Video Archive         Recent Topics      
YMR logo

You are here:  Your Model Railway Club > More Practical Help > Scratchbuilding. > Ash Handling Plant To bottom of page
                 

 Moderated by: Spurno Page:  First Page Previous Page  1  2  3  4  Next Page Last Page  
Start New Topic Reply Printer Friendly

Ash Handling Plant - Scratchbuilding. - More Practical Help - Your Model Railway Club
AuthorPost
 Posted: Wed Jan 12th, 2011 07:51 am
PMQuoteReply
link to this 21st post
Perry
Erstwhile scratchbuilder


Joined: Sun Oct 14th, 2007
Location: United Kingdom
Posts: 2657
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Janner wrote: That's very impressive :pathead  it's coming on really well.

The one thing that I can't really work out is why the ash towers needed to be so tall :???:


It needs the height to allow for a loco to pass underneath, some height for the discharge valve units, a tall enough hopper to make it able hold sufficient ash to make it worth doing, and height for a cabin on top to hold the hoist winch and associated gear.

Add all those up and you've got a pretty tall structure. It's still dwarfed by the coaling plant though! :shock:

It does seem to be, to coin an old phrase, a 'sledgehammer to crack a walnut', but in an MPD servicing a large number of locos on a daily basis, there must have been a huge amount of ash to deal with. This solution was presumably more efficient than some men with shovels.

I'm glad it was, because it will make an imposing addition to my layout. :thumbs

Perry




____________________
Due to cutbacks, the light at the end of the tunnel has been switched off.
Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Wed Jan 12th, 2011 08:09 am
PMQuoteReply
link to this 22nd post
Janner
Former Member
 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Thanks for explaining that Perry, makes sense now :oops:

Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Wed Jan 12th, 2011 01:06 pm
PMQuoteReply
link to this 23rd post
Perry
Erstwhile scratchbuilder


Joined: Sun Oct 14th, 2007
Location: United Kingdom
Posts: 2657
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

I feel like my eyeballs are out on stalks! :shock:

I've started fabricating the skip hoist gear and needed to make up a pair of brackets. I've just cut the first twelve pieces to size, but it's very fiddly.

The four back supports are made from 0.030" square strip, cut 20mm long, and the eight horizontal bracket plates are made from 0.020" plastikard. The plan below shows the dimensions. They're fairly small!



O.K. My eyeballs have now retracted back to their normal positions. Onwards and upwards! :thumbs

Perry





____________________
Due to cutbacks, the light at the end of the tunnel has been switched off.
Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Wed Jan 12th, 2011 06:42 pm
PMQuoteReply
link to this 24th post
MaxSouthOz
Admin


Joined: Sat Aug 23rd, 2008
Location: Adelaide , Australia
Posts: 12343
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

I know how you freel, Perry.  Mine were on stalks after Jeff posted the picture of his sister in her cricket gear.  :shock:



____________________
Max
Port Elderley
Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Thu Jan 13th, 2011 06:00 pm
PMQuoteReply
link to this 25th post
wogga
Knows nowt about prototypes


Joined: Sat Mar 27th, 2010
Location: Longridge, Lancashire, United Kingdom
Posts: 847
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

The instructions in this Kit are a bit poor Perry, are sure you everything in the box?:shock:



____________________
Regards
Pete.

ECOS2 with RR&Co Traincontroller and a load of other electronics so i can sit back and watch the trains go by.
Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Thu Jan 13th, 2011 06:43 pm
PMQuoteReply
link to this 26th post
Perry
Erstwhile scratchbuilder


Joined: Sun Oct 14th, 2007
Location: United Kingdom
Posts: 2657
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

:mutley:mutley:mutley

Sorry. :oops::roll:

You stick part 1 to part 2, then you stick part three to part four, then you stick parts 1 and 2 to parts 3 and 4 ......well, you get the idea! :cool wink

The build for this project is similar to the coaling plant in many ways, but simpler and smaller, so I didn't think there was much point in going through the same stuff again. If anyone has any questions, ask away. I can't promise I'll know the answer, but if I don't, someone else on here will! :thumbs

Anyway, back to the Ash Plant.

My photographs of the plant at Carnforth show what appears to be a 'planked' surface inside the hopper, so I fitted some suitable embossed plastikard in the back and inside both sides to represent this. It probably won't show up on photographs, but I know it's there.:roll:

This is the Carnforth plant:



I made up a pair of brackets consisting of eight small pieces of microstrip each as mentioned in a previous post. These were allowed to set hard, then attached to the front of the plant. These will support the skip rails.

