Video Archive         Recent Topics      
YMR logo

You are here:  Your Model Railway Club > Other Areas. > Trams. > New Tramway To bottom of page
                 

 Moderated by: Spurno  
AuthorPost
MaxSouthOz
Admin


Joined: Sat Aug 23rd, 2008
Location: Adelaide , Australia
Posts: 12232
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

I discovered the other day, that I have room to build a shelf layout over one of my benches.  I've been following the guys doing Rr&Co, and I thought a tramway might be a way of having a go at it.




Here's the framework and the nook where the computer is to go.




. . . and from the other direction.




Aha!  An interloper.  Caught in the act of ebaying!  I'll sneak up on her . . .




Rats!  She heard me coming . . .




Our youngest, Alice.  You can see she takes after her Dad - same tummy!   Well, she is having a baby, so there is some excuse.  ;-)

More work tomorrow.

Last edited on Sat Feb 20th, 2010 08:38 am by MaxSouthOz

Sol
Former Member
 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Our youngest, Alice.  You can see she takes after her Dad - same tummy!   Well, she is having a baby, so there is some excuse.  ;-)



 

OK, well then what is your excuse :question

phill
Hello


Joined: Sat Oct 13th, 2007
Location: Lancing West Sussex, United Kingdom
Posts: 6496
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Sol wrote: Our youngest, Alice.  You can see she takes after her Dad - same tummy!   Well, she is having a baby, so there is some excuse.  ;-)



 

OK, well then what is your excuse :question


Did not like to ask but now Sol did, i would also like to know the exscuse, is it age :mutley, and also how come she got the looks, i mean look at your piture of yourself :mutley

Phill

henryparrot
Former Member
 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Now i thought you wernt going to build a tramway Max

I look forward to you doing the tramway:lol:

It will make a lovely layout and with it using R &R like you are planning it will be great to watch while you are working at your bench.

Phill

The reason Alice is smiling she is looking at Max and thinking "Im glad i look like Mum" :lol::lol:

cheers brian

Gwiwer
Former Member
 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Watching this project with some interest, Max, as I had hoped to be able to somehow incorporate a tramway in a layout of my own. The idea got rejected at an early stage but the underlying interest is still there.

MaxSouthOz
Admin


Joined: Sat Aug 23rd, 2008
Location: Adelaide , Australia
Posts: 12232
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Let's hope I can do it justice.  :shock:

MaxSouthOz
Admin


Joined: Sat Aug 23rd, 2008
Location: Adelaide , Australia
Posts: 12232
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

phill wrote: Sol wrote: Our youngest, Alice.  You can see she takes after her Dad - same tummy!   Well, she is having a baby, so there is some excuse.  ;-)



 

OK, well then what is your excuse :question


Did not like to ask but now Sol did, i would also like to know the exscuse, is it age :mutley, and also how come she got the looks, i mean look at your piture of yourself :mutley

Phill

Why are people so unkind?

phill
Hello


Joined: Sat Oct 13th, 2007
Location: Lancing West Sussex, United Kingdom
Posts: 6496
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Because we care about you Max, :thumbs

Phill

henryparrot
Former Member
 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Max

Its going to be interesting seeing you create roadways within the rails around the double slips you are mentionining in the R & R thread:lol::lol:

cheers Brian

Petermac
Moderator


Joined: Sat Oct 13th, 2007
Location: Nr Bergerac, France
Posts: 16253
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

I like those shots Max - particularly nos 3, 4 and 5 - there's some lovely scenery there !!!

I note once again that there's no cheap "rough cut timber" for you - that superb aluminium tubing.  Just wish it was cheaper here - certainly makes a stron, good looking baseboard support.

I'm looking forward to seeing what our resident "electrickery kid" does with a tramway.  It should prove very interesting.

Gwiwer
Former Member
 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

It should indeed though I'm trying to think of where a double-slip is used on a tramway and failing.

Tramways would probably use back-to-back Y-points to permit the same moves in a restricted space.

There are plenty of street-corner intersections where a # crossover (or "H") is also equipped with curves to make turns. Melbourne has one complete "Grand Union" with all four turns, and several with three out of four possible.

But no actual slip diamonds since these are actual curves with their own sets of points separate to the # crossing in the middle.

MaxSouthOz
Admin


Joined: Sat Aug 23rd, 2008
Location: Adelaide , Australia
Posts: 12232
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Confession time, Peter.  That is steel tubing (RHS) rectangular hollow section.

The double slips will be in an open, unpaved section.  The Bay tramway has a grassed right of way between Adelaide and Glenelg.  It's really only paved at the ends, stops and crossings.  I'm hoping to hide my double slips outside the terminus precincts in the undeveloped areas.

The St Kilda Museum Tramway has all the turnouts in grassy, unpaved areas.  Bushes and trees overhang the tramway and almost touch the trams as they pass.  The ballast is the same height as the surrounding dirt, sometimes lower 

Another way I could do it is to have a single turnout, running the main lines into a single station, but I think that won't look as interesting as a double track station.

At the end of the day, the point of the exercise is to play with Rr&Co.  The tramway is just a bonus.

henryparrot
Former Member
 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Max

You spoilsport i was loooking forwrd to you tackling roadway around double slips:lol::lol:

cheers brian

mikeyh
Former Member
 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Double slips, or compound switches, or puzzle switches occur on tramways throughout the world. Double compounds are featured on Tramways in Victoria , Australia. the definition of a tramway is a light railway that uses existing roads for its track UNLESS it is absolutely neccessary. Many rural tramways will have a permanent way especially constructed but as long as the majority of track is built at the side of ,or on existing roads, its a tramway.

