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Robert
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Somehow we have lost the original, presumably to our recent virus attack so I am doing my best here to rescue the bulk of it.

The East Anglian Railway Museum, near Colchester, Essex, has a beautifully restored Great Eastern Goods Shed as one of it's main buildings.

I wanted to feature a decent-sized goods shed on my layout and thought that this one would fit the available space nicely.

Here is a photo of the prototype:



At the time I visited the museum, I took lots of photographs of the Goods Shed from as many angles as I could. I also measured a single brick, together with it's share of the mortar. This turned out to be 9" x 3" which in 'OO' scale; 4mm=1ft, is 3mm x 1mm. I was therefore able to draw up reasonably accurate plans by counting the bricks on the photos.

This having been done, I made a cardboard mock-up, just to make sure it would fit onto the layout.



Here it is with a Superquick Goods Shed kit, just to give an idea of the size:



The model will be built from embossed Plastikard and because the prototype was built using English bond brickwork, some suitable stock was purchased from Slater's.

Work has now begun and the four main walls have been cut out. Each will now have layers of plastikard built up to give the relief effect evident on the prototype. I will post some photographs as work progresses.

The end of the shed furthest from the office was tackled first. This is what I am trying to achieve:



The door opening, triangular recesses and window openings were cut out from what I termed the ‘base layer’ of embossed plastikard. There will be layers either side of this to give the required depth of relief to the brickwork.



It quickly became evident that the 15 thou thickness of the embossed plastikard wouldn’t give enough depth, so strips of 40 thou x 80 thou plain plastikard were glued edge-on around the lower window panel. The two lower windows were cut out and the panel glued behind the base layer.

I used a ‘Jakar’ Compass Cutter, £2.75p from a local craft shop, to cut the curved tops of the windows.

Plain 040” white plastikard was used for the windowsills and the various stringer courses were added.

The 3-course arches over the top of the windows were marked out on the back of some scrap material then cut out using the Compass Cutter.

Glazing will be done towards the end of the project.

The lower window panel construction is complete and will be left to dry thoroughly before the top windows and panels are tackled.



To be continued.

Perry

Robert
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Thank you for the encouraging responses guys.

I'll try to answer the questions all in one post if I may:

The supplier of Plastikard that I use - personal preference only, you understand - is Slaters. They have a website with some handy .pdf files showing the various types of sheets they stock:

http://www.slatersplastikard.com/

Their mail order service has been excellent too.

The standard sheets are roughly the size of an A4 piece of paper but I believe larger sizes are available to order.

No doors or windows are provided. Embossed Plastikard is just a raw sheet material and everything made from it has to be scratchbuilt. I spend a fair amount of time researching a building before I start a model and usually draw up at least a rough plan for the main dimensions. As I think I mentioned before, these can often be calculated by counting bricks on the photos. If you know the size of one of them you can work out many dimensions pretty accurately.

The cost isn't excessive. I bought ten sheets of the English Bond embossed brickwork and paid a few pence over £19, including postage and packing, so the average cost is only £1.90p per sheet. There is very little waste, because I keep all the offcuts and make the smaller parts including strengthening braces from them. When you consider that the two longest walls of this goods shed project will be cut from one sheet, you can perhaps appreciate that the whole model with probably only use up four brick sheets and I will still have plenty of offcuts to use elsewhere. Add another sheet of roof tile plastikard or perhaps make one up from plain sheet cut into strips/tiles and the whole model shouldn't cost more than £10. Not bad when compared with some kits or ready-builts, and I have the pleasure of knowing that it is unique.

The window arches were made by turning over a scrap piece of embossed card so the the plain side was uppermost. I then used a compass cutter to mark concentric circles. Using the centre mark as a guide, I then scribed right across all the circles to give the appearance of bricks. the circles were then cut across the middle, leaving me with two semicircles. The parts of the centremost circle were then removed completely and the waste material carefully trimmed from the outside. It then just remained to trim the ends of the resulting arches to fit the location. This all sounds a bit complicated so when I do the next arches, I will photograph the sequence as I make them.

I hope that has answered most of the questions, but if there are any others, please don't hesitate to ask. I am no expert and the way I do things may not be the 'right way' but they work for me.

Perry

Robert
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Here is a seven-step guide to the way I made the window arches for the goods shed:

1. Mark out a circle the diameter of the top of the window with a compass cutter. Mine happened to be 14mm.



2. The prototype had three-course arches, so three concentric circles were added at 18mm, 22mm and 26mm respectively. The middle ones weren't cut so deeply as the inner and outer ones.





3. Using the centre point as a guide, start to scribe lines across the circles, keeping them as even as you can by eye. Start with one line. Add a second line to make a cross, then carry on dividing each segment until you go cross-eyed!



4. You should end up with something like this:



5. Cut the circles in half, then remove the centre pieces.



6. Carefully cut away the waste outside the circles.



7. Try the arches in place on the model. They may need a little trimming with a small file to get a perfect fit. These obviously haven't been trimmed yet!



That's all there is to it. Providing your required arches are semicircular then a compass cutter will do the job. Otherwise it gets a bit more complicated!

One last little tip: If you use a compass cutter on plastikard, cut very lightly, taking several passes to complete a full-depth cut. Otherwise there is a fair chance the blade will wander off-line if it is 'forced'.

Perry

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Novice wrote: Perry

What do you use for the window frames as i note you have copied the prototype pretty well?

Novice

I think perhaps you are referring to the window arches? They were made as I have just described in my previous post. I haven't decided on how to do the actual glazing bars (frames) yet. I have considered using strips of PVC tape; the same method I used for my Signal Box project (elsewhere in the Scratchbuilding section), but as there are 18 mainly large windows on the shed alone, plus a few more on the office, I think I may generate some on the computer like I did for my Water Softener project. I still have time to give it some more thought as there is a lot to do yet.

Perry

The PVC tape method of making window frames works well but is very time consuming if there are a lot of complex windows to construct. They certainly look a whole lot better than computer printed ones. The problem with using commercially etched frames and the like is that the window openings have to be made to fit them, rather than the other way around. If you are OK with that, then fine, but I want my windows to be as close to scale size as possible. Therefore I have little choice but to make my own.


The remaining 3 arches over the top windows and the wider one over the door have been completed. I made the one over the door by cutting three single brick courses and cementing them in place, one after the other. The arch capping strips were then glued in place. The rest of window sills and the rain strip over the door opening have also been fitted.



The first end wall is now complete except for glazing and painting.

The doors will not be made until later. I intend making all the doors as a batch. The ones at each end will be fitted in the open position so that vans can be shunted in and out. The positions of the loading bay doors have yet to be decided.

This is all I can scrape together at the moment so I will have to keep looking around for the rest. If anyone has more on their computer please let me know. I have been in touch with Perry and unfortunately he hasn't a record of this build on his computer so at the moment we are at a dead end unless someone comes forward with a copy of the topic.

gordons19
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Many thanks for rescuing what you could of this thread Robert.  Much appreciated....:thumbs

Robert
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With a bit of luck I may be able to get more because I may have a copy on and old database. Fingers crossed.

Marty
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Well done Bob, this project is just to awesome to lose.

Bob K
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Just a small point - I thought the title was a Great Eastern Good Shed, rather than warehouse?

Bob(K)

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Absolutely right Bob, his warehouse project is OK so I have changed the title. Thanks for catching on to that.

Robert
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Have managed, with Jim's unstinting help to get the rest of Perry's topic. It's worth everyone's time reminding themselves just how good this is :


The 'office end' of the shed was begun today. I marked out the recesses and window openings on the main wall but then I decided it might be a good idea to make certain the office building would fit - i.e., that I had got my calculations right.

I therefore cut out the four walls for the office and cut the door and window openings in them where required.

I taped the office walls together very roughly with pieces of masking tape, just so I could get an overview of how it would all fit together.

These are the results so far:







Now that I'm happy all is OK, I can get on with doing the rest of the cutting on the shed end wall.

A little tip when working with brick-embossed plastikard is to use the brick courses as cutting guides. If you want two walls exactly the same height either cut them out of the same piece of material both at once or line up the courses to get them to match up. Always make sure you have a full straight course at the bottom of your wall and measure everything from that base line.

Perry

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I have been getting on with the second end wall; the one where the office is situated.

Here are a couple of pictures of the prototype around the area I am working on:





The office end main wall construction has been completed leaving only the chimney stack, glazing and doors to do (apart from painting and final detailing, of course).

This is how it looks now with the recesses and window arches all done.



The office isn't assembled yet but has been stood in place to judge the effect.

Here are both basic end walls at their current stage.



These will now be put aside to fully harden before any more work is done on them. In the meantime, the two other walls will be done, starting with the back wall. This should be straightforward enough having six bays all very similar. The main bugbear for a wall like this is the boring repetition of cutting out so many identical pieces. :(



To be continued.

Perry

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Cutting the arched window reveals with an adjustable compass cutter needs a little planning and forethought.

I intended to work on just the rear wall today, as it has six arched windows. :shock:

Having set up the compass cutter to the correct radius, I realised that not only did I need to cut the windows for the back wall, but those for the front wall as well, otherwise getting them identical was going to be tricky.

After lots of careful measuring and marking out - and checking - I set to and got all the windows cut out, not forgetting to leave room for the loading bay doors.



I also realised that the inner curve of the decorative arch over each window would best be cut with the compass cutter still set to the same radius. Cutting these arches will be the next job - hopefully late tomorrow afternoon.

To be continued.

Perry

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Work continued steadily today with arches for all ten windows being prepared.

The two wall panel overlays were cut and the rectangular panels cut out of the one for the rear wall; the one with six windows. To achieve a strong relief effect and to allow the correct room for string courses and arches it was necessary to introduce spacers between the two panels. I needed .080" (2mm) between them. At first I thought of cutting these out of .040" plain sheet in the same manner as the panel layer but then realised that this would create a lot more work marking out and cutting as well as being rather wasteful in material. I therefore opted to cut narrow strips of .040" plastikard that would only needed cutting to length before gluing them up as a framework behind the panels



These were laminated with the panel layer resulting in a wall that is three thicknesses of plastikard thick so far. This will add strength and stability to what is otherwise a rather weak, long, narrow wall.

I used tube cement as the liquid solvent evaporates too quickly for this kind of job. I will leave the assembly to dry flat overnight and then cement the window reveal layer underneath it so that it will look something like this:



Once that's glued up, string courses, window sills and window arches can be fixed in place and apart from final trimming, the main construction of this wall will be complete.

After this part of the project, I will work on the front wall where the road vehicle loading areas are.

At one stage I looked at the pile of 26 pieces of plastikard that make up just the part of the wall shown above, that is without string courses or window sills, and realised just how many parts will go into building just this wall. There are, I believe, another 54 pieces of plastikard yet to be cut out, just to finish this wall. I have yet to start on the more complex front wall and I've still got the interior platform, the roof, the office, all the doors and windows and the access ramp to build.

I wonder how I'll fill my time after the week-end? :shock: :shock: :shock: :roll:

:lol: :lol: :lol:

Perry

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Novice wrote:Perry I am really enjoying watching this project grow.

It would be interesting at the end of the project to see a list of materials used and the approximate cost, as I am interested in seeing whether this type of scratch building is genuinely much cheaper than buying a commericial card or plastic model. Of course I accept that the key reason you do this is to create your own unique models and you could not buy anything like this.

The reason this came to mind is, when I built one of my tunnels I used quite a lot of materials and, although much of this was due to my bodging early attempts :oops:, the cost began to rise.

Novice


I'll bear this in mind when the project is finished and see what I can do. I don't think scratchbuilding in Plastikard is cheaper than buying kits. It may be the case where ordinary card can be gathered from various 'free' sources, but for the type of thing I am working on the embossed plastikard is a must as far as I am concerned. One thing I always try to do is minimise waste. I keep all the offcuts sorted into type and thickness. Even the bits cut out to form windows and doors can be pressed into use somewhere along the way. If you want to try scratchbuilding 'on the cheap' then have a good look at some of Bob's masterpieces. I'm guessing that the cost involved with some of them would be pretty minimal.

Perry

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Thank you all for your kind comments and encouragement regarding this project. Feed-back is very much appreciated; positive or otherwise. :wink:

Here is a photo of the wall I am currently buidling:



The construction of the back wall has been completed with the remaining layering done and string courses and window arches added.



As a matter of interest I counted the components that went into the make up of this wall up to it's current state and was quite surprised to find that the total was eighty!

The combination of the various laminations has resulted in a strong rigid wall that will not need any other bracing. The extreme ends will be finally trimmed when the four walls are assembled.

I want to get the front wall built next. :D

Perry

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Petermac wrote:Are you a retired professional ?

It looks really fantastic - such skill and, I suspect, patience. Brilliant.

Petermac


My scratchbuilding experience is not really very extensive. I just take a lot of time and care over what I do. There is no real skill to it. If you can measure and cut bits of plastic card up, then stick them together again, you're 90% of the way there. :wink:

Anyone can do it. :)

Perry

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lockboys wrote:Hey Perry mate :D could you build us the Faller Ferris Wheel :?: :P :P :P :P :P :P :P
I bet you could :lol:


Sure! How many would you like by next week-end? :roll: :lol: :lol: I'll fit them in around finishing the goods shed. :shock:

I think the one thing that any prospective scratchbuilder needs to spend is TIME, and lots of it. Plastikard is still reasonably cheap so if you make a part and it doesn't quite fit, either trim it before you glue it in place or better still make a replacement part. The rejected part can go in the spares box. I have quite a lot of bits and pieces in mine, believe me, but it's amazing how often you can cut a different part out of an offcut thereby saving using fresh stock.

