Video Archive         Recent Topics      
YMR logo

You are here:  Your Model Railway Club > More Practical Help > Scratchbuilding. > Island Platform Ticket Office/Waiting Room To bottom of page
                 

 Moderated by: Spurno  
AuthorPost
MikeC
Former Member
 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

So what am I doing in the scratchbuilding section? Having a bash at making my station building, based on plans provided in the April '96 edition of Railway Modeller.

I'm only loosely following the plan, which is for a timber building, but it's a good guide with drawings to scale.
I'm using stone pattern Slater's Plasticard, and reinforcing with 1mm styrene sheet, intending to laminate the two together. That means cutting out all windows and doors twice :!: but I want the thickness around openings to better represent stonework.
At this stage I'm aiming to make all window frames from thin styrene similar to that used in margarine containers. I'll see how I go.
I'll be adding interior walls, seating and lighting. The building has rest rooms, and there will be vents in the walls nearby.
The footprint is 6 x 1 3/4 ins. I'm adding 3mm of styrene at the base so I can recess it into my platform. The building will be removable so it won't always block the view :)

Here are the walls, also showing one door cut from the 1mm styrene. That 1mm styrene is tough :evil:

                Unable to repair, Images removed at source by OP.        Barchester   

Mike

Robert
Deceased Member


Joined: Sat Oct 13th, 2007
Location: Benidorm, Alicante, Spain
Posts: 12454
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

knowing nothing of the Plastikard scene Mike I must ask why you are using styrene instead of plain plastikard in the sandwich? Especially as the styrene sounds a bit difficult to handle.

MikeC
Former Member
 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Bob I'm using the styrene because the plasticard is very floppy and yes I know it could be braced here and there, but I also really want a deepish rebate in windowsills and doorways. I thought that with so many windows I'd feel the need to surround each one on the inside to provide the depth. I f I was to go that far I might as well make a whole second layer and be done with it. Anything else would have been too easy :)

Mike

Robert
Deceased Member


Joined: Sat Oct 13th, 2007
Location: Benidorm, Alicante, Spain
Posts: 12454
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Wouldn't card have been easier to use perhaps or is it unsuitable for the job in hand? For adding depth I mean, not for the model itself.

MikeC
Former Member
 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Yes Bob I suspect it would be a LOT easier, but I'm afraid I have to use what I have available. I originally planned to use foamboard but that hasn't eventuated either, for one reason or another.
I've cut out a couple of the windows now, using the plasticard walls as a template, and although it's hard work I think the result will be quite good, without being a particularly high standard. I'll rely heavily on my paints to disguise things.

Mike

Perry
Erstwhile scratchbuilder


Joined: Sun Oct 14th, 2007
Location: United Kingdom
Posts: 2657
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Robert wrote:knowing nothing of the Plastikard scene Mike I must ask why you are using styrene instead of plain plastikard in the sandwich? Especially as the styrene sounds a bit difficult to handle.

Er....plastikard IS styrene as far as I'm aware. :?

Perry

Perry
Erstwhile scratchbuilder


Joined: Sun Oct 14th, 2007
Location: United Kingdom
Posts: 2657
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

MikeC wrote:..............I'll rely heavily on my paints to disguise things.

Mike


Good plan; one of my favourite ploys! :roll: :wink: :lol: :lol:

Perry

owen69
Former Member
 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Perry,you are right plasticard here,styrene america,
i used to be confused on that one. :oops: :) :) :) 8)

Robert
Deceased Member


Joined: Sat Oct 13th, 2007
Location: Benidorm, Alicante, Spain
Posts: 12454
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Mike seems to think there is a difference as he very specific in his post about Plastikard being too floppy, hence the use of styrene. I seek enlightenment.

owen69
Former Member
 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Bob,when i started to fit knucle couplers all the sites i
visited said use styrene for packing etc,i was clueless
till i found an english site, it defined the difference,ie americans
call it styrene we call it plasticard. i think mikec is using the
wrong thickness plasticard hence floppy. :roll: :roll: 8)

Perry
Erstwhile scratchbuilder


Joined: Sun Oct 14th, 2007
Location: United Kingdom
Posts: 2657
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

There is no difference. I use mainly Slaters 'Plastikard' for the embossed sheets and Evergreen Scale Models styrene sheet for the plain stuff.