MaxSouthOz
Admin


Joined: Sat Aug 23rd, 2008
Location: Adelaide , Australia
Posts: 12232
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Today I made a truss for the downlights.  I found when I started my main layout that I need lots of light to work.  I figured I may as well put the downlights up at the start.  I'll be able to see better and the scenery will show in its right shades.  Whenever that happens. :shock:

Here is the truss:-




It's another length of RHS.




The two wires which carry the lamps are tensioned from one end and there is a tension wire over the top.  Light, but strong.

The chains are doubled to allow the assembly to be lowered for maintenance and to complete the work.




These are the three pairs of wires over the main layout.  I used high tensile fencing wire and pulled it up with turnbuckles.  Because I'm using solid state transformers, the downlights can be dimmed.  The dimmer rack is that white floating square on the left.


Gwiwer
Former Member
 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Thanks Max

It's always good to see the "big picture" around layouts and to understand how each of us has tackled issues such as lighting.

Model railways require much more thought sometimes than just the model railway!

Petermac
Moderator


Joined: Sat Oct 13th, 2007
Location: Nr Bergerac, France
Posts: 16253
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

That's an interesting lighting gantry over your layout Max.

Are the lights the type that screw-contact onto a constantly live wire runner or are they fed separately and the wires just carry them ?

Lighting is, to me,  always a problem with "fixed" layouts - what to use and how to keep them high enough to allow access for working and yet still close enough to give decent light.  Less of a problem on exhibition layouts because they can be built into a fairly low "pelmet".

Gwiwer
Former Member
 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Peter - I have seen excellent use made of up lighting from behind scenery which sometimes provides more even and superior illumination of the layout area than does down lighting from bulbs or spots.

What works for Max may not work for others and vice versa since we all have our layouts in different situations. Even outside where most of my lighting is natural I have strip lights high above the layout which give reasonable illumination over about half of it at night and some illumination to the rest.

Photoman
Former Member
 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Don't you just love how potential layout space jumps out at you every so often.

Will also look forward to seeing how this plans out as I had considered a tramway prior to opting for a smaller scale.

MaxSouthOz
Admin


Joined: Sat Aug 23rd, 2008
Location: Adelaide , Australia
Posts: 12232
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Peter, the wires just carry the lamps.  I'll try to get a shot of how it's wired tonight.  The lights are becoming a bit redundant on the main layout now - what with all the LEDs!

Myansome
Member


Joined: Sun Jun 22nd, 2008
Location: Newlyn, Cornwall, United Kingdom
Posts: 1075
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

:thumbs Really looking forward to the Tramway!!!!!!!!!!!!! Cool!:doublethumb

MikeC
Former Member
 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Ditto!

Marty
Enjoying the Journey


Joined: Sun Oct 14th, 2007
Location: Perth, Western Australia, Australia
Posts: 5885
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Yup, me too.

MaxSouthOz
Admin


Joined: Sat Aug 23rd, 2008
Location: Adelaide , Australia
Posts: 12232
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

No pressure, then :question    :pedal

Alan
Former Member
 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

How many trams do have already Max, and how many more do you think you will need for the layout

Great start to the new layout, forward planning always hepls in the end, can you have sound in the trams as well.

MaxSouthOz
Admin


Joined: Sat Aug 23rd, 2008
Location: Adelaide , Australia
Posts: 12232
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Alan wrote: How many trams do have already Max, and how many more do you think you will need for the layout

Great start to the new layout, forward planning always hepls in the end, can you have sound in the trams as well.

Just this one, so far, Alan.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cVGOpEiZwNY

Alan
Former Member
 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

That's what I thought Max

But asked the question in case I had missed you building another one :roll:

MaxSouthOz
Admin


Joined: Sat Aug 23rd, 2008
Location: Adelaide , Australia
Posts: 12232
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Petermac wrote: That's an interesting lighting gantry over your layout Max.

Are the lights the type that screw-contact onto a constantly live wire runner or are they fed separately and the wires just carry them ?

Lighting is, to me,  always a problem with "fixed" layouts - what to use and how to keep them high enough to allow access for working and yet still close enough to give decent light.  Less of a problem on exhibition layouts because they can be built into a fairly low "pelmet".


Here's a shot of the completed wiring, Peter.




You can see the two transformers and the 240 Volt junction box.  I'm not sure if it's clear, but the white cables are carrying the current and the top part of the chocolate block connectors clamp to the high tensile fencing wire, to hold them in their positions.




Maybe this shows it better.  I still have to paint the upper part of the downlights with heat resistant black paint, to stop the light showing out of the tops.  Tomorrow night will do for that.

On another matter, I decided to use Peco Code 75 track as the tram wheels are so tiny.  Guess what!  Peco don't make insulfrog turnouts in code 75 - only electrofrog.  That means I have to modify them to make them DCC friendly!   :roll: 

Gwiwer
Former Member
 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

That means I have to modify them to make them DCC friendly!

No problems at all for a man of your talents Max. ;-) Next you'll be looking for grooved tramway rail in HO :thumbs

MaxSouthOz
Admin


Joined: Sat Aug 23rd, 2008
Location: Adelaide , Australia
Posts: 12232
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

There is such a thing, Rick?  OMG :shock:

Gwiwer
Former Member
 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Not that I've heard of, Max, other than from a very few dedicated tramway modellers who build their own. But someone here might know different .....