I would love to see a few people - or even a lot of people - having a go at some simple scratchbuilds. A little lineside hut is plenty to start out on, so it doesn't have to be an expensive disaster if it all goes 'Pete Tong'; it can be a nice cheap disaster instead! :lol: I think that's unlikely though. When you break it all down to basics, most buildings are just boxes joined to other boxes of different shapes and sizes. As I said elsewhere, break a project down into small tasks and you will suceed in the end.

I guess what I'm trying to put across is that it LOOKS complex and difficult and that may be putting you off, but don't let it bamboozle you. Start with something small and work up from there. It really is easy if only you'll give it a try. 8)

So come on you lot; have a go! :D You could even let us see some photos of your work on here. :)

Perry

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MikeC wrote:I have my plasticard, and I plan to build a booking office/modest station building for my island platform. I don't think it's stiff enough though, and would need reinforcing somehow.
You're right - a small lineside hut would be a good way to start. I've made buildings from balsa and card ages ago but they were awful :lol:
Mike


You are quite right, Mike, the embossed plastikard I use is usually only about .015" thick and doesn't support itself well unless it's very small piece. I often back mine with plain plastikard to give it strength.

.020" stock (half a millimetre thick) will suffice for many reinforcing jobs. I have used two thicknesses of .040" to back parts of the goods shed, but that is because I needed to represent some fairly heavy relief panels. Internal corners usually need reinforcing and some plain strips glued in place not only do that but also make the job of joining the thin embossed sheets a lot easier.

Perry

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I finished the basic construction of the front wall this evening - the one with the vehicle loading bay doors.

Close inspection of my photographs of the prototype suggests that this side of the buidling has been altered or rebuilt at one or more times during it's history. I have therefore decided to build the model depicting the shed pretty much as it is now as I can't find any historical photos of it.

I shall set about building the office next and then see how it all fits together before going any further. At that stage I'll probably take a couple more pictures and post them on here.

Windows will obviously need to be made and fitted before the walls are permanently fixed together. This looks like it's going to be one of the slightly trickier tasks and may well take a fair amount of time. :shock: There are 21 full windows and a glazed panel above a door.

Perry


I have turned my attention to the glazing of the eighteen windows including the small one above the pedestrian entrance. I have not included the office windows because they are of a completely different design to the shed windows and are small enough to do by hand.

I toyed with the idea of actually making the frames and glazing bars from microstrip but when I worked out how many really tiny pieces were involved, I decided that the probable result wouldn't justify the effort.

I therefore decided to use a technique I have employed before that prints the window framing onto clear acetate sheet. This can then be cut up and the window transparencies fixed in place with glue. I prefer a 5-minute epoxy resin, but no doubt some other adhesives would work as well.

The designs themselves were laid up using Microsoft Publisher software, but again, I'm sure that there are other programs that are also suitable.

Having drawn out one of each size and type of window, I printed them out on plain white paper so that they could be checked for size and registration. Once I was happy that they would fit, I copied and pasted the required number plus a few spares onto the page before adding labels so that I know which windows fit to each part of the model. If I was clever enough to make each window exactly the same size it would probably be quicker and easier, but my shaky hands and dodgy eyesight don't always give the degree of accuracy I would want. :roll:

Anyway, the finished window designs were finally printed onto a sheet of acetate. I was fortunate on this model that the window frames are black because this shows up well when printed. Paler colours do not always respond so well to this technique.

Here is a grabbed image of the sheet. Unfortunately the quality has suffered during size reduction for posting here, but I hope it gives you the general idea.



I will let the ink dry really thoroughly before I cut the windows out and glue them in place.

Perry

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Novice wrote:Perry

Very clever, I wondered how you were going to achieve this. I assume you can print them in any colour too?

Novice


Yes, it is possible to print them in any colour your printer can handle, but the darker colours always come out far better than the light ones. I did some very pale yellow ones for a project a while back and they don't show up as well as I would have liked. Part of the problem is the thickness of the acetate and the fact that it is not actually clear but rather has a 'greyness' to it. Bearing in mind that some kit manufacturers see fit to provide similar transparencies, I'm happy to use these 'custom-made' ones now and again. I would pefer more three-dimensional modelling methods, but time is a constraint and corners have to be somewhat rounded off, if not cut, at times! :roll:

Perry

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All the shed windows were fitted this morning. I would normally paint the edges of the window reveals before glueing the transparencies into place but as the windows are not set deep into them and the plastikard is 'brick coloured' I decided it wasn't necessary. As I had labelled the windows on the transparency sheet they were easy to identify as to which window opening each of them fitted. Thank goodness I made a few spares as I managed to ruin one by getting glue on my finger and then dabbing it right in the middle of the window I was fitting! :evil: Clumsy oaf!

Each 'window' was cut out using a sharp craft knife leaving a good margin all round, then I used a 5-minute epoxy resin to glue each one in place. This glue is only workable for about 4 minutes, so I did each wall with a freshly-mixed batch.

The glue was spread thinly around the back of the window opening using a cocktail stick to apply it in the small quantities needed. I tried not to get the glue too close to the edge of the opening because it may smear onto the visible part of the transparency when the window is slid about and adjusted into it's correct position. I then carefully balanced the transparency on a fingertip and, holding the wall 'right way up', pressed the transparency into place from beneath.The epoxy resin set off quickly but needs to be left to cure properly for an hour.

This is the effect I was trying to achieve:



...and result looks like this:



This view is almost too close-up because the effect when looking at the model gives a better effect in my humble opinion.

So, that's it. All the windows are done. The office structure and the shed doors are next.

Perry

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I couldn't decide whether to model the left-hand loading bay doors open or closed, so I decided to make them 'operational'. :wink:



The doors themselves were made from a piece of .040" plastikard, scribed to represent the framing and board panels.

I then used some scrap material to make a pair of runners for the doors to sit it - as per your normal sliding cupboard doors with channels top and bottom. I made the runners from scraps of plastikard using two thickness of .040" and one of .020" material. I reasoned that I would need a little bit of clearance to enable the doors to slide, hence the additional .020" piece.

Here the doors are laid in the channels (albeit back to front), just to show how the pieces fit together:



When the doors have been painted, the runners will be cemented in place behind the door opening:



And hey presto! Sliding doors:



As you will appreciate, the doors and runners are currently not fixed into position, hence the slight misalignment shown in the photos. :oops:

Perry

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I'm going to take a short break from building the goods shed, probably until tomorrow evening.

I always know when it's time to take a break because I find it increasingly difficult to achieve the results I want. I have just binned the third attempt at making the first pair of office windows. :roll: :(

Add to that the fact that I actually managed to stick a scalpel blade right through the side of my index finger this afternoon, in one side and out the other, and you may understand why I feel the need to take a break. :shock: The annoying thing is I wasn't even using the knife at the time; just moving it out of the way on the workbench. Pity I didn't move my other hand out of the way first. :roll: No lasting damage done though. :D

The moral of this story is: be careful, these things are pretty sharp!

Perry

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owen69 wrote:Perry, when i asked how to get blood off plasticard, i did not expect a
practical demo, a simple explanation would have done!!
your model was going great ,i was enjoying watching its progress. :oops: :oops: :wink: :wink: 8)


Youy know me; nothing is too much trouble for the guys on the forum! :roll: :lol: :lol:

There will be more progress very soon; it's not a bad injury, just a nuisance being on the index finger - which, strangely enough, I tend to use rather a lot when I'm modelling! A great big sticking plaster (designed to attract sympathy from the missus and get me out of the washing up) tends to get in the way when I'm glueing very small parts together. :twisted: :lol: :lol:

Perry

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After three abortive attempts to fabricate the windows of the small office at one end of the goods shed by using PVC tape strips, I realised (it took me long enough! :roll: ) that to get a similar appearance to the windows on the shed itself, I was going to have use computer-generated ones again. There are two pairs of windows in the office building. Each window on the model is 20mm high x 12mm wide with a 3mm gap between the pair. The window reveal is slightly curved at the top. To add to the problem, the windows have yellow glazing bars with a green surround. :shock: They are sash-type windows too.



I got around it by using the same technique that I used for the main windows, but having drawn the frame size to scale I overlaid it with green lines, then added yellow lines to get the two-colour effect. I put in a dark grey line beneath the bottom edge of the top sash to try to indicate the overlap.

Here is a grabbed image of the finished design:



I have made a few spares as usual. The colours may look a bit bright on this image, but by the time they are printed on acetate and installed, the colours will not appear as contrasty. Don't be tempted to try to print very pale colours. It doesn't usually work very well - and of course, you can't print in white!

If you decide to try printing some windows yourself, make sure that the acetate is printed on the rough side - 'cos ink won't stick to the smooth side! Also, if your printer has the option available, print them at the best quality you can and select transparency as the printing medium. If you leave it set to text only and plain white paper you won't get very good results, so be warned. I always print my windows out onto plain paper first and offer them up to the window opening they are destined for. That way you can spot any problems before using up a sheet of acetate. I buy my acetates from a local office supplier. If I bought a box of 100 A4 sheets it would work out cheaper, but I don't use that many so I buy ten sheets at a time and they charge me 50 pence a sheet. So for 50p and a few pence worth of ink I can generate a whole A4 sheet of windows in whatever shape, colour or design takes my fancy. :D

And the finished windows look like this:



Bear in mind they are laying flat on white paper to be photographed. The image is shown considerably larger than the actual thing. These windows, as I said earlier, are only 12mm wide. They will look better once installed in the building so that they can be seen through into a darker interior.

Will I light the office eventually? Maybe, maybe not! :wink:

Perry

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The three walls of the office have been assembled and offered up ready for fitting to the main end wall.

I braced the corners of the office with some strips of plastikard to increase the area that the cement could use. Attaching .015" to .015" plastikard doesn't work under these circumstances. I also cut four triangular fillets that fit at floor and ceiling height to brace the corners of the building and to help keep it square on assembly. I have two steel rulers screwed to a board at right-angles to each other and use this for checking buildings are square as I work.



Here is the office so far, against the end wall, but not attached yet.



The two doors on the end wall will be tackled next.

Perry

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With the road vehicle loading bay doors were given a quick coat of paint - to be finished in situ later - and both pairs were fixed in place. The left-hand pair have been made so that they can be opened and closed on runners, as per the prototype.

I have now begun to fabricate the railway doors. Two pieces of .040" plain plastikard were cut to 56mm square. Each square will form a pair of doors, but it is easier to make a matching pair while they are still in one piece! :wink:

I counted the planking on the prototype doors on a photograph and found that there were roughly nine-and-a-half plank widths to each door, so I called it 19 planks across the full width. A quick bit of maths gave me a width of about 3mm per plank so the doors were marked out and scribed on both sides.

I will need to model both sides of the doors in detail as they will be fixed in the open position - so I can shunt my vans and wagons in and out!

A small access door within the main door was also scribed in, giving it a battered edge. I did this because plain scribing didn't delineate it sufficiently. A small offcut of plastikard was cemented across the top as per the strut on the original. Cross members were added from microstrip at the top and bottom edges of the doors and shorter pieces of microstrip formed the main hinges. The hinges for the access door were made by cutting a short piece of microstrip at an angle to give two small triangles. These were fixed in place and then two tiny sections of microrod were added to form the hinge pins.



To prevent the piece from warping I will leave it to dry overnight before tackling the inside details. Fortunately I photographed the inside of the doors too! :D

Perry

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Please don't forget that when you are reading through this build that just because my picture is on all the posts it doesn't mean I had anything to do with it because I didn't. I was just one of those who sat back and enjoyed the ride.

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The fabrication of the first pair of doors has been completed with the exception of painting.

This image shows the front and rear sides of the same pair:



Looking at my photographs, it appears that the pair of doors I chose to model first have had less restoration done on them, so are hopefully a bit nearer what the originals were like in terms of the framing. I will therefore use a small amount of 'modellers licence' and make the other pair very similar to these.

Perry

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Both pairs of the rail-access doors are now finished, so next on the list (and there really is a to-do list!) is the pedestrian access door next to the office.

I feel I'm really making progress now. :D This looked like a big project when I started it, but I have been surprised how easy it has been and how quickly it has come together.

There is just the office ramp and interior platform to make, then assembly of most of the main units can begin. After that there will be the roofs and the chimney stack to be fabricated.

Interior painting will be fairly minimal, because the main roof will be fixed in place and therefore not a great deal of the interior wil be visible. :wink:

Perry


Twelve small offcuts of plastikard later - remember not to throw any bits and pieces away - and the pedestrian access doors are in place. These needed to be installed for completeness but due to the way the building will be sited on the layout I'll need a rubber neck to be able to see them as they will be at the far end! Never mind; I'll know they're there. :wink:



Perry

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phill wrote:Perry wrote #This looked like a big project when I started it, but I have been surprised how easy it has been and how quickly it has come together.#

Blimey :shock: if that was easy, i hate to see what you do that is hard mate........................Phill


It seems I am having a problem getting across to people on this forum that what I'm doing really is easy - and I'm not being modest. Take your time and reasonable care and there is absolutely no reason why anyone here can't do something similar. I have no particular talent or skill. I'm just a (very) average guy who can cut a bit of plastic without cutting himself (most of the time!!! :oops: ) and stick it back together into a different shape. All it will take is for someone to have a go, find out that I'm not telling 'porkys', and let everyone else know. Then our Scratchbuilding section will really take off. :D

Perry

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Some more work has been carried out on the office end of the main building with the construction of the slightly strange chimney stack that ends part-way up the main stack.

The interior of the office building has been painted matt black.

Using pieces of masking tape at the corners, the building has had a test assembly carried out. It's not good to start glueing it all up and then discovering that there's a problem! :shock: This way, if there are any slight adjustments needed I can do them before it's too late.