The skips rails were made from some 1.6mm diameter plastic rod. These were bent carefully to shape by hand, working a little at a time to prevent overstressing of the plastic. I needed two pairs of rails, two inners and two outers. I made up one pair to fit the main structure, then made the second pair to match the first as closely as possible making sure the cross supports were fixed in mirror image. The inner and outer rails were then set 4mm apart, using some scraps of plastikard as temporary spacers. They were assembled on a sheet of glass, as is my usual practice.

Once they were set, I attached them to the brackets with tiny dabs of tube polystyrene cement as this gives more time for adjustment than solvent - which basically doesn't give you any!

Four small rectangles of 0.040" plastikard were glued up to make the skip receiving box at the foot of the rails.

That's about all for today. It all needs to dry hard overnight before I do anything else.

Here's how it looks so far. The cabin is still not fixed in place yet.



There's not really that much more to do now. A few little brackets and rods here and there, the hopper discharge outlets, stairs and handrails, and Robert is your mother's brother!

Perry



____________________
Due to cutbacks, the light at the end of the tunnel has been switched off.
Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Fri Jan 14th, 2011 04:11 am
PMQuoteReply
link to this 27th post
phill
Hello


Joined: Sat Oct 13th, 2007
Location: Lancing West Sussex, United Kingdom
Posts: 6496
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Cant wait for this to go the GWR lsyout, lovrly job Perry. Think i exit stage left :pedal:mutley

Phill

I reckon the only way you could improve this is to make it a working plant, :thumbs

Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Fri Jan 14th, 2011 05:03 am
PMQuoteReply
link to this 28th post
Petermac
Moderator


Joined: Sat Oct 13th, 2007
Location: Nr Bergerac, France
Posts: 16709
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

It looks the business Perry and thanks for explaining what the box at the bottom was. :thumbs

On that point, how does the whole shooting match work ?  Do they tip ash into the box and hoist it up to the hopper ?  How does it get into the box in the first place - by hand and where from ?

As I think you've said earlier, but I'd hate to be around when they discharge the ash from the hopper into trucks ............ Maybe they could have saved some cash and just put women under the shutes rather than having to go through that lipstick stage mentioned by Owen ............:roll::roll:



____________________
'Petermac
Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Fri Jan 14th, 2011 07:07 am
PMQuoteReply
link to this 29th post
Perry
Erstwhile scratchbuilder


Joined: Sun Oct 14th, 2007
Location: United Kingdom
Posts: 2657
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

The box at the bottom actually surrounds a shaft that on the prototype goes down into the ground. The skip, after being emptied into the top of the hopper, decends on a cable along the curved rails into an underground hopper, passing through the box. It sits there in the lower hopper until a weight sensor in the cabin decided it's full and hoists it up again to be emptied. One presumes that the box was primarily there to stop railway workers from either falling down the shaft or being struck by the skip when it was being raised or lowered.

The ash from the locos is dropped and/or shoveled through grids at ground level, either beside or between the running rails - not into the box. The ash slides down a shaft, that connects with the skip shaft, into the underground hopper, collecting in the skip. There were up to three parallel roads (tracks) connected by dumping shafts to each skip hopper, although my model is a single road example. In that case all the shafts met in the underground hopper.

The hoisting mechanism automatically shut off the grids so that ash being dumped onto them couldn't fall into the lower hopper whilst the skip was not there. Once the skip was empty and back in place, the grids opened again allowing the flow of ash down the shaft(s).

I have considered making a skip and fixing it half-way up the curved rails, but I think it might look too 'static'. I will probably just run a cable from the cabin winch (yet to be built) down into the box where it will 'disappear' into the shaft, representing the (unseen) skip in its lowered position.

These structures were very hi-tec for their time and very cleverly designed and engineered. Most of the structure was cast concrete.

Perry



____________________
Due to cutbacks, the light at the end of the tunnel has been switched off.
Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Fri Jan 14th, 2011 08:15 am
PMQuoteReply
link to this 30th post
ddolfelin
Straight man to the stars.


Joined: Thu Sep 10th, 2009
Location: Denbighshire, United Kingdom
Posts: 5554
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

"very cleverly designed and engineered"

As is your model.



____________________
http://dddioramas.webs.com/

11 + 2 = 12 + 1
Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Sat Jan 15th, 2011 08:23 am
PMQuoteReply
link to this 31st post
Perry
Erstwhile scratchbuilder


Joined: Sun Oct 14th, 2007
Location: United Kingdom
Posts: 2657
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

ddolfelin wrote: "very cleverly designed and engineered"

As is your model.

