
Posts: 2072
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

  Hi Mike,
            I`ve just caught up with your topic here. You are doing an excellent job with this layout and the bridge area especially looks tremendous. Your young`uns will enjoy every moment playing trains with this special little railway......and aren`t you lucky having the KWVR close by. I spent a day there last year and loved it.!!!!

:doublethumb :doublethumb :doublethumb :doublethumb 


Cheers Gormo

emmess
Full Member


Joined: Mon Jul 15th, 2013
Location: Burley In Wharfedale, United Kingdom
Posts: 399
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Gary - what a detailed reply: Thank you! I had read your entire Plank thread but had forgotten your approach of adding soil everywhere first. That's a good idea, and one I will copy. I am going to be using a mix of flocks, coarse turf, clumps etc. I would love to use static grass but can't justify the cost of an applicator. Do you know how well the 'puffer bottles' work? I can probably stretch to the fiver they cost. I am, incidentally, treating the grassed parts of the right side of the bridge as part of Section One on the left, precisely because of what you say: consistency.



Well there is nothing for it. I am going to just have to dive in and do this!!



Gormo - thanks for your encouragement. I can't wait for the boys to see the finished article. I only hope I can keep it secret from them both!

Last edited on Fri May 2nd, 2014 05:28 pm by emmess

toto
Former Member
 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Hi Mike,

I'm looking forward to seeing the grass go down. Your scenics and landscaping have been A1 to date and I'm sure that will continue. There are a few folk on the scenic side of things at the moment so I'm finding all this really good for the learning process.

Good luck going forward.

Cheers

Toto

Gary
Inactive Member


Joined: Mon May 21st, 2012
Location: Sydney, Australia
Posts: 3835
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Hi Mike,

I have made my own 'static grass applicator' quite cheaply. In your money for about £15.00 ($28.00 Au). I used one of these :

http://secure.oatleyelectronics.com//advanced_search_result.php?keywords=negative+ion+generator&osCsid=ff1fpsfacp44pjqa7h1vod8nj6&x=7&y=7

...and some pvc down pipe and fittings from a plumbing supplier. Here is a link to my thread on making one : http://yourmodelrailway.net/view_topic.php?id=10945&forum_id=12&highlight=static+grass+applicator

Cheers, Gary.

edit # When using soil, collect what you need, run it through a sieve and then slow cook it in the oven for about 20-30mins at gas mark 1 (140*C) to kill off any life. Allow to cool and then put through another extra fine sieve (tea strainer) and into a container.

Last edited on Fri May 2nd, 2014 09:47 pm by Gary

col.stephens
Full Member
 

Joined: Tue Feb 7th, 2012
Location: Kent, United Kingdom
Posts: 2609
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Mike, I have found that the puffer bottles are o.k provided you give them a good shake to charge the fibres.

Terry

Gary
Inactive Member


Joined: Mon May 21st, 2012
Location: Sydney, Australia
Posts: 3835
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Just adding to Terry's reply, you can apply the static grass then use a vacumm cleaner to stand the grass up. I would recommend putting a piece of stocking over the nozzle first. Make sure you ask SWMBO first before cutting them up ! ;-)

Cheers, Gary.

col.stephens
Full Member
 

Joined: Tue Feb 7th, 2012
Location: Kent, United Kingdom
Posts: 2609
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

And make sure she takes them off first! :lol:

Terry

toto
Former Member
 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

And if she doesn't, we'll understand about the lack of photographs being posted.

There again, it could make a good how to. ....... No let's not go there.

Back to grass applicators please.

Cheers

Toto

gormo
Full Member


Joined: Fri Dec 21st, 2012
Location: Sydney, Australia
Posts: 2072
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Ahh Hemm..
                Yes ,yes...those grass applicators.....jolly good chaps!!
Cheers Gormo

emmess
Full Member


Joined: Mon Jul 15th, 2013
Location: Burley In Wharfedale, United Kingdom
Posts: 399
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

DIESEL SHED FINISHED AND PLACED (232 days until Christmas)

Ahem... Moving on from all thinks stockings, thanks for the grass/vacuum/stockings assistance! :lol:

The diesel shed is finally complete and placed on the layout, squeezed in beside the retaining wall. It was a great Scalescenes kit to make. Something went a little wrong during construction though. I think it's designed really to be made up in more than one multiple of its length. Since my space is small, I'm going for a one-module length. When it came to fit the roof and guttering - the roof was 12mm too short!



Not to worry though - a bit of printing, chopping and sticking soon sorted it out.

Here it is in situ on Pig Hill Yard:

 



I am really impressed with how sturdy the model is, and how well the inspection pit looks. It has provision for under-layout LEDs to be added to the inspection pit, behind a layer of greaseproof paper to diffuse the light. It works well:




I have used 4 LEDs wired in series and a 330r resistor to keep the light quite dim. Looking at the above though I wonder if I should lose the resistor, or wire in two sets of two.

The interior detail of this kit is stunning. The bits and bobs inside - tool boxes, battery chargers, access panels etc. all look good, especially when glimpsed through the grimy windows. 

I wired in a couple of LEDs in the roof space too, to give it an overall lit appearance. It would be only right to take some photos once the sun went down:



And looking back to the shed in the dead of night...




I don't think I can put off that ballast and grass any longer!

Last edited on Tue May 6th, 2014 06:09 am by emmess

MaxSouthOz
Admin


Joined: Sat Aug 23rd, 2008
Location: Adelaide , Australia
Posts: 12331
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

It's a cracker, Mike.  Deserves one of these . . .



I avoid putting LEDs in series.  Occasionally one will fail - usually from my rough handling.  :lol:

If one fails, you won't be able to tell which one.  Just a thought.

emmess
Full Member


Joined: Mon Jul 15th, 2013
Location: Burley In Wharfedale, United Kingdom
Posts: 399
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Hmm... Good point, Max. And here was I thinking that I had been clever! I will bear that in mind for future builds. The problem is that I have embedded the wiring and the LEDs in the roof that is subsequently glued on, so any kind of maintenance is impossible anyway. My thinking was that it looks good without any wiring on show, and should it fail, it still looks good. :s.

