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No.2 Coaling Plant - Scratchbuilding. - More Practical Help - Your Model Railway Club
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 Posted: Sat Jan 1st, 2011 09:09 am
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owen69
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I now know how make the rails for my long viaduct, mine were a real cock -up.
I love this forum me...

:thumbs:lol::lol::cool:

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 Posted: Sat Jan 1st, 2011 10:18 am
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Perry
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I have just come up with an alternative method for fixing the handrail onto the tops of the uprights.

I taped a metal straightedge to my sheet of glass, then pressed the handrail against it, thereby keeping it straight and in place.

The base strip, already fitted with uprights, was laid on it's side, with the top of the uprights touching the handrail. Working left to right (or the other way if you're left-handed), press the upright against the handrail and apply a small amount of solvent to the joint. Hold in place for a few seconds, then move on to the next one. This method gives time to adjust the position of each upright before the solvent is applied.

In the following photo, I have fixed the first four uprights and am working my way along to the right.



Once the whole lot has set hard, I plan to reinforce each joint with a touch of tube cement.

This method is a lot less tricky than trying to get the handrail in place with the uprights all waving about in the air.

I'll update again if I run into any snags.

Perry



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 Posted: Sat Jan 1st, 2011 10:49 am
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Perry
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This worked fine. :thumbs

I fixed the handrails to two bases with eleven uprights each in a matter of seconds. It's much faster, more accurate and less hassle than the original method. In fact, I would say it is at least five times as fast and twice as accurate.

I'm going to let the solvent dry for several hours before I start reinforcing the joints with tube cement. I'm also only going to do the reinforcing a bit at a time; perhaps a third or half of the uprights before allowing drying time, just as a precaution.

I find I get my best ideas after a drop or two of Scottish falling-down water! :thud

I have three more long sets and some short sections still to make, but all of sudden it doesn't seem such an onerous task.

Perry



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 Posted: Sat Jan 1st, 2011 11:00 am
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Petermac
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Ah - you've answered my question Perry.

You'd said earlier that you use tube cement because solvent is too "fine", then you said solvent with this new method - now I understand why - the tube cement will follow. :thumbs

That "flat" system must be much easier than trying to stick the handrail onto floating uprights and it looks such an obvious thing to do - once someone else has discovered it.................:roll::roll::cheers



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 Posted: Sat Jan 1st, 2011 11:18 am
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Perry
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Exactly so; the solvent will only be used for 'tacking' the uprights in place. It's fast to do and easy to adjust the position if required.

The tube cement will give it strength but doesn't have the instant 'grab' of solvent.

Perry



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 Posted: Sat Jan 1st, 2011 12:34 pm
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Wayne Williams
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Perry,
What exactly is the polystyrene tube cement?
Wayne



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 Posted: Sat Jan 1st, 2011 12:55 pm
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Perry
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The stuff I have here on my bench is marketed by Humbrol and the printing on the tube states, "Poly Cement'. It's the glue used a lot by builders of plastic kits; just the common or garden polystyrene cement. Any hobby shop will have this or it's equivalent. I call it 'tube' cement because it comes in a 'toothpaste tube' type container and to distinguish it from solvent which is liquid and comes in a bottle. It is quite viscous.

Perry



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 Posted: Sun Jan 2nd, 2011 07:32 am
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wogga
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Top tip there Perry, i take it using glass doesn't let the Mek bond to it? it's coming on lovely can't wait to see the painting stage i shall continue to lurk.

Regards

Pete



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 Posted: Sun Jan 2nd, 2011 08:26 am
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Perry
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wogga wrote: Top tip there Perry, i take it using glass doesn't let the Mek bond to it? it's coming on lovely can't wait to see the painting stage i shall continue to lurk.

Regards

Pete

I basically use two surfaces for my modelling; a cutting mat for marking out and cutting on, and a thick piece of glass for construction and glueing up. (I do a lot of my marking out with a knife.)

As you quite rightly say, solvent doesn't bond to glass and neither do many other adhesives, although obviously some do. :shock:  Paint, glue, PVA, you name it, it will all scrape off easily with an old utility knife blade I keep for the purpose.

For keeping stuff flat and square, you can't beat a piece of glass.

By the way, don't EVER try cutting or drilling down onto the glass. Even if it doesn't harm the glass, it will blunt the tools very quickly and there is always the danger of the blade or bit slipping and causing injury.

Enjoy your 'lurking'! :thumbs

Perry



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 Posted: Sun Jan 2nd, 2011 08:40 am
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Petermac
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A good idea about using glass for assembly Perry.

