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Chubber
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I have started this thread to illustrate the building of a classic piece of railway modelling, namely the Harbour Office shown in John Ahern’s ‘Miniature Building Construction’* first published by Percival Marshall in 1939. It is to be built in three-quarter relief in 4mm-1/76th scale and I intend to include production of a working drawing, drawing a development of the hipped roof, applying texture sheets and forming cornices together with scratch-building Georgian arch-topped and square sash windows mainly in card and paper with some wooden components.
I thank Mrs Celia V Russell and Mrs Eunice Fells for their permission to reproduce material from the book, and Mr Gerald Russell for his biographical assistance.
John Henry ‘Jack’ Ahern lived with his wife Gladys in the 1930s in St John’s Wood London behind the Lords Cricket ground and worked in the insurance business. They were members of the Fabian Society, and associates of H.G. Wells, and Gladys produced illustrations for some of his books. Taking early retirement, he set about building a model railway in the basement. Madder Valley now on permanent exhibition at Pendon ^ following his death in 1961. 
That a book first published in 1939 was re-printed in 1979 speaks volumes for its value to modellers. Printed in a pre-plastic age, before the inception of ‘Hobby Shops’ and ‘Craft Centres’ the illustration below detailing the use and sharpening of the principal cutting tool, a razor blade, brings home how well served modellers are today.


 
Copyright CV Russell and E Fells                                                                                                         Copyright CV Russell and E Fells

The use of a computer drawing system alone saves hours of drawing and scaling of components although ‘brick’ papers were available for a short while until the stringencies introduced by WW2 and which lasted for years afterwards made sourcing modelling material difficult. The majority of materials were household items, sourced from stationers and hardware shops. It makes the building of the wonderful street scene below even more remarkable, especially in the ‘newfangled’ 4mm/1ft scale, as model railways until then had been in large gauges and strictly the preserve of the wealthy.



Copyright CV Russell and E Fells

Failing to plan is, as everyone knows, planning to fail, so the first thing needed is a plan. Comparing the original drawing with another scaled drawing in the book, in this case a small stone-built warehouse, I drew several pictures of the Harbour Office on graph paper next to one of the warehouse which I knew to be 50 foot long until it 'looked' right. Then, on fine graph paper I drew a full size picture from which I could size the various elements both with dividers and by reference to the 40mm/10ft scale proportion. 

Y.M.R. members are very welcome to make any non-profit use of any of my own drawings but I earnestly ask you not to reproduce any of the original drawings or illustrations.


Copyright D Dickson

Suitable ready made plastic window frames are not to be found for the upper storey so I drew a series of pictures to help me understand their geometry, eventually discovering that by dividing them into thirds vertically gives the right impression. Having printed them out on satin photo-paper I set to and cut out the first set. I need to cut out 7 before I managed three presentable specimens, only to find that with glazing bars of 0.5mm they looked too clumsy so repeated the exercise at approximately 0.3mm and this time did it after 4 attempts. The use of satin paper is recommended as gloss papers tend to de-laminate whilst being cut. As they fit an opening only 20mm high they were quite fiddly and I needed to hone the scalpel blade down to half thickness on fine wet-and-dry paper to achieve this modest level of success.
A couple of useful tips here is to align and then multi-print the drawings before using a steel rule along several windows. Start to cut from the left-hand corner of every pane with the ruler covering the glazing bars across the sheet, then up to the next row of panes, before turning the sheet 90 degrees and repeating the exercise until all four sides of each pane are cut almost to their right-hand extremities. Then, turn the whole sheet over and extend the cut lines into the corners. Do not 'pull' out any pieces reluctant to come out, you will left with a little feather of paper which you will be tempted to cut out and in so doing cut through a glazing bar.
Once you have one you are happy with, give it a coat of matt acrylic varnish to seal the cut edges of the paper to prevent weathering paints from de-laminating them and to strengthen the paper.





Here they are, mounted in a piece of card as a mock-up.  They will later be stuck to CD case material using MEK, which will evaporate leaving the plastic clear, before being glued to the inside of the building.