I only copied what they designed and built. :???:

I've done a little more construction work. The hoist rails have had the remaining braces and brackets added. The skip receiver box has been fixed in place. I realised that it may be possible to see through the window into the cabin when the model is on the layout, so I'm building a winch to go inside. In the prototype it was sited just inside the window, so I think it's needed. I can drop the cable down through the floor (again, as per the prototype) and thence down between the hoist rails into the box - where I can pretend it disappears undergound.

I may put a small bench or table in the cabin too but I don't know if it will be visible, so I'll have to experiment to see if it's worthwhile.

Next are the stairs and handrails, plus one or two finishing details and that should be it. More photos today or tomorrow, hopefully, depending on distractions and disturbances over the weekend. :roll:

Perry

Edit: Oops! Nearly forgot: I've still got to make the outlet valves too. :oops:



____________________
Due to cutbacks, the light at the end of the tunnel has been switched off.
Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Sat Jan 15th, 2011 10:38 am
PMQuoteReply
link to this 32nd post
owen69
Former Member
 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Peter, I could be wrong here, but I think the ash was damped down before discharged into trucks,
in my case it was not in a hopper but washed through a channel then dredged into trucks.

:thumbs:lol::cool:

Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Sat Jan 15th, 2011 10:50 am
PMQuoteReply
link to this 33rd post
Petermac
Moderator


Joined: Sat Oct 13th, 2007
Location: Nr Bergerac, France
Posts: 16709
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

That would certainly kill the dust Owen and, thinking about it, reduce the volume massively.

It would make a lot of sense. :thumbs



____________________
'Petermac
Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Sat Jan 15th, 2011 11:40 am
PMQuoteReply
link to this 34th post
Perry
Erstwhile scratchbuilder


Joined: Sun Oct 14th, 2007
Location: United Kingdom
Posts: 2657
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

I'm fairly sure that the coaling plant and the ash plant were both equipped with some way of spraying water whilst discharge was taking place. I have been unable to obtain any idea of how the arangements for this would have looked, so I've left them off.

Progress today has been much better than I expected. :brickwall

I made two discharge outlets from some hexagonal plastic tube - a ballpoint pen originally. The ladders (sorry, I think I said stairs earlier) have been fitted, as have the handrails around the platforms.

I've used up my remaining stock of yoyo string to make the cable and installed the winch.

Apart from a very short **section of handrail that can't be fitted until the cabin is fixed in place, I think construction is just about finished. I think there's a risk of doing too much to it, so I'm going to call it a day.

Here are some photos of the (** almost) finished model:







The cabin has been removed to show the winch.



The winch can be seen through the window. The short section of handrail to the right of the cabin remains to be constructed after the cabin is fixed in place.

The lot has to be allowed to set hard before painting can start.

O.K. That's another little scratchbuild project completed. If you enjoyed it half as much as me, then I enjoyed it twice as much as you! :mutley

Perry




____________________
Due to cutbacks, the light at the end of the tunnel has been switched off.
Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Sat Jan 15th, 2011 03:12 pm
PMQuoteReply
link to this 35th post
Michael Thornberry
Former Member
 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Hello Perry,
Excellent modelling. It's been a pleasure to follow this and the previous building. What next I wonder - a Coking-Plant and Cooling-Tower or something lower so that we can get-rid of our stiff-necks from looking-up too much, :lol::thumbs
Kind Regards,
Michael Thornberry.

Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Sat Jan 15th, 2011 03:25 pm
PMQuoteReply
link to this 36th post
John Dew
Full Member


Joined: Tue Dec 1st, 2009
Location: North Vancouver, British Columbia Canada
Posts: 3791
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Superb Perry.......quite brilliant. Its the absolute precision which both impresses and depresses me:lol::cry:

Kind Regards



____________________
John
Granby III
Lenz DCC,RR&Co Gold V9 B1 Windows 10
Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Sat Jan 15th, 2011 03:49 pm
PMQuoteReply
link to this 37th post
Perry
Erstwhile scratchbuilder


Joined: Sun Oct 14th, 2007
Location: United Kingdom
Posts: 2657
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

John Dew wrote: ............Its the absolute precision..........

I wish! :mutley:mutley I strive for, but never achieve the standard I seek.

Thanks for the kind comments though. :cheers

Perry



____________________
Due to cutbacks, the light at the end of the tunnel has been switched off.
Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Sat Jan 15th, 2011 05:43 pm
PMQuoteReply
link to this 38th post
Chubber
Casseroled Badger


Joined: Thu Oct 2nd, 2008
Location: Ivybridge, Devon, Gateway To Dartmoor.. , United Kingdom
Posts: 4562
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

A1 model engineering, Mr P., and thank you for posting the "'OwIdidits'" too.