I have the problem of light being projected onto the sky. Will a strategically-placed tree be enough to sort this out, I wonder...

toto
Former Member
 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Hi Mike,

You've done a great job of the shed. It looks really good and as you say, the detail is superb. The maintenance pit makes it.

Cheers

Toto

Last edited on Tue May 6th, 2014 08:02 am by

Gary
Inactive Member


Joined: Mon May 21st, 2012
Location: Sydney, Australia
Posts: 3835
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Hi Mike,

Excellent shed build. :thumbs The detail is very good. I think the pit lights are very good and not too bright. Place a loco over the top and I'm sure you get a good amount of light. I would assume that the roof lights actually dull down the pit lights to some extent. As for the lit backscene, either strategically placed bushes/trees or sheet the back of the windows with some white paper. Afterall, nobody will really see through from the backscene side of the layout. Another option is to build some scale window louvres for that side of the shed.

Cheers, Gary.

gormo
Full Member


Joined: Fri Dec 21st, 2012
Location: Sydney, Australia
Posts: 2072
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

G`day Mike,

                Beautiful job on the shed.

               When you and I and the rest of us ,build this sort of thing, or any other modelling project for that matter.......we are so close to it physically and mentally....that we see every single little fault.

                However, when you invite friends and family to examine your handiwork.....they don`t see the minor errors and touch ups.....they don`t know about the artistic licence you employed and the adjustments you made to make it work. 

               What they see is the overall picture......a delightful model ,skillfully built by you ,and they only wish they had your patience and skill and determination.

              Job well done !!.....:cool wink

Cheers Gormo
             

Last edited on Tue May 6th, 2014 10:23 am by gormo

col.stephens
Full Member
 

Joined: Tue Feb 7th, 2012
Location: Kent, United Kingdom
Posts: 2609
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Brilliant job Mike. :thumbs Now you've got me thinking that I would like to build one of those, even though I don't need one at the moment!

That's the wonderful thing about 'Your Model Railway Club', inspiration on every page!

Terry

emmess
Full Member


Joined: Mon Jul 15th, 2013
Location: Burley In Wharfedale, United Kingdom
Posts: 399
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Thanks for the positive comments, everyone. It's really appreciated.

Gormo - you're right - you notice every little fault in your own work, don't you? I think it's part of what keeps us going though - that desire to improve. We all work to our skill level and strive for the next step. And I think this forum is the perfect place for that as it seems that everyone understands that. I am really enjoying working on Pig Hill Yard. Big Sister is enjoying helping, and I am really pleased and proud of how it's going. And when all's said and done, as long as I see two beaming smiles on Christmas morning from the two boys, then it will be 'job done'. I very much doubt they'll say, 'but daddy, there's a patch on the roof of the diesel shed, and there's light projecting onto the clouds!' :lol:

Terry - go on! Build one!

And a quick update on the shed roof issue. I dropped a line to John Wiffen who replied straight away. He said that he'd assumed that no-one would build a single-length version on account of the length of most diesels (he'd obviously not thought about Pig Hill Yard before). The roof components are the right size for when multiples of the lengths are used. He said he's going to update the sheets and instructions and he even sent me the two roof-related sheets with adjusted components on it. Terrific service, and an incredible job. You really can't fault his approachable style, can you!? :thumbs

Ballasting was started today. Looks good so far. However... Despite utmost care, there's loads of stray bits on the sleepers and rail sides. Ho hum. And with the glue dry, scraping them off is bringing the paint with it, thus exposing bare sleeper and shiny rail sides. Double ho hum. Out with the paintbrushes again, I think.

Phil.c
Full Member


Joined: Thu Mar 15th, 2012
Location: South Wales, United Kingdom
Posts: 1784
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Hi Mike,

 

I was born and brought up in a very old little Welsh village called Fochriw, which mean's pig hill, or a hill where there are pigs :lol:

 

Phil 

Spurno
Owner/Webmaster.


Joined: Tue Aug 14th, 2012
Location: Torquay, United Kingdom
Posts: 4342
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

John Wiffen's service is second to none.When i was building my canal i wanted a large area of water to create a basin and he sent me one at no charge.You can't get better than that.

Chinahand
Full Member


Joined: Sat Jun 23rd, 2012
Location: Daventry, Northants.., United Kingdom
Posts: 799
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Hi Mike,
Just found this thread for the first time and, having read it from start to finish, I am very impressed, not only with the progress you have made in little more than 6 weeks, but also with the standard of your workmanship and attention to detail. Your boys should be well pleased with their new layout.
I too am a big fan of Scalescenes kits and have always found John Wiffen to be very helpful if you need something that's a bit non-standard.
Keep up the good work and I'll be keeping an eye open for further progress reports.

emmess
Full Member


Joined: Mon Jul 15th, 2013
Location: Burley In Wharfedale, United Kingdom
Posts: 399
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Phil.c wrote: I was born and brought up in a very old little Welsh village called Fochriw, which mean's pig hill, or a hill where there are pigs :lol:

Brilliant! So this layout's name perhaps is not as silly as I was thinking it may be!

Chinahand wrote: Hi Mike,
Just found this thread for the first time ... Keep up the good work and I'll be keeping an eye open for further progress reports.

Thank you for your encouragement Trevor - it gives me confidence that I am doing alright! :)

emmess
Full Member


Joined: Mon Jul 15th, 2013
Location: Burley In Wharfedale, United Kingdom
Posts: 399
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

SCENERY UPDATE (228 days until Christmas)

I have had a week off work, so have had slightly more time than usual to work on Pig Hill, amongst other things. Looking through progress pictures, I seem to have done loads that I've not posted, so here is a very quick update...