My next task will be the '6 over 6' Georgian sash window for the ground floor. I shall try to cut separate upper and lower sashes, glazing each with doubled over Sellotape so that it can be modelled partly open.




*Miniature Building Construction: an Architectural Guide for Modellers  by John Henry Ahern ISBN: 0852426860 / ISBN-13: 9780852426869.]
 
^http://www.pendonmuseum.com/about/madder.php














Last edited on Fri Jul 30th, 2010 10:36 pm by Chubber

MaxSouthOz
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This going to be very interesting, doofer.  Thank you.  :thumbs

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Doof

In my mind John Ahern was probably one of the greatest modellers of all time and the Madder Valley decades ahead of its time.

With your model buildings skill you are probably the very best person on this forum to produce a model that will do justice to his memory.

I am really looking forward to following this thread.

ddolfelin
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Well done as always.

Gwent Rail
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Here's one that's going to be well worth following!

I'll be very interested to see this develop, Doug. Please go in to as much detail as you can manage, this is one plasticard scratchbuilder who's going to have a go in card after the show - just for fun. :thumbs:thumbs

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If this one turns out half as good as those I saw, and I'm sure it will, it will be some building !!

Looking at those windows Doug and your description of how you did them, I'd be wishing they would bring the window tax back !!!

Even honing a scalpel blade to half it's normal width is like talking quantum physics to me - I can hardly see them fresh from the packet :shock::shock::shock:

I know I'm not going to be the only one glued to this thread. :cheers

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Another great thread to follow. Yet that old photo of a "temperance hotel" makes my hands shake.

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will follow with great interest, i have some old modelling books and have always been fascinated wth the techniques
they used .

:hmm:lol::lol::cool:

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Don't forget the sixteen Georgian windows around the back, Doofer.
The panes are mounted in rows of 5 x 10.
Each pane measures 5" x 4" and the window bars are 0.125" actual size to view.

Actually, I suppose I'm being a pain myself - this is a joke.

Do you have rear detail?

Chubber
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ddolfelin wrote:

Do you have rear detail?


How dare you Sir, we hardly know one another!!!!



Rear-guarding Doofer

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:It's a no no


I was waiting for that!

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Thank you for your encouragement, after several false starts I've achieved a passable window for the ground floor. Again, printed onto satin photo paper and cut out carefully, one with the lower sash cut out, one with the upper sash cut out and one with both sashes cut out to leave the 'frame'. The fourth was saved for the almost inevitable slip-up. The background colour is deliberately pale grey, so that any slight errors in cutting out don't show up too glaringly as they would if they were printed in black ink.




Then I cut some pieces of Sellotape to fit behind the panes, covered them 'sticky to sticky' face with other pieces, leaving just enough overlap to stick them to the back of the cut-outs and sandwiched them together holding them along the top edge with a bulldog clip whilst I applied PVA between the lower edges where needed, then gluing the top edges once the top had stuck fast.


Shown here in the cardboard mock-up wall, covered roughly with some Scalescenes brick paper. A 'stone' window sill would be fitted in the lower part of the square opening.





I'm off to the beach at Royan for a few days camping, I'm meeting up with old chums and their kids, otherwise I wouldn't contemplate going near the coast during the French holiday season! More 'Harbour Office' when I get back.

Doug







Last edited on Sat Jul 31st, 2010 06:03 pm by Chubber

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Lovely modelling - those sashes are incredible !!!

Have a great trip to Royan Doug.  Just chill out for a few days whilst honing your next batch of blades. :cheers

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Superb stuff,Doug.I can see you making a few converts to card modelling with this thread!
(Me included!)

Cheers,John.B.:thumbs

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I like the Sellotape idea, Doug.  It will look like the older type of glass.  :thumbs

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Well, having had time to do a little more research into prototypical building construction, Mr Ahern’s drawing is a little ambiguous. The building as drawn was possibly pre-Georgian, of brick construction in the lower storey and timber above and the lower front elevation rendered in two thicknesses.  The front overhang was probably clad with ‘mechanical tiles’ later to ‘modernise’ it or to render it less vulnerable to the weather. In order to do so, the original [Georgian?] windows would have needed shipping further out-board or replaced entirely, perhaps explaining why they differ from the other two sash windows shown. The hipped roof, too, raises concerns because the upper cornice needs a system of draining the rainwater and I can find no satisfactory example in my Vols. 1-3 of McKay’s ‘Building Construction’.
 