The main reason I use these products is easy availability where I live.

It is the thickness that makes the difference in rigidity.

.040" = 1mm is pretty stiff unless one is using huge unsupported expanses of it. Likewise, long, narrow strips need bracing if they are to stay straight.

I use a selection of .005", .010", .020", and .040" thicknesses in the plain plastikard. I can laminate pretty much any thickness I need from those.

The embossed stuff is about .015" thick, generally speaking, and I tend to use .020" or .040" thick plain material to back it.

I think one needs to be prepared to design the model so that sufficient bracing can be incorporated during construction, otherwise it may well turn out 'floppy'. :roll:

Perry

MikeC
Former Member
 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Yes I wasn't saying plasticard isn't styrene, because I know it is, just making a distinction between embossed plasticard and the 1mm plain sheet [Evergreen]

Mike

Perry
Erstwhile scratchbuilder


Joined: Sun Oct 14th, 2007
Location: United Kingdom
Posts: 2657
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Understood Mike. :)

I was trying to 'enlighten' Bob at his request. I know he doesn't commonly use this material.

I would certainly agree that the embossed stuff is pretty 'floppy' and the 1mm plain sheet can take some cutting through! :shock: :D

Perry

Gwent Rail
Former Member
 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Mike, I also use the method of backing the embossed sheet with a thicker styrene (plain white) sheet.
Having cut out the pattern, including doors and windows from the white styrene, I then bond a sheet of embossed over it. Next I turn it over and cut out the openings for doors and windows using the white sheet as a template.

Incidentally, as demonstrated to me by Ken Ball (The author of the book "Modelling Buildings The Easy Way"), I bond the sheets together using double sided adhesive tape and not liquid poly cement. I find this helps to avoid warping and areas where the two sheets are not bonded properly.

Robert
Deceased Member


Joined: Sat Oct 13th, 2007
Location: Benidorm, Alicante, Spain
Posts: 12454
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

I am fully enlightened thank you all. Both materials are the same, got it. I do get there eventually you know. :roll: :wink:

MikeC
Former Member
 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

:D :D :D

Jeff - many thanks for the tip - I'm going to need all the help I can get :)

That 1mm stuff is so tough that my elbow has had enough for now :cry:

Mike

Perry
Erstwhile scratchbuilder


Joined: Sun Oct 14th, 2007
Location: United Kingdom
Posts: 2657
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

MikeC wrote::D :D :D

Jeff - many thanks for the tip - I'm going to need all the help I can get :)

That 1mm stuff is so tough that my elbow has had enough for now :cry:

Mike


....Then your knife isn't sharp enough and you're pressing to hard. Take lighter cuts but more of them. :wink: :D It shouldn't be hard work. :roll:

Perry

MikeC
Former Member
 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

With fresh blades things have become a bit easier, but it's not my cutting arm albow - it's the left elbow that complains when I hold the stryene tightly for cutting :cry:

Anyway, I've now cut out all windows and doors. After doing one wall in two separate pieces, I decided to glue the others together [much as Jeff suggested, although I cut them in the opposite order] after the relatively easy job of cutting all openings on the Slaters plasticard, and using each one as a template for the tougher styrene sheet.
Then I couldn't wait to see how it would look as a unit, so I propped it up as a house of cards and noticed a glaring error :x With side walls inside end walls, the thickness of the inner layer of stryene, visible along each edge of the end walls, showed as a white strip down each join. I realised that at each end of the side walls, the stone card should have overlapped the thick styrene on those side walls by the thickness of that visible styrene: 1mm. Even if I painted it to match, it would never have the same texture as the Slater's card.
Seeing as I had already glued Slater's card to Evergreen sheet, I had two options: make two new walls!! or carefully score away 1mm of styrene without removing or damaging any of the stone card that was stuck firmly to it. I chose the latter, and got away with it. Phew!
Now there's no white strip running down each corner, and stonework meets up with stonework. Or it will when it's glued.
No doubt this pitfall will be obvious to many, and maybe I should have foreseen it, but I didn't. I will next time :D
Here's a progress pic, with the walls balancing against each other.



