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Scalescenes Large Overall Roof......for Granby - Scalescenes Building Kits. - More Practical Help - Your Model Railway Club
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 Posted: Tue Feb 7th, 2012 05:40 pm
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John Dew
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I  think this is what is known as a wrap......the build is complete!

The end module is in place and the street foundation wall permanently glued in position.

On the South or station end:




The white structure in the foreground is the start of the station concourse/platform  which I will describe in the Granby III thread.

The station buildings will form a hollow square around the concourse. The white card rectangle in front represents a single storey station building at right angles to that will be the main station building complete with tower and cupola and adjoining it a second single storey wing.




This is where the wing will be placed. As I wrote previously I had intended to use this wall as part of the building but decided there would be too much weight. I will make the building as a separate stand alone structure and butt it on to the wall..........I doubt if the " double wall" will be noticed.

This is a good shot of the foundation wall........despite my best efforts and innumerable dry fits I managed to glue it 2mm out of true,  so that my carefully calculated clearance on the far side was in jeopardy

I had always intended to add a cosmetic extension of the linking pillar to the foundation wall.......now it became a practical neccessity  






Fortunately there is a little flex in the roof so three of these combined with a firmly glued piece of "luggage" on the far platform provide sufficient compression to force the structure correctly into place (and still be removeable when required)

Here is the support wall on the far side......with the planned clearance





The "Subway" wall is now in position (You can see the opening for other side on the first shot) and I have added some detailing.......at last I have got one bench in on this platform and a chocolate machine!

The marks on the roof underside are part of the design not sloppy glueing.......there is plenty of that......fortunately you cant see too much of it

The unsupported overhang looks a little odd at present but it will eventually be met by an identical matching overhang from the wall supporting the station roof.

The next shot shows how I decided to resolve the viewing issue. 



I will probably continue this roof line on to the station module. There was quite a bit of fiddling involved here and one unexpected and unwelcome development.




The colour difference is more than a little frustrating (its somewhat exaggerated in this shot.....but still a pain). Its partly caused by the shading because I used the top half of the sheet in order to retain the integral edging strip but there is clearly a difference between printing. Given hindsight (wonderful gift) I should have printed the entire requirement in one batch. Anyway its what it is......I guess given the modified roof line there was clearly some bomb damage, since repaired with new tiling!

I added cross beams to stabilise the arches and covered the exposed arch laminate with the girder strips that were supplied for the underside.......the beauty of Scalescenes.....just print another sheet.



It is by no means perfect and from time to time, to me, it appears somewhat over large but on balance I am pretty happy about it. I found it quite challenging but nevertheless thoroughly enjoyable. Not least because of the stream of praise and encouragement I have received from you guys



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 Posted: Tue Feb 7th, 2012 06:02 pm
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Robert
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Well I think you are due for a bit more John as it looks terrific and well worth your time and effort.



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 Posted: Tue Feb 7th, 2012 07:13 pm
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I'm reaching for my elephant stamp, John.  :doublethumb



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 Posted: Tue Feb 7th, 2012 07:42 pm
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MaxSouthOz wrote: I'm reaching for my elephant stamp, John.  :doublethumb


Something like this Max ?  :small:



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 Posted: Tue Feb 7th, 2012 08:13 pm
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That's great! The chocolate machine is just like the red detail in every Constable painting, it draws your eye in and makes you look at the bench etc.

:thumbs:thumbs:thumbs:thumbs

 

Doug



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 Posted: Tue Feb 7th, 2012 08:16 pm
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MaxSouthOz
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Sorry, Dave.  I can't see it.

I must make one for my files.



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 Posted: Tue Feb 7th, 2012 08:28 pm
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How 'bout this?




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 Posted: Tue Feb 7th, 2012 08:54 pm
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MaxSouthOz wrote: How 'bout this?




Wow! Now that is what Winnie the Pooh would have called a 'HEFFALUMP'!!!!

 

Doug



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 Posted: Wed Feb 8th, 2012 03:39 pm
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John Dew
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Wow thanks guys......particularly you Max......an original elephant from the originator is some accolade and much appreciated

Kind Regards



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 Posted: Thu Feb 9th, 2012 11:51 am
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John, that is a marvelous build you have there. I think it looks super, even with the color change on the roof. After all, take a look around and you will see different colors on roofs everywhere. Just tell everyone that the roof was damaged during hurricane Granby! :mutley :mutley :mutley

Seriously John I think you did a super job there.

Wayne



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 Posted: Thu Feb 9th, 2012 01:39 pm
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Great!
The colour shift makes it more interesting to look at and more realistic. A great idea from our master layout builder!