Does it have ground edges and is it pretty thick ?



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 Posted: Sun Jan 2nd, 2011 09:07 am
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Perry
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Petermac wrote: A good idea about using glass for assembly Perry.

Does it have ground edges and is it pretty thick ?

The piece of glass I use was originally a sliding door from a piece of furniture. It's 4mm thick and 370mms x 220mm in size. It has nicely ground edges and corners.  One side has a ground-in recess that formed a handle for sliding the panel open. I have yet to discover a use for that! I usually use the glass with the handle side downwards anyway.

Perry

P.S. I've just though of a use for the handle recess: I could use it to store small parts during construction to stop them rolling away! :thumbs



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 Posted: Sun Jan 2nd, 2011 11:26 am
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ddolfelin
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Great stuff, Perry.

"A good idea about using glass for assembly."
Yes, although it depends what's in it.



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 Posted: Sun Jan 2nd, 2011 03:18 pm
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Perry
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I can't build the railings for the very lowest level of the hoisting gear housing until the upper part of the assembly is permanently mounted on the lower part because a stairway and handrails bridge the two.

Apart from that, fabrication on this side of the structure is pretty much finished.





Since posting these images, I've spotted a misalignment on one part of the handrail that I will have to fix! :oops:

Overall though, I'm reasonably happy with the results, given that my eyesight and hands aren't as good as they were. :roll:

That's one more job to tick off my 'To Do' list. :brickwall

The counterweight rails and wagon platform and hoist are next. :thumbs

Perry




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 Posted: Sun Jan 2nd, 2011 03:58 pm
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Petermac
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That really does look good Perry - in spite of the wonky handrail. :thumbs



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 Posted: Sun Jan 2nd, 2011 04:03 pm
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Perry
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lPetermac wrote: That really does look good Perry - in spite of the wonky handrail. :thumbs
 

Thank you.  The wonky handrail is wonky no more!

I've just fitted the long handrails to the lower deck, so it's really starting to come together now. :doublethumb

The end is in sight! - well, almost. :shock:

Perry



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 Posted: Sun Jan 2nd, 2011 08:39 pm
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MaxSouthOz
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Looking good, Perry.  I reckon I'll put the glass over the blown up blueprints when I do my handrails.  :thumbs



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 Posted: Sun Jan 2nd, 2011 09:14 pm
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Janner
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That's a first class job Perry  :thumbs  very impressive.

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 Posted: Mon Jan 3rd, 2011 01:18 am
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Think I'm growing to hate you:twisted:.....:lol:

Looking real good Perry:thumbs

Perry wrote: I can't build the railings for the very lowest level of the hoisting gear housing until the upper part of the assembly is permanently mounted on the lower part because a stairway and handrails bridge the two.

Apart from that, fabrication on this side of the structure is pretty much finished.





Since posting these images, I've spotted a misalignment on one part of the handrail that I will have to fix! :oops:

Overall though, I'm reasonably happy with the results, given that my eyesight and hands aren't as good as they were. :roll:

That's one more job to tick off my 'To Do' list. :brickwall

The counterweight rails and wagon platform and hoist are next. :thumbs

Perry



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 Posted: Mon Jan 3rd, 2011 08:22 am
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Perry
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MaxSouthOz wrote: Looking good, Perry.  I reckon I'll put the glass over the blown up blueprints when I do my handrails.  :thumbs
That's a neat idea, Max. However, a word of caution; depending on how thick the piece of glass is, be careful that it doesn't lead to optical distortion because of the angle you are looking at it from. (Parallax) The thicker the glass, the more pronounced the distortion.

For example, in my case, the glass is 4mm thick. If I were to lay the glass over a dot marked on a piece of paper and make a mark on the glass with a wax pencil exactly over the dot, then move my head slightly, the mark would no longer appear to be over the dot. Bearing in mind the accuracy required in building something like your loco, it could throw the whole lot out of kilter.

Ask me how I know this..............or better still....don't. :sad:

 I hope I'm not "teaching granny to suck eggs" here and you probably know more than me about parallax issues, but I wouldn't want you to build your handrails using this method and then discover they don't fit. :shock:

Perry



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 Posted: Mon Jan 3rd, 2011 08:37 am
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Perry wrote: , but I wouldn't want you to build your handrails using this method and then discover they don't fit. :shock:

Perry


Perry, if he did find they did not fit, I would hear the explosion from where I live 35 miles away & see the mushroom cloud exclam:

I have felt the ground shake a couple of times while he has been building the loco.

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