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Ken
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I've had to make a small adjustment to the trackplan by re-routing the line to Barton Tracey from the Fiddle Yard track to the Quayside one (in effect thus making the latter a siding off of the B.Tracey line) due to it getting a bit crammed in at that area.   This also meant another alteration to the wiring plan - in fact more than one, for various reasons :roll: :oops: - which Trevor once again took a lot of time and trouble with and for which I am inestimably grateful - and that's putting it mildly!!!   (See 3 below).

 
In the meantime I started trying to create a trackplan for the switchboard (based on one Trevor had done for me much earlier) and after much trial and error I managed to produce the following using an editing programme which I'd hardly ever used, and have to say I'm very pleased with the result:-




Trevor then based his new wiring schematic (mentioned in the first paragraph above) based on my trackplan as follows:-




My next step was to make the actual switchboard and utilising some plywood and a plasticfilm stationery folder - the latter to keep the paper printed diagram from getting marked etc - I produced the following:-



Below is the back of the board and you'll see the crude "squares" I had to cut out to accomodate the switches due to the ply plus the folder being too thick for the thread length!:-




You will see there is a blank one numbered 16 and that's there in case I decide to add another track from the small branch station to go behind the Quayside Warehouse to places new!!!   This switchboard will hinge to the front of the baseboard and will pivot allowing me to get to the back for wiring or problems etc.   

I'm now ready to start laying and wiring the track and have been trying my hand at soldering etc before starting on the real thing; so far I've made a bit of a dog's breakfast at it but hopefully I shall get better as I go along. :sad:

More in due course, Ken.

Last edited on Thu Jun 21st, 2012 05:08 pm by Ken

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Your switchboard is very good Ken

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Just a point for the casual observer trying to follow this and the beginners electrics thread.

The wiring diagram shows the wiring for what is called Common Rail and a common black wire goes to the different points.

Ken has a Gaugemaster dual throttle (do not ask me the model number) which is OK for common rail otherwise you would have to ensure that you have two separate transformers for the controllers. Something along the lines of a Triang P5 and an auxiliary controller will not... well it will in one direction or the other if the locos are on but not trying to work them in opposite directions.

I think Ken has spared you of the work behind the scenes to get this far and I'm looking forward to seeing more of his efforts... hope the rest of you are too!

Trevor

Marty
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Very neat and tidy control panel Ken.
Have you started attaching the wires yet?

Any chance of an overall layout area photo to help us get this build in context. Doesn't matter if it's all bare boards or not even that yet. Gotta have somewhere to start.

cheers
Marty

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Yes Marty, I've completed the first part of the Control Board wiring - the 2nd stage will be from the track to the switches - and I actually found the soldering relatively easy I'm pleased to say (in point of fact I was quietly dreading it!). :oops:




Below is a picture of the baseboard (taken before the recent slight track modification) and which I did post in my initial "Help wanted..........Wiring" posting

 

It doesn't look in such a pristine state now as it's covered with all sorts of plans, odd track pieces, bits of wood, packets of this 'n that etc!!!   Anyway, it's all got to come off now as I'm starting on the track laying so more on that in due course.

Ken.

Last edited on Wed Jun 27th, 2012 10:40 am by Ken

Marty
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That's an economical way of wiring them up Ken, I hadn't thought of doing them that way. Always something new to learn.
I'm glad you've come to terms with soldering, you'll find it opens up a whole new world of modeling possibilities and it quite fun.
I've even used it around the house to mend things!

Thanks for the reminder of the layout space you have, puts it all in perspective.

I might suggest for your consideration, before you lay track, that I found that I should have painted the base sky blue on the back scene prior to putting toys on the board. This avoids the toys having lovely sky blue spots!! Just a thought.
Marty

Ken
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I can't believe seven months have gone by since I last posted, however there is a reason:  I had a bit of a layoff from modelling during our so called summer as I've done quite a bit of cycling (on my super new bike) and started playing Tennis again - at the age of 77 - after a 12 year break due to bad back, knee and neck injuries caused by same!    I'd missed playing so much and thought I'd give it a whirl and although my old problems surfaced at first I'm now playing quite well with few side effects so I'm really loving it.

Anyway, to get back to the layout I've included a new drawing and you'll see I've added 2 extra sidings as I wanted to accomodate my quarry (which I had worked on when I first joined YMR) and the crumpled binbags represent the hills around same, of course I'll be doing this properly asap but wanted to see how it looked first.   I've also added a new track section behind the Quayside Warehouse to enable me to extend the layout by another 8 feet or so at a later date - assuming I ever complete the main part first!   There are some other changes too: I've done away with the sector plate as operating it would be too complex as it's hidden under the fiddle yard so I've changed this to dead end switched sections, plus some other track positions have been altered slightly at the main station and an extra siding added in front of the harbour.  

All the track has now been laid and ballasted - a horrible job particularly in N as it's so small it floats around when adding the PVA/Water/Washing up liquid mix - and all droppers have been wired, tested and now have to be connected to the bus wire and switches, then all to the controller.   This will be my next job but first I have to connect the point controls for which I have come up with a newish system and which I will elaborate on when completed.

Incidentally, the hidden fiddle yard will have a village street with houses etc on top of the removeable lid, and I spent a bit of time experimenting on how to do this without minimising the station platform too much, and how the passengers would access same.   I based this on Bampton (Devon) where a ramp slopes down from the adjacent road bridge and all will become clear in due course.

Again I must acknowledge Trevor Gibbs' help with all the electrics, he deserves a medal for the amount of time and trouble he has taken and my gratitude knows no bounds.   Anyway, here's a few pictures:-















The only thing that concerns me now is: have I put in too much track at the expense of scenery particularly bearing in mind that the scenic aspect is what I like doing best!   However, I think there's still quite a lot of scope for this particularly with the interesting buildings I plan to scratchbuild (the quarry one is based on John Ahern's and I've always wanted to do this) and the harbour area in particular should turn out to be very interesting. 

Ken.  

Last edited on Tue Jan 22nd, 2013 02:32 pm by Ken

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Hi Ken

A great looking layout. It is amazing how much you can get into a reasonably small space with N gauge track. Having just built, and dismantled, an N Gauge layout myself (see Watton Erith) I am always interested in operating branchline terminus layouts in this scale, as there is quite a bit of coupling and uncoupling as trains come in and depart. This is not easily done in N gauge without a fair bit of messing around. I would be very interested in your plans, especially for passenger trains in Combe Hinton station and shunting in the sidings. I spent ages deciding what to do, but ended up using the Dapol magnetic uncouplers on my layout and then ran the locos around a loop to head the departing trains out of my station.