BALLAST

As per Gary's suggestion, I covered everything in dark brown flock first. I used a mix of two shades, but still slapped it on uniformly using neat PVA glue.

Next, the first part of the ballasting. I laid ballast from the end of the headshunt to just past the two points under the bridge. I used a mix of Woodland Scenics' fine ballasts in light grey, buff, and cinders to get the shade that I wanted. I will be introducing more and more cinders into the mix so that it will be almost all black by the time we get into the yard. I sprayed this with water then dribbled on dilute PVA with a drop of washing up liquid, as is common. I perhaps wasn't as gentle as I could have been though as it still seemed to go everywhere, but I am quite pleased with the result. Stray bits can be scraped off once dry, but this process brings the paint with it, which means that there's a job to do to patch up the painting. Ho hum.

A couple of shots of the drying ballast:





RIVER BED

Big Sister and I went for a walk along the canal and collected some tiny stones from the towpath. We glued these using neat PVA along both sides of the river bed. Starting with the large ones and then placing the small ones, we went right along both sides. We didn't put any stones in the middle as we wanted to hopefully make it look deeper there. We then sprinkled on a layer of sand taken from a beach near Formby, which I fixed using the same technique as for the ballast. This just adds a bit of texture to the river bed.



GREENERY

I was nervous about starting the greenery as I was not at all confident in my ability to mix and stick the various bits and pieced down. I started with an undercoat of flocks stuck down with neat PVA. I used various shades of fine and course turf from Woodland Scenics, and a bag or two of other colours from Javis.

I was careful to put the rougher textures on the steeper bits and keep just the finer ones for the field sections.

I was really pleased with how it came out...




At this point, I was happy and thought it looked great. I had bought a static grass puffer bottle though and thought I may as well try it out.

It came with some hideously bright green static grass, so I tried applying it to a test area. This worked well, so I dove straight in. Using my chosen shades of Woodland Scenics and Javis fibres though, it all clumped together like a cat's hairball in the puffer bottle and wouldn't come out. So I reverted to sprinkling it on by hand, massaging it into the glue with my fingers and then using a vacuum cleaner to tease the fibres upwards. I was careful to use different shades in places to suggest changes in ground colour.

I have to say that the result is excellent to my eyes. It's not sticking up as much as it would with an applicator perhaps, but with the rough undercoat, it looks like real wild grass and I am really happy with the result...




Here's a view down from the track over the bridge.



MORE RIVER

Once the stones and sand had dried, I painted the river bed in shades of dark brown, keeping the darker parts at the centre...




And then, last night, I applied the first layer of neat PVA. I dabed this on quite thickly using a stippling motion with a soft brush. I made sure it wasn't too thick so as to dry milky, but thick enough for it to slowly and gloopily find a level. I have tested various glues for their ability to dry perfectly clear and I have settled on "Craft PVA" from Hobbycraft.




It's still drying, so I hope it works!!

col.stephens
Full Member
 

Joined: Tue Feb 7th, 2012
Location: Kent, United Kingdom
Posts: 2609
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Brilliant scenery Mike. :thumbs Are you sure you haven't done this before?

Terry

Phil.c
Full Member


Joined: Thu Mar 15th, 2012
Location: South Wales, United Kingdom
Posts: 1784
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

It's starting to come together Mike and it looks great, it's all in the eye like painting a picture, you will look at it again in a few days and think, I could add a bush there and it will add a bit more.

 

I hope you inserted a piece of cloth over the vacuum cleaner pipe to catch the flock when you used it to lift the grass ;-)

 

Phil

emmess
Full Member


Joined: Mon Jul 15th, 2013
Location: Burley In Wharfedale, United Kingdom
Posts: 399
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Ha ha, Phil, after all that talk about stockings last week, I certainly did have a 'catcher' installed on the hoover! Yes... Bushes. They're next, then trees. Need to read up on how best to do bushes, as that's the next scary step!

Terry, I did stick down some dark green course turf on my N Gauge layout last year, but it looked terrible!

Phil.c
Full Member


Joined: Thu Mar 15th, 2012
Location: South Wales, United Kingdom
Posts: 1784
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

http://www.realisticmodelling.com/catalog.asp?subrange=Accessories  (KJ0920) Excellent for brambles, spray with glue and sprinkle scatter on.

 

Phil

 

 

Gary
Inactive Member


Joined: Mon May 21st, 2012
Location: Sydney, Australia
Posts: 3835
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Hi Mike,

The ballasting looks great, excellent job. :thumbs As for the scenery, well... It is looking great !

Mixing shades/colours and textures is the key to realism, and it looks as if you are accomplishing this with ease. I like what you have done with the creek bed, it looks really good, once again, excellent. With applying the PVA glue for water, do this in a few layers, letting each layer dry fully, before applying the next. Whilst the first layer of glue is still tacky, you can always plant a few reeds in the shallow banks. This can be done by using Woodland Scenics Field Grass (FG 174)

see here ; http://woodlandscenics.woodlandscenics.com/show/Item/FG174/page/1 

Pinch a few strands and cut in half lengths, push into PVA upright and allow PVA to set, then trim them down to height.

Question, how did you find the scenics coming together with the dark brown flock as the first/base layer under the green ??

Cheers, Gary.