Accordingly, I shall attribute the result to the local builder, Mister Daveth Reckly!
 
 
Hipped roof construction.
 
Here is a method of drawing the development for a simple hipped roof, from a scale drawing of the side and end elevations. With those two drawings, and a pair of compasses you will be able to measure the length of the ridge, [D-A], the length of the lower sides and ends, [E-C, C-B] and the distance down the slope of the roof to the lower edge, [A-B]. Notice that the distance G-F, the height of the roof is much less than the length of the slope, A-C.







Start by drawing three parallel lines, slightly longer than E-C and the distance A-C apart. In the middle of the middle line mark the length of the ridge D-A and divide it by two, marking the point G.
 
Using a set square [or by construction] draw a line at right angles from point G such that it cuts the two outer lines.
 
From the point where this line cuts the upper and lower line mark out half the distance E-C on either side to give points V,W,Y and Z and join them as shown, D-V,D-W,A-Y and A-Z.
 
From A scribe an arc of length A-Y and from Z an arc of length B-C.
 
Where they cross is point X. Join points A-X.
 
Repeat this exercise at the other end and you will have a pattern, which when folded up will look exactly like the side and end elevations of your building.

In constructing a hipped roof, I prefer to paste the pattern to 2mm card, and when dry cut it out as four separate parts of which I lay out three pieces and fasten them together from the inside with old-fashioned brown parcel tape [The licky-sticky type....yech...] ensuring they are firmly pressed together as the tape is applied. Then I cut the fourth strip, stick it carefully to one side of the remaining joint and allow to dry before folding up into a 3-D shape and sticking the last joint as shown below.



I hope that I have explained that well enough, if not please shout out!


Doug

Last edited on Sun Aug 8th, 2010 04:40 pm by Chubber

Gwent Rail
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As part of my planning for the show, I've been involved with getting the necessary speakers for our seminars.

One of the concerning things has been how we could replace any speaker that became ill or otherwise unavailable before his presentation.

This thread has given me what could well be the answer - perhaps Doug could be prepaired to step in with a short presentation on card modelling (maybe including a short demo) :exclam:exclam  Perhaps if nobody cries off, we could get Doug to do his pitch on Sunday afternoon instead / as well as the question & answer session.

Up for it Doof :question:question:question

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:shock::shock::shock::shock::shock::shock::shock::shock::shock::shock::shock::shock::shock::shock::shock::shock::shock::shock::shock::shock::shock::shock::shock:

Jeff, I'm flattered!

That said, for 'Lifeboats' and 'H4H' I'd do anything within my scope that's honest, decent and legal, but for the life of me I can't think  of much to say or demonstrate that lots of folks already do/know?

If you think the idea has legs then I'm up for it, I just need some inspiration and a 'game plan'......


Amazed Doofer

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Doof', demonstrating to people in front of their eyes is sure to sink in far better than what one reads & will in most cases, help what they have read be understood better.

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That's a great idea.
Will there be a backing group?

Back to the roof:
How do you deal with the edges topside, Doof?

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dooferdog wrote:................................................................................

If you think the idea has legs then I'm up for it, I just need some inspiration and a 'game plan'......


Amazed Doofer

I'd say it certainly has legs Doug - and they're running !!

As Sol said, there are loads of people who would love to see card modelling "in action" - myself included !!!

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ddolfelin wrote: That's a great idea.
Will there be a backing group?

Back to the roof:
How do you deal with the edges topside, Doof?


I'd like you to think I laboriously fill in the resultant right angled groove, sand it flat and prime with something, in truth, I fold a narrow strip of licky-sticky down it's length and glue it over the gap. When dry it is quite hard enough to support the application of a texture paper. Were you to want it even more resilient, a coat or two of shellac would make it almost glass-hard, but bear in mind there will almost certainly be a row of capping tiles on top running the length of the joint. [See below]



Doug



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My Word.  That would be a handy book.   Watching with interest/envy.