Bob

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It's looking very good Ken - I like a man who goes to the trouble of sealing the screw holes ...........;-)

Which half day did you go cycling this summer ?  I didn't think UK had had one this time around ..........:shock:

I'm sure you could get away with platform access down some steps from the upper level.  I see a long stepped ramp with a "landing" for a breather half way down.  Some nice wrought iron guard railings would give it some class.

I too am looking forward to seeing what you opt for in terms of coulping/uncoupling.  In "N" gauge, that won't be easy I'd imagine.

Some lovely sweeping curves there with a complex looking central junction - all just up my street. :thumbs

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Looking forward to seeing the scenery development Ken.
A very good trackplan....busy without looking overcrowded.....:thumbs

Marty
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Wow, it may be a while since the last post but you've made some decent progress in the mean time Ken.
I think you have struck a good balance between track and board, looking at the station building and the mine in place in comparison to the entire layout.
Nice ballasting too.

Cheers
Marty

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Superb work so far Ken!Looking forward to seeing the scenics come in too,its all looking very promising.I'm particularly interested in how you'll tackle the dock area.

Cheers,John.B.:thumbs

Ken
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Thanks everyone, and to answer your questions:-

Novice and Petermac:   Re uncoupling I thought I would just use Peco uncoupling ramps (or ones I will make myself) placed in various positions (ie dead end sections etc) and rely on 'forced' coupling (i.e., back them against each other) ;-)  but have already found this is not easy due to their light weight.   I'll come up with something though when I can give it a bit more thought, however, any suggestions on both aspects will be much appreciated.

Peter:  Your idea for the smaller station access is exactly what I had already planned (I'd made the stepped ramp and tried it in position when I experimented with the fiddle yard top just to make sure it would all fit ok).

JohnB:  I actually have the Dock area all planned out but don't want to elaborate on it yet as there are so many other things to do first, however I can promise you it should be very interesting if I can come up with the modelling to match my ideas! :roll:

In the meantime I've had a problem!   Peter mentioned lovely sweeping curves but I found that one of them didn't fit that category (I'd already thought it could be an issue and sure enough the join angle was far to acute for a loco to run on).   However I found a simple solution - and don't know why I didn't think of it in the first place :oops: - by swapping over the original head shunt as per the before and after pictures shown below.   A fiddly and messy job as I had to remove these ballasted sections and cut the new track very accurately to 'spring' it into position between the existing tracks;  luckily it didn't necessitate the wiring being altered in any way.   You'll see on the plan the zig-zagged marked track which has been removed and the new tracks which are shown in blue:-







Incidentally Novice, Watton Erith I well remember and was an inspiration too.

Ken.

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Phew!!! One less Wiring diagram modification needed!!!  Seriously Ken Well done that it was adaptable enough to be changed. Good on you mate!
Regards
Trevor

Last edited on Mon Jan 28th, 2013 08:45 pm by xdford

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I hadn't spotted that errant join Ken - it was a bit "tight" ...........:shock::shock:

I think you'll find the new plan works much better and offers an extra degree of flexibility of movements not offered by the original "kinky plan" ........:thumbs

Ken
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A brief update.   Because I altered the position of some tracks and added some extra sidings I have add to re-do my control board.   It was a bit complicated as the Fiddle Yard switches in particular had to be added to an area where there was very little room at the back of the board due to the reinforcing bar's 30mm depth (it runs along the top and supports the hinges).   I also had to remove all the wired in switches then re-align the new printed plan by matching up the existing holes plus adding the new ones then chiselling out the recesses to accomodate same - phew!    I now have to connect up the wiring for the five new switches and then all of the sections to the controller, anyway here's a before and after picture of the front and one of the back:-

BEFORE:-




AFTER:-





Incidentally the thin white line at the right hand side of the new plan has no significance as it happened in the printing! :cry:

Ken.

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It looks very neat Ken.  You wouldn't know there was a problem top right at all.

Can you explain the wiring to an idiot please. :oops:  Everything seems to be connected to everything else.  Are these section switches or point switches or both ?

Ken
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Peter, have a look at the original wiring plan below: it has altered since then due to the additional sidings etc but I think you'll get the drift ok.   (I haven't done a new plan for same as it's very time consuming and it's all in my head anyway!). :roll:

Basically they are all section switches except for the four on the left which are dead ends.   Have a look at the back of my control board and you will see I still have to connect all the wires from each section to the controller (the pink to each of the centre switch connector terminals and the black ones to the bus wire plus the track wires from the 4 dead ends shown in yellow).  

Your comment "Everything seems to be connected to everything else." is correct and you will see the blue and yellow wires to the switches are all in place.   As a matter of interest I did these first of all as it was my first attempt at soldering and I wanted to see if I could do it in the tiny spaces between each switch terminal (about 5mm) without soldering everything together!!!   As I said above, I still have to connect all the other wires to the centre terminals so that'll be fun! ;-)



Ken.

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The fog is slowly clearing Ken .................:???::???:

i didn't fully understand what was doing what and, as soon as there are more than 2 contacts on a swich, I think "electronics" and my brain shuts down instantly !!

Trevor has also very kindly PM'd me asking what I didn't understand but I think he might also be shocked at my lack of ability to grasp even the simplest of circuits.

To be honest, I hadn't appreciated they were section switches (probably because I hadn't read what you'd actually posted and just jumped to my own conclusions ...........:oops::oops:)

Given a few more years, I'll get there .......................:cheers:cheers

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Petermac wrote:
Given a few more years, I'll get there .......................:cheers:cheers


Peter, by the time you have finished wiring your layout, you will understand it ( but by then, another new technology will be around to keep you busy).

Ken has learnt the hard way over some time - trail & error after guidance and he is showing good results :thumbs-
me,  I was lucky as that was my career:  DC/AC , switches & relays.

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Thanks for your encouragement Sol.  I hope you're right and, no doubt once I start to get into the wiring rather than reading about it, with enough help,  I'll learn what works and what triggers a blue flash .............:roll::roll:

Like most things done for the first time, it's daunting ...............:???:

Ken
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It is daunting Peter and without Trevor Gibbs' and Sol's help I wouldn't have had a clue.   Once I started most things fell into place very quickly and I now have quite a good understanding of the electrical side of things.    May I suggest you jump right in and start on some wiring; you'll be amazed how it all falls into place whereas thinking too much about it in advance seems to create self doubt (and I'm an expert on that! :oops::roll: ).

Ken

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I've now completed all 21 of my manual point controls - based on Sol's method but incorporating some ideas of my own - so I'm going to post a seperate "how I did it" which I hope will be of interest.     You'll see that I'm able to put the baseboard on it's side for access and as I made it to overlap the cupboard upon which it rests by 50mm this enables me to have the controls underneath and out of sight.    In the meantime here's a photo to hopefully whet your interest:-




My next job will be connecting all the wiring to the controller and the switchboard and as you can see it's very easy to get at! :cool:

Ken.

