Video Archive         Recent Topics      
YMR logo

You are here:  Your Model Railway Club > More Practical Help > Scratchbuilding. > The Harbour Office To bottom of page
                 

 Moderated by: Spurno Page:  First Page Previous Page  1  2  3  4  5  Next Page Last Page  
Start New Topic Reply Printer Friendly

The Harbour Office - Scratchbuilding. - More Practical Help - Your Model Railway Club
AuthorPost
 Posted: Mon Aug 9th, 2010 08:21 am
PMQuoteReply
link to this 21st post
Petermac
Moderator


Joined: Sat Oct 13th, 2007
Location: Nr Bergerac, France
Posts: 16790
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

dooferdog wrote:................................................................................

If you think the idea has legs then I'm up for it, I just need some inspiration and a 'game plan'......


Amazed Doofer

I'd say it certainly has legs Doug - and they're running !!

As Sol said, there are loads of people who would love to see card modelling "in action" - myself included !!!



____________________
'Petermac
Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Mon Aug 9th, 2010 09:03 am
PMQuoteReply
link to this 22nd post
Chubber
Casseroled Badger


Joined: Thu Oct 2nd, 2008
Location: Ivybridge, Devon, Gateway To Dartmoor.. , United Kingdom
Posts: 4566
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

ddolfelin wrote: That's a great idea.
Will there be a backing group?

Back to the roof:
How do you deal with the edges topside, Doof?


I'd like you to think I laboriously fill in the resultant right angled groove, sand it flat and prime with something, in truth, I fold a narrow strip of licky-sticky down it's length and glue it over the gap. When dry it is quite hard enough to support the application of a texture paper. Were you to want it even more resilient, a coat or two of shellac would make it almost glass-hard, but bear in mind there will almost certainly be a row of capping tiles on top running the length of the joint. [See below]



Doug





____________________
'You may share the labours of the great, but you will not share the spoil...' Aesop's Fables

"Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy" - Benjamin Franklin

Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Mon Aug 9th, 2010 09:07 am
PMQuoteReply
link to this 23rd post
MaxSouthOz
Admin


Joined: Sat Aug 23rd, 2008
Location: Adelaide , Australia
Posts: 12343
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

My Word.  That would be a handy book.   Watching with interest/envy.



____________________
Max
Port Elderley
Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Mon Aug 9th, 2010 09:22 am
PMQuoteReply
link to this 24th post
ddolfelin
Straight man to the stars.


Joined: Thu Sep 10th, 2009
Location: Denbighshire, United Kingdom
Posts: 5554
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Thanks, Doof.



____________________
http://dddioramas.webs.com/

11 + 2 = 12 + 1
Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Mon Aug 9th, 2010 02:08 pm
PMQuoteReply
link to this 25th post
Chubber
Casseroled Badger


Joined: Thu Oct 2nd, 2008
Location: Ivybridge, Devon, Gateway To Dartmoor.. , United Kingdom
Posts: 4566
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

This view better shows how the apex and ridges are 'disguised', [from the Ringwell Alarm Clock building].

Doug








____________________
'You may share the labours of the great, but you will not share the spoil...' Aesop's Fables

"Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy" - Benjamin Franklin

Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Mon Aug 9th, 2010 02:26 pm
PMQuoteReply
link to this 26th post
Gwent Rail
Former Member
 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

going back to the seminar presentations for a moment, how about -

"Modelling buildings in card - some of the methods and materials I use."

The article recently published in the model railway press would provide some ideas on the structure of such a talk, but if you need any queeries answered feel free to contact me by PM, email or phone.

The will be any presentation aids you need on hand - table & chair, flip chart, OHP facility or projector & screen for MS Power Point use.

I'm sure that there will be a lot of interest in exactly how to go about building in card - also things like the roof template method you showed a few posts earlier, as well as the many other tips you've given would be an excellent addition to the seminars.

Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Mon Aug 9th, 2010 02:56 pm
PMQuoteReply
link to this 27th post
Chubber
Casseroled Badger


Joined: Thu Oct 2nd, 2008
Location: Ivybridge, Devon, Gateway To Dartmoor.. , United Kingdom
Posts: 4566
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

At last I have found an answer-a 'Parapet Gutter' from the McKay volumes. The cornice would have been made in wood as the property would not support massive stone mouldings, and the rear of the parapet/cornice would be boxed in lead sheet, which empties into an 11" deep 'cess' at its end. The plain guttering can empty into the same cess. The roof edge would be less deep behind the woodwork than at its uncovered sides.



So -  Vesti la giubba!




Doug















____________________
'You may share the labours of the great, but you will not share the spoil...' Aesop's Fables

"Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy" - Benjamin Franklin

Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Mon Aug 9th, 2010 03:25 pm
PMQuoteReply
link to this 28th post
Alan
Former Member
 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Gwent Rail wrote: going back to the seminar presentations for a moment, how about -

"Modelling buildings in card - some of the methods and materials I use."

The article recently published in the model railway press would provide some ideas on the structure of such a talk, but if you need any queeries answered feel free to contact me by PM, email or phone.

The will be any presentation aids you need on hand - table & chair, flip chart, OHP facility or projector & screen for MS Power Point use.

I'm sure that there will be a lot of interest in exactly how to go about building in card - also things like the roof template method you showed a few posts earlier, as well as the many other tips you've given would be an excellent addition to the seminars.

After sitting down and reading this thread through and feeling rather inadequate, I fully agree with a presentaion at the show :thumbs

Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Mon Aug 9th, 2010 03:59 pm
PMQuoteReply
link to this 29th post
Petermac
Moderator


Joined: Sat Oct 13th, 2007
Location: Nr Bergerac, France
Posts: 16790
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Don't press Doug too hard - I'm about to ask him to finish my module and I'm much closer than you lot !!!!

Doug, a presentation along the lines that Jeff has suggested would be great and I'd like to see it "front line" rather than "back-up" if Doug is willing. :roll::roll:



____________________
'Petermac
Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Mon Aug 9th, 2010 04:34 pm
PMQuoteReply
link to this 30th post
phill
Hello


Joined: Sat Oct 13th, 2007
Location: Lancing West Sussex, United Kingdom
Posts: 6496
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Lovely thread this mate. I am deffo be following this and be at the demo at the show.

Phill

Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Mon Aug 9th, 2010 08:53 pm
PMQuoteReply
link to this 31st post
Chubber
Casseroled Badger


Joined: Thu Oct 2nd, 2008
Location: Ivybridge, Devon, Gateway To Dartmoor.. , United Kingdom
Posts: 4566
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Right!  A bit of basic carcase work, to start putting the upper storey windows in place.  Hanging Tiles were commonly added to old timbered buildings to make them look more modern and to improve the weather proof properties of exposed elevations. The tiles were hung from split oak laths nailed [iron nails or oak pegs (trenails)] to the front of the building. 'Torching', a lime mortar was sometimes used at the upper part of the tiles to form a level surface on what was probably an uneven surface as a sort of 'glue'.

To make a weather tight joint the window frames were moved forward or the windows replaced to bring them within a tiles thickness of the outer surface and more torching applied around the gaps. This equates to perhaps to 0.5mm in 4mm scale, so simply cutting out 2mm deep recesses is not suitable. Hence the picture below, which shows an open frame of 2mm card for strength and rigidity over which a 0.6mm card layer will be layed, and the window frames fixed to the back of the 0.6mm card.

A look at the first perspective drawing from the book shows a very shallow level of inset of the frames, and this is what I hope to represent by this two-layer approach to the front upper storey. We shall see!

The arched piece of texture covered card represents the size of opening which will be cut in the outer skin of 0.6mm card, and the window cut-out shows why the rectangular cut-outs are much bigger.