Last edited on Sat May 10th, 2014 07:39 am by Gary

Barneybuffer
Full Member


Joined: Wed Nov 28th, 2012
Location: Gosport, United Kingdom
Posts: 1026
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Hi Mike

Really impressed with the scenery, ballasting and the river bed looking equally as good. Keep up the good work and keep the photo's coming please!

emmess
Full Member


Joined: Mon Jul 15th, 2013
Location: Burley In Wharfedale, United Kingdom
Posts: 399
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Thanks both. Gary - the brown underlay flock really helped. You don't really see it, but it does stick out here and there under barer patches on the steep bits and it lends an overall nicely blended look to the whole thing - definitely something I will do again in future!

emmess
Full Member


Joined: Mon Jul 15th, 2013
Location: Burley In Wharfedale, United Kingdom
Posts: 399
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

A BUSH TEST, AND A REQUEST FOR HELP (227 days till Christmas)

Spurred on by yesterday's comments, I did a quick test to see if I could make a convincing patch of undergrowth and bush. Using many techniques gleaned elsewhere on the forum, and in particular a guide on Nick's Much Murkle thread. I used a mixture of Woodland Scenics' underbush, foiliage, coarse and fine scatters. And a bit of field grass for fun...




I think it's come out brilliantly, but any suggestions on improvements will be welcome. It's had a liberal spraying of firm hold hairspray too.

HELP!

I have been progressing through a build of Scalescenes' "High Street Backs" façade 5. It is nearly finished. This is a low relief building that I think is perfect for the left corner of the layout. I was going to put a couple of terraced houses here, but thought that they would be a bit too squashed. This building, with its open garage doors, fits much better:




However... I don't know what to put around it. There's plenty of space for a yard of some sort. But I can't decide what. It would need to be easy to model with my limited skills. I am thinking timber yard perhaps, with shelves of wood. I want something dirty and grimy. Will I need a fence? Or wall? Along the river AND the embankment sides, or just the river? Hmm.

Suggestions on what to do here are very welcome indeed!

Here's another angle of the space:



col.stephens
Full Member
 

Joined: Tue Feb 7th, 2012
Location: Kent, United Kingdom
Posts: 2609
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Mike, why not put a wall or fence around the area to make it and enclosed yard, possibly with gates at the front.  Put in some cars and make it into a car-repair garage.  Add some tyres,etc.

Wall and gates here:

http://www.modelrailwayscenery.com/2014/02/6-old-industrial-brick-wall-gates-oo-4mm-176/

Terry

Last edited on Sun May 11th, 2014 08:27 am by col.stephens

Marty
Enjoying the Journey


Joined: Sun Oct 14th, 2007
Location: Perth, Western Australia, Australia
Posts: 6213
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Mike,

On using PVA for your river, have a read of this....

http://yourmodelrailway.net/view_topic.php?id=3870&forum_id=59

I did some experimenting and it's was just that but it may help you to not spoil what is going to be a wonderful present and much loved layout.

Basically, from my experience with PVA, less is more (again), a couple of light coats is all you should need, but you have to design your river banks accordingly.

As for the space, a small timber yard would be fine I reckon. Fenced at the base of the railway embankment , on top of the river bank and along the front edge with a gate for access?

The vegetation looks spot on. :thumbs

Cheers

Marty

emmess
Full Member


Joined: Mon Jul 15th, 2013
Location: Burley In Wharfedale, United Kingdom
Posts: 399
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Terry - I LOVE those gates! They may be just what I want here, thank you. I did ponder car repair shop, but I think it is just too much of a squeeze. But I like the idea of piles of tyres, so I will think some more.



Marty - your river experiments were very handy. I read the whole thread several times, and did some experiments of my own before settling on this method, which I hope works! I have kept the coats quite thin, but found it a bit of a challenge to get it into the nooks and crannies. My own experiments showed that this glue dries nice and clear after 2 days if kept at less than half mm deep. I tried varnish and 3 other PVA brands, none of which I was happy with. I'm aiming to do 4 coats, but will stop earlier if I think I need to. Second coat just gone on. Fingers crossed - the river is the risky bit, and like you say, it could really spoil this bit of the layout if it goes pear-shaped.

Last edited on Sun May 11th, 2014 08:53 am by emmess

Gary
Inactive Member


Joined: Mon May 21st, 2012
Location: Sydney, Australia
Posts: 3835
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Coming alone just fine. You are getting into the swing of scenery making now and the fruits of your labour is starting to show. Keep up the good work. :thumbs

As for the blank area, as has been mentioned already, why not turn it into a yard, foundry, cabinet maker, tooling shop etc... Something like this...



Cheers, Gary.

Last edited on Sun May 11th, 2014 11:29 am by Gary

col.stephens
Full Member
 

Joined: Tue Feb 7th, 2012
Location: Kent, United Kingdom
Posts: 2609
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Mike, it's just occurred to me that whatever you do, you are going to have to put a fence between the railway and the vacant plot, as it was a requirement by law in the UK, and still is as far as I know, that with a few exceptions all railways must fence off their running lines.

Terry

Marty
Enjoying the Journey


Joined: Sun Oct 14th, 2007
Location: Perth, Western Australia, Australia
Posts: 6213
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

emmess wrote:

Marty - your river experiments were very handy. I read the whole thread several times,

Awesome, it's good to know that it is of some use to somebody.... It's promoted me to finish it off.

Keep it coming... You're doing great.
Cheers

Marty

emmess
Full Member


Joined: Mon Jul 15th, 2013
Location: Burley In Wharfedale, United Kingdom
Posts: 399
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Gary - I half expected a fully-illustrated answer to my question from you - you always go the extra mile! That looks good. I can't decide whether I prefer a wall or a fence, and whether to bring the wall around the front of the layout or leave it open to the edge. I am leaning towards a wall simply because it's cheaper and easier to build, and I do love those rusty gates that Terry posted the link to.... However... a fence would look good... Decisions... Decisions...

Marty - I had wondered whether we'd see the end results of your Three Rivers experiments - thanks for sharing them today.

Gary
Inactive Member


Joined: Mon May 21st, 2012
Location: Sydney, Australia
Posts: 3835
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Hi Mike,

Those gates Terry put a link to look great. You could always mix it up a bit and use those gates with a rough corrugated iron fence...