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Now you've got me thoroughly wet Ken, I can't wait for the "How to". :thumbs

It looks extremely neat - both topside and underneath.  I've got a lot to learn I fear ..............:cry::cry: 

Ken
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A wiring update: you'll see I have put in a long terminal block - plus a smaller one to be added underneath it for the fiddle yard wires - and my control board will be immediately above this, fitted to the edge of the baseboard.  I have now soldered all the wires to the control board before fixing it into position and then I'll simply join all these to the terminal blocks - see the picture of "spaghetti junction" below!   Also, note how the bottom chocblocks holding the point control rods also accomodate the wiring joins from the droppers - I'm really pleased with that bit of forethought!!!!!  

Incidentally, the baseboard will be positioned about a foot to the right of where it is now so the wiring block section (which is unencumbered by any point control rods) will be to the right of the drawer plus my controller is going to rest facing upwards at an angle in the drawer so all nicely to hand, also I'll be able to reach all of the point controls when sitting in front of same.  







 

I had to use the same colour wires in some places as I only have 11 different ones but I do know where the all have to be connected! ;-)
 
The next photo shows how I can operate the point control rods quite easily due to me overlapping the baseboard by a couple of inches from it's supporting cupboard, thus they are all hidden.
 


Ken.

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HI Ken

As your consulting (or is it insulting...) engineer from the Antipodes, Might I suggest that you use making tape and label near the ends of the wires and using insulating tape, strategically tape the wires together to form a loom.  
That will give your wiring a bit more strength in the event of an accident and avoid the spaghetti junction effect. Even if you group 5 or 6 wires together over 4 runs, it would look a lot better...

Cheers Mate
Trevor

Last edited on Thu Mar 21st, 2013 01:16 pm by xdford

Sol
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The "hidden" point operating rods is a neat idea Ken.

Ken
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Yes I'd already thought of that Trevor plus I've allowed excess wire in case of having to repair any possible broken bits etc.   Once it's all connected to the terminal blocks it will look much neater but I thought it was fun to show it like this in it's raw state so to speak.

Ken

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I completed all my wiring not long after my last posting and then tested everything, much to my surprise it all worked ok!   However I found that some of my Ebay bought locos were not running properly (all my new ones were ok) so with the knowledge of other forum members I had to spend a lot of time in correcting faults, cleaning and generally refurbishing them.   A couple of them still tend to jump a bit or hesitate when going over points but although I'll keep trying to correct this I think I'll just have to live with it as I want to get on with actual modelling!  ;-)

Anway, here's some pictures of the control board and controller plus the rear of the former and under baseboard showing the completed connections; it still looks a bit spaghetti junctionish but "out of site is out of mind" as the saying goes!!!   The main thing is it all works well, it's easy to get at - the baseboard is very stable and lifts easily onto it's side - and every connection is clearly marked and colour coded.











Now that this is completed I can get down to my real love, ie., the scenic work, and I'm really looking forward to this.

Ken


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Having seen what you are capable of in past topics I'm looking forward to it too!

Did you bother with frog switching in the end? I've been running NE for four or five years now, haven't done any frog switching and never really seem to have any problems.

Marty

Last edited on Tue Jun 18th, 2013 02:13 pm by Marty

Ken
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I don't have a pond anymore Marty! :lol::lol::lol:     Sorry, couldn't resist it.........   :roll:

I don't know what frog switching is so could you clue me up please?    (One thing I really like with the electrfrog points is that I can hold a loco anywhere on the other track leading off from any point irrespective of it's section being live; very useful particularly for my quarry which is off of the mainline and doesn't have it's own section switch).

Ken

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We've had some pretty good weather over the past couple of months and although I've been out quite a lot plus catching up on the gardening chores I have managed to start working on the quarry area and the hills running along the backscene.   I decided to do this with card formers and strips rather than using chunks of packaging foam (although I've used this for support in areas where there will be trees etc) as I actually like creating the "skeleton" in this way even though it takes a lot more work and time!   I'm not yet sure how I'm going to cover it; I may use Marty's method or perhaps utilise 3 inch paper squares as I did with my quarry diorama, anway, here's some pictures:-

No.1:  I used corrugated card (instead of MDF or Ply etc) as it's quite strong when glued on 2 sides and there will not be any heavy items in this area.



No.2:

Mine entrance etc.


No 3:

Have you ever tried glueing 6 sections at once? !!!


No. 4:

Foam in place.


No. 5:

Added cross strips (at 12.15 last night!   I could have gone on for hours as I was enjoying it so much!).




Ken

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Hi Ken,
Your ears must have been burning as I was thinking of you yesterday and wondering how the layout was getting on... I need not have worried about any problems and I like your pix and tutorial.
Frog switching is when you have a slide switch or similar connected to your points connected with wire so that you change the polarity of the frog as you change your points. The cheaper slide switches are mainly used for that. I'll get a diagram up if necessary.
Good to see you about!
Regards
Trevor 

Last edited on Tue Aug 27th, 2013 10:20 pm by xdford

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G'day Ken,

Just read up on the whole thread and looking foward to more, especially the landscaping, which is probably my favourite tasks on building a layout. Good to see the control panel sorted out, regardless of the spaghetti junction. Afterall, it is only you who needs to know where they all go ! Will be following with interest.

Cheers, Gary.

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Ken, I've just read through the whole of this thread. You've made some brilliant progress, and the wiring you've done looks spot on. I keep putting off doing the wiring on Tedderton 'for real', and now regret not getting it all sorted at the outset. I'm looking forward to seeing Coombe Hinton progressing.

Mike.

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Hi Ken
Just to clarify the "switched frog" issue ... at least I hope it does...
It backs up the contact of the blades on the outer rails. You can use any extra contacts on the switch for basic signalling

Regards
Trevor 

Last edited on Tue Aug 27th, 2013 11:08 pm by xdford

Ken
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Thanks for the nice comments Gary and Mike plus Trevor of course who is my "font of all knowledge" when it comes to all things electrical!  