MaxSouthOz
Admin


Joined: Sat Aug 23rd, 2008
Location: Adelaide , Australia
Posts: 12232
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

I don't think I want to know, Rick.  ;-)

I just had a look at the Peco website.  They make insulfrogs in code 83, so that will have to do.  I have 83 meeting 100 where my turntable approach meets the line to the fuel depot.  The difference is significant.  I've still got some 83 offcuts, so I'll stick my one tram on it and have a look.

Gwiwer
Former Member
 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

It seems there is a supplier somewhere in the Yoo Ess Ovay; just in discussions with a tram buddy now.

AND .....

we may have a winner here:- http://www.greenhobbymodel.com/model%20trains/tt%20tram%20track.htm

And more here, referred to as "girder rail" http://www.customtraxx.com/ which seems to be the same thing.

Last edited on Mon Feb 22nd, 2010 11:02 am by

Petermac
Moderator


Joined: Sat Oct 13th, 2007
Location: Nr Bergerac, France
Posts: 16253
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

That lighting setup looks incredibly neat and tidy Max.  (Petermac thinks to self "I really must try harder" !!)


Petermac
Moderator


Joined: Sat Oct 13th, 2007
Location: Nr Bergerac, France
Posts: 16253
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Having looked at the shots again Max, what are the blue clip-like things ?  Are they just that - clips or are they blue choc. blocks ?

Petermac
Moderator


Joined: Sat Oct 13th, 2007
Location: Nr Bergerac, France
Posts: 16253
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Maybe cable ties - can't quite make it out ?   I'm old and you're several thousand miles away !!!!!

mikeyh
Former Member
 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

It seems I may have to eat humble pie re my statement about double slips on tramways!

A. they definately exist

B. they are rare

C Cant find any pictures to prove it!

Following a PM from Rick  querying where they existed ,I have spoken with several colleagues and tramway officials. They've heard of them but never seen them! It seems the problem is one of definition.  An alternative name for a double slip is a compound slip, but some people call a compound slip anything that isnt just a left or right handed single slip!

Anyway this picture of The grand junction in Prague is interesting. The slips give access to each of the three routes.  thanks to my friend Phil Kelly for the photo;

 




Mikey

 

Sol
Former Member
 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Mikey, the picture is interesting but they are not slips, just 3 way points - slips are normally  like a diamond crossing with track connecting each diamond
- see the Peco example
http://www.ehattons.com/StockDetail.aspx?SID=7736

or
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Railroad_switch#Double_slip

Last edited on Mon Feb 22nd, 2010 12:24 pm by

mikeyh
Former Member
 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Agreed sol, but i refer you to your own link where slips single or double are referred to (or can be referred to) as double compound points or switches. as i said it seems to be a definition thing according to what part of the world you live in. Yes the picture is a three-way point but Prague tramways refer to it as a compound slip. confused? I am (not too hard!)

mikey

MaxSouthOz
Admin


Joined: Sat Aug 23rd, 2008
Location: Adelaide , Australia
Posts: 12232
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Thanks Rick.  The links will stay here, so I can go back to them when I'm ready.  There is also some other good stuff there.  Bonus!

Peter, you are right.  The blue and green thingys are cable ties.  They pull up tight with pliers and keep it all neat.

Thanks also to Mikey and Sol.  I didn't realise that there would be so much interest when I started this thread.  It started out as a way to play with Rr&Co; but , "it's gotten a life of its own, Narelle!"

mikeyh
Former Member
 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Just for interest sake Max and Rick; i'm starting to receive responses from friends;

 





there ya go!

 

mikey



 

 

Sol
Former Member
 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Spot on Mikey, they may not be tramways but at least single & double slips in roads. I would not fancy riding a pushbike down there though, get the wheel caught & a*** up you would go.

MaxSouthOz
Admin


Joined: Sat Aug 23rd, 2008
Location: Adelaide , Australia
Posts: 12232
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Thanks, Mikey.  :thumbs

Gwiwer
Former Member
 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Quite right. A lot comes down to definition. "Heavy" railways running through streets are / were often referred to as "tramways" (the Weymouth tramway is an example) but were never used by, nor intended to be used by, "light rail" style passenger vehicles.

It is tramways of that kind whereupon I am not aware of a double or single slip.

mikeyh
Former Member
 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Max, I do hope you are not having a crossroads on your tramway.  If you are this may inspire you!!

Taken during the construction of the 'Grand Union in Montreal!!

 


 

Mikey

Gwiwer
Former Member
 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Superb engineering and still rather uncommon anywhere in the World today. Melbourne has one full Grand Union at Balaclava Junction as can be seen here.

MaxSouthOz
Admin


Joined: Sat Aug 23rd, 2008
Location: Adelaide , Australia
Posts: 12232
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Just south of us is this:-

http://www.horsedrawntram.com.au/our_history.html

http://www.victor.sa.gov.au/webdata/resources/files/HorseTramBrox.pdf

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Victor_Harbor_Horse_Drawn_Tram

double slips are when two people step in it together.

MaxSouthOz
Admin


Joined: Sat Aug 23rd, 2008
Location: Adelaide , Australia
Posts: 12232
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

mikeyh wrote: Max, I do hope you are not having a crossroads on your tramway.  If you are this may inspire you!!

Taken during the construction of the 'Grand Union in Montreal!!