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Thanks, Doof.

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This view better shows how the apex and ridges are 'disguised', [from the Ringwell Alarm Clock building].

Doug






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going back to the seminar presentations for a moment, how about -

"Modelling buildings in card - some of the methods and materials I use."

The article recently published in the model railway press would provide some ideas on the structure of such a talk, but if you need any queeries answered feel free to contact me by PM, email or phone.

The will be any presentation aids you need on hand - table & chair, flip chart, OHP facility or projector & screen for MS Power Point use.

I'm sure that there will be a lot of interest in exactly how to go about building in card - also things like the roof template method you showed a few posts earlier, as well as the many other tips you've given would be an excellent addition to the seminars.

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At last I have found an answer-a 'Parapet Gutter' from the McKay volumes. The cornice would have been made in wood as the property would not support massive stone mouldings, and the rear of the parapet/cornice would be boxed in lead sheet, which empties into an 11" deep 'cess' at its end. The plain guttering can empty into the same cess. The roof edge would be less deep behind the woodwork than at its uncovered sides.



So -  Vesti la giubba!




Doug













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Gwent Rail wrote: going back to the seminar presentations for a moment, how about -

"Modelling buildings in card - some of the methods and materials I use."

The article recently published in the model railway press would provide some ideas on the structure of such a talk, but if you need any queeries answered feel free to contact me by PM, email or phone.

The will be any presentation aids you need on hand - table & chair, flip chart, OHP facility or projector & screen for MS Power Point use.

I'm sure that there will be a lot of interest in exactly how to go about building in card - also things like the roof template method you showed a few posts earlier, as well as the many other tips you've given would be an excellent addition to the seminars.

After sitting down and reading this thread through and feeling rather inadequate, I fully agree with a presentaion at the show :thumbs

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Don't press Doug too hard - I'm about to ask him to finish my module and I'm much closer than you lot !!!!

Doug, a presentation along the lines that Jeff has suggested would be great and I'd like to see it "front line" rather than "back-up" if Doug is willing. :roll::roll:

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Lovely thread this mate. I am deffo be following this and be at the demo at the show.

Phill

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Right!  A bit of basic carcase work, to start putting the upper storey windows in place.  Hanging Tiles were commonly added to old timbered buildings to make them look more modern and to improve the weather proof properties of exposed elevations. The tiles were hung from split oak laths nailed [iron nails or oak pegs (trenails)] to the front of the building. 'Torching', a lime mortar was sometimes used at the upper part of the tiles to form a level surface on what was probably an uneven surface as a sort of 'glue'.

To make a weather tight joint the window frames were moved forward or the windows replaced to bring them within a tiles thickness of the outer surface and more torching applied around the gaps. This equates to perhaps to 0.5mm in 4mm scale, so simply cutting out 2mm deep recesses is not suitable. Hence the picture below, which shows an open frame of 2mm card for strength and rigidity over which a 0.6mm card layer will be layed, and the window frames fixed to the back of the 0.6mm card.

A look at the first perspective drawing from the book shows a very shallow level of inset of the frames, and this is what I hope to represent by this two-layer approach to the front upper storey. We shall see!

The arched piece of texture covered card represents the size of opening which will be cut in the outer skin of 0.6mm card, and the window cut-out shows why the rectangular cut-outs are much bigger.



Again, if that's not too clear, please shout out.

Boggled Doofer

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I've cut out and papered the 'thin' front upper wall, ready to insert the window frames. Here's a little tip to strengthen and disguise the cut edge of the card. Put a blob of PVA on a scrap piece of card, and with some moistened water colouring pencils, make a wet smear of colour next to it. With a wet paintbrush, swish a bit of PVA into the colours and paint around the inside of the cut out. It disguises it just as a felt tip pen would, but additionally seals the edges of the cut texture paper and card. I hope I'm not teaching everyone to suck eggs, there is a chance that someone here hasn't seen it before!