Ken

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First picture shows the station area completed with card strips etc:-




I then thought I would try a new method (for me) of using plaster bandage to cover the strips but didn't like this at all!   The bandage went on ok but retains a lot of water and I thought the strips might tend to degrade as it takes at least 24 hours to set.    They didn't but I went back to my old method of using kitchen paper towels cut into 2 inch squares which are then placed onto the previously glued strips (using the usual PVA/Water/W.up L. ballast mixture) in a sort of haphazard manner until an area about 8 x 8 inches is covered with several layers thick, each square having the glue brushed well in as they are added - and I really enjoy doing this!.   You can see where the two methods meet in the picture below

The following 2 pictures show the first squares being laid then the completed section (incidentally the masking tap at the bottom is holding down some clear plastic film to protect the track etc).:-






The next 2 pictures show  it at the half-way then the completed stage:-





This all makes for a very strong structure which is now ready for the plaster - actually I'll be using Artex - to be added and for the rock formations etc to be formed from same.

Ken

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Hi Ken, thanks for posting the photo's, looks like a lot of hard work you've put into your landscape to date, you must get a whole lot of satisfaction when it's finished. Keep the photo's coming, I for one am looking forward to the finished scenery.

 

Barney

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HI Ken,  
I can't believe how NEATLY you seem to work... oh how I wish I could but I seem to be a dirt and dust magnet!!! Well Done Mate! Have you actually operated trains as per a timetable etc to try stuff out?
Cheers
Trevor
 

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I can't believe how NEATLY you seem to work...

That's the exact same thing I noticed!!

Mike.

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Nice little hillside coming along there Ken, as you know I use the "J's" dishcloths, cut into strips to do a similar thing... Both methods make a light but strong shell.

The narrow gauge line from the mine is going to be terrific, you are using the mine building from your original diorama I believe?

Marty

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Trevor and Mike, yes I am a tidy worker but it still gets a bit messy sometimes! ;-)

Trevor, not only have I not worked to a timetable, I actually haven't operated any trains at all!!!!!    Well, that's apart from the original testing stage which you will perhaps remember my mentioning that every point and section was 100% ok when I just ran various locos over same.    Since then I've disconnected the controller as it tends to get in the way when I'm landscaping etc  :shock: - I know that most people love running their trains but to me it's secondary to the scenic work - but it means I have that to look forward to! :cool:

Thanks, Marty. Yes I was going to use the J cloths as per your method but in trying the plastercloth it kind of put me off so I reverted to my original way of doing it.    You're right, it is my intention to use the original mine building but I might just redo it as I can see where I can make some improvements - ain't it always the case! :roll:
Ken.

Last edited on Fri Sep 20th, 2013 05:42 pm by Ken

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Have worked on the hills a bit more and added another one near to the hidden fiddle yard; see pictures below:-



Hill colour came out a bit pale as it dried:-



So I decided to give it a coat of typical Devon earth colour:-


 
I've now got to tone it down a bit and go all over it with different colours here and there to bring out the fissures and outcrops before grassing it etc.     Funnily enough although I'm an artist I've been a bit chary of starting on this :roll: so I've been scratchbuilding the goods shed, signal box and the Barton Tracey station shelter in the meantime and I'll post some pictures shortly.   I intend making all my buildings in this manner but it's amazing how much time it takes, however I really enjoy this best of all.

Ken.


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Coming on nicely Ken.
I am with you on this railway lark.
The build is the main interest.
regards,

Derek.

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Depending on how much earth you want to leave exposed I find that once the scatter, grass, shrubs and trees are applied I can't see the original ground colour much.

You might be able to save yourself some time by doing a ground cover test somewhere less visible.

Just a thought.

Coming along nicely.

Bravo on protecting your trackwork, I really must try to do that.

Cheers

Marty

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As a break from cliff making I've been designing and scratchbuilding my Goods Shed and Signal Box:-

I've now completed the Goods Shed (the shed and the office have yet to be joined together and the doors to be fixed open: this will be completed when positioned on the layout) and the Signal Box.   The latter - which again is my own design - was very fiddly being so small (I've added a pencil to show the sizes of both buildings) and the last stage was gutters and drainpipes - even more fiddly!   I'm going to leave them white (matches the window frames etc!) although I know they should be the GWR beige colour as painting these would be ultra fiddly!!!   Plus I'm 78 now so I must make it a bit easier on myself as fingers and eyes ain't what they used to be!     Anyway, here's some pictures:-









































They actually look a lot better in the flesh as close-up pictures show up all sorts of things the eyes don't normally see, anyway that's my excuse!

Ken.







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Hello Ken, a couple of fine examples of your designing and craftmanship in the goods shed and signal box. I'd be over the moon if I could produce items of that quality. Gets my good show vote Ken! 

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G'day Ken,

I have to say that you have a rather large pencil...! ;-);-) 

Great work on those tiny models. These models you and other N-gaugers build are truly N-spiring. I'm just glad it's you and not me !

Cheers, Gary.

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I've been following your progress for a while now Ken without actually making any comments. However, it's really starting to all come together nicely now and those scratch built structures are first class. Excellent work.

Ken
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Thanks fellas, it's always nice to get some feedback - particularly when it's positive! ;-)    I'm sure we all find that when we are working on something we are so close to it that it becomes hard to view the completed model with true critical eyes, therefore the comments of our fellow modellers are always very helpful.  

I think I've mentioned before that holding the model in front of a mirror is a good way of seeing it in a different light as any shortcomings usually stick out like a sore thumb!   I've always used this method with my paintings and it's amazing how things look from a different perspective.

I've just started scratchbuilding my weighbridge, now this is really small: 20mm x 12mm!!!   What fun eh? :lol:

Ken

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Excellent builds Ken,
I would say adding point rodding will be a heck of a challange in the scale you are working with.

regards,

Derek.

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I mentioned I'd just started on a weighbridge so here's some pictures plus some of a signal box for my other smaller station and a cattle dock:-






I'm quite pleased with the actual weighbridge surface shown in the next one as it's just a piece of textured card into which I impressed the grooves etc:-
















I started out with the idea of making the cattle dock out of wood veneers but with such thin pieces there was no strength to the rails so I did the posts and rails with old credit cards; very strong and they have different thicknesses!:-

























Have yet to paint it of course!   Incidentally, it's based on the one at Grossmont in North Yorks.

Ken.

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Lovely buildings Ken and I like the old credit card trick... Have to look into that. What glue did you use?

Nice balsa cattle dock ramp too. Once painted it will look the part very well.

Cheers


Marty

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A fine example of a weigh bridge there Ken. I like the cattle dock, I've made the base of one (out of card). I've been wracking the brains, thinking what I can use for the posts and rails. (I wonder if SWMBO will miss her card :twisted: ). I tried using card but that's not strong enough at that thickness.

 

 

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Ken wrote:

I started out with the idea of making the cattle dock out of wood veneers but with such thin pieces there was no strength to the rails so I did the posts and rails with old credit cards; very strong and they have different thicknesses!:-




Hi Ken,
That idea is brilliant!!!  In fact it will be used in Hints and Tips if that is OK!!! Glad to see you are steady at it!
Cheers
Trevor

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Hi Ken...great work on those scratchbuilds   :doublethumb

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Thanks for the encouraging comments fellas.