 


 

Mikey

I think I will go and have a little lie down, now.

MaxSouthOz
Admin


Joined: Sat Aug 23rd, 2008
Location: Adelaide , Australia
Posts: 12232
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Gwiwer wrote: It seems there is a supplier somewhere in the Yoo Ess Ovay; just in discussions with a tram buddy now.

AND .....

we may have a winner here:- http://www.greenhobbymodel.com/model%20trains/tt%20tram%20track.htm

And more here, referred to as "girder rail" http://www.customtraxx.com/ which seems to be the same thing.

Thanks very much, Rick.  CustomTraxx is the go.  I just spent another half hour there.  Very interesting.  The tram fraternity have nearly as many products as the rail mob.  Addictive.

phill
Hello


Joined: Sat Oct 13th, 2007
Location: Lancing West Sussex, United Kingdom
Posts: 6496
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

I am really enjoying this thread, so much more to running trams than meets the eye.

Phill

MaxSouthOz
Admin


Joined: Sat Aug 23rd, 2008
Location: Adelaide , Australia
Posts: 12232
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

mikeyh wrote: Double slips, or compound switches, or puzzle switches occur on tramways throughout the world. Double compounds are featured on Tramways in Victoria , Australia. the definition of a tramway is a light railway that uses existing roads for its track UNLESS it is absolutely neccessary. Many rural tramways will have a permanent way especially constructed but as long as the majority of track is built at the side of ,or on existing roads, its a tramway.




Photograph posted with permission of Steve McNicol railmac@westnet.com.au


This typical of most of the Adelaide - Glenelg tramway, Mikey.  It's not a great shot, but you can see that a dedicated right of way has been created for the tramway.  There is a road behind the trees and houses back on to the line on the left side.

Interestingly, the SA Govt have started building another tramway down the middle of the Port Road where the planned canal was never built.  The new tramway will connect the CBD to Port Adelaide. 

You can also see the plain rail.  The girder rail is only found at crossings, the CBD and the main street of Glenelg, Jetty Road.


Last edited on Sat Mar 6th, 2010 04:16 am by MaxSouthOz

MaxSouthOz
Admin


Joined: Sat Aug 23rd, 2008
Location: Adelaide , Australia
Posts: 12232
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

OK.  On we go.




The lamps have been painted with heat resistent paint and plugged in.




The two 16 mm MDF boards are butt glued with PVA.




The boards are turned over and a butt plate is screwed and PVA glued across the joint.  I plan to turn the boards over to wire them up, for ease of access.  The butt plate stops the joint from breaking when I turn it over.  I estimate that the two boards together weigh at least 10 kg (on the grunt meter).




The lighting truss is hauled up and the lights turned on.  I will be able to slide the lamps along the wires later to create more interesting areas of light and shade.


The shelf with the Bluebird and the tram on it will be relocated higher.

Last edited on Wed Feb 24th, 2010 09:09 am by MaxSouthOz

Petermac
Moderator


Joined: Sat Oct 13th, 2007
Location: Nr Bergerac, France
Posts: 16253
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

That looks like a useful area to work with Max - and a good surface (if a little hard !!).

MaxSouthOz
Admin


Joined: Sat Aug 23rd, 2008
Location: Adelaide , Australia
Posts: 12232
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Okey dokes, now for a fascia.




The fascia sits in four curtain pole brackets and is trapped in the vee under the base board.  Easily removed for maintenance or new work.

Last edited on Thu Feb 25th, 2010 10:28 am by MaxSouthOz

MikeC
Former Member
 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

So how long is this, Max? I did read through but couldn't spot it.

Mike

MaxSouthOz
Admin


Joined: Sat Aug 23rd, 2008
Location: Adelaide , Australia
Posts: 12232
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

It's 3.9 metres, Mike.  The wide bit is 500 mm and the narrow bit is 400 mm.

MikeC
Former Member
 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Thanks Max - about as long as the long side of my new one, so it'll be interesting to see what this looks like as it develops.

MaxSouthOz
Admin


Joined: Sat Aug 23rd, 2008
Location: Adelaide , Australia
Posts: 12232
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Oh, and I've thought of a context - the Tram Museum.  So the trams can go from somewhere to somewhere else - and back again!  That way I can run any old tram I like.

One of our local model shops actually has stock of all the turnouts, double slips and track in Code 75 that I'm needing.  I've ordered it all on line.  Once the track is down, I can get back on to Rr&Co and start planning and plotting.

Sol is going to help me with the live frog switching (he doesn't know yet, so keep it between us). ;-)

MaxSouthOz
Admin


Joined: Sat Aug 23rd, 2008
Location: Adelaide , Australia
Posts: 12232
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

MikeC wrote:  it'll be interesting to see what this looks like as it develops.
The limiting factor is going to be the OHLE cables, Mike.  A bit of a challenge I expect.

Gwiwer
Former Member
 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Depends how it's wired and switched. It might be horribly over scale but I'd look at stripping single-core bell wire for live overhead if nothing better was available at a sensible price. But that doesn't reduce the need to have frogs, crossing pans and all the poles and insulators which a street tramway requires.

If you're not planning on running live overhead then construction may be simpler as everything can be dummy and only need to look the part without acting it as well.

I seem to recall piano wire being used by some tram modellers but just how easy is it to use?