This is Scalescenes 'Hanging Tile' paper, I think it looks quite realistic, I shall have fun when I come to represent the 'corner turning tile thingies'* at either end of the wall [*technical phrase....];-)









Last edited on Tue Aug 10th, 2010 07:21 pm by Chubber

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[*technical phrase....]     Quoins ?   I think  http://www.wordnik.com/words/quoin

Edit - VG Doof :exclam

Last edited on Tue Aug 10th, 2010 08:42 pm by

Chubber
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Thanks, Ron!

[I also quoint lke that site............]

Instructed Doofer

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Fixing the windows in position
 
 
I put a smear of ‘Bostik Rapid Glue Pen’ around the inside edge of the window openings and let it dry. When dry it acts like the adhesive on a ‘Post-it’ note and allows the window frames to be successfully aligned before a layer of CD case plastic is laid over the back.
 
MEK is applied to the edges of the windows and the glazing bars from the front which bonds them permanently to the plastic, before blobs of PVA are applied at the rear around the corners of the plastic  so fixing it securely to the cardboard carcase.
 
Small strips of card cut as window sills and secured with PVA complete the windows. Later, having weathered the window frames with watercolours [which is why I varnished them…] I will apply a dilute coat of acrylic matt varnish to the window panes.






















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dooferdog wrote:.................................................................
 
MEK is applied to the edges of the windows and the glazing bars from the front which bonds them permanently to the plastic,..............................................................................

:hmm:hmm:hmm

Doesn't that cloud the window Doug ?

Ah - on edit !!!  Silly me - they're not glazed are they - it's the CD case that forms the glazing !!!!! :oops::oops::oops::oops:

Come on Peter - wake up at the back !!!!

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Too much RLW, Peter......or not enough! :lol:

D

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Turning my attention to the upper cornice, I was stumped by a means of producing a piece of 1mm radius moulding, so resorted to what a cabinet maker would call a 'scratch-stock', but in miniature, it's my old friend the brokrn hacksaw blade ground to a small curve and used as a scraper over the length of the thin wood strip. Afterwards, an Exacto razor saw down the whole 18" and then planed smooth, glued together with some bits of card,












I'm having problems getting the photo of the finished cornice moulding to load...I'll try again later!


Puzzled Doofer

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Look forward to seeing it, Doof.

I tried grinding a hacksaw blade.
I think there will be scars.

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ddolfelin wrote: I tried grinding a hacksaw blade.
I think there will be scars.


:shock::shock::lol:

Doug

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Here we are, the upper cornice moulding painted off-white........














....and the lower mould, much simpler, just three flat pieces of card.








Doug



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You are a genius Doug - that moulding is superb. :thumbs

What do you use to cut the CD cases with ?  I'd imagine they would split if you tried using a kraft knife (although I've never tried, it's the type of material that would worry me) and I doubt a saw would do it either.

Once I know, then maybe I can find a use for the dozens of empty cases I've got !!!!!

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I'm loving this, John Ahern was my hero from way-back-when. Madder Valley and Madder Port, names on buildings like Quibble & Cuss Solicitors etc. brilliant. I have plans drawn up for (Oh no! not another one) 0 gauge micro for a quay side layout with. wait for it, a method for making the tide seem to ebb and flow.
May be just may be Warley 2011 or 2012. No, I cannot be serious.
Mike (don't tell the wife)

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Mike wrote: method for making the tide seem to ebb and flow.



:shock::shock::shock::shock::shock::shock::shock::shock::shock::shock::shock::shock: :thud


D

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A tilting baseboard or a large chair labelled "Canute" ? :hmm:hmm

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Petermac wrote: 

What do you use to cut the CD cases with ?  I'd imagine they would split if you tried using a kraft knife (although I've never tried, it's the type of material that would worry me) and I doubt a saw would do it either.

 


THE SCRUTTER


http://yourmodelrailway.net/view_topic.php?id=5055&forum_id=11

Look here, Peter.

I think I'll make a dozen and bring them to the show and flog them at £2 each!!

