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Bob K
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As part of the development of the backsecene for my layout I am constructing 2 Metcalfe kits. This is the first one a row of 4 low relief Victorian terraced houses in brick. They were quite straight forward to make, although the bay windows are a bit fiddly. I also cheated with the chimneys, by using Wills plastic ones, rather than the paper items provided with the kit. I coloured the edges using felt pens as described elsewhere in this section.

Bob(K)

Gwent Rail
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Looks a well made kit there Novice, nice one :!:

I've found these useful for my layout, but needed to leave the bay windows out, to match typical terraces (Ex National Coal Board) found locally.
Like you, I intend to replace the chimney pots with Wills ones and re-roof by tiling over the card roof fitted.
I also intend to provide gutters & down pipes, finishing off with some weathering using Artist's Pastels.

Tony
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They do look good Bob! Nice job.

Will have to look at these Wills chimney pots as my attempts at the Metcalfe one's leaves a lot to be desired :roll:

phill
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Looking good as per norm Bob. Glad you mentioned the chimney,s, now i know what i can do to replace mine, cheers
Phill

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Very smartly done, Bob. Any plans to light them?


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Les
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They look good Bob. :)

Have wonderd about these low relief kits and you could maybe answer a question I have. If, as you say, you are going to put them against your backscene, does that mean you have to paint the rest of the house ie. the reamining gable wall, onto the backscene? I suppose you could disguise it with a tree or something. :? :?

Les

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Les if I may reply to that - I haven't bothered to paint the remainder of my low relief shops onto the backscene. Yes mine look a bit odd from some angles. It's just another compromise, I guess. Trees do help disguise them, as do more buildings - painted or printed - behind them.

Mike

Bob K
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MikeC wrote:Very smartly done, Bob. Any plans to light them?


Mike


Mike

No, I am going to keep it simple. They will just sit in the background - for the moment.

Bob(K)

Les
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Thanks Mike, I have no problem accepting your advice. if I finish up with scenery remotely like yours (and Bob's) I'll be delighted. :D

Les

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I,ve also made these and found the bay windows fiddly , the Wills chimney pots look good have got some in the spares box so going to replace with those :)

Gwent Rail
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Les wrote:They look good Bob. :)

Have wonderd about these low relief kits and you could maybe answer a question I have. If, as you say, you are going to put them against your backscene, does that mean you have to paint the rest of the house ie. the reamining gable wall, onto the backscene? I suppose you could disguise it with a tree or something. :? :?

Les


If you have a look at my backscene thread (Backscenes for non-artists), you will see another idea for blending in low relief buildings against the background Les.
In my case, I've used layers of backscene papers to give the illusion of depth and treated the low relief buildings as part of the backscene. (Well they are really) The eye is then fooled into thinking that the low relief structure is a full building.

Have a look at my link to see what I mean, you'll find the first photo of a low relief terrace halfway down the initial post, which then goes into some detail on how I built it up.
Here's the link:-

http://yourmodelrailway.com/viewtopic.php?t=162&start=0&postdays=0&postorder=asc&highlight=

Les
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Jeff,

Put it down to age I'm afraid but I had forgotten just how good that post is, in fact worse still I had forgotten the post altogether. Thanks for reminding me. :oops: It really does answer my question in a very effective way.

I hope I forgot it because I was nowhere near that stage of work on my layout so to be sure I have copied it, saved it as a Word file AND printed it out. :wink:

Thanks again,

Les

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:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

sparky
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it would be nice if some clever person came up with a holographic backscene paper .trees or biuldings. i have seen this type of thing on gift wrapping but balloons or stars are not quite appropriate. :D

anyone know how they do that?

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Buying Wills chimney pots......?  I can hear Bob cryinging into his beer:lol:

I didn't think the Metcalfe roll-up chimbly pots were too clever, but I've found that if you use comparatively generous amount of PVA, wind on the tip of a cocktail stick, you end up with a slightly glazed looking clay pot, soft enough to 'twiddle' on the stick with your finger nail against the end to give this [below] appearance, [ a scratchbuilt LR bombed terrace circa 1900], go on, have another go!

Depending on how you cut your strip of paper, and what you 'twirl' them on, the possibilities could be endless, and you can spend the money on important things like Scottish Laughing Water :cheers

PS I know the chimneys should be laid-up in plain bond, but I hadn't got any at the time, sorry!