Marty, I first tried Humbrol plastic glue but it wouldn't stick the c/c rails to the posts!   I settled on Superglue but even that didn't always adhere well at first, however it eventually did the trick and I also used it for sticking the rails to the wood base.

Incidentally Trevor I actually used some 1.5mm square plastic strip for most of the posts plus thicker credit card for the doubled up posts on the sloping section - I forgot to mention this. :roll:    Please feel free to use this for your Hints and Tips.

Ken.

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Ken,
    Marvelous buildings and structures you're producing!!! I particularly like the goods shed and cattle dock.Its going to all add up to one stonker of a layout........so much better to make your own than go down the Metcalfe route and have a really unique feel to your layout.Good for you ,pal!!!
:doublethumb

Cheers,John.B.:thumbs

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georgejacksongenius wrote: ...........so much better to make your own than go down the Metcalfe route and have a really unique feel to your layout...............
Thanks for your nice comments John and re Metcalfe, that is my thinking too.   Of course I can well understand that many people utilise their kits as it saves them a lot of time and trouble, but for me it has to be something original and I get a lot of satisfaction out of designing and making these tiny N scale buildings etc.    Wish my eyesight was better though! :sad:

Ken

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Time flies I know but I can't believe my last updates were posted in January!   I haven't been idle and did get some modelling done but the nice summer we had meant more Tennis, Cycling (I bought a new Bike), a couple of short holidays and some nice rides in my new car - not to forget the blinking gardening! - plus a few gigs.   Anyway here's some pictures:-

First few are of the Winding Shed for the Quarry and this will be positioned at the extreme left side of the upper track bed and it's function is to pull the wagons from the mine to the Quarry building where their loads will be crushed (in theory) and then slid into the wagons below.   Although the winding mechanism will be hidden by the roof I couldn't resist making same using some odd bits of plastic etc just for my own satisfaction!   The cable (wire) will be coupled to the mine wagons when I've made 'em!













I then decided to make an Engine Shed as I thought it would fit well at the end of the top head shunt (I don't suppose this would have been allowed in real practise but as it's my railway...........!!!!!):-
















My next task was building up more hillocks within the goods yard, adding the bridge and small hills abutting Barton Tracey station towards the Quayside and painting the backscene.   The latter I have based on the Dartmoor area where I live showing distant tors etc and once the grass, trees and foliage have been added to all the hills (my next task) this should all blend in quite naturally.    I placed a small piece of mirror under the bridge and by setting it at an angle it appears that the track bends away to the right - must say I was pleased with this!













Lastly I made some level crossing gates for the road from the bridge (where it crosses the track which goes behind the Quay Warehouse buildings) into the Quayside area.    Very fiddly hence the finger for comparison!!!




Now that Winter is here I hope and expect to get a lot more done!

Ken.

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Hi Ken,
Your ears must have been burning... again!!!  I was wondering how the layout has been going... can hardly wait to see the final colouring on the hillocks!
Well Done Mate,
Regards from Oz

Trevor

Last edited on Sun Nov 9th, 2014 02:32 am by xdford

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A very comprehensive update Ken with such a lot having been done.
I love the little engine shed and the backscenes are superb. Looking forward to seeing how the landscaping develops but so far it looks brilliant. 

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Hi Ken, really like the way you've worked the landscaped hillocks into the back scene, obviously a lot of thought and planning gone into that! Secondly the engine shed is brilliant. Finally the level crossing gates, outstanding must have taken a lot of skill not to mention a few choice words making those. Well done on all of them!


Last edited on Sun Nov 9th, 2014 04:21 pm by Barneybuffer

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I'm late to this thread but I was blown away by the quality of the buildings and structures - excellent stuff!  I'll be watching more closely from now on.

John

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Super railway build Ken,I love your backscenes and the builds track plan with buildings.

Cheers,
Derek.

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Thanks for the feedback fellas, a little encouragment goes a long way!

Ken

Last edited on Wed Nov 12th, 2014 09:03 pm by Ken

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Really like the trackwork, very nice shape to it. Will make sure i keep my eye on this thread for some ideas myself :)

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The hardest thing I find in "N" scale is holding and manipulating small objects: e.g., I'm making some small stone carrying wagons for the Mine which has "Z" scale track as a sort of narrow gauge section.

Firstly I used two old business cards for the wagon bodies as the card was just the right thickness and I used the printed side for their insides so that I could draw in the strapping, rivets, etc on the clear surface.   They are supposed to be of metal construction so I painted them accordingly.   I found a piece of chain on an old watch bracelet which I think is just the right size and I've used Peco track pins for holding the chain and the wheels in place.   The wheels are from snap fasteners and lay over the "Z" scale track nicely after a lot of fiddling about positionwise.   Actually this whole little project is definitely the most fiddly I've done so far and there's even more to come when I chain them together i., getting fingers in between etc., and then fixing them permanently to the rails.   Everything else should be a breeze thereafter!


















Incidentally, none of the wagon bodies have been glued to their undercarriages yet as I think this will be easier to do once they have been chained together.

Ken



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An ingenious and inventive bit of modelling Ken and you've made a lovely job of those narrow gauge wagons.
Incidentally, what are the undercarriages made of ? They look like pieces of square balsa wood section but I could be wrong.

Marty
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Clever and intricate work Ken.

I always wondered how you were going to make those mineral wagons .

lovely job

Marty

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Thanks fellas and yes Trevor it is Balsa wood, well observed!   It's very easy to push the pins into it and as I have to cut them short the resulting blunt ends also go in easier plus the Balsa grips them very well.

I've just completed the wheels on all three - what a job! - so I can now complete them and get them positioned on the track (which I have yet to glue down, my next task)!

Ken

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Narrow gauge in N, I don't know how you do it

Brilliant job Ken.


Ed

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Having built the Quarry/Mine wagons I could now get down to some scenic work in that area and here's the results (perhaps I should mention that I'm working all along the backscene first before adding the various station buildings and foreground as I don't want to damage them by brushing against them - very easily done I've found out!).  :sad:

First photo shows the general Quarry area and my first attempt at adding grass to the cliff tops/face - this still has to be finished off with bushes, trees etc:-




Incidentally the Quarry is based on the one in John Aherne's "Miniature Landscape Modelling";  his work has always been my inspiration and I've wanted to build this for years!      The next 4 show making up the trestle support, something I've really been looking forward to but it was very fiddly cutting up the small wooden beams from coffee stirrers and matches then glueing them using the small template card - the size is 67mm x 50mm.