A fence like this ; http://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/topic/58132-dock-green/?p=1011904

Cheers, Gary.

emmess
Full Member


Joined: Mon Jul 15th, 2013
Location: Burley In Wharfedale, United Kingdom
Posts: 399
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

I couldn't resist those gates that Terry put a link to, and the wall matches the building nicely too.



This is the first kit I've downloaded from Model Railway Scenery. I found it straight forward to build. It was interesting using cereal box instead of 2mm greyboard like Scalescenes kits use. It was cheap (obviously) but I found it a bit flimsy sometimes, but nothing that a bit more care could fix. Making the gate posts out of four slivers of card glued at right angles to each other was more fiddly than gluing four rectangles of card into a block like I am used to, but it worked well. The extra grab of the Rocket Card Glue really helped here.

I will post more pictures of the finished build when it is, well, finished!

Thanks for the link, Terry - I wouldn't have seen these excellent gates otherwise!

Gary
Inactive Member


Joined: Mon May 21st, 2012
Location: Sydney, Australia
Posts: 3835
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

The wall and those gates look terrific. I do like the heavily weathered brickwork from Model Railway Scenery, very nice. Now you have to fill that yard full of junk ! Well done. :thumbs

Cheers, Gary.

Barneybuffer
Full Member


Joined: Wed Nov 28th, 2012
Location: Gosport, United Kingdom
Posts: 1026
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Those gates look good and go well with the building. Nice one! :thumbs

 

Marty
Enjoying the Journey


Joined: Sun Oct 14th, 2007
Location: Perth, Western Australia, Australia
Posts: 6213
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Looks great.
Marty

toto
Former Member
 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Hi Mike,

Excellent job done. Very convincing.

Cheers toto

col.stephens
Full Member
 

Joined: Tue Feb 7th, 2012
Location: Kent, United Kingdom
Posts: 2609
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Fantastic job Mike :thumbs  Well done!

Terry

Ed
Full Member


Joined: Tue Jan 29th, 2013
Location: West Anglia Main Line, United Kingdom
Posts: 3915
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

The gates certainly look good, especially with the cobbled courtyard :thumbs


Ed

col.stephens
Full Member
 

Joined: Tue Feb 7th, 2012
Location: Kent, United Kingdom
Posts: 2609
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Mike, whose cobbles are those in the picture?

Terry

Ken
Member


Joined: Sun Oct 21st, 2007
Location: Okehampton, Devon., United Kingdom
Posts: 1345
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Excellent progress Mike and everything is looking really good, very well done.

Ken

emmess
Full Member


Joined: Mon Jul 15th, 2013
Location: Burley In Wharfedale, United Kingdom
Posts: 399
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Thanks everyone. Looking forward to filling it with junk, Gary. And Terry, the cobbles are Scalescenes, they came with the High Street Backs kit.

emmess
Full Member


Joined: Mon Jul 15th, 2013
Location: Burley In Wharfedale, United Kingdom
Posts: 399
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

'PASHLEY BUILDING' Complete (220 days till Christmas)

I have finished the building at the headshunt end of the layout. The Boys' Big Sister decided to call the business "Pashley", so a sign was made with a phone number of her choosing. The nature of the business is yet to be decided, so the yard that you helped me decide on is still devoid of all junk.

Here's the building in situ:




This shows that this side of the layout is more or less complete. You can see the building alongside the vegetation that is slowly growing along the embankment towards the bridge. I am quite pleased with how this is turning out. And the river has had four coats of PVA and is starting to look good. Only a couple more, I think.

But... Back to the building.

This was a build of "façade 5" from the Scalescenes Low Relief High Street Backs kit, along with the Model Railway Scenics industrial wall and gates as previously discussed.

This building was notable for a few reasons:

  • This is the first time I have varnished the sheets by brush before constructing. Once all the sheets were laminated onto their card (or otherwise in the case of the Print Only ones), I gave each one with an external-facing print a coat of Ronseal clear matt interior varnish. The type sold in B&Q for wood. It was an experiment that really paid off. Although there is an ever-so-slight sheen on the surface, the prints became a kind of plastic to use. This made it a dream to build - glue simply wiped off; score lines were crisp and even, and the 'sticky fingers pulling off the print surface' problem that I always suffer from seemed to vanish. The paper does warp slightly if you're not careful to keep it down, but the varnish is dry in a matter of minutes, and it's something that I will definitely use again.
  • Whenever I have made a Scalescenes building in the past, I have loaded the best paper into the printer, set the quality to 'high' and set it off going. I can't believe it's taken me this long to realise that I only need the best printing and paper for the elements that face outwards. Bog standard paper and black/white 'draft' mode are fine for the internal base layers! I also used selective printing to only print the bits that I need. Paper is dirt cheap, ink isn't, so although it took more paper, I used much less ink.
  • The kit as-supplied has the extension with the doors on it facing the other way. Because I didn't want the doors opening onto the embankment, I used the printer driver's 'mirror image' function to print the entire kit in mirror image so that it all pointed the right way.
  • The ground on which I planted it wasn't quite level - there's a slight dip towards the river and from the embankment. I needed to cut tiny slivers of brick-paper-laminated card to go in the bottom. It's not really noticeable, which is a good thing.
  • Once the lights went on, I noticed a load of light leaking out of the underside of the roof - not glued on properly! I needed to use superglue to get it to stay down and I have bent the guttering and dented the roof in doing so, as well as pulling off some of the roof printing. A bit of grey felt-tip has sorted it out and it's hardly noticeable.
I enjoyed this one, and I think it really finishes off this part of the layout.

Here it is with the sun going down on Pig Hill...




And even one with a loco for the first time! I am starting to enjoy this!



And since I was on, I couldn't resist a 'through the bridge' shot while I had the good camera out!