MaxSouthOz
Admin


Joined: Sat Aug 23rd, 2008
Location: Adelaide , Australia
Posts: 12232
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

I'm not too worried about the cable, Rick.  You can see the wire I used in post 52.  It's 0.70 mm galvanised tie wire and it doesn't look too bad.  I was thinking more about the amount of work in the poles, guys and aerials to negotiate the bends and turnouts.

I figure I'll go and look at our local tramway and copy their ideas, but it will be a bit of a job.  Once the web of wires is up, then I have to sink the rare earth magnets into the roadbed to trigger the pan flash as the tram passes the occasional pole.

Last edited on Thu Feb 25th, 2010 07:34 pm by MaxSouthOz

Sol
Former Member
 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Max, as a young person when we had trams running around Adelaide, I don't remember flashing at each pole, only normally at the crossovers in the city and that was more with trolley pole than pantographs.

MaxSouthOz
Admin


Joined: Sat Aug 23rd, 2008
Location: Adelaide , Australia
Posts: 12232
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

From what I can gather, Sol, the flash only happens if the tram is under load (e.g., accelerating).  I understand that if it is coasting the flash doesn't happen.  I'm not having magnets on every pole, just some to suggest the effect.

Sol
Former Member
 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

MaxSouthOz wrote: ..............

Sol is going to help me with the live frog switching (he doesn't know yet, so keep it between us). ;-)

If you pick up from the pantograpgh for one connection, then both track rails can be the return & you won't have to worry about live frog switching - known as  LFS  :exclam ( though for a bloke who plays with LEDs in his sleep, LFS will be a piece of cake).

I think our Forum Index has articles on LFS but if not, then this site certainly describes it -
http://www.brian-lambert.co.uk/Electrical-2.htm#Live%20frog%20%28Electrofrog%29%20points

In your case, just substitute Tortoise for solenoids - all you need is a changeover switch.

And if you still are/get confused, of course SSAS will be available ( Sol's Specialised Advice Service)

Gwiwer
Former Member
 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

A trolley pole should not cause a flash on plain wire. The flash results from contact between the pole and the electricity supply being briefly interrupted such that the electricity tries to jump the gap in an arc.

It is fairly normal to see small arcs as trams pass through intersections where there are crossing pans or frogs in the overhead. As well if a driver fails to shut off power while passing a section insulator then an arc will be drawn.

In wet weather you might see small flashes from other areas of overhead due to a film of water accumulating on the trolley wire.

But under normal operating conditions I would be wary of having a flash at each span wire. There is no reason for most of those flashes to occur.

Sol
Former Member
 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

MaxSouthOz wrote: ..............  I'm not having magnets on every pole, just some to suggest the effect. 

Ahhh, so Post #61 was a slight furphy
trigger the pan flash as the tram passes each pole.

We have got him at last :mutley

MaxSouthOz
Admin


Joined: Sat Aug 23rd, 2008
Location: Adelaide , Australia
Posts: 12232
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Settle down, Sol.  The overhead is just going to be a dummy, like me.  :oops:

Rick, our trams tended to flash at the suspension points along the wire, possibly because the pole wheel bounced downwards and broke contact for a second.  Sol's right.  Pantos rarely flash on the new trams, so it's all a bit academic, really.

I'm just going to put a few magnets around the layout so there will be the occasional flash to keep the crowds of visitors entertained.  :chicken

The layout is primarily for me to play with Rr&Co.

MaxSouthOz
Admin


Joined: Sat Aug 23rd, 2008
Location: Adelaide , Australia
Posts: 12232
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Sol wrote: MaxSouthOz wrote: ..............  I'm not having magnets on every pole, just some to suggest the effect. 

Ahhh, so Post #61 was a slight furphy
trigger the pan flash as the tram passes each pole.

We have got him at last :mutley

. . . fixed.  Bl***dy rivet counters :exclam

MaxSouthOz
Admin


Joined: Sat Aug 23rd, 2008
Location: Adelaide , Australia
Posts: 12232
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Sol wrote: MaxSouthOz wrote:

I think our Forum Index has articles on LFS but if not, then this site certainly describes it -
http://www.brian-lambert.co.uk/Electrical-2.htm#Live%20frog%20%28Electrofrog%29%20points

In your case, just substitute Tortoise for solenoids - all you need is a changeover switch.

And if you still are/get confused, of course SSAS will be available ( Sol's Specialised Advice Service)

. . . once again, you misunderstand me.  When I said, "help", I meant, "come and do it for me."  We both know people like that, don't we?

Sol
Former Member
 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

I will admit, the flash does look neat though, especially if irregular.

because the pole wheel bounced downwards and broke contact for a second.  - I had forgotten about that
 but I do  remember now it happening a couple of times, tram came to a halt coz when it, the trolley pole,
bounced back up,  it missed the wire & the Connie had to get out & re-position it.

owen69
Former Member
 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

that happened with our trolley buses too Sol, they were like trams only had tyred wheels ,no track.

:thumbs:lol::lol::cool:

Gwiwer
Former Member
 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Oddly enough I don't recall flashes from trolleybus overhead though there must have been some at times.

I well remember trips on London, Portsmouth and Bournemouth trolleybuses and saw them in action in other places as well.

Something like YouTube footage of moving ones shouldn't be hard to find for reference.

MaxSouthOz
Admin


Joined: Sat Aug 23rd, 2008
Location: Adelaide , Australia
Posts: 12232
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

As they phased out the suburban trams, they were replaced here with trolley buses, which had twin poles.  I don't remember them flashing.  Interestingly, the plan is now to replace all the buses on Adelaide suburban routes with, guess what - trams!