The next one shows the inside of the building and the double doors are access from the screening area (where I have imagined a tunnel going through from the building into the cliff behind) and the shute (which pivots up and down - yes I know I'm crazy!) allows the rocks from the mine wagons to be slid into the ones waiting below.   By the way these are real granite rocks which I've broken up from ones in my garden!


    

Next photo shows the Quarry supporting wall which I only wanted to glue at it's base - i.e., not to the top in case I need to lift off the building for some reason - so I inserted some track pins with their heads removed which gives it real stability.




The remaining 4 show general views of the area including my first try at weathering - on the wagons, the building has yet to be done.    You'll probably have noticed that the wagon wheels overlap the outside of the "Z" scale track but as I made them from press-studs they are double wheels which overlap both sides of the track!   My excuse - or reasoning - is that they need double ones because of the weight they have to carry!!!!!   What a laugh eh? :cool:












Ken.

Last edited on Thu Feb 12th, 2015 05:16 pm by Ken

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Super job Ken.Its all coming together very well.
I like the look of that craft knife to.
cheers,
Derek.

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That's a great piece of scratch building Ken. John Ahern would have been proud of you.:doublethumb

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Great work Ken.Those wagons look fantastic.

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Great results there Ken, and in N gauge ? How DO you guys do it ? I'm looking at my thumb nail then you're wagon...my thumb nail....your wagon.....:thud



Cheers

Matt

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Hi Ken

I believe there were many different types of wagon ways originally, certainly some where the rails were flanged and the trucks had smooth wheels. So a rail with wheels each side isn't that unlikely to have existed somewhere at some point.

As for the trestle with two inch bits of matchstick :roll:

As Matt says, I'm at a loss as to how you N gauge blokes do these models, but it looks brilliant :thumbs



Ed



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Ken,
What is really nice about your latest post is that after all these years (how long ago did you make the mine building?!) we finally get to see it in place on a big layout and that which we had all said would be a great scene has proven correct. Those last couple of photos show the potential for some great images of the mine site.
Lovely to see some greenery on the layout too... it is all blending in together very well. Looking forward to seeing the building and trestle weathered... 

Keep it coming...

Cheers
Marty

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Thanks for the nice feedback fellas, it sure makes everything worthwhile. :)

Marty, I can hardly believe it was actually 6 years ago (when we were both working on our respective dioramas as a test for our skillbase) - wow, time certainly flies!    I can't remember why it took me 3 years from then to actually start constructing the layout but I know it was a lot to do with trying to come up with the "perfect" layout plus life's other interruptions!!!    Of course in the meantime my eyesight has got worse so I'm really cracking on with it particularly as I'll be 80 in April - but still feel only 17 and have the energy and enthusiasm to go with it, long may it last!!!!!  :cool:

Ken

Last edited on Sat Feb 14th, 2015 03:11 pm by Ken

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Had an awful bout of Flu since my last posting but managed to do some modelling now and again and here's some photos of my Quarry Office Building from drawing to completion.    I usually design my own buildings but I found a picture of an actual Dartmoor one which really impressed me and the last photo shows my model held up to the real one pictured on my PC.

























I've still got the drainpipes etc to do, and incidentally I don't use Scalescenes or other brick papers as I like to download them from CG Textures etc and reduce them to the correct size plus you'll notice I use quite thin card (.5mm) and then back it up with thicker card and/or my window material which makes for a strong structure.

Ken











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Looks brilliant Ken :thumbs

(and I had to pinch myself to remember how small it is, N Gauge)


Ed

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Here's my latest progress report: I wanted to complete the street scene above the fiddle yard at Barton Tracey Station as it's the most awkward part to get at.   As it's a straight edged liftoff section I thought I would make the low relief buildings on a curve to make it more interesting, however never having made any low relief ones before I didn't realise what a difficult task I had set myself with the curving!   It's actually taken me over a month - of course scratchbuilding always takes much longer - and the roof angles really took some time, anyway, here's some photos of work in progress:-



















As I had a garage I had to have some petrol pumps so made these out of bits of shaped wood, beads and wire and only 15mm high!   I also wanted displays of fruit and bakery products in the shop windows so scaled down some pictures - to about 10mm wide!  Close ups show them up a bit cruelly but they look fine at normal viewing positions - bear in mind it is in N scale!!!!!








More to follow shortly.

Ken

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As I said before, it is work in progress so here's the overall area in it's rough state.   I will be painting extra buildings, trees, road continuence etc behind this strip of houses and adding various other things in the foreground side of the road including a small car park for the upper station building on the right.


Continuing the village street scene above the fiddle yard, I decided to add a small timber yard to fill in the left hand corner and here's the main building (the first two pictures are a bit blurred but they do show the scribed planking and the overall shape:-





I also slightly cut into the card to make it easier to curve the roof:-







I decided to weather it as I went along - including the inside - and I cut up over a 120 small pieces of card to form the timber strips and boards and then glued them individually into place; to make less work you'll see they are only half lengths but when all are in position it gives the proper impression:-









Last 2 show the position where it will be placed:-







I've another small building or two to be added followed by the scenic work; hopefully I will finish this shortly so that I can get on with the main areas.

Ken.

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More buildings etc.




The buildings immediately above lift off to reveal a screw (enabling me to hold this and lift off this section to get to the fiddle yard below) and have a hole underneath them to facilitate this - see 1st picture of these - and you'll see the screw in the following one:-






Lastly here's my added "village" backscene to go behind the main street, first without the buildings then with:-










And finally with all the buildings roughly in position:-




I now only have to add the grass and other surfaces plus the platform surface etc.

Ken

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I've now completed this upper area above the fiddle yard apart from adding some people and vehicles (I want a Lorry in the Timber Yard and a car or two in the station car park etc) when I get them!    Here's a few more pictures:-










The next ones show the fiddle yard with the two removeable sections lifted off and then in place (it's going to be "fun" doing blind coupling and uncoupling etc., but I'll worry about that later!!!) then an overall view of the area.













Obviously a lot more ground work to do in front of this area but I'll leave this for a while as I'm now going to concentrate on the opposite end of the layout (which is a lot easier to get at!).

Ken

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"and I cut up over a 120 small pieces of card to form the timber strips and boards and then glued them individually into place; to make less work you'll see they are only half lengths but when all are in position it gives the proper impression:-


"

You must have the patience of a saint, Ken :thumbs:thumbs:thumbs


Ed



Last edited on Wed Apr 6th, 2016 12:00 pm by Ed

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I had originally planned to have a small village on the left corner opposite the station but it just didn't seem to fit in naturally so after a few weeks of mulling it over and experimentation I decided to site the Quarry Building there and add a field behind it.   This building was originally going in front of the Quarry trestle but I thought it conflicted and blocked the overall scene - see following picture (in which the various buildings have only been loosely placed before fixing):-




Since then I have been concentrating on this whole station area and I have progressed well beyond the pictures shown below:-










Incidentally, a strange thing happens when taking photos from some (sideways) angles, i.e., the backscene goes all out of proportion - I've managed to cut most of this out here - but not much I can do about it I guess. 