Here are a few rough pictures to give an idea what the finished shed will look like:



There is still the pedestrian access ramp to build when the office has been attached.



The doors are in 'undercoat' only at present. :oops:



The interior platform needs building soon so that the walls can be assembled around it.

As shown in an earlier post, the main doors are already made but were not attached for this test session.

Work continues.

Perry

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I've just been looking at what's left to do and a few of the jobs are a little daunting. I guess I'll have to do my 'break them down into smaller tasks' thing again.

Take a look at the fance ridge tiles, the canopy edging and the canopy support brackets. :shock: :shock: :shock:



They look like they'll be fun to make!

Perry

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I think the ridge tiles will be made by bending a strip of plastikard lengthways to give the angle over the roof tiles and then making the vertical decorations in two separate 'sets'; plain and pierced. They can then be fixed in place alternately along the ridge. It shouldn't take too long to do and should look good when it's finished.

I'm working on a method to make the canopy edging, but the idea hasn't quite come together yet. :?

The canopy brackets will be (comparatively) easy, I would think.

Perry




Novice wrote:...........It is only when the building is assembled that you get a feel for the overall size of the structure. The roof must take up quite a large area. Will you have to put some form of inner roof support structure in? If so what form do you have in mind?
Novice


I believe the prototype roof has some fairly heavy duty trusses in it, judging by the photos I have. I'm considering another trip to the museum to take a few more pictures as I didn't take enough of the interior during my previous visit. :evil: Certainly the roof will need some extra support
of some kind as it is more than 10" long and each side is about 4" wide.

Perry

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phill wrote:Looks quite a size that building. Canopy should be interesting to see how it is held up.
Phill


The canopy will be held up pretty much the same way the prototype is; on beams and brackets. It won't weigh much and doesn't have any load to bear other than it's own. :wink: :D

Perry




Petermac wrote:..........Having put plasticard on my "shopping list" for when I go to UK on Tuesday, I'm now having a slight re-think !! It seems modelling with this stuff, is potentially as dangerous as a real building site. " of you down with gashed fingers...............
Petermac


Plastikard isn't likely to cause an injury and the craft knives I use are the same type of thing that any modeller uses, regardless of modelling material, so I don't think you need worry there. :roll: :wink:

My recent injury was caused when I wasn't even using the knife. I was just moving it out of my way on the bench and managed to stick it in my finger - which also should have been moved off the bench! :roll: :lol: :lol: :lol:

A little serious advice regarding knives in general though; always use sharp blades, renewing them regularly. More people are injured through trying to force a blunt blade through material than ever get cut by a sharp one. The reason is that trying to force a blunt blade to cut renders it much more likely to suddenly slip.

Perry

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The office has been fixed to the end wall and work on the pedestrian access ramp has begun.

I used some scraps (literally) of .040" plain plastikard to build the framework:



Then clad the sides in embossed brick material. The steps were made by laminating pieces of plastikard together with cutouts in the appropriate places.



The ramp across the end of the office has yet to be added and the remaining framework has to be 'plated over' with .020" plastikard. Capping strips and railings will follow later. Then door steps, etc., will need to be added to complete this area.

Perry



The office roof has been started by glueing in place some strips of plastikard thick enough to support the ends of the tiled part of the roof. These were followed by two pieces of .040" plain plastikard to form the base of the roof. The reason for this is that the embossed plastikard roof tiles that I intend using for this model are too thin to be self supporting and will need to be cemented on top of the .040" stuff. I thought about using .020" for the base but don't think it would be substantial enough to withstand all the solvent that will be applied when fixing the tile strips without distorting.

Whilst I was waiting for some of the solvent to dry, I set about making the first lengths of guttering - scratchbuilt of course! :lol: I employed my usual method of using a scraper on some .040" plastikard. There is a little post I did a while back on using scrapers at:
http://yourmodelrailway.net/view_topic.php?id=134&forum_id=11&highlight=scrapers
A few more small parts have been added to the office end of the building at this stage because I felt it would be easier to manoeuvre the end wall + office into a position to work on a lot more easily than the whole assembled shed which is over a foot long! :shock: These small items includes doorsteps, ramps and steps.

Once the gable end capping was fitted I cemented the gutters in place, then started tiling the roof.

For this I used Slaters Embossed roof Slates as the size of the roof on this project precludes fitting individual tiles from a time point of view if nothing else! :shock: The Slaters rooing tiles comes in roughly A4 sized sheets and has to be cut into strips. The tiles are embossed in paired rows with plain strips. The way to use these is, starting at the lowest edge of the roof, cement a strip in place with the tile part at the bottom edge. The next strip goes above this with the tile part overlapping the plain part of the first strip. It sounds complicated but it's very quick and easy to do. Just remember to overlap the tiles by half their width on each new row.

Here is how it looks with the first half of the roof tiled:







As can be seen from the photos, there are still of lot of areas that are incomplete but work is progressing nicely. :D

Perry

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I decided to have a go at the ridge tiles this evening, just to see if an idea worked before I set about the main (BIG!) roof. :shock:

This is what I wanted to achieve:



...and this is how it turned out:



I think I'm fairly happy with that. :D

The main ridge tile strip is just a plain strip of .020" plastikard bent in half lengthways. I will scribe the tile lines on it later. Each tile, either plain or 'fancy', works out to be about 4.5mm long, so I cut strips from some .020" plain plastikard, one wider than the other, then marked them off at 4.5mm intervals. The wider strip then had two holes drilled in each 'tile'. The tiles were cut off the strip and the corners and middle 'V' shape cut out with a knife. The narrower strip formed the plain tiles. It was surprisingly quick and easy to do. I made a load up and put them into a little container before starting assembly. Then I took the tiles alternately and held them in place with a pair of fine tweezers (forceps) whilst applying solvent with a fine brush.

Perry




Wayne Williams wrote:Perry,
What can I say? Looking fabulous :!: :!: Are you keeping track of the hours spent building this? Just curious.

Wayne


Thanks Wayne. Sorry I didn't respond sooner. I must have missed your post somehow. Anyway, the answer is no, I haven't a clue how long I have been working on this project, but it's probably not as long as you might suspect. Working with Plastikard is usually quick and easy - which is why I use it; no patience! :roll: :wink: :lol: :lol:

Whilst I'm answering your question, may I also take time here to thank everyone else for their kind comments too. I can't keep acknowledging them all individually or I'll never get this shed finished! :D :D

Perry

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Gwent Rail wrote:I reckon that's a cracking job Perry, certainly as good as anything I've seen without resorting to brass etching, which really isn't an option for one-off jobs.
Painted up, they are going to look superb.
BTW, what size drill did you need to use for that job :?: Real precision work there good buddy.


The drill bit is nominally 1mm but according to my electronic digital caliper thingy it was slightly under at 0.99mm. :roll: :wink: :lol: I didn't measure it before I started - I just picked one out of the box that looked about right. If it looks right,......etc. :D Before drilling I made a small mark at each hole location with a sharp metal point to stop the drill bit wandering. The drill bit was held in a pin vice and rotated between my fingers.

I have worked out that the main roof ridge will take somewhere around 58 tiles to complete, so that's roughly 30 of each (plus a few spares) I will need to fabricate before I start work. One thing I did learn by doing the office roof first was that it's a lot easier to work from left to right when fixing the tiles in place. This will obviously be different for people who are left-handed.

Perry




Novice wrote:Perry

Going back to the very first part of this project, when you were making the window arches, I note you used reversed brick embossed plastic card for the arches. Was there a reason for this or was it just that you had spare card available?

Really enjoying this project. I note that there have been over 1000 views of this thread. Is that a record?

Novice


I used the reversed brick embossed card simply because I could use up some of the offcuts. I reversed it because obviously the courses of bricks don't run the right way for an arch. The 'new' courses were scribed in with a steel point. One could just as easily use some .010" plain stock but I used what I had to hand. Although I keep all my offcuts in a box it's surprising how little remains in there very long. I often find a piece exactly the size I need for a small job and don't even bother having to cut it. :D

I'm not sure about the number of views of this thread being a record, but it's certainly encouraging to know that some of our members are finding it interesting. :wink:

Perry




Due to circumstances beyond my control, my workbench is going to be unavailable for a couple of days so there probably won't be too much in the way of updates on here until the weekend. :(

However, I have managed to wangle a trip back to Essex to revisit the prototype goods shed upon which this project is based. :wink:

I thought I had photographed everything I needed to complete this model but I reckon that a few more images would be very useful, so I shall sally forth once more with my trusty 'Box Brownie' in hand and snap all the bits I want. :roll: :D


Any excuse for a trip out! :roll: :lol: :lol: :lol:

Perry



I took a briefly heart-stopping step and cemented the shed walls together into pairs this evening so that I have each side wall joined to one end wall, giving me two 'L'-shaped structures to deal with. I can now build the internal platform into one side and finish off the other internal bits and pieces before the two assemblies are joined together. I'm still breaking things down into manageable steps; it's the only way for me.

Perry




I paid a return visit to the East Anglian Railway Museum today and spent some time photographing and sketching some of the features of the goods shed that I don't have enough details of. A tape measure came in handy too, along with my eldest son to hold the end of it! :lol:

I had an interesting chat with the staff there and told them the reason I was measuring and photographing the shed. I have been asked to send them a picture or two of the finished project and they have requested permission to possibly use them in one of their publications. If this happens, I will ask for this forum to get a 'plug' too if our 'F.C.' has no objections. :wink:

Bob, if you read this, I'm sure you will be as disappointed as me that the Scammell I photographed before has gone. I enquired after it, but it seems there was a bit of a 'tidy up' going on and owners of some of the stuff stored there were asked to move it. I have no idea where it has ended up. :(

With any luck, my workbench will be back 'in action' by Saturday evening so hopefully work will continue on the goods shed then.

Perry

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sparky wrote:all good stuff perry ,very much looking forward to the finished job. re the scammell,pity about that maybe a few of us could buy it if its up for grabs .someone may know where it is ,and if its open to offers ..
with a view to restoration of course ,i would not be surprised if among our virtual family we have the skills to do it .and think of the lunch breaks :D . sounds like you struck gold with the staff at the museum to possibly get a plug for barchester . well done all of it perry :D


I would like to think the owner of the Scammell will be doing something to restore it, but the staff I spoke to didn't know where it had gone - just that it had departed during a recent clean-up operation. I believe Bob mentioned on the old forum that there is an organisation that restores these machine, so we can only hope that they are aware of this one.

Here's how it looked during my previous visit:



:cry: :cry: :cry:

Perry

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On the good news side, my workbench has been restored to it's former site and has even benefitted from a tidy up. :D I also treated myself to a new, larger, cutting mat. This goods shed is so big I can't get it all on the old one! :roll: :lol:

I'm working through this coming weekend, (not unusual, I don't get many weekends off with my shift pattern) but I hope to get a bit more done on the goods shed over the next couple of evenings.

I'll keep you posted. :wink:

Perry




The internal platform is now taking shape. I laminated some embossed planking plastikard with some .020" plain sheet to make it a little more rigid. I made sure the planks ran the right way too - across the shed, not along the length of it.



There are two sets of steps leading from track level onto the platform, one just inside each of the main doors:



Although I don't intend modelling all the interior detail because it won't be visible once the roof is on, these steps will be seen from the outside of the shed. Two rectangles were cut out from the platform to make room for these to be built in later.

The platform edge protrudes beyond the door pillar as can just about be seen in the photo, so a piece of spare track was laid temporarily through the shed and a wagon 'tested' :roll: :lol: to make sure I had got the dimensions correct and it wasn't going to foul running gear.

Six dummy brick pillars were made by laminating two pieces of .040" plain plastikard together and covering two sides and one edge with embossed brickwork. These were cemented in place along the front edge of the platform.



A supporting framework is now being built up using strips of Plastikard cut to the correct width.



By making the platform free-standing it will be easier to make any small adjustments needed to ensure the building is dead square when the walls are joined together. This should preclude any problems when the roof is built.

Perry.

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The bracing supports beneath the platform have been completed and the steps at either end are being built as per the picture shown above.



Perry



With the steps installed and the doors and platform placed into position, it's easier to get an idea of how the whole thing will look.



The view from above:



I'll get some paint slapped around inside to disguise the inside of the doors and windows, and Bob's your Fat Controller! :wink: :lol: :lol: :lol:

P.S. If the walls look curved, it's down to my poor photography - they're not really! Honest! :oops:

Perry

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Wayne Williams wrote:Perry,
Can you elaborate a little on the amount of planning you did before you began actually building the model? Like what kind of drawings, if any did you do? I know you took pictures of the actual building, but after the pictures what did you do?
This is really looking good, I'm :mrgreen: with envy :!:
Wayne


After taking the photos and some basic measurements of the prototype, I did some very basic, and I mean very basic, drawings of the four main walls of the shed and the three walls needed for the office. These drawing were done using a very simple Computer Aided Design (CAD) program that I got free with a computer magazine many years ago. I didn't need to do this; a simple pencil and ruler would have sufficed but I like messing about on computers. :wink: All I needed was length, height and positions of doors and windows. A lot of the calculations were done by counting bricks on the photos. Given that I knew the size of one brick, everything else was straightforward.

Planning is a different matter though. I spend quite a lot of time just thinking about how I'm going to do the next task in the build and write down lists of 'things to do'. This helps because it gives me a chance to put things in sequence, for example, it makes sure I don't paint something that I want to glue another part to later, saving me the trouble of scraping off the paint again. Perhaps not the best example, but I hope you get the idea.