I'm going to put all this flashing behind me now . . .

MaxSouthOz
Admin


Joined: Sat Aug 23rd, 2008
Location: Adelaide , Australia
Posts: 12232
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Sol wrote:

In your case, just substitute Tortoise for solenoids - all you need is a changeover switch.



I got a job lot of Tortoise motors from a bloke whose hobby was building and tearing down layouts.  There's no way I can afford solenoids compared to the price I got the Tortoises for.  :mutley

MaxSouthOz
Admin


Joined: Sat Aug 23rd, 2008
Location: Adelaide , Australia
Posts: 12232
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Sol wrote:
http://www.brian-lambert.co.uk/Electrical-2.htm#Live%20frog%20%28Electrofrog%29%20points


I know I'm thick, Sol, but that's about as clear as mud.  I can work it out, but I thought I'd save some time by copying someone who's done it.  I'll look in the forum index. 

MaxSouthOz
Admin


Joined: Sat Aug 23rd, 2008
Location: Adelaide , Australia
Posts: 12232
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Nope.  Nothing in the index about Live Frog Wiring.

MaxSouthOz
Admin


Joined: Sat Aug 23rd, 2008
Location: Adelaide , Australia
Posts: 12232
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Is this what he means?







MaxSouthOz
Admin


Joined: Sat Aug 23rd, 2008
Location: Adelaide , Australia
Posts: 12232
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

. . . and are these the double slips?







It looks as though the frogs are switched by the opposite pair of points.

Does anyone disagree with any of the propositions?

Sol
Former Member
 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Max, I have responded to you via e-mail but the way you have drawn it is not ideal.

http://yourmodelrailway.net/view_topic.php?id=1645&forum_id=6

Last edited on Fri Feb 26th, 2010 12:42 pm by

Sol
Former Member
 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Also have a look at this Max
http://www.wiringfordcc.com/switches.htm

MaxSouthOz
Admin


Joined: Sat Aug 23rd, 2008
Location: Adelaide , Australia
Posts: 12232
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

It looks like my drawings are too simplified.  I'll try again.  I'm not dealing with the moving rail contact issue.  I'm trying to understand the "polarity" issues.  I've read all the articles and clicked all the links on this stuff.  They are all very well and good, but if I can't understand them, all there is are some excellent graphics.

I'm determined to come up with some useful diagrams.  I ask the question again.  Do the diagrams show the principles of switching the frogs correctly?  They are schematic only, so I can understand what's going on.  Once I understand how it works, I'll draw it up so we "simple folk" can wire our turnouts.

Geoff R
Member
 

Joined: Sun Nov 8th, 2009
Location: United Kingdom
Posts: 1317
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Would a picture like this help you at all, Max?


I know it is for a junction and not a double slip, but I could create a similar one for a double slip if it is the sort of thing that would be helpful.

Geoff R
Member
 

Joined: Sun Nov 8th, 2009
Location: United Kingdom
Posts: 1317
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

MaxSouthOz wrote: . . . and are these the double slips?







It looks as though the frogs are switched by the opposite pair of points.

Does anyone disagree with any of the propositions?

Yes, I agree! Your drawings are electrically correct and yes, the frogs are switched by the opposite pair of points.

MaxSouthOz
Admin


Joined: Sat Aug 23rd, 2008
Location: Adelaide , Australia
Posts: 12232
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

I'm sure it will be when I understand the principles, Geoff.  What I'm trying to get an answer to is, have I drawn the "polarity" shifting to the frog correctly?  I know it's not strictly polarity with DCC, but I don't know how else to describe it.

I want to deal with powering the moving rails separately, once I'm confident that I have the frog correct.

From what I can see, the moving rails never change polarity.  They are either up agains the stock rails or away from them.  It's a mechanical connection issue to make sure they have a reliable connection.

It's like the Emporer's new clothes.  I'm the idiot who's putting up my hand saying, "I really can't follow the drawings by the 'experts."  If I dissect the task into bite size bits, I might have a chance.

Thank you for the photo.  It will come in handy as I progress.  :thumbs

MaxSouthOz
Admin


Joined: Sat Aug 23rd, 2008
Location: Adelaide , Australia
Posts: 12232
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Thanks, Geoff.  I was responding when you posted.  Now I can try to get my head around the moving rails.  :thumbs

Geoff R
Member
 

Joined: Sun Nov 8th, 2009
Location: United Kingdom
Posts: 1317
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

MaxSouthOz wrote: I'm sure it will be when I understand the principles, Geoff.  What I'm trying to get an answer to is, have I drawn the "polarity" shifting to the frog correctly? YES  I know it's not strictly polarity with DCC, but I don't know how else to describe it.

I want to deal with powering the moving rails separately, once I'm confident that I have the frog correct.

From what I can see, the moving rails never change polarity. CORRECT  They are either up agains the stock rails or away from them.  It's a mechanical connection issue to make sure they have a reliable connection.

It's like the Emporer's new clothes.  I'm the idiot who's putting up my hand saying, "I really can't follow the drawings by the 'experts."  If I dissect the task into bite size bits, I might have a chance.

Thank you for the photo.  It will come in handy as I progress.  :thumbs

Geoff R
Member
 

Joined: Sun Nov 8th, 2009
Location: United Kingdom
Posts: 1317
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

MaxSouthOz wrote: From what I can see, the moving rails never change polarity.  They are either up agains the stock rails or away from them.  It's a mechanical connection issue to make sure they have a reliable connection.