Again, if that's not too clear, please shout out.

Boggled Doofer



____________________
'You may share the labours of the great, but you will not share the spoil...' Aesop's Fables

"Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy" - Benjamin Franklin

Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Tue Aug 10th, 2010 06:17 pm
PMQuoteReply
link to this 32nd post
Chubber
Casseroled Badger


Joined: Thu Oct 2nd, 2008
Location: Ivybridge, Devon, Gateway To Dartmoor.. , United Kingdom
Posts: 4566
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

I've cut out and papered the 'thin' front upper wall, ready to insert the window frames. Here's a little tip to strengthen and disguise the cut edge of the card. Put a blob of PVA on a scrap piece of card, and with some moistened water colouring pencils, make a wet smear of colour next to it. With a wet paintbrush, swish a bit of PVA into the colours and paint around the inside of the cut out. It disguises it just as a felt tip pen would, but additionally seals the edges of the cut texture paper and card. I hope I'm not teaching everyone to suck eggs, there is a chance that someone here hasn't seen it before!


This is Scalescenes 'Hanging Tile' paper, I think it looks quite realistic, I shall have fun when I come to represent the 'corner turning tile thingies'* at either end of the wall [*technical phrase....];-)











____________________
'You may share the labours of the great, but you will not share the spoil...' Aesop's Fables

"Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy" - Benjamin Franklin

Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Tue Aug 10th, 2010 07:41 pm
PMQuoteReply
link to this 33rd post
Sol
Former Member
 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

[*technical phrase....]     Quoins ?   I think  http://www.wordnik.com/words/quoin

Edit - VG Doof :exclam

Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Tue Aug 10th, 2010 07:54 pm
PMQuoteReply
link to this 34th post
Chubber
Casseroled Badger


Joined: Thu Oct 2nd, 2008
Location: Ivybridge, Devon, Gateway To Dartmoor.. , United Kingdom
Posts: 4566
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Thanks, Ron!

[I also quoint lke that site............]

Instructed Doofer



____________________
'You may share the labours of the great, but you will not share the spoil...' Aesop's Fables

"Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy" - Benjamin Franklin

Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Wed Aug 11th, 2010 02:02 pm
PMQuoteReply
link to this 35th post
Chubber
Casseroled Badger


Joined: Thu Oct 2nd, 2008
Location: Ivybridge, Devon, Gateway To Dartmoor.. , United Kingdom
Posts: 4566
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Fixing the windows in position
 
 
I put a smear of ‘Bostik Rapid Glue Pen’ around the inside edge of the window openings and let it dry. When dry it acts like the adhesive on a ‘Post-it’ note and allows the window frames to be successfully aligned before a layer of CD case plastic is laid over the back.
 
MEK is applied to the edges of the windows and the glazing bars from the front which bonds them permanently to the plastic, before blobs of PVA are applied at the rear around the corners of the plastic  so fixing it securely to the cardboard carcase.
 
Small strips of card cut as window sills and secured with PVA complete the windows. Later, having weathered the window frames with watercolours [which is why I varnished them…] I will apply a dilute coat of acrylic matt varnish to the window panes.
























____________________
'You may share the labours of the great, but you will not share the spoil...' Aesop's Fables

"Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy" - Benjamin Franklin

Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Wed Aug 11th, 2010 02:51 pm
PMQuoteReply
link to this 36th post
Petermac
Moderator


Joined: Sat Oct 13th, 2007
Location: Nr Bergerac, France
Posts: 16790
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

dooferdog wrote:.................................................................
 
MEK is applied to the edges of the windows and the glazing bars from the front which bonds them permanently to the plastic,..............................................................................

:hmm:hmm:hmm

Doesn't that cloud the window Doug ?

Ah - on edit !!!  Silly me - they're not glazed are they - it's the CD case that forms the glazing !!!!! :oops::oops::oops::oops:

Come on Peter - wake up at the back !!!!