Perry




owen69 wrote:straight as a die no prob, bottom step iffy..............


So was the prototype! :roll: :lol: :lol: :lol:

Perry




Progress this evening was a little slow. I checked some items I had made previously consisting of 2 units with just over 20 small pieces of plastikard in each and really wasn't happy with them. There was a small error I hadn't noticed when I built them. :? They went straight in the recycle 'bin' and new parts were fabricated. No messing about. :evil:

The main problem with using unsatisfactory pieces is that although other people may not notice initially, the builder will always know the fault is there. If someone later looks closely at the model, the builder will be thinking, "I hope they don't notice that". :oops: Better to spend an hour or so now putting it right before any further assembly is carried out. :wink:

Never mind, I'm happy with the new ones so perhaps there will be a little more progress tomorrow evening. :D

Perry




I'm now moving into the detailed planning phase of the main roof construction. As the two sides of the main roof are each roughly 27 cms x 9 cms (10.5" x 4") they will need a fair amount of support.

I am considering making roof trusses from some square-section styrene in a similar design to those on the prototype. However, once the roof is on, they won't be visible, so we come back to the old saying; if you can't see it, don't model it. They would be a big construction job and I can't help feeling the effort would not be justified in the end result.

An alternative is to make them from .040" or even .080" plastikard sheet and just to cut out some pieces to suggest the shape of the trusses. They would certainly be stronger than ones made from bits and pieces glued together. See? I've just about talked myself into using this method already. :wink:

I will almost certainly make a mock-up of the roof from ordinary card before I commit the more expensive plastikard to it, just to make sure it will all fit together nicely.

I have made the two main gutters that run the length of the shed by using a scraper on some strips of .040" plastikard. They have been made purposely overlength and will be cut to fit at the appropriate time.

I will use Slaters embossed roof tiles cut into strips to match those already on the office roof.

Perry

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I have run a little short on .040" plastikard as my local model shop is currently out of stock. :evil:

The roof trusses must therefore wait a little longer, so I have decided to make a start of the canopy.

The main 'carcase' of the canopy is a simple plate of .040" plastikard 135mm x 38 mm. Three sides have 8mm strips of the same material cemented around them on edge, giving the general 'box' shape of the canopy.

I then set about finding a way to come up with something that will look like this around the edge; the valance:



I eventually decided to use some 1mm x 2mm microstrip as thinner material distorted too much when it was drilled.

So the first stage was to drill a hole near the end of the strip using a 1mm drill bit in a pin vice:



I then cut across the hole, just under half-way across the diameter:



The alternating strips have curved ends so these were trimmed roughly to shape with the knife. They can be touched up with a file later:



To see if the final effect was going to be acceptable before I cut the rest, I laid up a few on the cutting mat, not very well aligned I'm afraid :oops: ,just to get a rough idea:



I will need slightly in excess of 50 of each type of strip, plain and drilled, to give me sufficient to glue round the outside of the carcase. :wink:

Even if the parts look a little uneven in the photos, it shouldn't matter too much once they are assembled, painted and seen at normal viewing distance. I think they will give the appearance I want. :D

Perry

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Stop Press!! :roll:

I have just found a quicker, more accurate and altogether better way of making the round-ended parts. Instead of trying to trim them with a knife, after cutting to length I give one end a couple of gentle strokes across a piece of sandpaper, rotating it slightly as I do so. End result? Nicely curved ends! :D :D

Perry



I completed the valance around the goods shed canopy this evening. I guessed I would need about 50 of each type of edging and it turned out I wasn't far out; I needed 51 of each!

I purposely made the edging look a little 'rough' and uneven as it does on the prototype. I didn't want it to look too 'new'. A bit of weathering when it's painted will help the effect.

Here is the original:



and here is the result:



The brackets that support it will probably be next. :wink:

Perry

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Thanks all. :oops:

I started making the four brackets needed to support the canopy this morning.

The prototype looks like this:



Although the photographs show the parts on a cutting mat for clarity, the brackets were actually constructed on a sheet of glass. It keep them flat and stops them sticking! :wink:

I constructed the right-angles from 1mm x 2mm microstrip, then added .020" triangular braces in the angle.



Another piece of 1mm x 2mm was rolled gently around a craft knife handle to curve it roughly to shape, then one end was glued in place and allowed to dry before the free end was trimmed to length and also glued.

Close examination of the photos showed that the side braces are fitted outside the frames in an opposing pattern. They were fabricated from pieces of .020" x .030" strip, cut slightly long, then glued in place before being trimmed to length.



Perry

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Marty wrote:There'd be just no way I could do that amount of detail in N scale, oh well, too late now. "Nice" Perry.

Surely that's one of the advantages of N scale, Marty? It's detail you don't need to bother with because it would be too small to see. Instead you have the opportunity to build sweeping vistas of scenery that I have no chance of being able to incorporate in OO - no space! :roll:

Perry




Looking at it now that the valance is finished and the brackets are built, I'm a little concerned that I have incorporated more details into this canopy than are really needed. Once the shed is on the layout I don't think it going to be easy see the brackets unless you're a contortionist! :shock: :? You may recall me saying before, if you can't see it, don't model it? Well I think I have 'bent' my own rule a little with this project, but I am enjoying building it so much that it doesn't seem to matter.

A total of 56 pieces of plastikard make up the four brackets and they still need their quarter-roundish shaped pieces at the bottom of the vertical struts. Still, that will make them up to a nice round figure of 60 parts for the set! :roll: :lol:

Perry



Are we going to get rich, Jeff? :roll:

I have completed the canopy as far as I can until it is mounted on the shed later. The brackets will need to be painted before they are glued in place, as will the underside of the canopy.

I stood the brackets roughly in position to show how it will look, so they are not perfectly aligned yet:



I hope this bears at least a passing similarity to the prototype given the limitations of the material - and the modeller! :shock:

Now, what's next............................. :wink:


Perry

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There's probably not going to be too much to photograph for the next day or two as it's now a case of preparing the various sections of the model for assembly.

I have measured the angle of the ridge of the roof at 117 degrees so I will now be able to put in the end supports for this. I'm still cogitating over the construction of the roof trusses. I am torn between building them from square section plastic tube and cutting them out from .040" sheet.

I have discarded the sets of guttering I made before as being substandard and have made some new ones. I'm happier with these, fortunately. The old ones have gone in the spares box. Waste not, want not! :wink:

Meanwhile, back at the ranch.....

I have started slapping a base coat of Humbrol No. 70 brick red over the inside of the walls as it wouldn't be easy to get a brush in there after the two wall sections are joined. I'm not planning a great deal of detail inside, just sufficient to look convincing when peering through the doors or windows. Quite a lot of painting will be done prior to assembly - a bit like the old Airfix kit days. :D Things like the canopy brackets and the canopy itself need to be painted before they are fixed to the shed. The internal platform and steps also need a coat of paint before being fixed in place, so all in all, there is a lot to do before the next major part of the build takes place - which is, of course, the main roof with all those lovely fancy ridge tiles to make and glue in place. :wink: I'm really looking forward to doing them because in my opinion they are one of the features that give the shed such a distinctive appearance. According to my notebook there are 34 plain and 33 fancy tiles along the ridge of the prototype - (yes, I know, how sad; I counted them!) - so it will be interesting to see how close I can get to those figures on the model.

Perry



On the platform inside the goods shed is a rather nice crane or hoist. The base is attached to the platform and the top is attached the roof trusses, so that it can swivel round.



I know it won't be very visible once the roof is on, but I couldn't resist building one. :roll:

I set to with some 3mm square section plastic tube and built the upright, the cross member and the angles support beam. I then used tiny pieces of plastikard from the scrap box to fabricate thevarious parts of the mechanism.

The six-spoked large pulley wheel at the top had me puzzled for a few moments, but a slice cut from an old plastic container gave me the rim. Then I fashioned a small circle for the hub by trimming a small square of plastikard until it was fairly round before drilling a small hole in the middle.

I then laid the hub and the rim of a sheet of glass and added spokes from microstrip, one at a time.

I used thin plastic rod as 'axle bearings' for the various parts that needed them, drilling holes as appropriate and threading the parts on before glueing them all up.

The paint job still needs to be finished and eventually a piece of 'cable' will be added from the winch, around the main pulley and out over the end of the arm pulley.





The top and bottom bearing plates will be added when the crane is installed in the shed, so that I can build them to fit the exact height of the location.

The photos were taken with the crane stuck onto a piece of Blutak and I'm afraid it isn't vertical :oops: but I think it gives a general impression of what the finished piece will look like.

I hope this gives some idea of the versatility of plastikard. Scratchbuilds don't need to be big or expensive. This one cost me next to nothing. :D

Perry

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From some angles the crane will just be visible through the doors and windows so I felt I had to include it. Apart from that, I just liked it and thought it was a good way to pass a few minutes using up some scraps of plastikard.

I will bear your suggestion of having "something dangling from it" :wink: :lol: in mind when I come to fix it in position. :D

Perry



These 'blue' bricks are a very distinctive feature of this building, Bob(K) and have been incorporated by the builders in a decorative manner. I have to admit I have no idea why this was done, except for the aesthetic effect. There aren't enough of them to make it something that was done for strengthening purposes. I'm looking forward to trying to recreate the effect with paint.

Perhaps someone with more knowledge of railways and brickwork than I can 'shed' (sorry) more light on it?

Perry



The painting of the inside of the shed is proceeding slowly.

I have begun painting the platform floorboards. I 'half-mixed' a combination of a medium matt brown with a little white and an even smaller amount of black. Black is very strong and doesn't need much to over-darken a colour, so care is needed. The reason I use the term 'half-mixed' is that I try not to mix the colours evenly. What I want is a streaky mish-mash of tones rather than a nice even colour. A few drops of thinners were added to make the resultant paint mixture flow off the brush. With an area about 26 cms x 11 cms to cover quickly I didin't want to have to overwork the paint.

Then comes the 'making it look like wood' bit. :wink: I added some more black to the remaining paint and thinned it down a lot more. This mixture was then brushed onto the still-damp first coat, working along the length of the 'floorboards'. Having covered about a quarter of the area I very gently dragged a piece of paper kitchen towel over the paint, barely touching it, again along the length of the boards. This left dark paint in the joins between the floorboards and created a woodgrain effect on the surface. I could only do about a quarter of the surface at a time, otherwise the paint dries too quickly and wiping tends to pull too much paint off.



The photo gives a reasonable idea of how it looks, but I feel the actual effect on the model looks better.

Perry

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I'm battling impatience now as I want to get the inside finished so that I can do the main assembly. :? Still, I must make haste slowly, otherwise I'm sure to mess something up. :shock:

The inside of two of the walls have been painted, along with the platform and the crane, so another couple of walls and odds and ends and I will be there.

I have decided to build the roof trusses properly, using square section plastic tubing, rather than cheating with cut outs from plastikard sheet. There are five of them to make so perhaps a small cardboard jig would be worth constructing to ensure uniformity of angles, etc. It will add �3 or �4 to the total cost but I think it will be worthwhile.

When I come to build the roof, I am considering installing LED lighting but a final decision hasn't been reached yet.

So all in all, there's still quite a lot to do on this project. I hope everyone won't get bored with it before I finish! :shock: :D

Perry



I'd better get on with this shed then! :roll:

Painting of the internal walls, the inside of the doors, canopy brackets and guttering continued this evening.

I don't know if I've mentioned this before, but for anyone new to this lark I'll mention it again; almost never use pure black paint straight out of the tin. It's too black. The problem with painting models is that colours and finishes don't always emulate the prototype. Try painting a model house door with gloss paint and you'll see what I mean. It is way too shiny. The gloss is 'out of scale'. We are trying to deceive the eye into believing a model is the real thing so we have to 'cheat' a little sometimes. If you really must have a 'freshly painted' look, using a satin finish on the door will look much more convincing than full gloss. Likewise, black paint is visually too strong and will overpower everything else. I like to take the edge off my black with a touch - just a touch - of white, making it a very dark grey. Even the tyres of model vehicles look 'wrong' if they're painted black. Paint them dark grey and you will see a tremendous improvement. Try never to have just one tone of a colour. Very few things in the real world look evenly coloured all over due to the action of the weather, prevailing light conditions and a dozen other factors. That is why the mass-produced injection moulded buildings such as the old style ones from Hornby, always look bland and characterless. It's also why a coat of paint or two and a bit of weathering makes such a difference.

So next time you start to paint something, consider your base colour, but then work other shades and tones into it. You'll be pleased you did! :wink: :D

Perry



The interior of the loading bay doors got their first coat of paint this evening, along with the rail-side doors. I gave them a coat of a medium matt brown and will add thin washes to accentuate the scribed 'planking' and to give the appearance of wood grain. I painted the hinges a very dark grey whilst I was at it because the washes will tone them down and make them look more a part of an oldish door, rather then new hinges bolted on afterwards.

I cut two small sections of 'I'-beam plastic to form the beams that are situated above both the loading bay doors. These have been painted very dark grey too prior to be glued in place, because they would be very difficult to paint afterwards due to their awkward shape. I left the paint off the small areas that will be glued.

I have been giving consideration to the painting of the loading bay canopy. A close look at my photos suggests that the paint was once white, but has yellowed slightly with age and exposure to the weather. I have decided to paint the canopy in a very pale grey to start with. When this is dry, I intend dry-brushing with white with the merest touch of pale yellow added, allowing some of the grey to show through in places. I'm hopeful that this will give a convincing result. If it doesn't I'll resort to Plan B - whatever that is! :roll: :wink:

More piccies soon!

Perry

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The roof trusses of this shed are of a rather interesting design. One can just about be seen behind the crossed mount for the upper part of the crane:



The timbers are braced with metal rods and brackets.