Doug

Last edited on Fri Aug 13th, 2010 08:32 pm by Chubber

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Thanks Doug - I'd forgotten that thread. :oops:

Do they hold an edge well or do you have to sharpen them fairly frequently ?  I'll happily buy one from you. :thumbs

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Using an 'all hard' blade they keep an edge for ages. To re-sharpen they only need a minute touch on the outside tip on a wheel, even a rub with fine wet and dry will do it. The important thing is to keep a 'hook' so that the waste plastic is actively lifted out of the groove, thus obviating any binding. Simply keep making even, moderately firm strokes until there is only a whisker of material left, then break off. You could carry right on through, but boy does it make a mess of a cutting board!

Doug

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Now for the horrid bit....cutting and gluing the mitred corners of the upper cornice before fitting the roof. I hate cutting mitres, knowing that if it goes wrong you only have so much spare moulding!

Then, using the inside measurements of the cornice I drew out a development as discussed earlier, just remembering to leave on two little overhangs for the plain guttering over the clap-board walls and altering the rear side to make a flat low-relief side.

Using little scraps of card I made up a three legged pattern from which I cut out three internal braces, deliberately using thin corrugated card as it is rigid and light, but soft enough to squeeze a little if a hard high spot shows up. Then all edges are sealed with 75% PVA to strengthen them and the scored folds treated similarly so that tomorrow, when well dried I can use a sandpaper plane to give a smooth outside surface.

The roof will be covered with a new Scalescenes small red 'old' tile paper, soon to be released, and will not be made up from individual strips because the real tiles show little more than 3" - 4" in each row.













I'm really being held up at the moment because I am waiting for some doors from Chivers Finelines, last week after 2 weeks wait I called
to ask when they would arrive and I was told 'Sorry, I forgot your order......' and I'm still waiting.

Without them I can't fit the lower front wall, so can't fit the beams under the upper floor, or the lower moulding or the pillars......Aaagh!

Hope it's still interesting, any questions do shout out.

Doug

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I see you've wrapped the Scalescenes tile sheet around the side walls, are you planning to use any quions or other means of diguising the curved tiles ?

Stu

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I thing Doof hopes to if post #32 is any thing to go by. I am also looking foreward to this part as well.

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It's coming on a treat Doug - the moulding and roof look superb. :thumbs

I too wonder about the corners. :hmm

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Stubby47 wrote: I see you've wrapped the Scalescenes tile sheet around the side walls, are you planning to use any quions or other means of diguising the curved tiles ?

Stu


Hi, Stu,

Research shows that there were two ways of doing the 'corners', i.e. 'Purpose [made] Tiles' which turn 90 degrees or something called 'Winchester cutting' in which tiles are cut on the cant like shingles. I've experimented with cutting into the corner with a fine blade under each tile and lifting them slightly like the scales of a fish and as the overhang is only about 3/4" in real life this is how I will do it, but because the effect is easily squashed with handling it will have to be the very last thing to be done.......and if it goes wrong.......:shock:

Doug

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In case you think I have given up, herewith the progress to date, roof, lower moulding, doors and a base to put it on. It looks a bit skew-whiff as the base isn't glued up yet as I have to put the beams under the overhang, build some steps up to the doors and fix the notice-boards and perhaps a barometer for public display for them Ancient Mariners...




Keep on doin' it,

Doug

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Outstanding Doug.........Outstanding :thumbs

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First class Doug really enjoying watching you do this

Brian

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I am not going to respond as I cannot find the right words to say coz what I would say, IMO, would not be adequate to convey my appreciation of such modelling !
Perhaps a few Koala stamps might be OK to hand out to you Doug.

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Yes outstanding work, doofer :thumbs

Mike

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Absolutely.

Also pleased to see a Bank letter used as scrap blotter.

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Doug

Are you bringing any of your buildings over fro the show ?

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Proper job Doof :doublethumb

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Not sure what to say Doug.  I've not only followed your other "building" threads on here, but I've actually seen your buildings in real life so know just how good they are.  This one is certainly up there with them.  It's also very educational seeing how you approach a scratch build.