Again, correct with the mechanical issue for reliable connection, BUT .....

When you purchase a new code 75 point (not a double slip, just an ordinary turnout), the moving rails are connected to each other via links from each of them to the frog. Effectively they carry out frog switching for you, by making an electrical connection to one stock rail or the other.

So, if you wish to connect a moving rail to a stock rail, you have to remove the link to the frog first.

These pictures I posted on my layout thread show me doing just that:-






Geoff R
Member
 

Joined: Sun Nov 8th, 2009
Location: United Kingdom
Posts: 1317
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

One other thing which may not be obvious when it comes to the moving rails. On an electrofrog peco code 75 double slip, the moving rails are ALREADY connected to the stock rails at manufacture. You don't have to cut anything or solder anything. Just connect up the frogs as you have now worked out for yourself.

MaxSouthOz
Admin


Joined: Sat Aug 23rd, 2008
Location: Adelaide , Australia
Posts: 12232
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Thanks Geoff.  I read your posting on that.  Very good.  I was just a bit unsure about the frogs.  I have ordered all the trackwork bits which should be here next week.  Once I have the Code 75 turnouts in my hands, I will be confident to proceed now.  Thank you again. :thumbs

Last edited on Fri Feb 26th, 2010 08:34 pm by MaxSouthOz

MaxSouthOz
Admin


Joined: Sat Aug 23rd, 2008
Location: Adelaide , Australia
Posts: 12232
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Thanks, Geoff.

Sol
Former Member
 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

YMR has this topic which also described point & frog wiring
http://yourmodelrailway.net/view_topic.php?id=4179&forum_id=6
The link is also listed in the YMR Index under Wiring Live Frogs.

Last edited on Fri Feb 26th, 2010 08:55 pm by

MaxSouthOz
Admin


Joined: Sat Aug 23rd, 2008
Location: Adelaide , Australia
Posts: 12232
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

I didn't think of W.  I looked under F for frogs, L for live, T for turnouts and P for points.

phill
Hello


Joined: Sat Oct 13th, 2007
Location: Lancing West Sussex, United Kingdom
Posts: 6496
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

MaxSouthOz wrote: I didn't think of W.  I looked under F for frogs, L for live, T for turnouts and P for points.

Could give you the reason but its Lent and i am being nice :cool wink.

Phill

MaxSouthOz
Admin


Joined: Sat Aug 23rd, 2008
Location: Adelaide , Australia
Posts: 12232
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Thanks, Phill.

MaxSouthOz
Admin


Joined: Sat Aug 23rd, 2008
Location: Adelaide , Australia
Posts: 12232
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Well, all of the turnouts are in, wired, ballasted and pastelled (if that's a word).




This is a GP-7 number 402 and GP-9 number 531, pretending to be trams at the northern terminus.




This is GP-9 number 534 at the southern terminus and GP-7 number 415 hiding in the tram barn.  Ballasting will continue on the rest of the track and then the board will be turned over to fit the Tortoise motors and wire up all the bits.

Lenz parts, L1 USB and LS 150 are winging their way from the US as we speak.  I'm still having trouble getting the 2 x LR 101s and the 8 x LB 101s all together from the one supplier.  I distrust back orders.

I might give DCC Supplies another go - if they're still speaking to me.

Petermac
Moderator


Joined: Sat Oct 13th, 2007
Location: Nr Bergerac, France
Posts: 16253
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

It's looking good Max. :thumbs  Looking forward to seeing the trams flashing by.

Knowing little about US outline locos, is there any significant difference between a GP 7 and a GP 9 ?

MaxSouthOz
Admin


Joined: Sat Aug 23rd, 2008
Location: Adelaide , Australia
Posts: 12232
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Thanks, Peter.  As you can see with them side by side, they are almost identical.  The side panels and running gear are different.  There were also a lot of retro-fit options available as well, just to further confuse the issue.

Then there were quite large body mods like on John Flann's GP-9s, which were undertaken by individual roads.  The GP-7s and GP-9s were the VW beetles of the railroad industry.  There are still some old ones around as well.

MaxSouthOz
Admin


Joined: Sat Aug 23rd, 2008
Location: Adelaide , Australia
Posts: 12232
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

 

 

OK.  The remaining Lenz bits arrived from Chris yesterday, so turn the board over and begin.




Eastern end, showing the patented bus tensioners, Tortoise motors, LR 101 and LB 101s, buses and droppers.




The middle bit.  The top bus is the J K track bus and the bottom one is going to be a 12 Volt DC bus for LEDs, et al.




The western end.  Another LR 101 and two more LB 101s.  The anchor end of the buses and more droppers.

Sol
Former Member
 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

I like the Tortoise mounting methods.

Petermac
Moderator


Joined: Sat Oct 13th, 2007
Location: Nr Bergerac, France
Posts: 16253
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

"Patented bus tensioners"  :hmm:hmm:hmm:hmm

Have I missed something here ?  I'll re-read the thread to see what they are but they certainly seem to work. :thumbs:thumbs
Those bus wires look extremely tidy. :pathead

MaxSouthOz
Admin


Joined: Sat Aug 23rd, 2008
Location: Adelaide , Australia
Posts: 12232
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Thanks, guys.