Doug



____________________
'You may share the labours of the great, but you will not share the spoil...' Aesop's Fables

"Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy" - Benjamin Franklin

Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Sat Jan 15th, 2011 08:16 pm
PMQuoteReply
link to this 39th post
Wayne Williams
Member


Joined: Mon Oct 15th, 2007
Location: Hudson, Florida USA
Posts: 2635
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Perry wrote:
I wish! :mutley:mutley I strive for, but never achieve the standard I seek.
Perry



Perry,
Now that was one super build. I know what you mean by never achieving what you know you can do.

I think you and I are from the same mold. (You just have more experience than I do.)

I really enjoyed watching this go up.

One thing I've noticed from your work. I think I am still using too much solvent to make my bonds. I will strive to correct that.

Wayne



____________________
My Layout "The South Shore Line":
http://yourmodelrailway.net/view_topic.php?id=509&forum_id=21
Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Sat Jan 15th, 2011 08:41 pm
PMQuoteReply
link to this 40th post
Perry
Erstwhile scratchbuilder


Joined: Sun Oct 14th, 2007
Location: United Kingdom
Posts: 2657
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Thanks for your kind comments, Wayne - and everyone else, of course. :oops:

One thing that might interest you about the coal and ash plant builds is that I found that I used more 'tube glue' (polystyrene cement) on these than I would usually use on a 'normal' four-walls-and-a-roof building. I didn't use it exclusively though. There was still a lot of use for a dab or two of solvent, about which more later in this post.

The reason for using more tube glue is that I quickly discovered that there were going to be a large number of small joints to be made that needed a good degree of strength and that also needed to be able to be adjusted for accurate positioning.

With solvent, the part is held in place, solvent applied, and that's it, it can't be moved!

Tube glue not only allows for this adjustment but, if a small amount is squeezed out into a small container - I use a milk bottle top - and left to 'go off' for a few moments before applying it, it becomes wonderfully 'sticky' and helps hold awkward pieces in place whilst they are poked and prodded into position. I apply it in tiny amounts with the tip of a cocktail stick to both surfaces wherever possible. If only one surface can be glued, then I apply it slightly more thickly.

On the subject of applying solvent, I keep two brushes with my solvent bottle; one small and one medium sized. I choose the appropriate brush for the joint I'm making at the time. With the larger brush it's too easy to flood a small joint. Conversely, the small brush doesn't carry enough solvent to do the job on a larger joint. It's just one of the habits I have when I'm scratchbuilding, but it's often a lot of these little habits that make a big difference when they're all brought together. I suppose we all find our own special ways of doing the simplest things, but seldom think to tell anyone else about them because to us they are so habitual.

I'm sure many of our members have little tips like that which are never mentioned - probably because we tend to think, "Oh, everybody knows how to do that." I'm probably the worst culprit. Even things such as how to cut microstrip and rod with a knife so that the tiny cut piece doesn't fly off across the room. We all know that one, I'm sure. Or do we? :hmm

Perry



____________________
Due to cutbacks, the light at the end of the tunnel has been switched off.
Back To Top PMQuoteReply

This is topic ID = 7978     Current time is 12:19 am Page:  First Page Previous Page  1  2  3  4  Next Page Last Page    
You are here:  Your Model Railway Club > More Practical Help > Scratchbuilding. > Ash Handling Plant
You can type a quick reply to this topic here. Click in the box below to begin.

Or to reply to an individual post, or to include images, attachments and formatted text,
click the Quote or Reply buttons on each post above.

To start a new topic in this forum, click the Start New Topic button below.
To start a new topic in a different forum, click the Forum Jump drop-down list below.
Start New Topic


Back to top of page

           
15 Most Recent Topics

Problems with this web site? Please contact the Webmaster.

All material submitted to this web site is the responsibility of the respective contributor. By submitting material to this web site you acknowledge that you accept full responsibility for the material submitted.
Unless stated otherwise, all the material displayed on this web site, including all text, photographs, drawings and other images, is copyright and the property of the respective contributor. Registered members are welcome to use it for their own personal non-commercial modelmaking purposes. It must not be reproduced or re-published elsewhere in any form, or used commercially, without first obtaining the owner's express permission.
The owner of this web site may edit, modify or remove any content at any time without giving notice or reason.    © 2008

                 

Recent Topics Back to top of page

Powered by UltraBB 1.15 Copyright © 2007-2011 by Jim Hale and Data 1 Systems. Page design copyright © 2008-2013 Martin Wynne. Photo gallery copyright © 2009 David Williams.