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Perry's Great Eastern Goods Shed. - Scratchbuilding. - More Practical Help - Your Model Railway Club
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 Posted: Sat Jan 9th, 2010 04:14 pm
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Robert
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All the shed windows were fitted this morning. I would normally paint the edges of the window reveals before glueing the transparencies into place but as the windows are not set deep into them and the plastikard is 'brick coloured' I decided it wasn't necessary. As I had labelled the windows on the transparency sheet they were easy to identify as to which window opening each of them fitted. Thank goodness I made a few spares as I managed to ruin one by getting glue on my finger and then dabbing it right in the middle of the window I was fitting! :evil: Clumsy oaf!

Each 'window' was cut out using a sharp craft knife leaving a good margin all round, then I used a 5-minute epoxy resin to glue each one in place. This glue is only workable for about 4 minutes, so I did each wall with a freshly-mixed batch.

The glue was spread thinly around the back of the window opening using a cocktail stick to apply it in the small quantities needed. I tried not to get the glue too close to the edge of the opening because it may smear onto the visible part of the transparency when the window is slid about and adjusted into it's correct position. I then carefully balanced the transparency on a fingertip and, holding the wall 'right way up', pressed the transparency into place from beneath.The epoxy resin set off quickly but needs to be left to cure properly for an hour.

This is the effect I was trying to achieve:



...and result looks like this:



This view is almost too close-up because the effect when looking at the model gives a better effect in my humble opinion.

So, that's it. All the windows are done. The office structure and the shed doors are next.

Perry



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 Posted: Sat Jan 9th, 2010 04:15 pm
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I couldn't decide whether to model the left-hand loading bay doors open or closed, so I decided to make them 'operational'. :wink:



The doors themselves were made from a piece of .040" plastikard, scribed to represent the framing and board panels.

I then used some scrap material to make a pair of runners for the doors to sit it - as per your normal sliding cupboard doors with channels top and bottom. I made the runners from scraps of plastikard using two thickness of .040" and one of .020" material. I reasoned that I would need a little bit of clearance to enable the doors to slide, hence the additional .020" piece.

Here the doors are laid in the channels (albeit back to front), just to show how the pieces fit together:



When the doors have been painted, the runners will be cemented in place behind the door opening:



And hey presto! Sliding doors:



As you will appreciate, the doors and runners are currently not fixed into position, hence the slight misalignment shown in the photos. :oops:

Perry



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 Posted: Sat Jan 9th, 2010 04:16 pm
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I'm going to take a short break from building the goods shed, probably until tomorrow evening.

I always know when it's time to take a break because I find it increasingly difficult to achieve the results I want. I have just binned the third attempt at making the first pair of office windows. :roll: :(

Add to that the fact that I actually managed to stick a scalpel blade right through the side of my index finger this afternoon, in one side and out the other, and you may understand why I feel the need to take a break. :shock: The annoying thing is I wasn't even using the knife at the time; just moving it out of the way on the workbench. Pity I didn't move my other hand out of the way first. :roll: No lasting damage done though. :D

The moral of this story is: be careful, these things are pretty sharp!

Perry



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 Posted: Sat Jan 9th, 2010 04:17 pm
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owen69 wrote:Perry, when i asked how to get blood off plasticard, i did not expect a
practical demo, a simple explanation would have done!!
your model was going great ,i was enjoying watching its progress. :oops: :oops: :wink: :wink: 8)


Youy know me; nothing is too much trouble for the guys on the forum! :roll: :lol: :lol:

There will be more progress very soon; it's not a bad injury, just a nuisance being on the index finger - which, strangely enough, I tend to use rather a lot when I'm modelling! A great big sticking plaster (designed to attract sympathy from the missus and get me out of the washing up) tends to get in the way when I'm glueing very small parts together. :twisted: :lol: :lol:

Perry



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 Posted: Sat Jan 9th, 2010 04:18 pm
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After three abortive attempts to fabricate the windows of the small office at one end of the goods shed by using PVC tape strips, I realised (it took me long enough! :roll: ) that to get a similar appearance to the windows on the shed itself, I was going to have use computer-generated ones again. There are two pairs of windows in the office building. Each window on the model is 20mm high x 12mm wide with a 3mm gap between the pair. The window reveal is slightly curved at the top. To add to the problem, the windows have yellow glazing bars with a green surround. :shock: They are sash-type windows too.



I got around it by using the same technique that I used for the main windows, but having drawn the frame size to scale I overlaid it with green lines, then added yellow lines to get the two-colour effect. I put in a dark grey line beneath the bottom edge of the top sash to try to indicate the overlap.

Here is a grabbed image of the finished design:



I have made a few spares as usual. The colours may look a bit bright on this image, but by the time they are printed on acetate and installed, the colours will not appear as contrasty. Don't be tempted to try to print very pale colours. It doesn't usually work very well - and of course, you can't print in white!