Last edited on Sun Oct 5th, 2008 12:23 pm by Chubber

Robert
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It's shown time and time again, it's all in the details.

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Is that really card Dooferdog?  That looks like the real thing to me!

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Yup, the pots are paper, rubbed with a little clear matt acrylic varnish before being stuck on. They are part of this model, a bombed terrace with a 'vacant' lot. There were still some like this in Portsmouth when I was a child, with a tar-papered shored up end.










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Fantastic looking terrace - is that all card as well?

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Yes, everything is card,paper [Scalescenes] DAS clay, scrap wood etc, the sash windows, however have got thin plastic strip. The card is cornflake packets and the back of an old calendar. The hardest bit to get 'right' was the rubbish tip at the end, I did it three times before it looked right.

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Most impressive. Can I ask what you used to stain the wooden beams as they give a great impression of weathered timber?

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Bleeding heck, DD, the end of those buildings looks so real !!!

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Lovely work!!!!!


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well all i can say is bloody marvelous,they look the part.
:doublethumb;-):lol::lol::lol::lol::cool:

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you are "the man" DD more excellent work!

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Wow, that's very very good.  In fact the best card models I have ever seen.  I'm really impressed.

 

Well done mate

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Here's another WOW, DD, Super job.

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That's some terrace DD :shock::shock::shock::shock:

Put's mine to total shame. :oops::oops:  When I'd "finished" mine - "out of the box" - but in stone, the first thing that sprang to mind was a comment I'd heard before somewhere - "Could do better" !!!!:roll::roll::roll::roll::sad::sad:

phill
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:doublethumb:wowAmazing from me as well DD.

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mojo1 wrote: Most impressive. Can I ask what you used to stain the wooden beams as they give a great impression of weathered timber?

Sorry so long in replying, been away for a while.......


Thank you for your kind remarks:oops::oops:

The wood is thin softwood, planed smooth, then sanded lightly in different directions with medium glass paper, a coat of 'gunge' coloured acrylic wiped off after a couple of minutes and allowed to dry, and then either painted with dilute dirty black for the battening on the walls, or, for the supports weathered with a dry brush application of watercolour.

The fence is my own print-out on 140 gm 'NOT' watercolour paper, which gives a minute texture to the surface.



georgejacksongenius
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Awesome terrace,dooferdog!!!:shock::shock::shock:

Cheers,John.B.

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Oh dear! Had to prop them up, did you? :thud:thud:thud

If you had built them out of Plastikard in the first place they wouldn't have needed shoring up! :lol::lol::lol::lol::lol::pedal

Seriously, I'm not a great fan of card, but I have to admit that these really do look terrific. Well done indeed.

Perry

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Perry wrote: Oh dear! Had to prop them up, did you? :thud:thud:thud

If you had built them out of Plastikard in the first place they wouldn't have needed shoring up! :lol::lol::lol::lol::lol::pedal
.................................................

:lol::lol::lol::lol::lol::lol:

Chubber
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Hm!  There's no emoticon for 'Nah-nah-nee-nah-nah', is there???:lol:

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Don't take any notice of 'em Doug. :pathead

Gawd knows I've tried hard enough to get'em away from that horrible, nasty plastic stuff. They just wont listen. :It's a no no

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I know, I know, and that plastic stuff costs money...[shhh, whisper, don't want to let them know, it gives me more left over for Scottish Laughin' Water;-)]

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I think that often plastic modellers become seduced by the textures that they are using, and just accept that each of their roofs will be the same as someone elses 200 miles away, because of the comparatively narrow range of [particularly] roofing sheets.

That does not mean, I assure you most earnestly, that I do not respect the skill they use in making the models.

I just like knowing that my model is my model, from the ground up, for instance, in the roof below, I wanted the effect of the rough ended old slates, so cut the strips off  in some places, to include the drawn line for the slate below, to give that effect.

Some one else may do the same, but not exactly like mine. I'm not ranting, but give an OO model a look-see from a reasonably scale distance, and brick pointing would be invisible, some need to see it, because they know it is there, so want to see it.


Below is a real slate roof, [modern machine cut] , at 20 ft away you would be hard pressed to see the thickness of a slate, let alone a scale 200 yards....