Last edited on Sun May 18th, 2014 09:21 pm by emmess

MaxSouthOz
Admin


Joined: Sat Aug 23rd, 2008
Location: Adelaide , Australia
Posts: 12331
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Wow!  It's looking great, Mike.  :thumbs

I can see some header shots there.


toto
Former Member
 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Hi Mike.

It looks great. The whole scene really ties in well and I don't blame you for wanting the through the bridge shot as it just doubly confirms its realism.

Excellent

Toto

Gary
Inactive Member


Joined: Mon May 21st, 2012
Location: Sydney, Australia
Posts: 3835
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Hi Mike,

Just a couple of words for you...,

                                                    "FANTASTIC, GOOD WORK, BRILLIANT !!"

                                                                        :doublethumb

Cheers, Gary.

Last edited on Mon May 19th, 2014 06:47 am by Gary

Spurno
Owner/Webmaster.


Joined: Tue Aug 14th, 2012
Location: Torquay, United Kingdom
Posts: 4342
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Excellent photos Mike,the "through the bridge" shot looks so real.:thumbs

col.stephens
Full Member
 

Joined: Tue Feb 7th, 2012
Location: Kent, United Kingdom
Posts: 2609
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Excellent work Mike :thumbs  Why don't you just get the kids some football gear for Christmas, and keep the layout for yourself? :lol:

Terry

emmess
Full Member


Joined: Mon Jul 15th, 2013
Location: Burley In Wharfedale, United Kingdom
Posts: 399
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

A quick update (211 days till Christmas)

Thank you everyone - your encouragement is always appreciated! Terry - yes, the 'ownership' of the resulting Christmas present may be an issue that is yet to be resolved! :)

Progress has slowed a little on Pig Hill - it's been a busy couple of weeks, and the fun quick-fire work is now complete. It's not been a complete standstill though. We now have:

The Stream

The stream has had four coats of PVA on top of the browny-green paint. It looks good. Every photo seems to make it look quite cloudy, and it is a little bit, but is generally stream-looking and is better in the flesh. I don't think I will give it any more coats, but a top coat of gloss varnish may be called for at a later date...




Left-end scenery

I have completed the scenery on the left end. More of the same really. Various shades of Woodland Scenics foliage, bushes, scatters and rough turf. I used a bit of foliage glued to the backscene behind the bridge abutment which looks vaguely tree-like...




The Edward Stanley building

Work has started on this Scalescenes build. The right end of the layout will be dominated by this warehouse. This is a four-module-long part of the frontage. It will be 7 modules long by 4 deep, part ultra-low-relief, and part not. As someone else pointed out on this forum - there is a lot of cutting involved with this one!



Last edited on Tue May 27th, 2014 07:02 pm by emmess

Dorsetmike
Save oil - bring back steam


Joined: Mon Feb 18th, 2013
Location: BOURNEMOUTH, United Kingdom
Posts: 1563
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Just read this layout right through, looking good.

there is a lot of cutting involved with this one!
That's  why I now cheat and use a plotter cutter for the card cutting, I can import jpgs, pngs or most other image formats also   PDFs into the plotter cutter software. For buildings with no fancy detail like arched lintels or decorative brick work, I print brick or stone textures to A4 labels, stick that onto the card then cut, for things with more detail I print the building walls with all the detail, cut plain card in the machine then stick the printed wall with detail onto the cut card, it's much easier just hand cutting window and door openings in paper than card!  It is possible to cut detailed items, but getting the registration exact can be a PITA, especially to get the opening cut exact in  something like this window surround, an alternative is to print the surrounds separately and then stick  them on after.
 



emmess
Full Member


Joined: Mon Jul 15th, 2013
Location: Burley In Wharfedale, United Kingdom
Posts: 399
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Y'know, Mike, I never even knew there was such a thing! Are they expensive to run? I don't think I'd ever be able to justify the cost of one, but I am intrigued by the idea.
That is a good looking window - can we see more of the building?

Dorsetmike
Save oil - bring back steam


Joined: Mon Feb 18th, 2013
Location: BOURNEMOUTH, United Kingdom
Posts: 1563
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

There was a long thread on Plotter cutters about a year ago (imagine one of the plotters used for cad work, replace the pen with a blade)

http://yourmodelrailway.net/view_topic.php?id=10103&forum_id=62#p183690

The model I have, and which was mentioned in the above thread is this one

http://klicnkut.co.uk/shop/knk-zing/

Price has gone up since I bought mine  but it now has Bluetooth connection as well as USB.

The window was copied from this building I found on Google



I've not (yet) built that particular building, I just liked the window surrounds  which I used on this semi but adding a brick cill,



The garages are from the Metcalfe Semis kit covered with Flint and Brick paper

Last edited on Wed May 28th, 2014 09:15 pm by Dorsetmike

D_Will
CR's the best!


Joined: Wed May 28th, 2014
Location: Davis Bay, British Columbia Canada
Posts: 186
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Looks great Mike! This is really inspiring for me! :) thanks

emmess
Full Member


Joined: Mon Jul 15th, 2013
Location: Burley In Wharfedale, United Kingdom
Posts: 399
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Thanks Darius! I can't believe it is so long since I visited the forum. All of a sudden work went mental, then it was the summer holidays and now it's only 7 days to go until Christmas!

I am sorry to say that Pig Hill development stopped. But I've got it wired up and working ready for the Big Day. I'll post some photos here shortly.

But I am really pleased to see my photo on the front page today - thank you! :)

And I am also really pleased to see this excellent forum in fine fettle on my return. As usual, I am in awe of the amazing things that you all have been doing. It's nice to be back! :)

Gary
Inactive Member


Joined: Mon May 21st, 2012
Location: Sydney, Australia
Posts: 3835
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

G'day Mike,

Welcome back ! I'll be looking foward to your latest pics. Good to hear that the layout is all wired up and working. Only a few sleeps now before the major unveiling on the BIG DAY !

Cheers, Gary.

D_Will
CR's the best!