I have some lovely thin styrene strips in 3 sizes by Evergreen that I'll use for window and door frames.

Mike

Wayne Williams
Member


Joined: Mon Oct 15th, 2007
Location: Hudson, Florida USA
Posts: 2635
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Knowledge gained by experience is never forgotten Mike. You can read all you want on how to do something, but actually doing it and seeing it develop yourself ......... Priceless

Wayne

Bob K
Member


Joined: Sun Oct 14th, 2007
Location: Bedfordshire, United Kingdom
Posts: 2759
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Mike

You could probably sort out any problems at the wall ends by adding decorative stone corners. This would be quite common with stone buildings. Just a thought :)

Bob(K)

phill
Hello


Joined: Sat Oct 13th, 2007
Location: Lancing West Sussex, United Kingdom
Posts: 6496
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Looking good mike, i have got to have a go now.
Phill

MikeC
Former Member
 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Yes Bob , decorative stone corners would be a good option. I'll give it some thought. Thanks.

This was always destined to be a "how-not-to" :D Did I mention I discovered one glaring error? Make that two. When I cut the end walls from the Plastikard I mindlessly didn't allow for the pitch of the roof! What WAS I thinking? :x :x :oops: I could try to add the required triangular pieces, I guess, and disguise the join in the stone with some decorative stonework. I'm thinking it might be a bit flimsy, although I could reinforce with lots of 1mm styrene. Or I could make two more end walls, which is probably the smarter move. For anyone who's been following this, bearing in mind the haphazard way it's been going, which option do you think I might try? :lol: :lol: Ya gotta laugh


Mike

Bob K
Member


Joined: Sun Oct 14th, 2007
Location: Bedfordshire, United Kingdom
Posts: 2759
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Mike

Not quite the end of the world as you could have sloping ends to the roof, making 4 faces - take a look at the Dapol booking hall thread as an example or, as with many island platform buildings, you could have a roof which incorporates the platform canopy.

Best of luck though.

Bob(K)

Gwent Rail
Former Member
 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

One way of adding the triangular piece would be to use a plain piece of styrene cut to shape, cover it with embossed brick and then back it with another piece that overlaps on the inside of the side wall.
This would be an ideal solution if you made the triangular piece of a different material (wooden planking or rendering for example).
If you want stone all the way up to the eaves, I would take the option of forming a new side wall entirely.

"How not to" you may think, but on the positive side you have learned something that you will never forget again.
Perry's right, planning is 50% of the sucess.

On a positive note, I must compliment you on the neat job you made of cutting out the windows and doors, we'll make an "Ace scratchbuilder" of you yet :!: :!: :!:

MikeC
Former Member
 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Thanks for the great suggestions and encouragement!

I really would like stonework all the way up, because I've found some old photos of Hythe [Hants] Fawley and Marchwood which had fairly austere looking buildings, although they were covered with pebbledash. They had straight ends, and I really like that spartan look. I think it has great atmosphere.
I might try to insert a band of different stone, just to indicate the ceiling level. I'll see how it goes. Failing that, I guess I'll bite the bullet and make two more. I really don't fancy having to do that.

Thanks again for the ideas.

Mike

MikeC
Former Member
 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

"...you have learned something that you will never forget again. " Said Jeff. Don't bank on it :lol: :lol:

Stubbornly, I took the option of splicing in a band of decorative stone, cut from a slightly different plastikard pattern. Two courses of it = 3mm in height, and I felt a band higher than that would look odd. NOW he worries about his building looking odd, I hear you say :D :D So I scored away 1.5mm of the original stonework from the top of each end wall, leaving the 1mm thick backing-styrene intact, and glued in the 3mm decorative strip. 1.5 mm overhangs, and that's where the heavier styrene joins in again, cut in a triangular shape from 1.5mm upwards. All I need to do is cover it with the original stone pattern. [ I hope]
It's been a lot of fun doing all this. Frustrating at times, but enjoyable nonetheless. I don't expect excellent results, but already this thing is looking better than the balsa buildings I made years ago.
After all the adjustments I'll be stunned if the roof goes even close to fitting, and I still have a chimney and all those windows to make. I'll need to be in good painting form when the time comes :lol:
What a great forum this is. Activities of others on this forum push me all the time, and provide fresh ideas. As a 'hacker' of a scratchbuilder, I wouldn't feel comfortable posting this effort on any other forum. I do hope others are encouraged to give it a go. There's no doubt you could do better than me. And as Bob[K] pointed out, it's not the end of the world when things go wrong. I'm extremely grateful to all who have commented and made suggestions. I have a strange feeling I'm going to need you again yet.....