I worked from sketches made on site and worked out the approximate angles by eye. The model trusses are based upon 5mm square section plastic tube, 2.5mm x 4mm strip and .030" rod. I drew out the plan on a piece of card and laid the parts on it to mark for cutting and glueing angles, etc. The black metal brackets on the prototype will be represented by painting them on later.



One down, four to go! :wink:

Perry



MikeC wrote:......... You must be itching to assemble this brute....

Mike


Thanks for the kind comments, Mike.

Yes, I'm getting a bit fired up now as all the major components are gradually being finished as far as they can be prior to final assembly. :)

I'm learning all the time as I build and little things like the painting of the hinges I have sometimes not done in a satisfactory manner on previous models.

I reckon this build will be finished by Christmas - I'm not sure WHICH Christmas, but still....... :roll: :lol: :lol:

Perry



Things haven't moved along quite as quickly as I would have liked as I seem to have been roped in to help with some domestic redecorating. :shock: :(

Still, I managed to get a few minutes work in on the shed this evening and finished the fabrication of all five roof trusses - apart from painting.



They were absolute pigs to build! :evil: For something that looks so simple, cutting all the angled joints was, well, tricky to say the least, and to get the straining rods to the correct length within what seemed like a micron or two was, er, rather trying. I constructed the trusses over a plan drawing I prepared on a piece of card beforehand, giving me a least a fighting chance of getting them as near to identical as possible.

Anyway, they're built now, so I can move on. I'll leave them to dry thoroughly until tomorrow evening, then paint them. If I have time I will then finish the interior painting too.

Perry



Marty wrote:................[size=9]What I want to know is... how many failed trusses ended up in the recycle box

Amazingly, none! I binned no more than two or three of the shortest angle pieces because they weren't up to standard, but otherwise there was virtualy no waste. :lol: :lol:

Building them over a drawn plan really helped. :wink:

Perry



I didn't get too much done on the model this evening due to some more domestic decorating duties getting in the way. :(

However, I think all the interior painting on the shed is now complete. I'll check once more when the painting I did this evening is dry. I'm now getting very close to being able to assemble the wall units.

The railside doors got another coat of paint as well; just a well thinned coat of base brown with a dash of black, brushed over quickly and then most of it wiped off again with a paper towel. There's still a fair bit of paintwork still to do to finish them though, and they will need to finished before being glued in place. The thinners removed a few flecks of the base coat here and there, but the more worn and used the doors look, the better. I'm not going for a smooth freshly painted look.

I then mixed up a very light grey paint and gave the canopy valance and interior a rough coat. I want this to be a rough, uneven coat, because it will work better when I dry-brush the yellowish-white over the top of it. I even remembered not to paint where the supporting brackets will be fixed. :roll: :D

Perry



I think I shall tackle the painting of the brickwork once it is all glued up solid with the roof on. Being a largish building I want it to be as rigid as possible when I come to handle it for painting. I can do without having to do repairs before it's even finished. :(

Perry

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More painting took place 'ageing' the railside doors this evening. They are now nearing completion.

The canopy has been painted and the brackets fixed in place.

This is the prototype:



First the inside of the canopy and all the valance was given a rough coat of very pale grey.



The top surface was painted a very dary grey to simulate the roofing felt used on the prototype. This will gradually be 'dirtied' to lessen the uniformity of colour.



After allowing drying time, the inside of the canopy and the valance were then dry-brushed with a very pale yellowish white colour, trying to leave it looking patchy and weather-beaten. This doesn't show up too well photographed under tungsten lighting, unfortunately.

The brackets were fixed in place using tube cement applied with a cocktail stick. This leaves enough time for small adjustments in position to be made, whereas liquid solvent 'grabs' almost instantly.



Some of the valance boards were given a dry-brushing with pure white, just to increase the range of tones. Some dark green was dry-brushed on in a few places to suggest algae growing where the wood was damp - and probably going rotten. :? I can't imagine the valances on these sheds got repainted too often!



In a spare moment today I wrote a 'To Do' list of jobs needed to finish this project. It's still quite long....... :shock:

Perry

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All the walls were glued together last night. It's finally starting to look like a goods shed rather than a random collection of sub-assemblies. :D



Perry



I constructed a cardboard mock-up of the base layer of the roof this afternoon, partly to make sure everything would fit together properly, but also to save Plastikard if I made a mistake. Plastikard is cheap enough providing not too much gets wasted. :shock:

I drew out a rectangle of card with the overall length equal to the length of the main walls and measured the sides to within a few millimetres of what I thought I would need to reach from gutter line to gutter line via the ridge. I made certain that the card roof was drawn and cut out perfectly square to test the accuracy of the build so far. I marked out and cut two triangles from scraps of card which would give me the 117 degree angle I needed for the slope of the roof. These were glued inside with a general-purpose adhesive for quickness.

The whole thing was then unceremoniously plonked on top of the shed. It fits to within a millimetre or so, so I'm reasonably happy with that. :D



Before the final measurements are committed to Plastikard, I need to check that allowances made for the gutters and the thickness of the roof tiles are acceptable. I'd far rather do any adjustments now in card than have to remake the whole roof later.

The canopy obviously isn't fixed yet, so I've propped it up roughly in position on a couple of paint tins just to check the overall effect.





Now I need to get the roof trusses painted and fixed in position. :D

Perry

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Novice wrote:.............Now you just have to paint it :!: :lol:

Bob(K)


If that's all there was to do I'd be laughing, but the 'To Do' list is still fairly lengthy. :shock: It's coming together though and it would be a mistake to try to rush it now. :)

Perry



As Bob(K) said, I need to get on with some painting, so I finished the detail painting on the roof trusses this evening.



It would be very difficult - nay, almost impossible :shock: - to carry this out once they are glued in place.

Perry

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Before the roof base layers and tiles can be fitted, the gable ends need to be built up to their correct thickness.

I did this by laminating some 4mm x 2.5mm thick strips of plastikard together and gluing them inside the existing gable end wall. Another layer of brick embossed plastikard was then added - brick side outwards, of course - to the 'inside' of the laminations. This give me a gable thickness in the region of 6mm.





Obviously the capping tiles have yet to be added but they can't go on until after the roof is 'tiled'.

I used some scraps of plastikard from the bits box and fabricated the remainder of the chimney stack. The prototype has four 'steps' at the upper end and a final stack on top of that which is larger than the stack lower down. If that doesn't make sense, take a look at the photos and hopefully uou will see what I mean.





The chimney pots on the model are only there to give a rough idea of the finished article. The prototype pots are tapered and have a lip around the top so they will have to be specially made.

Also, the solvent wasn't completely dry when I took these pictures, so final trimming and 'squaring up' of the chimney stack hasn't yet been done.

Had I not planned this build carefully, one of the pitfalls might have been cutting the roof panels too soon. By doing things in the order I have, I can now ascertain the required dimensions very easily. I can also fit the lead flashing before the gable capping tiles and the roof tile layer goes on. :wink: :D

I haven't yet decided yet whether to attach the roof trusses to the walls or to the roof panels first. I have been a little crafty insofar as I have not glued the platform in place so it will lift out to allow access to the roof from below.

Perry



I took another photo of the chimney stack from the footbridge; much further away, but a good deal higher. :)

The chimney pots are an 'interesting' shape. :?



There's no rush to fit them to the model so I'll keep a look out for any suitable materials over the next few days. I suppose I could make them from Milliput around a plastikard tube former if need be. The mortar on the very top of the stack that the pots are set in to will probably made from that material anyway.

Perry



Novice wrote:Perry

I have never seen pots that shape before :? . they look like large upturned flower pots or buckets - that may be a solution :idea: . I look forward to seeing how you solve this one.

Bob(K)


So do I.  :shock: 

Work is continuing this evening. The double and triple stringer courses at the top edges of the main walls have been added. These couldn't be done before the gable end thickness was sorted out. The gutters have been set in place. I will finish tidying the little 'overhangs' at each corner of the building and then set the whole lot aside to dry until tomorrow. Then it will get a good check over in case I've missed or forgotten anything before I start work on the roof itself. :D I'm looking forward to that :!: :D

Just by way of a little postscript, I am now seriously considering installing some lighting in this shed. I have never bothered to do this before, but so much work has gone into the interior of the model that I think it warrants the added cost of a few white LED's; three or four should do it.

Perry



At this point I would like to sincerely thank everyone who has taken such an interest in my goods shed project. I noticed this evening that the number of visits to this thread has passed the 2,000 mark! Without your interest, input and encouragement, I doubt if this project would have developed in the way it has. I've learned lots from it and I would like to think my modelling skills have also improved during it.

Thanks guys! :D

Perry


Matt wrote:perry
can you do a how to on the LED's installed a couple to buildings but i would like to see how you do it :wink:


I have never done it myself yet, Matt, so it will be a learing curve for me too. I don't have a problem with the electronic side of things; that's easy enough, it's how to fit the LED's in and hide the wiring that will be the test. I've got a few ideas on the go, so I'll try to do a 'How To' when I've found out, er, how to! :roll: :lol:

Perry

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I decided to fix the roof trusses to the walls, as per the prototype. It seemed more logical! :?

A small 'wall plate'; a tiny rectangle of plastikard, was added to each end of the main cross-beams. As these beams were made of hollow square-section tube there wouldn't be sufficient surface area for the glue to get hold of - it would make for an inherently weak joint. A small 'plate' can be seen on the prototype, albeit of a slightly different shape, but I claim modeller's licence! :wink:



As the roof trusses were set in place, they were located at the logical points; where the wall piers give added support.

Each one was glued using tube glue for strength, then checked for alignment in the vertical plane with a carpenter's square,





Each one was allowed setting time before the next was added. (This gave me time to get on with the domestic decorating - painting the walls of the room opposite. :shock: )

All five have been fixed and will now be allowed to dry thoroughly before any stress is placed on them by adding the roof.



As one can imagine, adding these trusses has firmed the whole building up considerably.

Perry


I don't intend including too much detail of the inside of the roof as it will be too dark to see under normal circumstances, and will be 'behind the lights' when it is lit - so it would still be almost impossible to see. I think a point has be reached when a modeller says "enough", and I think the interior is reaching that stage. The crane and the lighting still has to go in, of course.

I may include some longitundinal stringers, but it depends how it will affect the fit of the roof itself.

It's a bit of a shame that the roof won't be removeable so that detail inside can be displayed, but I feel it's too 'gimicky'. A peek through the dors and windows is all that's going to be possible. (But I'll know the detail is there! :wink: :D ) And before anyone suggests it (Phill? :twisted: ) I know I am perfectly capable of making the roof removeable; I just don't want to. So there! :roll: :wink: :lol:

By the way, a little update on the lighting; the white LED's I chose for the job are currently out of stock at my local branch of Maplins so that phase of the build may have to wait a while. :( I wonder how it would look with yellow lighting.....?

Perry



Wayne Williams wrote:Perry, If you put LED's inside a building, do you have to have access to the LED's for any reason? Or are they totally maintenance free and future access is not needed. Not trying to convince you to make the roof removable :lol: but what if say someone who doesn't exactly know what he or she is doing places too much voltage to the LED, and burnt it out, wouldn't it be very bad if there was no access?

Wayne


It would be bad, Wayne. :shock: The workers in the shed would have to work in the dark! :roll: :lol: :lol:

But if LED's are installed using the correct value of current-limiting resistor for a chosen supply voltage, then they should be maintenance free and should last for years. They are far less likely to need replacing than grain of wheat or other filament-type bulbs.

I will go into how to calculate the resistor value in detail on here when I do the job, but suffice it to say at this stage that it is a simple mathematical formula that requires three values to be 'plugged in' to it and the result gives the value of the resistor required.

Perry



Marty wrote:Perry,
Would you base your lighting colour on the prototype lighting available for your era modelled.
That is, white LED for fluoro tubes, a weaker, yellowish colour for incandescent or gas lighting?
cheers


That's a very good question, Marty. I had decided initially to use bright white LED's, but I'm now leaning more towards using yellow ones. I think I need to rig a couple up temporarily just to see what the different effects are. I have a suspicion that yellow is going to look more 'atmospheric', particularly if I adjust the resistor values to take the brightness down a touch. I'll post the results of the tests on here when I manage to get some white LED's - hopefully later this week.

Perry

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As I am short of some materials that I can't stock up on for a day or two, I have had to content myself with a little bit of detail work this evening.

The crane that is mounted on the loading bay platform is supported at the top and the bottom; between two pivots (obviously! :oops: ). The thing that intrigued me was the way the top mount was constructed. At first I thought it was just a plain beam at right-angles to the roof trusses with a couple more arranged in a cross to give additonal strength.

However, if one studies the photo of the prototype, it will be seen that the crossed beams don't in fact cross in a straight line. They are offset by the width of the beam.



Having working out the geometry of the mount I set about fabricating one in plastic strip. There were seven components; six half-beams and a centre plate.

This is the view from what will be the botttom:



The top looks like this:



..but i may fit another reinforcing plate. I can't see if the prototype has one, but it would be logical to have an additional one there.

Here is the completed mount placed in it's approximate location:





With the mount glued in place I will be able to work out the height of the top and bottom pivot mounts I need to build. I may even make it rotatable! :wink: :D

Perry


Progress has been slightly delayed of late due to 'circumstances beyond my control', :? but now the decorating is just about finished and further supplies of modelling materials have been obtained, I can pick up where I left off.

Making the upper and lower rotating mounts for the goods shed crane has been a little fiddly, but was accomplished by drilling a very small hole in each end of the crane assembly and setting an ordinary household pin in the pre-built mounts for it to rotate on.