More photos to follow shortly.

Ken

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Ken,its been a while since I looked in on Coombe Hinton,and I have to say I'm amazed at how things have come on for you.I absolutely love these bespoke buildings that you're producing,particularly your low-relief set of buidings and the ingenious timber stores.Fabulous!
  Its a pity Combe Hinton is a fixed layout,because it's certainly of a "show" quality.At least us lot can appreciate it on here.Well done mate,you should be really proud of what you've achieved.

:thumbsCheers,John.B.

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I like your backscene, what type of paints did you use?

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Thank you for such encouraging comments John - it sure makes it all worthwhile!   I'll add a few more photos shortly which I hope you'll find interesting.


Ken.

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Andy, I used acrylics but with lots of water thus treating it virtually as water colour.


Ken.

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I've been doing quite a lot of grass "sowing" etc since my last post (which I'll add photos of shortly) but for a bit of light relief - that's a laugh! - I thought I'd make up a ruined barn which I've been wanting to do for a long time and I made it in Balsa instead of my favourite card due to it's thick walls.   It's taken me over a week as it's the most fiddly building I've ever attempted, anyway here's all the 'warts and all' pictures:-










The following bit took some courage, i.e., taking out a chunk with my small pliars!































It will be positioned on an uneven hillside hence the sloping base sides and it will have weeds etc growing from the top broken wall plus the usual ivy and bushes around and partly inside it.   I must say I'm really looking forward to doing this!

Ken.

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I like it Ken, I fine example of modelling a run down building. Nice one, looking forward to how things progress.




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As I've said before Ken, the barn is a masterpiece in miniature.
Where did the roof ... stone is it... come from? I notice that you haven't overlapped the rows but they look really good. Did you scribe between the rows to get them looking so good?

 Cheers 🍻 

Ken
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Am pleased you like it Barney and thanks again Marty, you're always in my corner!  :)


 


I can't remember where I got the roof picture from but almost definitely either CG Textures or Mayang's Free Texture Library.   It's a typical Cotswold's type of stone roof with large slabs at eves level then reducing as the height increases - ideal for Devon or Wales too!  :cool:   I didn't do any scribing as it's so realistic.


 


I've tried to add a sample here but it won't load so if you send me a PM with you email address I'll get it sent immediately (when you see it close up it's amazing!).


 


Ken.


 

Last edited on Sun Oct 23rd, 2016 07:35 pm by Ken

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PM sent!
I may never have to layer rows of tiles again!  :lol:

cheers
Marty

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Emails sent Marty.

 

John, here's an update photo; I want to try and get the unfinished scenic areas greened up first i.e., the brown earth bits beyond the engine shed you'll see in the following photo, plus get the quayside warehouses built!   Incidentally my ruined barn will be going on the far right hand hillock where it's kind of marooned between the tracks as a result of the GWR compulsory purchasing the land back in the old days!



Ken.

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Ken,
lovely shot of the layout so far.Your delapidated barn is a masterpiece my friend!

Cheers,John.B. :pathead

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Well deserved Picture of the Week. :)

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I'll second that emotion. Well done Ken :thumbs

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Superb shot of the layout Ken, well done indeed. Keep up the good work.

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Lovely modelling Ken and a deserved header.
Phil




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Hi Ken Picture of the week Well deserved Keep up great modelling Well done

Best of Luck

Noviceman

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"Picture of the week", well that's a real surprise and I thank you for that Alan and everyone else who has commented on this.

 

I've had a very busy few months and haven't done much modelling since doing the ruined barn, however I'm back into it now so more to follow in due course.  But just before that I made up and weathered a coaling stage for the engine shed area plus coal staithes and office in the goods yard - note the merchant's name on the latter (which for a laugh I just had to utilise) and I'm sure plenty of you will remember what the initial N stands for?


Incidentally, the surface of the goods yard hasn't been done yet (and the coal office is not actually leaning to the right, it's just the angle of the photo!).

Ken.

Last edited on Sun Feb 19th, 2017 08:25 pm by Ken

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Yup... well deserved header photo. It shows the level of perseverance and attention to detail required for a decent sized N gauge layout. Bravo.
I like the look of those painted rails... something I'm yet to get around to on NE.

Nice coal yard too.


cheers

Marty 

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Ken wrote: Thanks for the nice feedback fellas, it sure makes everything worthwhile. :)

Marty, I can hardly believe it was actually 6 years ago (when we were both working on our respective dioramas as a test for our skillbase) - wow, time certainly flies!    I can't remember why it took me 3 years from then to actually start constructing the layout but I know it was a lot to do with trying to come up with the "perfect" layout plus life's other interruptions!!!    Of course in the meantime my eyesight has got worse so I'm really cracking on with it particularly as I'll be 80 in April - but still feel only 17 and have the energy and enthusiasm to go with it, long may it last!!!!!  :cool:

Ken
Hi Ken.  I wish I knew your secret if I am lucky I"l be 70 this year, but I feel much older than that:oops: . Tablets, visits to the Doc and Hospitals.    All the best. Kevin

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Thanks Marty and Kevin and a couple of things I forgot to mention:-

Loco Depot: the Water Tank and Crane were of course from a Ratio kit but the raised staging/steps etc were scratchbuilt from Balsa plus I used real coal.

Coal Staithes: this was also scratchbuilt but from card - see photo below - (upon reflection wish I'd used Balsa instead as it kept delaminating)
Anyway, I was very pleased with the way it turned out.

Kevin, that comment paragraph you referred to was done 2 years ago so I'll be 82 in April and still playing tennis and cycling etc despite having various health problems!!!   I'm very fortunate as I still have very high energy levels and the enthusiasm to go with it, mind you my eyesight and my memory are getting gradually worse - oh well.................


 


I've started grassing up the far hillocks and am just about to place the ruined barn in position so pictures will follow shortly.


Ken.

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Looking forward to them.
Marty

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As usual I'm amazed that it's a few months since I posted any updates, however I have worked on the layout in between doing all my other hobbies and jobs around the house etc., however I'm going to really try and crack on with this now as I'm taking far too much time doing all these other things!   (why does time seem to go faster as one gets older?). 