Mike

owen69
Former Member
 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

mikec, you have expressed my sentiments exactly,
this forum does that to you thats why i like it so much.
and i think im right when i say mr Heath had all this in
mind when he set the wheels in motion. :wink: :D :D :D :D 8)

MikeC
Former Member
 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

The end walls wound up looking like this.


I spent a long time making door- and window frames. I started them off by glueing styrene pieces to the inside walls around the openings. Fine window dividers were made from Evergreen styrene strip - 0.56mm square. Wall vents were made with 1.09mm strip.

The building has been painted with acrylics and rubbed with pastels.

This is the front view:


Panelled doors were constructed from two pieces of styrene sandwiched together after the cutouts were made.


A view of the rear wall:


I've added interior walls, benches, a ticket window and various additions have been painted in.

Next step, after some tidying up will be the ceiling and roof.

Mike

[/img]

Gwent Rail
Former Member
 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Mike, I don't think you need to be unduly concerned about the standard of your scratchbuilding, because I think you have achieved a very acceptable result. If this really is your first serious attempt, it's a lot better than my first was :!:

Now to one queery / concern. You have a 4-window opening on the Right of your last picture posted and a simular one on the picture before. These didn't seem quite right to me and for a while I couldn't put my finger on it.
Then I realised that it was the middle dividing line of bricks that jarred. In reality I'm wondering if they would ever exist, or would they be replaced by a lintel :?: Can't see how they would hold up without a window frame holding them, something that would never happen in real life.

Sorry if you think I'm being picky, but I'm trying to be helpful and it's easy to fix if you agree with me.

MikeC
Former Member
 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Thanks Jeff, no I don't think you're being picky. After all, the pics are here for comment. It's a good point you make, and I must admit it does look flimsy. There is a thin frame in there, but as you suggest a lintel would be much better, and that's what I'll do! Thanks to you for pointing it out. :D

Mike

Bob K
Member


Joined: Sun Oct 14th, 2007
Location: Bedfordshire, United Kingdom
Posts: 2759
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

There you go Mike, an excellent result. The next one will be really straight forward :) I like the colour of your stone work, which looks just like the grimey stone found on railways. Will you be giving more details as to how you achieved this effect, I for one would be interested?

Bob(K)

Robert
Deceased Member


Joined: Sat Oct 13th, 2007
Location: Benidorm, Alicante, Spain
Posts: 12454
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

You're not the only one Bob. If a how-to is forthcoming I'd like to see a piece of the chosen material in it's 'as bought state' so that we get a better idea of just how great the transformation is.

owen69
Former Member
 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

like Bob i too would like that, i think you have done a
really good one mikec, that finish is excellent. :shock: :shock: :lol: :lol: 8)

phill
Hello


Joined: Sat Oct 13th, 2007
Location: Lancing West Sussex, United Kingdom
Posts: 6496
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

I third that and you have done a tremendous job.
Phill

Perry
Erstwhile scratchbuilder


Joined: Sun Oct 14th, 2007
Location: United Kingdom
Posts: 2657
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Well done, Mike.

If that's a first attempt then I must say I am very impressed. It is surely up there with the good stuff. :D

The finish on the stonework and the slatted window openings look really good. I would be very grateful if you could tell us how you did it. As you know there are many different ways of getting the results one wants and it is impossible to learn too many techniques.