If you decide to try printing some windows yourself, make sure that the acetate is printed on the rough side - 'cos ink won't stick to the smooth side! Also, if your printer has the option available, print them at the best quality you can and select transparency as the printing medium. If you leave it set to text only and plain white paper you won't get very good results, so be warned. I always print my windows out onto plain paper first and offer them up to the window opening they are destined for. That way you can spot any problems before using up a sheet of acetate. I buy my acetates from a local office supplier. If I bought a box of 100 A4 sheets it would work out cheaper, but I don't use that many so I buy ten sheets at a time and they charge me 50 pence a sheet. So for 50p and a few pence worth of ink I can generate a whole A4 sheet of windows in whatever shape, colour or design takes my fancy. :D

And the finished windows look like this:



Bear in mind they are laying flat on white paper to be photographed. The image is shown considerably larger than the actual thing. These windows, as I said earlier, are only 12mm wide. They will look better once installed in the building so that they can be seen through into a darker interior.

Will I light the office eventually? Maybe, maybe not! :wink:

Perry



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 Posted: Sat Jan 9th, 2010 04:27 pm
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The three walls of the office have been assembled and offered up ready for fitting to the main end wall.

I braced the corners of the office with some strips of plastikard to increase the area that the cement could use. Attaching .015" to .015" plastikard doesn't work under these circumstances. I also cut four triangular fillets that fit at floor and ceiling height to brace the corners of the building and to help keep it square on assembly. I have two steel rulers screwed to a board at right-angles to each other and use this for checking buildings are square as I work.



Here is the office so far, against the end wall, but not attached yet.



The two doors on the end wall will be tackled next.

Perry



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 Posted: Sat Jan 9th, 2010 04:28 pm
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With the road vehicle loading bay doors were given a quick coat of paint - to be finished in situ later - and both pairs were fixed in place. The left-hand pair have been made so that they can be opened and closed on runners, as per the prototype.

I have now begun to fabricate the railway doors. Two pieces of .040" plain plastikard were cut to 56mm square. Each square will form a pair of doors, but it is easier to make a matching pair while they are still in one piece! :wink:

I counted the planking on the prototype doors on a photograph and found that there were roughly nine-and-a-half plank widths to each door, so I called it 19 planks across the full width. A quick bit of maths gave me a width of about 3mm per plank so the doors were marked out and scribed on both sides.

I will need to model both sides of the doors in detail as they will be fixed in the open position - so I can shunt my vans and wagons in and out!

A small access door within the main door was also scribed in, giving it a battered edge. I did this because plain scribing didn't delineate it sufficiently. A small offcut of plastikard was cemented across the top as per the strut on the original. Cross members were added from microstrip at the top and bottom edges of the doors and shorter pieces of microstrip formed the main hinges. The hinges for the access door were made by cutting a short piece of microstrip at an angle to give two small triangles. These were fixed in place and then two tiny sections of microrod were added to form the hinge pins.



To prevent the piece from warping I will leave it to dry overnight before tackling the inside details. Fortunately I photographed the inside of the doors too! :D

Perry



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 Posted: Sat Jan 9th, 2010 04:31 pm
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Please don't forget that when you are reading through this build that just because my picture is on all the posts it doesn't mean I had anything to do with it because I didn't. I was just one of those who sat back and enjoyed the ride.



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 Posted: Sat Jan 9th, 2010 04:32 pm
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The fabrication of the first pair of doors has been completed with the exception of painting.

This image shows the front and rear sides of the same pair:



Looking at my photographs, it appears that the pair of doors I chose to model first have had less restoration done on them, so are hopefully a bit nearer what the originals were like in terms of the framing. I will therefore use a small amount of 'modellers licence' and make the other pair very similar to these.

Perry



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 Posted: Sat Jan 9th, 2010 04:33 pm
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Both pairs of the rail-access doors are now finished, so next on the list (and there really is a to-do list!) is the pedestrian access door next to the office.

I feel I'm really making progress now. :D This looked like a big project when I started it, but I have been surprised how easy it has been and how quickly it has come together.

There is just the office ramp and interior platform to make, then assembly of most of the main units can begin. After that there will be the roofs and the chimney stack to be fabricated.