As ever, it's not merely "what" you do, it's the accuracy with which you do it that amazes me.  Those clean crisp lines and sharp corners are, to me, the very devil in small scale.

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:oops::oops::oops::oops::oops::oops::oops::oops::oops:

Er, thanks, chaps....I shall bring one or two models with me as aids to my possible 'talk' if someone else goes poorly.  I'd like someone to do an LED that fits in a 4mm ID tube with a couple of  wire tails to connect to a battery, just to see if my idea works for lighting the interior......


Doug

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dooferdog wrote: :oops::oops::oops::oops::oops::oops::oops::oops::oops:

Er, thanks, chaps....I shall bring one or two models with me as aids to my possible 'talk' if someone else goes poorly. ...........................................


Doug

I thought this was going to be more than a "possible talk" Doug - I thought it had been fixed that you'd do a presentation sometime on the Sunday....................:roll::roll::roll::roll:

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Doug, for your LED try http://www.kyteslights.com . They are at the Truro show this weekend, but have lots of info on the website.

Stu

Last edited on Sun Aug 22nd, 2010 11:33 am by Stubby47

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Peter he is booked in for a demonstration/talk on sunday his audience awaits:lol::lol:


Brian

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Thanks Brian - that's what I thought - good news !! :thumbs

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Now for some chimbleys.....


Not much to go on in the original picture so here goes.....


I have decided to use balsa wood as the main body of the stacks with a built-up card plinth on top, pots rolled from paper  and covered with Scalescenes brown brick Stretcher Bond TX11.  This bond is single thickness so as to leave a flue-way in the centres. Very probably the tops would have been flat and open when the building was first built, but later capped and fitted with pots when stoves and grates were installed.

Here is how I put a covering of paper on a plinth,



the next picture shows how I imitate the layer of mortar in which the pots are bedded [the flaunching] using a piece of watercolour paper. I have rolled the chimney pots as at

http://yourmodelrailway.net/view_topic.php?id=5490&forum_id=11&highlight=doofer+chimney+pots

but for the smaller chimney I have used some stripped off brown rubber cable covering pushed over two small panel pins for a change.





finally a 'so far' picture. Any questions, please shout out.






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Stubby, thanks for the link to the Kyteslites site, just the job, but sadly another half hour of my life passed just lookin' in!

I forgot to say that I have fixed the chimneys in place by drilling through the roof at the appropriate places, then securing a block of wood inside into which I have glued a toothpick, a mating hole in each chimney fits over the protruding toothpick, all 'a l'Ahern'.

Flashing is yet to do, a process I dislike!


Doug

Last edited on Mon Aug 23rd, 2010 06:45 pm by Chubber

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Well, it didn't go so badly, it is such a fiddly job though.

I'm not too happy with the Scalescenes flashing download as it is 'wiggly' down both sides, looking at references the lead is cut in in a zig-zag to the side of the stack and goes in a straight line down the side of the tiles so I've cut the zig-zags off of one side. No doubt a builder would say it isn't fit for purpose, but it will have to do!

The dreaded presentation is taking up a bit of time, so I'll have to press on today, the garden needs some attention before we travel to UK, sadly looks like our precious raspberries will be ready to pick while we are away......:sad:


Keep doin' it,

Doug



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That looks brilliant Doug - I really like those chimney stacks and ridge tiles :thumbs

How are the ridge and hip tiles done ?  Surely not laid as individual tiles ? :shock::shock::shock:

It really looks like an old roof and even the camera isn't showing any faults.  You're dead right about the flashing - the lead is set into the mortar courses on the chimney and lies under the tiles on the roof (usually on flat timber supports) - hence the "wiggly" stack profile and "straight" roof profile.  On this occasion, and rather unusually,  Scalescenes have got it wrong :roll:

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Hullo, Peter,

Thank you for your kind remarks, the ridge/hip tiles are simply a strip of tile shapes, coloured filled the same as the roof tile download, printed out onto 140gm/m2 watercolour paper and carefully cut into the individual tapered tile shapes. Then I pressed a blunt blade in  between each adjacent tile to enhance the 'separateness' of them, bent them around a 60 degree angled piece of wood and stuck them on.  UNFORTUNATELY.....the PVA made the paper swell up virtually eradicating the neatly impressed line!