Let's hope this is the first of many projects from you. :wink:

Perry

Gwent Rail
Former Member
 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Thanks for responding positively to my comments Mike. Sometimes I worry if things will be taken in the right spirit when I'm making comments :!:

The point that all the others have made about the finish and the slatted windows is well made though and there really must be a step-by-step "how to" following (at your convienience).

owen69
Former Member
 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

at your convienience, so thats where he makes them? mmm
not sure i want to know how he got the colour now.
:oops: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: 8)

Diesel
Member


Joined: Sun Oct 14th, 2007
Location: West Rainton Co Durham, United Kingdom
Posts: 822
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Very good for a first attempt like the colours on the brickwork .

MikeC
Former Member
 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Thankyou all for the kind comments.

I'll be glad to put together a little group of photos concerning the colouring of the stone. Not sure when I'll be able to do so, but hopefully it won't be too long in coming. I just have to recall what I did :)

The slattted wall vents are just thin styrene strips glued across the opening. The inner layer of styrene was not cut out so they rest against it. Once the glue had set I poured black paint onto them, and wiped it here and there.

Various items have been added to the interior, including a fireplace, as well as a card ceiling and grain of wheat light bulb, whose wires run up through the floor of the restrooms and can't be seen. The chimney through the roof is causing problems :D The roof is being made from stiffish card and will have slates made from paper. I'm not relishing that job.

Mike

Robert
Deceased Member


Joined: Sat Oct 13th, 2007
Location: Benidorm, Alicante, Spain
Posts: 12454
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

It's the apparent bits of morter of different depths and in some cases it seems to be missing altogether. Does the sheet of brickwork come like this or is it something you have done. This picture shows what I mean.


MikeC
Former Member
 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Bob it's just my hit and miss approach with powdered pastels. I like to vary things a bit. The plasticard is more even than that.

Mike

Robert
Deceased Member


Joined: Sat Oct 13th, 2007
Location: Benidorm, Alicante, Spain
Posts: 12454
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

It might be hit and miss to you Mike but the effect is excellent.

sparky
Member
 

Joined: Thu Oct 18th, 2007
Location: Hitchin Herts, United Kingdom
Posts: 2571
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

its as good if not better than many pro jobs well done mike :D

MikeC
Former Member
 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Thankyou Bob and Reg.

Here's how I coloured my chimney. I hope it gives a good idea of how I went about doing the walls. The methods I used are identical. Please remember that everything here constitutes a 'what-I-did', and I know darned well that I don't know everything. Far from it!

First up, here's the chimney alongside some Slater's Plastikard Stonework sheet. The chimney is built up over a block of balsa wood, with 1mm thick styrene for a capping, and a bit of ballpoint pen ink refill tube as the pot. The ink tube was filed a bit rough to accept paint better.
Just to show the effect you can get with pastels, I've rubbed some pastel dust onto part of the unpainted card, and sprayed it with my magic spray :shock: [photo following]


To start colouring the chimney [and walls] I mixed black acrylic paint with some mid-toned blue, which is an opaque colour. It produces a semi-opaque and grimy dark grey which I love. I slapped it all over the stonework.


Then I rubbed the excess paint away with my fingers. Paint sure is good at hiding flaws :lol:


I mixed some black and red oxide acrylics to make a dirty terracotta colour and painted the chimney pot with it, as well as working some into the still-wet bluish-black. Then I carefully painted blue-black onto the flat top of the chimney around the base of the pot.


I wiped away any overly thick patches and set it aside to dry.
I used a blade to scrape some pastels into a pile of dust. I used white and a mild yellow that if it was paint I would have named Naples Yellow. I mixed the two dusts together with a dry brush.


When the paint was thoroughly dry I dipped a finger into the dust and wiped it onto the chimney, exactly as I did on the walls. It wasn't so easy to be hit and miss on such a small surface, and I doubt that really matters in this case. The dust will not adhere permanently.


I rubbed my fingers over it which smoothed things a lot, and the dust lightened the dark surface of the stonework nicely. I figured, rightly or wrongly, that close to the 'business end' of the chimney, the stonework and mortar would tend to be darker, so I rubbed it back more thoroughly there, and I used a small brush to remove excess.


Loose crumbs were brushed away, then the magic spray was used - artists fixative. It must be sprayed from a distance or it blasts the pastel dust away, as I found out to my dismay. Keep it about 12ins away from your work, and lay your work flat. I had to do the four sides one at a time. If it DOES remove the dust, you can quickly add more dust to the wet spray. It dries fast with a matt finish. Follow safety directions, including avoiding breathing the vapours etc.