Christrerise
Former Member
 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Good to see them put to proper use!

henryparrot
Former Member
 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Max how did you find the Ls150 worked is it a very positive throw i am used to throwing points using a CDU but i think im correct in saying with an Ls150 you cant do that?
I have one here i have never used so i am thinking of using it but was unsure how well they throw points peco solenoid type ones
Brian

MaxSouthOz
Admin


Joined: Sat Aug 23rd, 2008
Location: Adelaide , Australia
Posts: 12232
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Brian, the LS 150 can be used to throw any kind of turnout motor, as you probably know.  I've re-read your question, but I'm still not sure what you are asking.  The LS 150 can deliver enough power to drive the Tortoise motors and can be set (once you decipher the manual), to deliver a pulse of any length.  I have set mine to 2 seconds, which is plenty for a Tortoise.

The way I have mounted the Tortoise with the double pivot gives a terrific amount of back pressure, so it isn't necessary to have the motors stalled to keep the blades in place.  (Important for RR&Co).  The things I like about the Tortoise motors are that they operate on low current and that they don't slam the mechanism of the turnouts.

As I understand it, the current from the LS 150, while being AC, is a bit under spec. for solenoid motors and should be used to drive a CDU, via a relay.

Does any of that help?  :oops: 

henryparrot
Former Member
 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Yes Max the last bit you say for solenoid a Cdu is needed that i use at present but my CDU does All 42 points
With the Ls 150 i assume any Cdu would have to go after the Ls150 otherwise it may blow it up im not sure about that.
If its after either 6 seperate CDU`s or some sort of relay arrangement would be required i would have thought.

I think what i am saying is does the electronics on the ls 150 gets its power from the standard dcc track feed if so thats fine and does the power that sent through the six contacts come from elswhere and does not affect the electronics as it passes through only in that case a CDu could be before the LS150

does that make sense?
Brian

Geoff R
Member
 

Joined: Sun Nov 8th, 2009
Location: United Kingdom
Posts: 1317
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

henryparrot wrote: Yes Max the last bit you say for solenoid a Cdu is needed that i use at present but my CDU does All 42 points
With the Ls 150 i assume any Cdu would have to go after the Ls150 otherwise it may blow it up im not sure about that.
If its after either 6 seperate CDU`s or some sort of relay arrangement would be required i would have thought.

I think what i am saying is does the electronics on the ls 150 gets its power from the standard dcc track feed if so thats fine and does the power that sent through the six contacts come from elswhere and does not affect the electronics as it passes through only in that case a CDu could be before the LS150

does that make sense?
Brian


Brian, I looked into the LS150 a while back when the source of my preferred ZTC decoders dried up (they are available again now).

http://www.dcctrains.com/productcompare/sta_dec_comparison_ls150.htm

I just checked and the article is still there. I think you will find it worth reading.

henryparrot
Former Member
 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Thanks Geoff thats a very good article


Brian

MaxSouthOz
Admin


Joined: Sat Aug 23rd, 2008
Location: Adelaide , Australia
Posts: 12232
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

You can power the LS 150 from the track bus Brian, but I made a separate power supply from a Toroidal transformer and ran the 16VAC straight into the LS 150. 

Iansa
Member


Joined: Sat Aug 16th, 2008
Location: Adelaide, Australia
Posts: 450
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Sorry to make a correction here but the LS150 must be powered from a separate AC power supply.
The only connection to the DCC bus should be J&K terminals to receive the DCC signal when point/s are operated.

 Lenz advise max 16v ac  which causes the LS150 to struggle to fire Peco solenoid type point motors.

All my LS150's are powered with 18-20 volt AC 5amp. Yes 18-20v, which I have been doing  for over 7 yrs with no problems what so ever. Have not blown one up yet.

 All my points are Peco with surface mounted Peco point motors. Some even have the cheap SPDT Peco switch attached which operate 99%.of the time. Nothing is ever 100%.

 I have a number of cross overs(two points op in tandem) that operate with no problems.

 I do not have any CDU's.

 Don't be frightened to up the power supply voltage to LS150's. As I said, after 7 +yrs the 12  LS150s on my layout have never failed.

Ian


 



MaxSouthOz
Admin


Joined: Sat Aug 23rd, 2008
Location: Adelaide , Australia
Posts: 12232
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Iansa wrote: Sorry to make a correction here but the LS150 must be powered from a separate AC power supply.
The only connection to the DCC bus should be J&K terminals to receive the DCC signal when point/s are operated.

 Lenz advise max 16v ac  which causes the LS150 to struggle to fire Peco solenoid type point motors.

All my LS150's are powered with 18-20 volt AC 5amp. Yes 18-20v, which I have been doing  for over 7 yrs with no problems what so ever. Have not blown one up yet.

 All my points are Peco with surface mounted Peco point motors. Some even have the cheap SPDT Peco switch attached which operate 99%.of the time. Nothing is ever 100%.

 I have a number of cross overs(two points op in tandem) that operate with no problems.

 I do not have any CDU's.

 Don't be frightened to up the power supply voltage to LS150's. As I said, after 7 +yrs the 12  LS150s on my layout have never failed.

Ian


 




 

Just goes to show you shouldn't guess.  It's the LB 101's and the LR 101s I have hooked up to the track bus.  As I said, I built a separate power supply for my LS 150.  I don't have any solenoid motors, so I don't really know about them.


                 

Recent Topics Back to top of page

Powered by UltraBB 1.15 Copyright © 2007-2011 by Jim Hale and Data 1 Systems. Page design copyright © 2008-2013 Martin Wynne. Photo gallery copyright © 2009 David Williams.