____________________
'Petermac
Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Wed Aug 11th, 2010 03:52 pm
PMQuoteReply
link to this 37th post
Chubber
Casseroled Badger


Joined: Thu Oct 2nd, 2008
Location: Ivybridge, Devon, Gateway To Dartmoor.. , United Kingdom
Posts: 4566
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Too much RLW, Peter......or not enough! :lol:

D



____________________
'You may share the labours of the great, but you will not share the spoil...' Aesop's Fables

"Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy" - Benjamin Franklin

Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Fri Aug 13th, 2010 06:29 am
PMQuoteReply
link to this 38th post
Chubber
Casseroled Badger


Joined: Thu Oct 2nd, 2008
Location: Ivybridge, Devon, Gateway To Dartmoor.. , United Kingdom
Posts: 4566
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Turning my attention to the upper cornice, I was stumped by a means of producing a piece of 1mm radius moulding, so resorted to what a cabinet maker would call a 'scratch-stock', but in miniature, it's my old friend the brokrn hacksaw blade ground to a small curve and used as a scraper over the length of the thin wood strip. Afterwards, an Exacto razor saw down the whole 18" and then planed smooth, glued together with some bits of card,












I'm having problems getting the photo of the finished cornice moulding to load...I'll try again later!


Puzzled Doofer



____________________
'You may share the labours of the great, but you will not share the spoil...' Aesop's Fables

"Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy" - Benjamin Franklin

Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Fri Aug 13th, 2010 07:41 am
PMQuoteReply
link to this 39th post
ddolfelin
Straight man to the stars.


Joined: Thu Sep 10th, 2009
Location: Denbighshire, United Kingdom
Posts: 5554
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Look forward to seeing it, Doof.

I tried grinding a hacksaw blade.
I think there will be scars.



____________________
http://dddioramas.webs.com/

11 + 2 = 12 + 1
Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Fri Aug 13th, 2010 04:10 pm
PMQuoteReply
link to this 40th post
Chubber
Casseroled Badger


Joined: Thu Oct 2nd, 2008
Location: Ivybridge, Devon, Gateway To Dartmoor.. , United Kingdom
Posts: 4566
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

ddolfelin wrote: I tried grinding a hacksaw blade.
I think there will be scars.


:shock::shock::lol:

Doug



____________________
'You may share the labours of the great, but you will not share the spoil...' Aesop's Fables

"Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy" - Benjamin Franklin

Back To Top PMQuoteReply

This is topic ID = 6851     Current time is 03:39 am Page:  First Page Previous Page  1  2  3  4  5  Next Page Last Page    
You are here:  Your Model Railway Club > More Practical Help > Scratchbuilding. > The Harbour Office
You can type a quick reply to this topic here. Click in the box below to begin.

Or to reply to an individual post, or to include images, attachments and formatted text,
click the Quote or Reply buttons on each post above.

To start a new topic in this forum, click the Start New Topic button below.
To start a new topic in a different forum, click the Forum Jump drop-down list below.
Start New Topic


Back to top of page

           
15 Most Recent Topics

Problems with this web site? Please contact the Webmaster.

All material submitted to this web site is the responsibility of the respective contributor. By submitting material to this web site you acknowledge that you accept full responsibility for the material submitted.
Unless stated otherwise, all the material displayed on this web site, including all text, photographs, drawings and other images, is copyright and the property of the respective contributor. Registered members are welcome to use it for their own personal non-commercial modelmaking purposes. It must not be reproduced or re-published elsewhere in any form, or used commercially, without first obtaining the owner's express permission.
The owner of this web site may edit, modify or remove any content at any time without giving notice or reason.    © 2008

                 

Recent Topics Back to top of page

Powered by UltraBB 1.15 Copyright © 2007-2011 by Jim Hale and Data 1 Systems. Page design copyright © 2008-2013 Martin Wynne. Photo gallery copyright © 2009 David Williams.