The pastel dust is now fairly well anchored, but it should be handled as little as possible. It can always be renewed, of course.


As I said, my walls were done exactly the same way, with the same colours. When I painted the walls I worked at getting them more blue-black down low than they are up higher, where a touch more of the red oxide + black colour is apparent.

The fixative spray will frost your glazing I used it before adding the glazing. I wouldn't be surprised if cheap hairspray would work just as well, but I'm all out of it :) Dullcote would do the job too, but it also frosts glazing.

I hope that illustrates what I did. If I left any gaps, please let me know.

Mike

MikeC
Former Member
 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

I don't know if this will help anyone, but on the off chance it does, and with the same disclaimers as my previous post, here goes.
For really fine work I use cheap, but good quality 'rigger' or 'liner' brushes. I don't like the short brushes hobby shops tend to offer. With a bit of practice, the longer rigger style brushes are far more effective and manoeuvreable, in my opinion. The one in this photo is a size 2 liner by Art Basics. Francheville make nice ones too. The bristles, if you can call them that, are made of Taklon and are very fine and soft. When new they are white.They cost only about $4. A size 0 would be even better for the job in this photo. The window dividing frame that I'm painting is 0.59mm wide.
To help steady a shaky hand I like to press a finger from my left hand against the ferrule of the brush. It's surprising how accurate you can be if you do this, and with a quality brush such as that the paint flows just as it should.
My wife took the pic.



Eventually the building will be bedded down into the platform surface. Signs, door knobs, a poster or two, barge boards and plumbing to do too. Very happy with it so far. I know it has flaws, but it's been rewarding.

Mike

Bob K
Member


Joined: Sun Oct 14th, 2007
Location: Bedfordshire, United Kingdom
Posts: 2759
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Thanks Mike, a very clear idea of what you did. It is a method which I have not tried before, but the effect on your stonework is remarkable. Certainly this is one to store away for future projects.

Thanks again

Bob(K)

phill
Hello


Joined: Sat Oct 13th, 2007
Location: Lancing West Sussex, United Kingdom
Posts: 6496
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Well i reckon you and Perry are twins, you both produce outstanding work on what you both do. Well done.
Phill

Robert
Deceased Member


Joined: Sat Oct 13th, 2007
Location: Benidorm, Alicante, Spain
Posts: 12454
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Very nice work Mike, clearly explained. I think your description of colouring/weathering plastikard should have a separate thread in the Scratchbuilding section under it's own heading, as well as staying as part of this thread of course. Now I can copy and paste it for you but that means it will have my name in the listing as the originator so I would prefer that you did it. Sorry to ask even more of you but it's the kind of information that needs extra coverage. If you don't have the time let me know.

Perry
Erstwhile scratchbuilder


Joined: Sun Oct 14th, 2007
Location: United Kingdom
Posts: 2657
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Very nice, Mike. Thanks for the clear description of how you did it.

I have never used acrylics for painting models although I have used them in other contexts. I always found that unless the acrylic colours were mixed with some 'matt medium' they always dried to a sheen - perhaps not an actual gloss, but certainly shinier than I would want on a building, for instance.

Do you use a matt medium or is there some other way of obtaining a matt finish when using them?

Perry

Robert
Deceased Member


Joined: Sat Oct 13th, 2007
Location: Benidorm, Alicante, Spain
Posts: 12454
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

I think Mike uses a matt fixative Pery.

MikeC
Former Member
 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Glad it was useful - I'll transfer it some time soon.

Yes the matt fixative takes care of any sheen. The pastels help too.

Mike

Robert
Deceased Member


Joined: Sat Oct 13th, 2007
Location: Benidorm, Alicante, Spain
Posts: 12454
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Cheers Mike, whenever you can fit it in, no rush.

MikeC
Former Member
 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

The roof has been fitted with slates individually cut from a piece of junk mail that was not too thin, not too thick. Each slate was attached with PVA and then the entire roof was sealed all over with more PVA, before being painted with dryish acrylics to avoid any warping. Powdered grey pastel was then rubbed onto the slates. I haven't sprayed it with fixative, I'll wait and see how it holds up. The chimney is now glued in place.
Now it's a matter of more detailing, such as plumbing and gables or bargeboards - whatever you call them. The platform will be widened at the rear to better accommodate this building, the signal box and bridge.