Joined: Wed May 28th, 2014
Location: Davis Bay, British Columbia Canada
Posts: 186
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Hi again Mike!
I was wondering if your boys have seen the layout or not? Also, make sure to post some pics of those big, big grins!

Marty
Enjoying the Journey


Joined: Sun Oct 14th, 2007
Location: Perth, Western Australia, Australia
Posts: 6213
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

G'day Mike,

Yes, very good to have you back and we DO want a full report and photos!


Remember to give the track a clean beforehand.


Cheers

Marty

emmess
Full Member


Joined: Mon Jul 15th, 2013
Location: Burley In Wharfedale, United Kingdom
Posts: 399
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Wiring and things (6 days till Christmas)

So I am back, and suddenly found myself with only 10 days until Christmas, and nothing had changed on Pig Hill since May. Whoops. So it's now a present that will allow me to finish it with the boys, which I think they'll enjoy even more than having it complete.

To give them something to actually do with it though, I needed to finish the wiring. So that's what I have done.

I use an old 12v charger from a long forgotten electrical thing to provide the lights and the point motor power, and have used a couple of banana plugs on the ends of the wires from the controller. It looks quite neat in the end of the baseboard:



Underneath, I've used a bit of old N-Gauge track to carry the power along the length of the board:




If only my wiring was as neat as some on this forum! The card rectangle is the inspection pit from the shed up top.



The nice thing about the Cobalt point motors is that they have two switches built in. So one is for the frog polarity, and the other, the LEDs on the simple panel I've put on the front facia. It's a simple affair, with only one LED lit up at any one time. It shows which track the loco will go into if starting at the left of the layout:




I designed the track plan in AnyRail and printed it 1:1 onto paper which became the layout proper. I then printed it out at this size, so it's an exact replica of the actual track on the layout. Here, the first two points are switched to the down position, which means that the lowest track has the light on. The motors must have a point where neither side is "on", so there's a really satisfying pause when one LED goes out and the next one comes on.

This being an Inglenook puzzle, the rules state that there are 8 waggons on the layout. The sidings can accommodate 3, 3, and 5 waggons, and the headshunt 3 waggons plus the loco. The challenge is to choose five waggons at random and make up a train with those waggons in that order.

I photographed each waggon on the completed part of the layout and made a little card with its name, a bit of a description gleaned from the internet (no idea if it's right!) and the name of the boy who "owns" the waggon, in the hope of reducing any arguments when it's in use. I mounted these onto 2mm card and varnished them. They look quite good. Five will be drawn at random at the start of the game and then we will proceed to shunt!



Just the uncoupling magnets and staples etc to do now - as shown elsewhere on this forum!

Gary
Inactive Member


Joined: Mon May 21st, 2012
Location: Sydney, Australia
Posts: 3835
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Excellent Mike. Counting down the days now, but I'm sure you'll have it all presentable for teh day. Very nice wagon cards, they do look good.

Cheers, Gary.

Marty
Enjoying the Journey


Joined: Sun Oct 14th, 2007
Location: Perth, Western Australia, Australia
Posts: 6213
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Nice work Mike.

I reckon the 2 year old? Might struggle with the game concept but it will be a great learning aid.

Might I suggest for normal operations where small hands are possibly moving stock, that the floor might be a more suitable support surface rather than a table. Less of a distance for stock to fall!

Enjoy

Marty

emmess
Full Member


Joined: Mon Jul 15th, 2013
Location: Burley In Wharfedale, United Kingdom
Posts: 399
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Thanks both - started wrapping it all up tonight.

Marty - the youngest is (just) three, so it will all be too complex for him at the moment, and they'll both only play with my supervision.

I have protected the left side of the layout with a diode so that the loco will stall before hitting the end wall backscene, whilst being movable outwards, so it will be his job to do the pulling back, safe in the knowledge that no damage can be done. I've also made the facia about 2cm higher than the layout baseboard, so there's a lip along the edge should things be knocked. And apart from all that - I agree - the floor is the place for it!

Merry Christmas all! :)

Marty
Enjoying the Journey


Joined: Sun Oct 14th, 2007
Location: Perth, Western Australia, Australia
Posts: 6213
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Great forward planning Mike.

... And of course you'll have to supervise... Every session... What a great dad you are.... Such sacrifice... :lol::lol::lol:

Marty

Chubber
Casseroled Badger


Joined: Thu Oct 2nd, 2008
Location: Ivybridge, United Kingdom
Posts: 4889
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Marty, I'm looking forward to the next update! I guess he's very busy being 'Dad', eh?

Doug

Marty
Enjoying the Journey


Joined: Sun Oct 14th, 2007
Location: Perth, Western Australia, Australia
Posts: 6213
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

I think you might be right Doug. There is a high potential for some serious fun! (...and exhaustion).

Our next door neighbours little ones, 3 year old girl and 18 month boy, visited yesterday. They saw the hammock in the yard and had to get In and be swing gently. Then they had to get out... Then they had to get in again... And out again.. And in. Lovely children but I desperately needed a cup of tea by the time they left.

Come on the Pig Hill engineers... What's the state of play?


Marty

emmess
Full Member


Joined: Mon Jul 15th, 2013
Location: Burley In Wharfedale, United Kingdom
Posts: 399
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

 

CHRISTMAS DAY

We're a month past Christmas already. Only 11 months to go to next one! How did that happen? Time is slipping away, but I thought I'd post a quick update.

Pig Hill Yard went down very well on Christmas morning, and we've hardly left it alone since then. The older boy can use the switches to get the train exactly where he wants it, and is starting to understand the Inglenook puzzle element. The younger one can drive the train up to the headshunt as fast or slow as he likes and it will stop before hitting the end thanks to the diode in the track. They love it.

A big thank you from me to all of you on here who have commented, encouraged, or just provided inspiration without even knowing it - a belated Merry Christmas! I am looking forward to catching up with all your own layouts.