I have added some 'rope' to the winch and carried it around the main pulley wheel, out over the jib and over the small end pulley. The rope is made from tea-bag string. Luckily the tea has just stained it a nice 'ropey' colour. I secured it in place with a few dabs of PVA glue applied with a cocktail stick. A metal hook was attached to the end of the rope and the rope smeared with PVA to keep it fairly straight where it hangs down.

This is the view looking into the shed from one of the railside doors:



The roof has yet to be fitted so the view from above looks like this:



The crane isn't completely upright yet :oops: as it is only propped in place. Further painting will be carried out before it is glued in place.


Lighting:
I have tried out both white and yellow LED's for the internal lighting and think I prefer the yellow ones. I now have to decide how many, where, and how I'm going to fit them. This will have to be done before I can set about making the roof.

Perry

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Indeed it does work. There will be no need for me to provide the resistor formula when I get to that part. I'll just put a link in to Jeff's post. Cheers Jeff! :D

I have decided to use 6 yellow LED's to light the shed. They will be mounted on a beam that runs the length of the shed. I'm going to have to claim modeller's licence once again, because modern lighting has been fitted in the prototype shed and I have no idea how the previous lamps were arranged or fitted.

I chose a piece of plastikard strip 2.5mm x 4mm section and cut it to the internal length of the shed. I marked the beam where the six lamps would go - between the roof trusses - and drilled two 1mm diameter holes about 3mm apart at every marked lamp location. I threaded a small two-hole shirt-button onto the leads of each LED, then slipped a 5mm length of 4mm diameter plastic tube on before pushing the leads through the holes in the beam. Bending them over slightly will hold them in place until the resistors are soldered in place.

The component parts:



Assembled lamps, awaiting resistors and wiring:



The wiring and resistors will lie along the top side of the beam when it is mounted in the shed roof and shouldn't be visible once the roof is on.

Test fitting:





Perry

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As I've said several times before, scratchbuilding isn't difficult. It just takes time, care and patience. If one rushes at it, tries to take shortcuts or 'make do' when a part should be re-made then failure is possible, but breaking a project down into small, achievable steps makes it easy.

I'm truly not being modest when I say anyone can do it. All is takes is a little bit of practice. The only way to do that is to - well, practice! :wink: :lol:

Perry



The electrical work on the beam carrying the lights has been finished.

I ran a bare-wire 'bus' down each side of the beam, carrying the feed and return.

The return side was done first, as there would be less to get in the way when I came to fit the resistors. I used 150 ohm resistors. If you decide to use LED's, I strongly suggest you read Jeff's post about them. It explains how to work out the value of the resistors you will need.

All joints were soldered using a 25 watt soldering iron with a small bit. I held the parts in place using my 'Helping hands' device (discussed elsewhere on the forum - look for it in the index :wink: ) to make the soldering easier. The LED leads and the resistor leads were cut short and soldered together on the feed side.




The resistors were then linked together ensuring that the feed wire didn't short out the resistor. If it did, it wouldn't harm the resistor but it wouldn't protect the LED from excessive current flow.

These were folded as neatly as possible alongside the beam.



The finished job can be seen here:



I have given the bus wires and resistors a coat of matt black paint so that they look a bit more like the electrical conduit often seen festooning the walls and ceilings of industrial buildings. I have also painted the tops and edges of the shirt-buttons; sorry, I mean light shades.

Here is the light beam under test (not a very good photo, I'm afraid! :oops: :roll: ):



I now have to consider how I'm going to take the feed and return down to 'ground level' and get around to fixing the lighting beam in place.

Perry

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The lighting beam has been glued in place. I chose to thread the beam through the roof trusses as it would have fouled the movement of the crane if I had placed it lower, i.e. beneath the lower part of the truss. I have placed it more or less centrally over the internal platform area, reasoning that this is where the railwaymen would have carried out most of their work.





A quick lighting test with the roof area covered over revealed six nice little pools of light on the platform. I could maybe use a few of those areas to 'spotlight' some little cameo scenes inside the shed. Painting the backs and edges of the button lampshades has made the pearly surface of the button act like a reflector, and being slightly concave has perhaps helped 'focus' the lights into the aforementioned areas. I like it! You may, or you may not; but I like it! :lol:

The 'To Do' list grows shorter! :D

Still to do inside the shed:

1. Tidy away, secure and disguise the lighting wiring.
2. Final touches of paint to be done on the crane.
3. Final fixing in place of the internal platform.
4. Glue the crane mounts in place and secure the crane.

After that, the roof!!!!!!!!!!!!! (at last :shock:  :shock:  :shock: )


Perry

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I decided to run the lighting wires through some short pieces of plastic tube that were glued out of the way on the end wall. Fortunately, and completely unplanned, there were two small recesses that the tubes went into nicely. I threaded the insulated wires through them before glueing them into place with 5-minute epoxy resin. I thought about painting them black but thought they might be a little obtrusive, so I gave them a quick coat of brick red enamel paint - still wet and shiny in the photo!



A small cut out has been made in the edge of the platform up against the wall that will enable me to take the wires through to the baseboard.

Perry



The inside of the shed is finished as far as construction goes. Obviously figures and details such as packing cases, etc., will be added later.

I have begun work on the main roof. I cut two roof base panels; the ones the tiles will be mounted on, from .040" plastikard. These are 256mm x 100mm each. I ensured that they were 'square', so that the tiles will fit properly.

I will be using the same type of Slater's Plastikard Roof Tile sheet I used for the shed office roof. These sheets are cut into strips about 6mm wide that includes a plain strip and a tiled strip. The idea of these is that each tiled side overlaps the plain side of the preceding strip. A picture being worth a thousand words: :wink:



To make it easier to align the strips accurately, I used a pencil to draw parallel lines approximately 6mm apart on each roof panel. I started at what will become the eaves on each side and worked my way up towards the ridge. I won't necessarily glue a strip of tiles on each pencil line; they are just a guide to help me line them up.



Perry

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Novice wrote:..........Quick question if I may regarding the roof tiles: Are these produced as strips by the manufacturer as shown in your pictures or have you made these yourself by cutting them from a sheet? If the latter how do you create the plain section on the strip?

Bob(K)


The sheets from Slater's are embossed with alternate plain and tiled rows. All I have to do is cut them up into 'paired strips', a quick and easy job with a steel rule and a sharp knife. :)

Perry



phill wrote:I know im going to get me whatsits chewed but here go's. About the roof being able to come off and on, i just wondered how you can change any things inside without a removeable roof, :D .
Ok go ahead and have a go but i think its a valued point but there again im just a novice so guess i should not be asking :?
Phill


You are certainly not going to get anything chewed off. It's a very valid question. 8)

I have considered that very point, Phill, and have made the platform itself removeable from beneath. :wink: I reasoned that making the roof removeable wouldn't be much help as all the trusses, lights and all the other bits and pieces would get in the way if I tried to access it from that direction. Now I can simply take the platform out, do what I want to do with figures and other details on it, then slot it back into place. No point in getting older if you don't get craftier! :wink: :roll: :lol: :lol:

Perry

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I decided to 'tile' the roof panels before I put them onto the building. It is much easier to align the strips of tiles with the panels laying flat on the workbench.



I estimate that there will be about 25 strips per side when the job is complete.



You can see here how the tiled part overlaps the plain part to give the full effect.

Perry



All the roof tiles, with the exception of the ridge tiles have been fitted. There were a total of 54 double strips, 27 per side, to be glued in place.

A little advice for anyone using this method:

Don't attempt to align the strips by eye. It is essential to mark guide lines on the supporting layer. If one thinks about it, if I were even 0.5mm out of alignment on each strip in my example, I could have ended up 13.5mm out at the ridge! That's a fat half-inch for those working in 'English money'! :shock: OK, that's probably never going to happen because it is such a large cumulative error that it would be noticed, but it illustrates how easy it would be to end up on the skew with the tops rows of tiles a few millimetres out of alignment.

When cutting the embossed sheets into double strips, I have found it easier not to use a steel ruler. If the knife is moved slowly and gently, with a minimum of pressure on the blade, it follows the embossed lines quite easily. In cutting 54 strips that were useable, I only spoiled 2 by wandering off-line with the blade. Work carefully and slowly and all should be well. I found that the embossed lines were not, if fact, very straight, so using a ruler could cause more wastage than not doing so.

I will now allow the roof panels to dry thoroughly before I do any more as quite a lot of solvent was used fitting the tiles.
Perry

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The embossed sheets of roof tiles are about 30cms x 20cms. The alternate rows of plain and tile run lengthways along the sheet. You are absolutely correct, Wayne; if you lay the strips I cut edge to edge, that is precisely what the whole sheet consists of.

Here is (very!) rough sketch of a small section of a sheet:



I've just realised I drawn it upside down. :oops: Obviously when gluing it to the roof panel the tiled strip goes towards the eaves. The next row of tiles then overlaps the plain strip of the preceding row.

An average sheet gives just over 30 double rows, each 30cms long.

Perry



The roof tiling has been finished and the two roof 'panels' were joined by glueing four triangular braces into the ridge area, making sure they wouldn't foul the roof trusses. The ridge angle was set at 117 degrees by these braces. These were left to set solid overnight before the roof was lowered carefully into place. The tiling had introduced a slight bow into the roof panels - caused no doubt by the amount of solvent used on only one side of each. I had set them to dry tile side down, with a weight on the top, but the .040" plastikard still managed to bow a little. However, it was not sufficient to cause a problem.

I had previously removed and discarded the guttering as I wasn't happy with it. I fabricated some more using .040" plastikard and a scraper as I have described elsewhere on this forum.

The guttering and roof assembly were fitted and secured with solvent.





The shed will now be left to dry thoroughly again. In the meantime I will fabricate the main 'inverted V' part of the ridge tile assembly and begin making the plain and fancy tiles I will need to set along the top of the ridge.

The assembly of the shed is now drawing to a close. I have to make and fit the gable end capping tiles, finish the gable end details, attach the canopy and the two sets of railside doors and make the chimney pots.

I may not attach the canopy and doors until after most of the painting has been done to make this process easier.

Perry

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The main part of the ridge tile assembly has been fabricated from a strip of .020" plastikard, 8mm wide. This was scribed along the centre line to locate the ridge bending line, then before bending it was scribed with tiles at about 4.5mm intervals. After being carefully bent down the centre line - VERY carefully, as I didn't want it to snap in half - I fixed it in place on the roof with solvent.

Some more narrow strips of .020" plastikard where then cut and the making of the vertical alternate plain and fancy tiles has begun. I need around 35 of each for the job, so will probably make around 50 of the fancy ones. That way I can quickly reject any I'm not happy with, without having to stop to make more. The plain ones are no problem, but the fancy ones have 2 holes drilled in them and the corners and a middle 'v' cut out to give the right shape. Very time consuming. :? :D

Perry



The vertical tiles are being fitted to the main roof one at a time:



Perry



All the vertical ridge tiles have been fitted this eveing and after a couple of hours making and fitting such small components I off to give my eyes a rest. :shock:

The capping tiles for the gable ends will hopefully get done tomorrow evening, along with the detail on the gable end overhangs. (I'm sure they have a proper name, but I'm no architect so I don't know what they're called. :? )

I'm going to have to figure out how to make those distinctive chimney pots too. I looked for some ready-made ones at Warley without success.

Perry

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Wayne Williams wrote:...............If you could Perry, I have a favor to ask. I had a friend of mine over last evening and was showing him your marvelous work, and he asked me just how big is it? So could you please take a picture with maybe your hand in the photo, or a ruler maybe, so he can get a feel for just what detail you actually put into this. (Actually me too)
........


Seeing as you don't know whether I have dainty little mits or huge shovel-like hands, I thought a ruler in the picture might be the best plan. :roll: :lol:

So here are a couple of images that might help to convey the overall size of the model:





By the way, the 'cut-off' window arch visible in the first photo is to allow the correct positioning of the canopy when it's fitted - and yes, the prototype does have the canopy cutting across that arch too. :shock: It makes me think that the canopy was added as something of an afterthought.

I hope these pictures help. :D

....and before anyone says it, yes, I KNOW it looks as though it has been built by someone with huge shovel-like hands. :shock: :lol: :lol: :lol:

Perry

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Petermac wrote:..................... I often say, next time, I'll try to get closer to this model or that model. I never do but each is normally better than the last .................Petermac

Thanks for your kind words, Petermac.

As long as each model is a little better than the last then progress is being made. Better to make slow progress than none at all. If it was easy to get everything right first time there would be no challenge - nothing to keep the interest and enthusiasm going. It's feeling that something has been done a little better this time than last that makes it so worthwhile.

My hands aren't that steady and my eyesight isn't too good either, but I guess I do have a lot of patience. I don't consider that I have "immense skill" either. As I have said on this forum several times before cutting little shapes out of plastic sheets and sticking them together isn't difficult. Having the nerve to make a start is perhaps the most difficult bit. :wink:

Perry



I mark dimensions onto plastikard with the point of a knife blade. A pencil is way too thick and leads to inaccuracies.

If you are working in millimetres (which I suggest is the easiest) then lay your ruler on the material with the millimetre scale facing towards you. It doesn't matter if the numbers are upside down - you know what order they go in anyway! Then use the point of a sharp craft knife blade to 'prick' the material against the measurements you want. This is accurate down to about 0.5mm with practice. Aligning the knife blade with the markings on the ruler so that they form one straight line will help you achieve accuracy.

When you are ready to cut the material, you can 'feel' when the point of the knife is located in the mark you made, so slide the steel ruler you use to guide the knife gently up to it. Move the knife point into the second mark, slide the ruler up to it again, double check that the first mark is still aligned, then carry out your cut.