Bob K
Member


Joined: Sun Oct 14th, 2007
Location: Bedfordshire, United Kingdom
Posts: 2759
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Mike

The building looks superb. From such tentative beginnings you have produced a little gem. Now you have got the bug (no pun intended Jeff) I look forward to seeing more!

Bob(K)

Robert
Deceased Member


Joined: Sat Oct 13th, 2007
Location: Benidorm, Alicante, Spain
Posts: 12454
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

That roof is really impressive Mike. I know you said individual slates but does that mean each little slate or in strips? They also look from the picture that they may be of different sizes, or is that just the camera angle? Whatever it is they certainly look the part.

Ken
Member


Joined: Sun Oct 21st, 2007
Location: Okehampton, Devon., United Kingdom
Posts: 1340
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Really tremendous! The overall realism is remarkable particularly the textures and colouring. (I'm thinking: how will I ever come up to that when I start my scratchbuilding - if I wasn't me - if you see what I mean - I'd be giving up now!!!!!).
Ken.

MikeC
Former Member
 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Thankyou very much Bob, Bob and Ken for commenting so positively - it makes it all worthwhile!

Bob in answer to your question about the slates - every single slate was cut out of paper and applied individually - no strips were used. It was tedious and painfully slow work. Inevitably the sizes vary. Well I guess it's inevitable considering the way I work. I made absolutely sure that slate joins were straddled by the next layer, and had to stop to customise at times by cutting one to size. I realise that many buildings have slates of even sizes, but I have found examples that don't. I probably would've preferred them to be even but it's really only noticeable in close-up.

The ridge capping was made from photocopying paper, two pieces laminated together for a bit more strength. It was coloured by our printer, and scored and occasionally lined with paint as well. I rubbed grey and brown pastel dust over it, and touched up the cut edges with brown paint.

As for the texturing, it's really easy with plastikard, and it's fun to experiment with finishes and colours. I was afraid the roof would warp with acrylic paint onto paper, but I think the PVA must have sealed it pretty well.


Mike

Robert
Deceased Member


Joined: Sat Oct 13th, 2007
Location: Benidorm, Alicante, Spain
Posts: 12454
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Thanks for the information Mike. I don't think that a modern type roof with exactly the same size tiles would have had anywhere near the same effect as you have achieved. However tedius the tiling task may have been the end result certainly justifies your time and effort.

Wayne Williams
Member


Joined: Mon Oct 15th, 2007
Location: Hudson, Florida USA
Posts: 2635
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

MikeC
Truly remarkable Mike! If someone looked at the finished picture they would have no clue how it was built. You've definitely set a higher standard for scratchbuilding :(

Wayne

PS: Yes that is a SAD Emoticon, only because now my "standard" has been raised before I even reached the old one. :roll: :roll:

MikeC
Former Member
 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

:D Thanks Wayne. If I can get a building to stand up without falling apart, anyone can.

In case anyone's wondering, yes I DO realise the joins between end and side walls are not good :cry: I might have a crack at filling them a bit with clay or similar, and I'm hopeful that downpipes will go a long way towards hiding them.

Mike

phill
Hello


Joined: Sat Oct 13th, 2007
Location: Lancing West Sussex, United Kingdom
Posts: 6496
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

What a beauty that is. I would of thought, if i did not know it was scratch built that it was bought from a shop, bl,,, marvelous. Now about my water tower Mike, you see the thing is :D
Phill

MikeC
Former Member
 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Thanks Phill :D :D
Nice try :lol: :lol: :lol:

Mike

Marty
Enjoying the Journey


Joined: Sun Oct 14th, 2007
Location: Perth, Western Australia, Australia
Posts: 5993
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

You've got to admire Phil for his tenacity :roll: :lol: :lol: :lol:

Diesel
Member


Joined: Sun Oct 14th, 2007
Location: West Rainton Co Durham, United Kingdom
Posts: 822
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Looks like the real thing Mike , Brilliant

Les
Member


Joined: Sun Oct 14th, 2007
Location: Lliber, Nr.Valencia, Spain
Posts: 1929
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

I really like this one Mike, it is so realistic. You have weathering off to a very fine art and I'm green with envy.