Thomas



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 Posted: Sun Feb 12th, 2012 07:13 pm
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What an excellent build, if i had a hat i would take it off to you John :doublethumb



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 Posted: Mon Feb 13th, 2012 01:25 am
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John Dew
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Thanks again Guys........I am going to write any further developments on the roof in the Granby thread...... I really appreciated all the nice things you said about the project.



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 Posted: Mon Feb 13th, 2012 03:33 pm
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Don't go yet john.  We need a proper "de-brief".

Having done the build, which bits did you find fiddly, tricky, rewarding etc.  I know from other kits, these Scalescenes offerings can be tedious during certain stages - gluing dozens of nondescript bits of card together and, for ages, nothing seems to change then suddenly, it all comes together.  Certainly they go some way to put a smile on glue manufacturer's faces !!!!

Did you get bored often ?  Do you wish you'd never started it ? Do you wish you'd used Scalescenes ages ago and will you use them again etc. etc. etc.



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 Posted: Tue Feb 14th, 2012 03:34 am
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John Dew
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Good call Peter......I intended to do just that......but, of course, rushed off to do my subway project:oops:

So here goes:

Do I wish I had started sooner with Scalescenes? ...........absolutely...... with the caveat that the door didnt really open for me until I bought a laser jet printer......my previous one didnt really cut the mustard. 

What did I learn

Obviously read the instructions time and again......and then read them again.

Use the specified materials.....Doug may work wonders with cornflake packets but (a) North American packets dont measure in and (b) I hate Cornflakes.......if John Whiffen says 2mm it is a mistake to use anything different.

A number of people told me to use a craft (Stanley) knife,rather than a scalpel, for cutting thick card.........best advice I ever had but it got even better when Doreen (SWMBO) bought me Olfa (dark blue) blades which were totally brilliant.

One of the problems I had initially was not cutting at right angles......which made it impossible to achieve nice sharp edges when laminating boards together. Taking extra care with the angle of the blade and using a superior craft knife blade made all the difference.

Conversely the scalpel blades (frequently changed) were perfect for the curved cutting I had to do for the arches. Multiple shallow passes are far more effective than forcing one deep cut.

I found the best practice was to rotate the blades.......ie cut the outlines with a new blade and make the subsequent cuts with a second slightly duller blade

John Whiffen advises spraying the sheets with protective spray immediately after printing........excellent advice......there is a slight sheen and the surface is a little tougher but it is well worth it. If you are over enthusiastic, as I can be, applying adhesive it is simple to wipe off without any damage.........and of course the model is protected from fading.

Generally I used Spray mount to glue the printed sheets to card........its quite toxic (garage door open) but very effective in achieving a uniform bond and minimising air bubbles........an old credit card is perfect for eliminating the few that remain. For smaller pieces I used glue sticks.....initially el cheapo generic then switched to Uhu........which was much more effective.

Curiously despite its size the Large Roof turned out to be a very good starter project. Arches apart there was no intricate cutting and generally speaking it was less measurement critical than smaller projects (as I found with the subway:oops:)

The Large Roof Project specifically

Would I do it again........................Yes

Was I ever bored..........................Not Really......cutting out 14 arches was tedious but you had to be focussed.

What could John Whiffen do to improve the kit?........This is a scaled up version of the smaller roof that comes with the large station......and occasionally it shows......some instructions/notes on the smaller version where omitted.......I suspect the placing of the arches in relation to the roofing sheets is less critical with the small version in consequence there is zero advice about arch placement and tile placement. It would be helpful if thid was corrected. 

What would I do differently...................................recognise the visibility issues from the start and adopt my half roof, braced arches for the entire consructuction.

Make rigid framework to hold the support walls while glueing in the arches to ensure the overall footprint is totally square

Print out the entire roofing requirement in one session to avoid colour discrepancies.


Next Project

The large station........cant wait to begin


Somewhat verbose Peter but you did ask!










 




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 Posted: Tue Feb 14th, 2012 08:10 am
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Excellent John and just what the doctor ordered - you can "stand easy" now. :pathead

You made some very interesting comments - interesting to me anyway.

Ther Olfa craft blades - do they fit a standard "Stanley" craft knife or is it an Olfa tool ?  I alternate between a scalpel, a small Stanley "snap off" knife and the full sized craft knife for my 2mm card.  I find the scalpel more "handy" but the blades just don't last, which does add a fair bit to the overall cost of the project - my current batch cost me about 10p each.

Also interesting the difference between "generic" and branded glue sticks.  I use generics simply because they're far cheaper than the branded ones.

Reading the instructions thoroughly, and then again, is good advice !!  As you say, when the kit is an adaptation of another one, sometimes the instructions are not perfectly clear.  I found that with my terraced houses/corner shops.  I had to reactivate several "resting" brain cells to understand what was going on.  As a result, I also had to redirect those cells normally kept for speech - Liz was delighted and suggested I built another 3 !!!  Kits that is, not brain cells .......................