Measure at least twice - cut once. :wink:

Perry



All the roof tiles have been fitted. The gable caps have been fabricated from .040" plastikard and the small decorative round piece at the top of the gable end has been added.

I had been puzzling over how to make the 'corbels'; the decorative supporting blocks at the corners of the shed and the office. They can be seen here as the grey moulding beneath the brick-built 'blocks' at the corners of the building.



I suddenly realised that I had the ideal material for this in my tool box. It is a two-part epoxy putty called 'Milliput' that is very easy to work with. (I have put a link to the Milliput website in the 'Materials & Tools section.) I mixed up a small amount, pushed it into place, then trimmed it with a craft knife before moulding it to the shape I wanted with a small screwdriver blade.

The only part of the roof area still to do now is the top of the chimney stack. The two chimney pots need to be fabricated and mounted and because of the shape of them, I am considering making them from milliput too.



I'll post photos of the corbels and the chimney pots when they are finished.

Perry

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For such and apparently large building, it's perhaps a little surprising that it will only take three standard vans:



This came under discussion when I spoke to Bob at the Warley show. He thought it would hold around five, I believe. I think it's the width of the building that makes it so deceptive.

There a quite a lot of 'modern' fixtures on this building now, Wayne, including a telephone - presumably for the use of the Museum staff. There are what I assume to be security and flood lights and all manner of bits and pieces attached elsewhere, but obviously I won't be modelling them. The one concession I am making to the current appearance of the building is that I am including the pedestrian access ramp at the office end. In reality this wasn't added until 1996, but I like it and claim '"modeller's licence" - so there!   :lol:

Perry



The chimney pot assembly is almost finished part from final trimming to shape. I'll detail how I did them when I post some pictures.

The canopy has been fixed in place. I wasn't going to do it until after the painting of the shed had been done but have realised that two downpipes (drainpipes) run right through the canopy, so it must be fixed in place before the downpipes can be added.

Close examination of the photographs of the prototype show some downpipes, particularly those on the office, are partially or completely missing. I would like to think the the East Walsham maintenance guys are a little more conscientious and have replaced them. :wink:

So the construction of this project really is coming to an end now. After the downpipes have been fabricated and fitted it only leaves the main railside doors to add but these won't go on until after the shed has been painted. The access ramps will need railings fitted but they will be too delicate to risk having on the model whilst it is being handled for painting, so they can wait until last.

A final check around will be made after these jobs and a little tidying up done if required. I should then be ready to get the 4" paintbrush out! :roll:  :lol:  :lol:  :lol:

Perry

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Here are a few statistics:

I have just weighed the completed goods shed on an accurate digital scale and it comes in at 390g. Allowing for the paint the whole thing will come in around the 400g or 14 oz. mark.

There are 360 image files on my computer that are connected with this project. Some are of the prototype, some are of the model during construction. Not all were used on this forum. Some are re-sized duplicates admittedly, but it's still a fair amount of work.

I estimate I used the equivalent of 5 or 6 standard-sized sheets of plastikard, both plain and embossed, a sheet of clear material for the windows, maybe the equivalent of a pack or two of microstrip and rod of assorted sizes, about one bottle of solvent, 6 LED's and resistors plus a couple of scraps of wire to connect them up and a few miscellaneous items such as pins, thread, filler, knife blades, etc. I would think that the entire job comes in at a little under �20 which to my mind compares quite favourably with some ready-made or kit-built buildings. Bear in mind though that I used small quantities of many different sizes and shapes of microstrip. I already had most of these in stock. It would cost a good deal more if one had to purchase a packet of each size as it was needed.

So you see, it isn't horrendously expensive to build something like this. The raw materials are reasonably priced and easily available too, so go, build yourself one! You know you want to. :wink: :roll: :lol: :lol: :lol:

Perry



If there is anyone out there who isn't heartily sick of the sight of this model yet, here are some views of it after construction has been completed. The main doors aren't attached yet and the railings haven't been added, but otherwise it's finished (apart from painting).

Firstly, as promised, here are the chimney pots I finished up with:



I cut a small piece of .020" plain plastikard to act as a base and covered this in some thinly rolled out Milliput to give the appearance of the mortar that the chimney pots would be set into.

The chimney pots themselved are made from short pieces of plastic tube covered with Milliput and then rolled, carved and filed into shape. A very thin piece of Milliput was rolled out and made into two small circles that later formed the lip on the top of each pot.

Here then are the pictures of the (just about) finished Great Eastern Goods Shed:











And finally a view through the doors:



The doors at the far end fell over just as I took the shot! :roll: :lol:

By the way, the shed isn't standing quite level because I've pushed the lighting wires out of sight underneath it and they are a bit springy! :oops:

Painting will be next, but I'm going to leave it a day or two before I start, just to be sure that I haven't forgotten anything that needs doing first. I also want a couple of fresh tins of paint that I can probably get tomorrow.

Perry

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I have really enjoyed this build. I'm looking forward to the paint job now, but like everything else on this model, it won't be rushed. I'll probably spend a day or two thinking about the order in which to paint things. Then, of course, my method of painting embossed plastikard uses several different coats of paint and drying time needs to be allowed for. I am hoping to have the job finished by the holidays, but failing that, it'll have to be by New Year's Eve! :wink: :roll: :lol:

I started planning this job on 21st September 2007 so it has taken three months from planning to completion. Well, I did tell you I like to take my time! :D :D

Perry



henryparrot wrote:...........what do you find is the best tool for cutting a radius?.................

Thanks Brian.

For cutting most radii I use one of these:

http://yourmodelrailway.net/view_topic.php?id=345&forum_id=19&highlight=compass


Perry



As some of you may know, I use a detailed 'To Do' list, or in fact several of them, when I'm working on a project.

I've just had another idea; a 'To Do Later' list!

The reason for this is that sometimes during a project it's convenient to leave part of an assembly or process to be done later. The problem with this is that it's all too easy to forget that one needs to go back and actually do it later! :?

I like to leave a model unpainted for a day or two whilst I have a good check around it with fresh eyes. First thing this morning I looked at the goods shed again and immediately found three jobs that needed doing! :shock: Two of them were 'To Do Later' jobs that I had forgotten.

Perry

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I was giving the shed a wipe over with a cloth dipped in warm water with a drop or two of washing up liquid in it - just to take off any grease and muck before painting when I found yet another job that should have been on the 'To Do Later' list. :shock:

I thought the gable ends didn't look quite right - and then I realised I hadn't fitted any flashing. I needed something like this:



So I took a piece of ordinary computer printer paper and cut a strip about 2.5mm wide from one edge. Using a sharp craft knife I cut little tiny triangles out of it. These were then fixed in place on the model by holding them against the plastikard and soaking them with solvent.





A dab or two of greyish paint on them and they should look OK. :wink: :D

Perry

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Painting has begun with the main and office roof tiles getting three coats of paint each. I started off with a greenish-grey colour, then put a coat of medium grey on and followed that with a coat of bluish grey. Working quickly over the surface each time, I tried NOT to get too even a coverage of each colour. This should give a nice subtle variation across the fairly large expanse of roof. Once this is all thoroughly dry I will pick out various tiles individually with varying darker and lighter shades and also dry-brush some brick red colour around the ridge tile area, as per the prototype. Later I will give the whole roof a coat of thinned very dark grey - almost black - which will be wiped off again almost immediately, leaving traces of the darker colour in the grooves between and under the edges of the tiles to bring out the texture.

These stages of painting won't photograph well, particularly under tungsten lighting, so no more pictures yet, sorry!

Perry



These are all Humbrol matt enamels. Each coat is allowed to dry because it's the uneven colouring I want, not a mixing of the colours to one single shade. That's why I painted the three coats quickly and roughly; I don't want the roof to look all freshly tiled. I want it to look as though it's been there for years. All three coats were straight out of the tin as they only form the basis for further colouring with mixed shades. These will be thinned and darkened or lightened as needed.

Perry



Painting on the roof has continued with some brick red dry-brushed around the ridge area and a few of the tiles randomly coloured slightly different shades. These are a bit 'contrasty' at the moment, but the whole roof still has to have a wash of very dark grey to emphasise the tiles edges and to pull everything together tonally. I need to have a look at the current stage in daylight before I proceed any further becasue tungsten lighting can be very deceptive when it comes to getting colours right.



This is the effect I'm after, but it's a bit difficult to photograph adequately from ground level. :?



Perry

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Wayne Williams wrote:Perry, if YOU have to look at it in a different light to get the colors right, and YOU know what your looking for, how am I supposed to know if my colors are right?
I hope that question makes sense to you.

Wayne


I think you really answered this yourself when you said that I know what I'm looking for. When you think about it, the only person I really need to satisfy that the colours are 'right' is me! As you may have already seen, one of the 'unwritten rules' on this forum is: "If it looks right, it is right". Copying colours exactly from the prototype doesn't always work, simply because our models are so much smaller. This can affect the way colours are perceived. Some modellers only apply colour whilst using the type of light in which the model will be displayed. For instance, if an exhibition model is always displayed with it's own lighting, e.g. tungsten, then colours applied in daylight might not look right.

I don't want this to sound as though it is a difficult or technical subject. All I'm saying is that I want to be satisfied that it looks right to me. To be honest, I don't really care what anyone else thinks; it's my railway at the end of the day, so I'm the only one that has to be happy with it. :wink: :D :D

Don't forget modeller's licence too - you can paint things any colour you like. No-one here will tell you you're wrong! :roll: :D

Perry



Wayne Williams wrote:So basically your saying try it and if you don't like it ......
Can you change it?

This is sounding like a trial and error kind of thing. As you do it and view the results then the next project gets better. If this is true then starting small is a good idea, then work your way up to larger projects.

Wayne


Exactly so, Wayne. Just a couple of things to bear in mind though, it's a lot easier to make a change going for a darker shade than it is going lighter, so whenever you can, err on the light side initially. Also, remember that each coat of paint has a definite thickness and the more of them there are, the more detail can become obscured. (Sounds like Star Wars on here; 'Beware the Dark Side, Luke.....' :roll: :lol: :lol: )

Perry



Whilst again studying the photographs of the goods shed I realised that most of the guttering and downpipes on the prototype have been replaced with 'plastic' ones of a dark grey colour. However, the back wall of the office still has pieces of what I believe to be the original old cast iron guttering and downpipe attached. These are most definitely a glorious green colour!



That will make the building look even more attractive, I hope. :D

Perry

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Thanks for your kind comments, Ken. :)

As work continues on the goods shed I am still finding little jobs that should have been on the 'To Do Later' list. :oops:

The brackets that support the canopy rest on some nice little corbels as can be seen in this picture:



I filed a radius onto some tiny pieces of plastikard and glued them in place to represent these.

By the way, the above picture shows quite nicely the window arch partially covered by the canopy mentionaed elsewhere in this thread. It appears that the canopy may have been added as an afterthought.

The other detail I decided to add were the joints at roughly 6 scale feet intervals on the downpipes. These were simply tiny pieces of paper fixed in place with solvent. They are not very obvious on the photo but should show up better when they have been painted, and perhaps 'highlighted' with a dab or two of rust-coloured paint.



Perry



Wayne Williams wrote:Perry,
OK, I have some questions :roll: This "To Do List" is it a written down on paper list? Is the list organized (if written) in an order of when it should get done?
and
Just how much effort should be put into a "To Do List"?

Wayne

PS: Can you tell I am an engineer?


To answer these questions in order:

1. Yes, the 'To Do' lists (plural) are written down. I find that if I break the project down into stages during planning, I can create a 'To Do' list for each section. It helps me arrange tasks into the most practical order and should help me remember everything that has to be done to complete a section before moving on to the next. I wasn't joking when I said a 'To Do Later' list would be a good thing. Little jobs that are set aside during constuction for whatever purpose should go on that list so they don't get forgotten entirely.

2. Put in as much or as little effort as you are happy with. It's your list. Maybe your memory is better than mine. :? I feel that any time spent on planning is time well spent. Ultimately it saves me time, materials and temper. :wink: I'm happy to spend a couple of days just thinking about the best way to do a job if need be. Often the first idea doesn't turn out to be the best one. :shock:

3. No. Should I be able to? :? :D

Perry

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The roof, having dried really thoroughly, was ready for the next coat of paint.

So far, it has had three base-coats and some individual tiles picked out in varying shades, as stated in previous posts. This has left some of the 'gullies' between the tiles and the gaps beneath the rows of tiles a bit short of colour. I didn't worry about getting the base coats into all the little nooks and crannies as the next step will sort that out.

Using Humbrol matt enamels, I made a mixture of predominantly black, no.33, with literally a couple of drops each of white, no.34, and blue, no.25. The white takes the intensity off the black and stops it being overpowering, and the blue adds just that slight tinge of bluishness that the prototype has. These colours were mixed in one of my hi-tec paint pallettes (a milk-bottle top :roll: ) and then thinned with Humbrol enamel thinners. (Tip: don't risk using white spirit - use the proper stuff. It does make a difference.) I thinned it to a very watery consistency and mixed it with a brush. I find this mixes very thin paint better than cocktail sticks, etc.

I tested the mixture on the office roof first, as it is by far the smallest area and would be easier to rectify if the results weren't what I wanted. I brushed the paint on using a size 6 Prolene brush, working as fast as I could, but making sure that this time the paint flowed into all the 'wee liitle places'. :wink: It did this quite readily, being so thin. As the office roof is small, I just completed one side at a time, but the main roof panels were done roughly in thirds. The reason for not covering too large an area at once is that very thin paint such as this dries extremely rapidly - the thinners evaporates very fast - and I needed to deal with it before it was dry.