Les

MikeC
Former Member
 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Thanks Brian and Les.

I'm taking a bit of a break - although there's still so much to do to it. I've started work on something I've never tried before. Hoping to post the result soon.

Mike

phill
Hello


Joined: Sat Oct 13th, 2007
Location: Lancing West Sussex, United Kingdom
Posts: 6496
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Mike C wrote : I'm taking a bit of a break - although there's still so much to do to it. I've started work on something I've never tried before. Hoping to post the result soon.

Is it my water tower :D :D :D . you dont have too :D
What ever it is im sure is going to turn out as good if not better than what you have done already.
Phill

Wayne Williams
Member


Joined: Mon Oct 15th, 2007
Location: Hudson, Florida USA
Posts: 2635
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

This is worse than those old Cliffhanger shows where the "Hero" Was falling off into a ravine and the show ended. :evil: :evil: Then we all had to wait till next week to find out what happened to our "Hero". :lol:
Here I am holding my breath again.

Wayne

Perry
Erstwhile scratchbuilder


Joined: Sun Oct 14th, 2007
Location: United Kingdom
Posts: 2657
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

C'mon Mike. Let us in on the secret. :wink: Even if it all goes wrong we can learn from it - and I'm sure it won't anyway.

Having to keep this lot on here happy with photos and posts is a great incentive to see a project through to the (bitter) end. :roll: :D

Perry

MikeC
Former Member
 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Sorry - it's not another scratchbuild [sighs of relief all round :lol:] - but after seeing BobK's low relief house I know I have more building to do before long.
The 'thing' I'm attempting isn't really railway modelling as such, but it IS railway related, and involves my layout in particular.
I'll spell it out if anyone's interested, but I fear it might be a bit of a disappointment :)

Mike

Bob K
Member


Joined: Sun Oct 14th, 2007
Location: Bedfordshire, United Kingdom
Posts: 2759
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Mike

You can't leave us hanging like that - reveal all, please :)

Bob(K)

Perry
Erstwhile scratchbuilder


Joined: Sun Oct 14th, 2007
Location: United Kingdom
Posts: 2657
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

...only if you build the suspense any more, Mike! Just whisper; I won't tell anyone, I promise..... :wink: :roll: :lol: :lol:

Perry

rector
Now where did I put that...?


Joined: Sat Oct 13th, 2007
Location: New York USA
Posts: 3952
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

C'mon, Mike :!: Please :!:

MikeC
Former Member
 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

ok I was really only explaining why I wasn't about to finish the building, rather than trying to create any suspense, because as I said, the project isn't directly related to modelling.
I'm in the planning stages of producing a series of oil paintings taken from scenes on my Swanhurst layout. IF I get it to work - and painting locos accurately isn't that easy - I might post a pic or 2 on my layout thread.

Mike

Robert
Deceased Member


Joined: Sat Oct 13th, 2007
Location: Benidorm, Alicante, Spain
Posts: 12454
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Is there no end to this man's talents I ask myself?

Perry
Erstwhile scratchbuilder


Joined: Sun Oct 14th, 2007
Location: United Kingdom
Posts: 2657
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Apparently not, Bob. I would think it could make for some pretty unique paintings, and I for one am looking forward to seeing a photo or two.

So we'll end up with a digital image of a photograph of a painting of a model of a protoype - is that about the size of it? :roll: :lol: :lol:

Perry

Robert
Deceased Member


Joined: Sat Oct 13th, 2007
Location: Benidorm, Alicante, Spain
Posts: 12454
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

That's it, that's just about finished me off for the night Perry. :roll:

MikeC
Former Member
 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: That sounds about right, yes. I think.



                 

Recent Topics Back to top of page

Powered by UltraBB 1.15 Copyright © 2007-2011 by Jim Hale and Data 1 Systems. Page design copyright © 2008-2013 Martin Wynne. Photo gallery copyright © 2009 David Williams.