I'll certainly take on board what you've said and hopefully, my results will improve.

Many thanks.



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 Posted: Tue Feb 14th, 2012 08:28 am
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Hi, Peter and John,

 

I seem to have given the impression that I use Cornoflako Packeto for everything.......sorry! Below I have posted a little guide I sent to Les, who was asking me the same questions, I hope it will help?

My apologies for tacking this onto your post, John, but I wanted to catch you before we wandered off elsewhere!

 








About the only other advice I'd offer in a model like this where there are a lot of folded/wrapped corners very prominently of display is to scribe the inside AND outside of every fold/wrap so that when they are pressed together they meet at true square corners........

 




Scribing the outside/face fold

 

 



Scribing the inside/back face fold

 

 



The resultant square, sharp corner. Bear in mind even in extreme close up, it still looks like a brick wall. From normal viewing distance the sharp straight lines reinforce the effect, and you can see that if another papered sheet were glued to the back of this one, there would be no wonky rounded edge to give away the fact that they are two pieces, see the the wall below.



 

 

 

Generally, I use 2mm pasteboard as a carcase, something cheap and strong, and plenty of 'bracing' with the same material, see here the back view of a warehouse and glue it with PVA. If I'm not happy with a brace, I'll add a fillet or two of card here and there. The chimney stacks are cut from pine, first covered, then glued into place on the outside walls before the adjacent bracing being added to sandwich them.




This is straight out of John Ahearn's book Chapter XIV 'Low Relief Modelling'.

Another of my favourite materials is Cornflake Packet card. Not all cornflake packets are created equal, the large U.K. [1kg] packets are of a white backed card, about 0.6mm thick and are my preference.


I have used it here, underneath the Scalescenes TX18 Grey Tiles paper on the model above so that the viewer doesn't see a 2mm thick tile edge.




I often refer to 'Cartridge' paper, this is just a good quality acid free paper, usually sold for sketching, about 100gm/m2 and I use it for false lintels, stuck onto the walls above windows, doors etc. It takes watercolour well for weathering, and its very slightly grainy surface takes weathering powder/pastel dust extremley well. It also is strong enough to take a bit of punishment without tearing, like this chimney wrapper which needed to be gently pressed and manipulated whilst wet with PVA to form around the angled chimney base which was carved from pine. Ordinary paper would have torn. I've  just printed off half a sheet of this for this sort of job. Careful scoring will allow all sorts of liberties with it.



In the same picture you can see another useful card, on top of the pillars. This is 3mm pasteboard, it scales up to 9" in 1/76th and so represent the length of a brick. Used by picture framers to make deep mount surrounds it is ideal for anything that needs to look 'one brick thick' like an average brick wall. !/8th Balsa wood does the same job quite well, too., that's what I used for the mill-yard walls above, and below, the real thing I used for reference.




 

I hope that has helped with regard to what papers/card I use, John Wiffen's Scalescenes site gives plenty of good advice, and building one of his 'freebies' is a good start to getting to grips with card modelling.



 

oes that help at all?

 

Doug



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 Posted: Tue Feb 14th, 2012 10:55 am
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Now I know why my models aren't quite as good as yours Doug - I don't scribe the window joints ....................:roll::roll::roll::lol::lol:

Thanks for explaining the various cards you use - I did wonder how you managed to eat all that cereal !!!

Another thing I find annoying it that my "papered" panels tend to bend towards the papered side - even if I hold them flat whilst the glue dries.  You can't really see it much on the finished model but from underneath, it looks a bit like an old worn out horse .............  Obviously, once assembly starts, it's impossible to hold the thing flat.

Rather than clutter up John's superb thread, I seem to remember there is a thread running somewhere that you started ...........I'll see if I can bump it so we can continue our tutorial session:cheers.



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 Posted: Tue Feb 14th, 2012 03:27 pm
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John Dew
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Well there you have comments from the pupil followed by the master........very interesting reading.......thank you so much for re-posting Doug.

I need to make a scribing tool as you suggested some time back......I am afraid I am both impulsive and lazy when it comes to glue and wrap.

Peter, I use a Stanley Knife and the olfa blades fit in fine. My generic sticks were made in China and dried out very quickly I found they were a false economy

I found my 2mm boards had a tendency to bow slightly when paper was glued on one sides but it corrected itself when the second board (with printing applied on the other side) was laminated to it. I am beginning to suspect that is why John Wiffen always provides interiors. I was going to dispense with these when I build the station but now I think I will build as per plan!



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 Posted: Tue Feb 14th, 2012 03:39 pm
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Peter, I've found that Cornoflako-Packeto stand up pretty well if you apply the texture paper to the side opposite the printing.

 

Doug



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