Once the thinned paint was on, I wiped it off again! :shock: :? I know, sounds daft, doesn't it? Using a piece of kitchen paper towel, I rubbed across the surface of the roof tiles, keeping it fairly flat. This took most of the paint off of the surface of the tiles but left it in the gullies and beneath the overhanging rows of tiles. Being so thin, it also allows the tiles that were picked out in different shades to show through, but stops them being so 'obvious'. Basically, the process pulls the whole lot together and finishes up looking like a tiled roof. (I hope! :oops: ) The effect is quite subtle and may not show up to full advantage in a photograph so I hope this description will help give some idea how it all works.

I'm going to leave this to dry properly overnight and start on the next stage of painting tomorrow evening. :D

Beware: if you try to carry out more work on an area that has been painted with very thin paint too soon, it WILL lift off again, probably taking the underlying coats with it. :(

Perry



Gwent Rail wrote:..............my standard is still not as high as I would like :!: ...

Nor is mine, Jeff. :( The only way I've found to achieve any improvement at all is the obvious one; keep practicing. I think if one can visualise the final effect sought, it makes it easier to head in the right direction. I believe that one of my failings (of which there are a great many!) during earlier attempts at painting was to try to get to the finish line too quickly, and taking too many shortcuts. If a single part needs 5 or 6 different applications of paint to get it to look right, then that's what it needs to get. I have a long way to go with painting but I enjoy seeing the model hopefully 'coming to life' beneath the paintbrush. :)

Perry



The painting of the roof is all but complete, with just a little retouching needed here and there. (On the' To Do Later' list! :roll: )

Window sills and gable end capping tiles have all had a coat of grey paint as a base for further work when dry.

Likewise, the gutters and downpipes have had a first coat of green. As the viewpoint will normally be from above roof level, there will need to be some 'muck' colour in the channels of the gutters, otherwise they will look too clean and new. There; you read it on this forum first: I even model the muck in the gutters!! :roll: :lol: :lol: :lol:

The office and pedestrian access doors will get a coat of paint tomorrow, along with other small parts such as the corbels and the triangular fillets at the top of the gables. The wooden supports outside the sliding loading bay doors will also get a base coat.

As you may have worked out, I'm leaving the brickwork until last. Because of the structure of this building I happy that I can work on a smallish section at a time without the joins being obvious. This will make it easier to handle the model for painting without sticking my fingers all over the wet paint. To get a fairly standard brick base colour for the entire structure, I will mix a whole tinful of paint to the required shade first. That way there will be no further mixing part-way through, trying to match the shade I have already been using. :? If photographs of the prototype are studied closely enough, it can be seen that even the blue brickwork around the base appears to have a red 'undercoat'. It doesn't in reality, but I think the way to achieve the desired effect will be to paint all the brickwork in the reddish colour, then dry-brush the blue colour over the top later. I'm going to experiment with this on a scrap of embossed plastikard first, before using it on the model.

Perry

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I have carried out a very rapid experiment in preparation for painting the shed brickwork. It was done very quickly, without waiting for the various coats of paint to dry really thoroughly (naughty! :evil: ) but I only wanted to get a rough idea of what I need to 'tweak' before I set about painting the shed itself.

The following image gives an idea of the steps involved:



Stage 1 is a piece of 'raw' embossed plastikard, completely unpainted.

Stage 2 has had a coat of slightly thinned light grey paint applied all over.

Stage 3 has had the surfaces of the 'bricks' wiped fairly free of paint again with a piece of paper towel.

Stage 4 has been dry-brushed with brick red.

Stage 5 had been dry brushed with grey-blue over the brick red.

By waiting for the different coats to dry properly I should get a better-defined finish. The experimental one is a bit blurry.

When Stage 5 is completely dry, detail can be further enhanced by picking out individual bricks with different shades. Some ares of the red brick show very obvious darkening on the prototype and this will be replicated as far as possible on the model. For example:



Perry



The 'mortar coat' is thinned, applied as rapidly as possible, then wiped of immediately before it has a chance to dry. That's why, when working on the model, I will need to work on smallish areas at a time - otherwise it dries and can't be wiped off! :? One can paint over it, but I prefer to wipe it off so there isn't too much of a build up of paint thickness.

Perry

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I have been rather busy with other things today so I haven't done much work on the shed. :(

The doors, guttering and downpipes have had their final coat of paint. The base coat was quite a dark green and the top coat is more of a match for the colour shown on the photos of the prototype.

By painting downpipes,etc. now; i.e. before the brickwork, I don't have to be too carefull about getting the odd dab of paint on adjacent areas. These will all be covered up when the brickwork is painted.



The wooden structure beneath the sliding doors has been painted, along with corbels, fillets and window sills.

The pedestrian access ramp has been left as bare plastikard at present. It won't be painted until I'm ready to add the railings, and these won't be done until all the other painting is finished. They will be too fragile to risk breaking whilst painting of the main shed goes on.

Perry

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I have begun to paint the 'mortar coat' using a thinned pale grey enamel. This is applied quickly over a smallish area before wiping it off with paper towel. I did one 'bay' at a time as this gave me time to wipe it off before it dried too much. The wiping is made easier if the paper towel is cut into smaller pieces first; i.e., quarters. This coat doesn't need to be even as most of it is wiped off and it will all be over-painted with other colours anyway. It's just there to suggest that there is mortar between the bricks.



I'll do one wall at a time and allow at least 6 hours drying time, preferably longer, before any other painting is done.

This will take me up to Stage 3 of the process shown in a posting above.

Perry



Jackster wrote:Perry absolutely stunning piece of work and excellent description of how its done. I take it the original photos you took have been an invaluable source, how many did you take out of interest? Superb piece of work Perry am gobsmacked!

Kev


Thanks Kev.

Two ways to answer the same question; A: not enough :? , and B: about 80. :roll: :D

I have ended up with about 380 images in the folder dedicated to this project, including all the prototype and the model images, although some of them are just resized copies that were uploaded to Photobucket.

I really couldn't have managed without the photo's. The plans were drawn up using them and all the details were added as a result of what was visible on them too. I actually had to make a second special trip to the Museum to take a second batch as I realised that I had missed out some important angles and details. I won't make the same mistake again though. I will photograph EVERYTHING next time. :shock:

Perry



Gwent Rail wrote:One of our local modellers, who's work is of a high standard, has a slightly different approach to doing the motar coat.
His method is to paint the motar colour all over (like you, Perry) with a very thin wash and then let it dry. When fully dry, he then gives the surface a very light sanding with fine glass paper to expose the under-colour once more.
Having seen your method, I'm not convinced that his way is better :!:
I certainly think that it is a more difficult way to achieve a simular result :!:


I have read about such a technique, Jeff, but I am wary of applying anything abrasive to such a finely moulded surface. There's not a lot of depth to play with and I can be a bit heavy-handed at times. :? Also, in respect of the model I am building at the moment, there are too many recesses and projections to make sanding an easy prospect - and you know how I like to do things the easy way. :wink:

Perry



I have applied the 'mortar coat' to three sides of the shed, including the office, so there is one end wall left to do. As this coat is so well thinned I am leaving it ample time to dry really well before I start the dry-brushing, otherwise there is a real risk that the mortar coat may lift or mix with the colours being applied over the top of it.

I'm now looking at finishing this project completely by the New Year. With work, the holidays and paint-drying time to allow for, having it done by Christmas would mean rushing it and there's no way I'm doing that.

Something new to start on in the the new year would be rather appropriate, I think! :wink:

(And no, Phill - it won't be the coaling stage or your cooling tower - sorry! :roll: :wink: :lol: :lol: )

Perry

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The brick red dry-brushed coat has been commenced. Bear in mind when you use this technique that it is a good idea to build up the required depth or strength of colour gradually. If you try to do it all in one coat, the paint will be going on too thickly and probably won't give the desired results.

I'll post a picture or two when I've made a little more progress.

Here's a little tip for people trying to paint around windows without making a mess.

Keep a few of the pieces you cut out to make the window openings. Glue on a little handle made from a scrap of plastikard and you have a quick and simple 'window shield' like this:





The little handle makes it easier to remove the shield without touching the wet paint,

These little devices really help keep paint off the window transparencies.

Perry



When the mortar coat was fully dry, a coat of brick red was dry-brushed over the whole surface of the walls, including the plinth that will be darker later. The reason for this is that studying close-up photos of the wall indicated that the greyish-blue plinths still appeared to have a reddish shade to it in many areas. I therefore needed this and the mortar coat to show through.

Here's a reminder of how the prototype looks:



And here is the current state of the model:



The plinth has also had it's first coat of greyish-blue paint dry-brushed over the brick red.

This initial coat only needed to be put on fairly quickly without too much regard to little corners etc being missed.

The next step, after allowing drying time, will be to apply some much darker brick red colour to areas that appear darker on the photos.

When all this is dry I will go over the model a small sections at a time completing all the areas that need retouching and adding more shades to various bricks to make it look less 'even'.

Obviously the pedestrian access ramp still need finishing and painting, but there really isn't too much more to do to complete the project now. :D

Perry

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The completion target of finishing this project by the end of the year is now achievable. :D I'm not incuding the pedestrian access ramp in that target as that can be sorted out later. The main thing was to get the building itself finished.

I spent some time this morning addding the darker red shade over the brickwork, again using a dry-brushing technique. I used photos of the prototype to indicate the areas that needed darkening. Over the next hour or two I shall be going over the model with a fine brush, picking out the odd brick here and there in different shades, as well as doing any little retouching jobs to things such as the downpipes and gutters.

This evening I will take some photographs of the completed model and post them on here. With any degree of luck you won't have put up with the goods shed saga much longer 'cos it's nearly finished! :roll: :lol: :lol:

Perry



Once I have finished posting a few pictures later today, I doubt very much if I will add to it. In fact I might lock the thread in a few days time, depending on what 'The Boss' thinks.

The goods shed may well be mentioned later when it gets permanently installed on the layout, but that's about all.

Perry



With the exception of answering any questions resulting from this post, this will be the last part of the saga of how I scratchbuilt a model based on a prototype Great Eastern Goods Shed situated at the East Anglian Railway Museum, near Colchester, Essex.

It has been something of a marathon, for which I apologise. :oops: However, it has been the support and encouragement of the members of this forum that has brought the project to what I hope is a succesful conclusion.

The final painting was just a case of adding light and darker shaded of colour to thos already on the model, using photographs as a reference. If I learned one thing from this project, it was that one can never have too many photographs of the prototype. Truth be known, I have learned a huge amount about scratchbuilding as this is the most ambitious scratchbuilding project I have ever undertaken.

There are one or two places on the model that still need a dab or two of paint; for example, where the main doors are attached. This will need retouching when the polystyrene cement is properly dry. No doubt I will also notice a few other little jobs that need attention too, including the finishing of the ramp, but for now, the job is complete.

Here is a reminder of what I set out to model:











So, without more ado, here are the final photos:













...and in place on the layout:









I will post a picture of two once it is landscaped in and the lighting has been hooked up to a power supply, but that's a way down the road at present.

I hope you enjoyed following this thread as much as I have writing it. :D

The End.

Perry



The whole project has taken two-and-a-half months and I would estimate somewhere in the region of 200 hours from start to finish - not including time spent documenting it on this forum. (It's a world exclusive, I hope you realise! :roll: :lol: :lol: )

There are now 410 digital images in the folder dedicated to the project, including those re-sized for Photobucket, etc.

I used perhaps the equivalent of 6 sheets of plastikard, including embossed and plain. The equivalent of 2 or 3 packets of microstrip and rod were used. The whole model consumed about one bottle of solvent, and the equivalent of perhaps a couple of tins of Humbrol paint.

I doubt if the actual cost in materials used came to more than �20 - �25. For that cost I have a model that is absolutely unique. I have learned a huge amount and gained the confidence that I will be able to do better next time.

Perry


I have been very touched by everyone's kind comments in relation to this project. Thank you all very much. I know I have said this before, but without the support and encouragement of the members of this forum, I doubt if this model would ever have been finished. It was a bit scary sometimes, coming into the room where I build these projects and finding it still sitting there, unfinished. Two and half months it sat on the bench and although I did something to it most days, progress seemed, to me, painfully slow.

I looked it over with a very critical eye today. :( There are certainly things I could have done better or perhaps done in a different way. I have also said before, elsewhere on this forum, that there is no 'right way' or 'wrong way' to carry out projects such as this. There is only the way that works for the builder.

I have also said elsewhere that the building of this goods shed was not difficult. I stand by that, and I firmly believe that most, if not all, the members of this forum, could achieve similar, if not better, results. All it takes is the will to succeed, time and patience. It's not a 'Black Art', nor am I a 'highly skilled, talented modeller'. I'm just an ordinary, average sort of chap who simply tries his best. It's nice to see some other scratch building projects starting to appear on here, and I hope to see many more.

I will leave this thread open for a few more days in case there are any further questions regarding this project, after which it will be locked.

Thanks again. :wink:

Perry



A final thank you to everyone for their support and interest on this thread, which is now locked.

Perry

Robert
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This is me again, the Fat Controller. That's it then folks and worth every minute I have spent on it. A big vote of thanks goes to our host Jim because without him it wouldn't have happened.

Cheers Jim.

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I am touched and humbled that you both quite obviously spent a great deal of time and effort in making the goods shed project rise Phoenix-like from the ashes of the old website.

Thank you for taking the trouble.

Sincerely, Perry

Robert
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No trouble for such a project Perry and it's great to have you logged on once more.

Ianbo
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A most impressive insight of how to build a stunning model .

Thank you I have just read it all again for the third time


                 

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