So, here's a few pictures, the first showing that I've completed grassing the remaing fields and hills etc (Incidentally, they are not dead sheep in the Quarry office car park, just some that need gluing back on the adjacent field!) :lol::-



 Next three show the ruined barn in position (I really enjoyed doing this):-

 

 



 


Of course I've now got to add the vegetation, trees and all the usual stuff around the station area etc and this will be followed by the various Quayside buildings, the main ones of which I am working on at the moment so more pictures very shortly.

Ken.

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Well Done Mate... and when you do actually get around to running trains, you will have plenty of vignette scenes to get some great modeller photos!  Love the building in ruins and can hardly wait to see the vegetation!
Regards from Oz

Trevor

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The ruined barn is a masterpiece...I particularly like the way you've modelled a rough path around it..it looks so "right"!Can't wait to see your next set of pictures.

Cheers,John.B. :thumbs

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Thanks for the PM Ken

I was always impressed with the ruined barn but now that its in situ it looks fantastic.....I have to keep reminding myself that you do all this at 2mm to the foot. I do admire your patience.

Its a long time since I was last in Devonshire but to my mind you have captured perfectly the rich red soil!

Looking forward to the Quayside buildings

Kind Regards

John
 

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Thank you all and am pleased you like the results.    I mentioned I was working on desiging and building the Quayside Warehouses so here's the results so far (1st drawing is not too clear!):-

 



 



 



 



 



 



 



 

More to follow shortly.   Obviously the roofs are only placed in position before gluing down and the roof tiles have yet to be added.   The buildingline at the back is staggered to reflect the track curve behind plus I think it looks more interesting than it all being straight.   (Incidentally the overall length of all five buildings is only 215mm.    As I've said before, I love making buildings and I've been looking forward to this one even more than I did the barn!)

Ken.

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Hello Ken,
This is going to be another superb model... is the stone wall actually textured or is is printed?  You should make it available for down load!!

I look forward to seeing it finished!

Cheers

Trevor

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Thank you Trevor; the stone wall is printed, not textured.  It's actually the same one I used for the ruined barn but I changed the colour slightly.   I think I downloaded it from CG Textures along with all sorts of others a few years ago.


Here's some more pictures showing it's position etc.,  but none have been fixed down yet:-

 








 
Where the track disappears behind the buildings is where it will be extended to come back as a loop (you'll remember you did the wiring diagram for me a while ago?).

Ken.

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I've now completed the Quayside Warehouse buildings and it's taken a lot of time particularly the cranes/hoists which are very tiny (made from old credit card plastic etc - don't ask how I did the pulley wheel! - and the chain from an old watch).   Anyway, here's some pictures - first one is a bit bright:-

 



 

 



 



 

 



Now I have to fix it in position - with a small area of scenic work immediately behind - and incidentally I didn't put any windows at the back of the buildings as it's only a couple of inches away from the backscene so they wouldn't be seen anyway!  

Ken.

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Hello Ken,
I read through the last two posts, the first of which was when we made the big move so I missed the part about the wiring for the "loop" ... are you talking a return loop or a simple passing siding? Do you need help again with a diagram? No problem just let me know!

Like the finished product and the credit card idea obviously works a treat for you!

Cheers from Oz

Trevor

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Actually Trevor you've already done this for me some while ago but I guess the stress of moving house took it out of your mind but thanks anyway.


Ken

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I've just completed the penultimate building on my layout and it's the trickiest one I've attempted with the matchstick supports (and particularly the cross bracing) being a real challenge in N scale.    It's my Quayside timber loading bay and here's a few photos:-



 



 

When I do a corrugated iron roof I scribe the surface with a blunt penknife to enhance the effect (a bit painstaking - about 740 scribings! - but I like the extra realism) anyway, see the next 2 photos:-

 

 



 



 



 



 

Above is the completed building which is shown placed loosely in position.   I'd like to say it was real fun making this one - I'd like to say!!!!!       Thank goodness I've only one more building to make and it's the Sawmill which will lie to the right of the above, then I can get down to more scenics etc.

Ken.

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Hi Ken.   I can see your point , OO gauge would be small enough for my patience. My latest project a “Pair of Coal Bins”, looked ore suitable for O gauge. I don’t know where I went wrong.   Best wishes. Kevin

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Hello Ken,
The intricate scribings are excellent but may I suggest that you try using a razor saw and hold it sideways and drag it over the length of the corrugations? You would get consistency over the length/width of the material and hopefully no where near the angst of 700 plus individual scribings...

If this actually works for you, I know ...  "where were you when I needed you?"

You definitely win my patience award mate

Cheers from Oz

Trevor

PS Trying any operations yet?

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TREVOR WROTE:- "The intricate scribings are excellent but may I suggest that you try using a razor saw and hold it sideways and drag it over the length of the corrugations? You would get consistency over the length/width of the material and hopefully no where near the angst of 700 plus individual scribings..."


============================================================================================


 


Sorry but I don't fancy trying that Trevor; bear in mind this is "N" scale and the paper for the corrugated roof is very thin therefore it would probably rip it to shreds!   Also, I actually like doing the scribing ;-) and when completed if I rub a fingernail over the roof surface I can actually feel all the corrugations which somehow makes it all worthwhile.


+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++


 


UPDATE:- I've now completed my final building which is the adjacent quayside sawmill and a lot of thought went into this; my idea for this side of the quay was that logs would be unloaded from a ship, piled up on the quay, carted into the mill, sawn into planks then pushed down the bridging slide onto the loading bay for despatch on wagons.   So with this in mind I designed the building accordingly.
As the doors to the sawmill remain open for cutting the logs I wondered whether I could mock up some kind of sawing machinery - daft really because it will hardly be seen once the roof is on, but I like a challenge! - so utilising a couple of "found" plastic bits I came up with what you can see here and the black moulding really seemed to fit the bill for supporting the logs (incidentally the log (scale = 22 feet long x 2 feet diameter) is a real twig and I have loads already cut up to pile onto the quayside.  Here's some photo's of the various stages:-


 


 



 


 


 


 


The above photo shows the buildings loosely placed on their quayside position where I now have to make a small crane and add all the appropriate extras to bring it to life - and this applies to the rest of the layout too which I can now get on with as all the buildings are complete.  


Ken.

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Hi Ken,
The scratching solution has worked for me in the past to simulate wood grain but mainly in thin plastic from margarine/butter lids etc. 

I did actually try what I suggested to you last night on some news paper as well as a sheet of printer paper and the results weren't bad but not as well defined (feeling the scratches as you suggest) as it seems in your pix. Also I tore the end of the paper alongside the rule. 

Being N scale, maybe you could use lids as they are only about .002" or so and I think the coarser razor saws should do the task as I explained...

That said, your work as always looks fantastic!  Well done mate!

Regards from Oz

Trevor




                 

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