As for the often quoted 'lack of texture' of card and paper models, I don't think this lacks scale texture, do you?  A little 'broken' ridge tile detail, the ridge tiles not pressed too hard down so as to leave hollows and so on, all add to the sense of texture. (IMHO)  I cant find realistic ridge tiles, not even in the excellent Scalescenes range, so do my own on the 'pooter from matt photo paper, and 'crease them with a blunt scalpel blade after the glue is dry.

Please be assured I do not want to start a 'mine's bigger than your's is' thread, I'm just explaining why I model in card, and really would like to see some of the skilled plastic modellers have a go in the medium,




Last edited on Sat Nov 29th, 2008 07:46 pm by Chubber

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Dooferdog,what the majority forget is the masters they worship :- via
modelling books etc, all hand made their models from whatever they had,
mostly card or balsa, i have books full of terrific buildings made this way.

:thumbs:thumbs;-):lol::lol::lol::lol::lol::cool:

Last edited on Sat Nov 29th, 2008 08:33 pm by

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Well,Dooferdog,you've convinced me.I'm going to try to stick to building in card and paper wherever possible!

Cheers,John.B.

Chubber
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 I expect, Owen, having looked at your profile your bookshelf would have plenty by John Ahearn and Edward Beale on it!  Both absolute masters of doing things with nothing. In those post war days, there was little available to buy, even if there was cash to buy it.

One of my Ahearn books has a page dedicated to how to make a razor blade holder, and how to sharpen a blunt razor blade. Even with all the modern materials, tools, facilities, not to mention lighting available, I can't touch those two who were after all writing modelling books as wellas doing the day job!

Not all the old ideas have been bettered, I recently made the hipped roof above using brown sticky parcel tape on the inside, and shall never use glue again, it went together so squarely and cleanly, and had I made more than my usual cock-up of it, a 'razor blade' down the join would have separated the parts in seconds without damage, too.

Ah, well, each to his own, one of the best things about this hobby is that there is no 'right' way, look at the superb work shown on this forum, all done in subtly different ways.:thumbs

Robert
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I think Doug hits it fair and square when he says ;

"Ah, well, each to his own, one of the best things about this hobby is that there is no 'right' way, look at the superb work shown on this forum, all done in subtly different ways.:thumbs "

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Now everyone on here (well nearly everyone) knows that I have always worked in Plasticard, but as always, this forum has opened my eyes to alternatives.

 Seeing the work of Bob, Doug and others in card has made me look again at the medium. I am sometimes pleasantly suprised by what I see and have developed a new attitude to using differing techniques.

I'll probably always be an advocate of my first mediun, Plasticard, but I will use other types of material as well. Both Bob and Doug are correct, there's no right way, but an open mind will always bring the best results.

Another thing to remember, there's no law against mixed mediums and I've seen some plasticard buildings recently with cracking rooves made out of cardboard. No doubt there's many more situations where this principle would apply.

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dooferdog wrote: .............Please be assured I do not want to start a 'mine's bigger than your's is' thread, I'm just explaining why I model in card, and really would like to see some of the skilled plastic modellers have a go in the medium, .............


Thank goodness for that.  :shock: Only "skilled plastic modellers" need apply. That lets me out then. :lol::lol::lol:

I admit I have been tempted from time to time to try card but I really feel I have chosen my favoured modelling material and will stick to it - especially if I use too much glue. :mutley 

I've built Superquick kits 'out of the box' and kit-bashed a few too, but I have never tried a scratchbuild just using raw card. I greatly admire the results of those card modellers skilled enough to achieve the standards shown on this forum and elsewhere, but I think I'll be staying with what I know. :chicken

Perry

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seriously there great i really like how you have captured the brickwork.

 

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dooferdog wrote: Yes, everything is card,paper [Scalescenes] DAS clay, scrap wood etc, the sash windows, however have got thin plastic strip. The card is cornflake packets and the back of an old calendar. The hardest bit to get 'right' was the rubbish tip at the end, I did it three times before it looked right.



Having just bought a new printer following advice on here, I find I can now print off the Scalescenes papers in pretty accurate colours.

I was looking at this shot Doug - or the "verbage" as much as the photo - because here, modelling card is as rare as hens teeth (unless I go to Bordeaux) but, surprise, surprise, we can get Corn Flakes !!!  Scalescenes recommend (in "OO") light card as being 200gsm;  medium card 1mm and heavy card as 2mm.