However, next time I shall give them a coat of matt varnish before I 'crimp' them! Here they are in case anyone wants them.



Doug

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Here we go, just about finished, I shan't put the little bits of guttering at this stage as it has to travel.









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Oh YESSS !!!  Brilliant Doug, absolutely first class bit of modelling there.

How did you do the mossy bits on the roof - I presume the yellow bits are powders but what's the "3D" moss ?

And the columns ?  Are they dowel ?

Although it's basically "flat" paper coverings, it really does look to have texture and depth.  Now I know what those 7 pairs of specs from +1.5 to +700 on your desk are for..............:roll::roll::lol:

Again. I really love the hip tiles and corner tiles but my word, they really must be incredibly fiddly things to fit. :???::???:

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Just caught this thread as you concluded the build.

Another masterpiece Doug, the weathering finishes it off nicely and I would like to know what you have used for the textured bits of moss on the roof as well.

:wow:pathead

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Petermac wrote: How did you do the mossy bits on the roof - I presume the yellow bits are powders but what's the "3D" moss ?

And the columns ?  Are they dowel ?


Hullo Peter and PNW,

Thank you for your kind remarks, the yellow bits are two different water colours, the '3D' moss, a litte over scale, is the dust in the bottom of a Woodland  Scenics bag of medium green foliage stuff mixed with 50/50% PVA and water, sorry, Mr Ahern, I couldn't face the job of rubbing dry bran through a horse-hair sieve and dying it!

The columns are made from the stick holding up the potted orchid in the bathroom, 'whizzed' in the pillar drill with some sand paper and them painted with flat off-white. [Shelagh hasn't yet seen the plastic knitting needle that has taken its place......:shock: I 'ave zat pleasure to come...]

Doug



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I am sure Mr Ahern wouldnt mind you didnt follow his recipe for lichen for the roof .  Absolutely outstanding job Doof , an absolute credit to you and a fitting tribute to Mr Aherns inspiration to many of us .

Mind you I dont fancy being in your shoes when Shelagh notices the replacement knitting needle especially if its one she uses . You may find its put to a use that doesnt involve creating garments from wool . Could be painfull  !:hmm

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You may find its put to a use that doesnt involve creating garments from wool . Could be painfull  !:hmm

but can be surgically removed now a days :mutley:mutley

a lovely model too.

:doublethumb:lol::cool:

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Absolutely stunning! I should not have questioned your method for the corners, they look perfect.

I've also followed your advice on how to get square edges to Scalescenes paper corners, and purchased a seam roller for the larger flat areas.

Stu ( learning from the masters)

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Absolutely top class, Doug. Brilliant work.

Mike

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MikeC wrote: Absolutely top class, Doug. Brilliant work.

Mike


Yes Doof also deserves  one of these



if I can ever get to half of that level of competence,  I would happy with a painted gold  or two

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If your presentation has the same attention to detail in it, you have nothing to worry about.
Masterful indeed.

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Great stuff.
I may miss Sunday School to attend the seminar if I can get in.

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Great stuff Doug.   I think you must be rated as the "Perry" of card modelling!:wow

Ken.

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Congratulations on a superb building Doug   :doublethumb

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By carving some sea-boots into the legs of a Dapol flag waver, cutting off his flags and gluing on the head of a driver wearing a flat cap, Harbour Master Pugwash is able to look over his kingdom as the sun sets and wonder when he will be able to afford a cleaner and a decorator!




That's it, folks, see you at Carn Brea, yee-ha!

Doug

Last edited on Sun Aug 29th, 2010 07:35 pm by Chubber

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Stunning Doug, just stunning. :thumbs:thumbs

My only hope is that one day I'll be able to produce something like that  - I wonder if it will happen...........................:hmm:hmm

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Beautifully done Doug. Learned a bunch about using texture papers from this thread.

Cheers
Dave


                 

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