Here are some pics of the big day...


 












emmess
Full Member


Joined: Mon Jul 15th, 2013
Location: Burley In Wharfedale, United Kingdom
Posts: 399
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

PIG HILL YARD WAREHOUSE

So now that the layout is uncovered, I thought it about time to make some serious progress, with the boys "helping" of course.

This is as far as I had got with the warehouse before everything ground to a halt last summer. It's the Scalescenes' Factory/Warehouse kit in random ashlar. The portacabin was a cheap download bought on Christmas Day for the boys to see printed and made. It's not too bad, but a bit floppy compared to the Scalescenes building.




There's not much to say for the build itself. Lots of cutting. I decided to print the windows directly to thin budget printer paper rather than acetate as most of the building was going to be in very low relief. The windows look quite good for it.

It was always my intention to have the end of the back siding disappearing into the warehouse. Since the track is on a slight curve, the clearances are quite tight.

I also decided to put a bit of a loading platform on the outside and turn a couple of windows into loading docks. Here is the platform edge marked out and the first formers glued in place. Because I made it all backwards, there was quite a lot of fiddly cutting to get the platform face to fit around the buttresses.




I did a Google Image search for "factory interior" and found a picture that I printed and stuck to the back scene. This should be glimpsed through the open doors. Once lit with an LED or two, I hoped it would look good.




Once the factory had its windows removed and the platform top put on, the effect is quite a good one. At least from some angles! I can't remember where I got this idea from. If it was you - thank you! :)




A top-down view of the platform face with its slots cut out around the buttresses.




I decided to keep the platform face on the inside too, to make it look like a continuous loading platform going from inside to out. Here's the not-pretty back view:




But once placed into the corner on the layout, I think it's worked OK. I tried really hard with this build to get the corners sharp, and I thought I'd done OK. But with the camera never lying, I see I have some way to go to meet Doug's standards of corners!




With such a small gap between backscene and factory (less than 1cm), I wanted the few LEDs I was installing to put out as much light as possible. I have no idea if this worked or not, but I glued tin foil across the back before putting the factory in place.




And with the lights on, it's turned out OK, I think...




This blurry shot shows off the factory interior quite well,  I think.




And a final view of it bedded in. Shame about that wonky portacabin!




It seemed like this build would never end - it's a time-intensive kit. And it was partly the reason why I fell out with Pig Hill back in the summer, I think.

But it's done now - and I am pleased with it. Shame it was a month late, but never mind! The boys like it.

toto
Former Member
 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

It us a fantastic result.

The lights work really well and the tin foil has worked a treat. Some quite atmospheric shots as well.

Keep it coming.

Cheers

Toto.

Gary
Inactive Member


Joined: Mon May 21st, 2012
Location: Sydney, Australia
Posts: 3835
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

G'day Mike,

You have made a good job out of the warehouse and loading platforms. I think that your internal lights need toning down a little. Perhaps just lightly paint them with white or a whitish-yellow colour. This will bring the intense brightness down.

All in all, a splendid job. I bet the boys love the plank.

Cheers, Gary.

Chubber
Casseroled Badger


Joined: Thu Oct 2nd, 2008
Location: Ivybridge, United Kingdom
Posts: 4889
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Cracking job! I do envy you having a Deputy and Under Deputy C.M.E. or is one to be Clerk of Works..:)?

I have succesfully (according to the recipient) used A4 tracing paper from  £ shop for windows, really inexpensive and glues with PVA.

Doug




g0ibi
Full Member


Joined: Sun Dec 28th, 2014
Location: Newark On Trent, United Kingdom
Posts: 1333
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Great result and worthy of the labour I think! Like the atmospheric lighting shot! :):)

Ed
Full Member


Joined: Tue Jan 29th, 2013
Location: West Anglia Main Line, United Kingdom
Posts: 3915
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Warehouse has turned out really well Mike, especially with the lighting.



Ed
 

emmess
Full Member


Joined: Mon Jul 15th, 2013
Location: Burley In Wharfedale, United Kingdom
Posts: 399
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Thanks guys. I am pleased with how it looks.

Gary - thanks for your comment re the lights. They're fine in the warehouse through their paper windows, but the shed is definitely over-bright. I was putting off changing the resistors, but your idea of using a dab of paint is a much better solution. I'll add it to the list! :)

Marty
Enjoying the Journey


Joined: Sun Oct 14th, 2007
Location: Perth, Western Australia, Australia
Posts: 6213
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Lovely work Mike, the boys look pleased!
I've watched several people tackle the scalescenes warehouse on the forum and while it always is a big undertaking the results are well worth the effort and your's is no exception.

Bravo.

Marty

MaxSouthOz
Admin


Joined: Sat Aug 23rd, 2008
Location: Adelaide , Australia
Posts: 12331
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

I've just found five minutes to follow your thread, Mike.

Very, very nice.  :thumbs

I bet the boys tell their mates about it.

emmess
Full Member


Joined: Mon Jul 15th, 2013
Location: Burley In Wharfedale, United Kingdom
Posts: 399
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

While Chantley progresses, the boys occasionally go and shunt Pig Hill Yard in the garage. Here's an atmospheric shot from this morning's session...


MaxSouthOz
Admin


Joined: Sat Aug 23rd, 2008
Location: Adelaide , Australia
Posts: 12331
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Nice shot.  :thumbs

Marty
Enjoying the Journey


Joined: Sun Oct 14th, 2007
Location: Perth, Western Australia, Australia
Posts: 6213
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

:thumbs Glad to hear they still use it occasionally.
Cheers

Marty


                 

Recent Topics Back to top of page

Powered by UltraBB 1.15 Copyright © 2007-2011 by Jim Hale and Data 1 Systems. Page design copyright © 2008-2013 Martin Wynne. Photo gallery copyright © 2009 David Williams.