When last in UK (because I came back by car) I did buy some 1mm card with this type of modelling in mind.  What "weight" do you rate cereal packets at Doug ?  They're cheaper than Dealer card and I don't have to go to UK for them !!!

I'm sure I said at the time but the above shot is superb :thumbs:thumbs

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My 180 gm card works out at 0.2 mm, my Cornflake packet is 0.4 mm and my 1 mm works out at  exactly 1 mm! [all by Vernier]

The 180 stuff I bought in France at a Papeterie in Montpon as 'A4 Carte pour menus'.

Hope this helps!

That is an old piccy, I must find that model, it's here somewhere!!!


Doug

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If you can't get card where you are and you are in need then I can get some here and cut it up into A4 size, or bigger if I can get an envelope, and send to you. It's what I make all my structures from as well as things like palettes, girder work etc. The off cuts make great timber loads and all the small items so nothing much is wasted.

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Thanks for that Doug - I'll have a scout around for a Papeterie - I think Bergerac may be the nearest - don't think there's one in Marmande.

Bob - that's very kind and an offer you may yet live to regret having made !!! :hmm:hmm:hmm  I seem to recall you have a good art and craft shop near you :roll::roll::roll:

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Hi all
Re:- card modelling.

An additional benefit I found using cornflake packets, is to glue (Pva) them together in layers put under a press or weight until dry.
This way you can build up the thickness you require it is rigid and stronger than wood.
Several layers needing a fret or scroll saw to cut to size.

Just something passed to me by a friend. (I have used this method).
He made an R/c model boat,2ft long, only using corn flake packets as a building material.
It featured in Model Boats around 15 years ago.
He’s built more since, but the original called Flakes is still running and water proof.

Robert
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We have a couple of good ones in Benidorm Peter. Contrary to the British press Benidorm has plenty of culture with art playing a very strong part.

Corn Flake packets will work well too Brian as you say. I have had to use them in the past when stuck for card. Always available in our house too, or rather the Spanish equivalent but they are just as good.

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:hi

We recycle the lot Bob. Cereal, Cat food, any box of that type really.


Often the cry from the domestic appliance department is. Throw it or keep it?


I used to say what is it?

Being in a different room out of sight, but this only received a muttered response.

So now it’s just yes dear keep it I’ll put it with the others later.

Last edited on Wed Jan 13th, 2010 08:23 pm by

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Is that something peculiar to model railways Brian ?

Liz always comes into the computer room carrying some strange looking empty box, bottle or packet and asks if I want it "for my trains" !!  Bless them, they're quite intelligent really - they soon learn not to throw anything out.  (you can tell it's early morning and she's not up yet - I'd never dare say that in daylight !!!)

You're right about the laminated corn flakes card making good model boats.  I've done the same thing with gummed paper strips before now and it works perfectly.

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They are a little like us Peter easily trained.
Lyn will often appear with various items either for storage or cutting up for modelling.

I used to get funny looks and remarks when I raided the vacuum cleaner for dust (Military modelling real dust and debris)
I’m banned from skips, collecting old soft red bricks, and taking secateurs out walking always an opportunity for small twigs or roots. (It’s the bag I take is the give a way).

She is very good when we pass a 99p shop always the offer I have to go to!!!
So I will see you back here in ½ an hour.

Bless her; she helps in modelling and operating (Dab hand with R/c).

Last edited on Thu Jan 14th, 2010 09:27 am by

Chubber
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Brian - I’m banned from skips

I'm married to one of your wife's relatives then...................


Doug

Old_Steamer
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Doug

Lyn has just spotted your avatar.

Threw her hands up and said “OMG it’s my sister in a bad mood“.

So you could be partly right.

The Bankie
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Cornflake packet warning.

Be careful of this type of packet as they often use shiny surfaces on the box and it can affect the glue holding power. Scuff them over with a light abrasive before use.
For some reason Wheatabix have a stiffer card but the b*^&%$£s emboss the name on it so if you don't want undulating walls etc, you are restricted to narrower strips.
I find supermarket own brands adequate but the card is softer. Still, they are cheaper so get approval from SWMBO (she's a Yorkshire woman) which is no bad thing.

Jim


                 

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