Interior painting will be fairly minimal, because the main roof will be fixed in place and therefore not a great deal of the interior wil be visible. :wink:

Perry


Twelve small offcuts of plastikard later - remember not to throw any bits and pieces away - and the pedestrian access doors are in place. These needed to be installed for completeness but due to the way the building will be sited on the layout I'll need a rubber neck to be able to see them as they will be at the far end! Never mind; I'll know they're there. :wink:



Perry



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 Posted: Sat Jan 9th, 2010 04:34 pm
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phill wrote:Perry wrote #This looked like a big project when I started it, but I have been surprised how easy it has been and how quickly it has come together.#

Blimey :shock: if that was easy, i hate to see what you do that is hard mate........................Phill


It seems I am having a problem getting across to people on this forum that what I'm doing really is easy - and I'm not being modest. Take your time and reasonable care and there is absolutely no reason why anyone here can't do something similar. I have no particular talent or skill. I'm just a (very) average guy who can cut a bit of plastic without cutting himself (most of the time!!! :oops: ) and stick it back together into a different shape. All it will take is for someone to have a go, find out that I'm not telling 'porkys', and let everyone else know. Then our Scratchbuilding section will really take off. :D

Perry



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 Posted: Sat Jan 9th, 2010 04:35 pm
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Some more work has been carried out on the office end of the main building with the construction of the slightly strange chimney stack that ends part-way up the main stack.

The interior of the office building has been painted matt black.

Using pieces of masking tape at the corners, the building has had a test assembly carried out. It's not good to start glueing it all up and then discovering that there's a problem! :shock: This way, if there are any slight adjustments needed I can do them before it's too late.

Here are a few rough pictures to give an idea what the finished shed will look like:



There is still the pedestrian access ramp to build when the office has been attached.



The doors are in 'undercoat' only at present. :oops:



The interior platform needs building soon so that the walls can be assembled around it.

As shown in an earlier post, the main doors are already made but were not attached for this test session.

Work continues.

Perry



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Robert
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I've just been looking at what's left to do and a few of the jobs are a little daunting. I guess I'll have to do my 'break them down into smaller tasks' thing again.

Take a look at the fance ridge tiles, the canopy edging and the canopy support brackets. :shock: :shock: :shock:



They look like they'll be fun to make!

Perry



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 Posted: Sat Jan 9th, 2010 04:36 pm
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I think the ridge tiles will be made by bending a strip of plastikard lengthways to give the angle over the roof tiles and then making the vertical decorations in two separate 'sets'; plain and pierced. They can then be fixed in place alternately along the ridge. It shouldn't take too long to do and should look good when it's finished.

I'm working on a method to make the canopy edging, but the idea hasn't quite come together yet. :?

The canopy brackets will be (comparatively) easy, I would think.

Perry




Novice wrote:...........It is only when the building is assembled that you get a feel for the overall size of the structure. The roof must take up quite a large area. Will you have to put some form of inner roof support structure in? If so what form do you have in mind?
Novice


I believe the prototype roof has some fairly heavy duty trusses in it, judging by the photos I have. I'm considering another trip to the museum to take a few more pictures as I didn't take enough of the interior during my previous visit. :evil: Certainly the roof will need some extra support
of some kind as it is more than 10" long and each side is about 4" wide.

Perry



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 Posted: Sat Jan 9th, 2010 04:38 pm
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phill wrote:Looks quite a size that building. Canopy should be interesting to see how it is held up.
Phill


The canopy will be held up pretty much the same way the prototype is; on beams and brackets. It won't weigh much and doesn't have any load to bear other than it's own. :wink: :D

Perry




Petermac wrote:..........Having put plasticard on my "shopping list" for when I go to UK on Tuesday, I'm now having a slight re-think !! It seems modelling with this stuff, is potentially as dangerous as a real building site. " of you down with gashed fingers...............
Petermac


Plastikard isn't likely to cause an injury and the craft knives I use are the same type of thing that any modeller uses, regardless of modelling material, so I don't think you need worry there. :roll: :wink:

My recent injury was caused when I wasn't even using the knife. I was just moving it out of my way on the bench and managed to stick it in my finger - which also should have been moved off the bench! :roll: :lol: :lol: :lol:

A little serious advice regarding knives in general though; always use sharp blades, renewing them regularly. More people are injured through trying to force a blunt blade through material than ever get cut by a sharp one. The reason is that trying to force a blunt blade to cut renders it much more likely to suddenly slip.

Perry



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 Posted: Sat Jan 9th, 2010 04:39 pm
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The office has been fixed to the end wall and work on the pedestrian access ramp has begun.

I used some scraps (literally) of .040" plain plastikard to build the framework:



Then clad the sides in embossed brick material. The steps were made by laminating pieces of plastikard together with cutouts in the appropriate places.



The ramp across the end of the office has yet to be added and the remaining framework has to be 'plated over' with .020" plastikard. Capping strips and railings will follow later. Then door steps, etc., will need to be added to complete this area.

Perry



The office roof has been started by glueing in place some strips of plastikard thick enough to support the ends of the tiled part of the roof. These were followed by two pieces of .040" plain plastikard to form the base of the roof. The reason for this is that the embossed plastikard roof tiles that I intend using for this model are too thin to be self supporting and will need to be cemented on top of the .040" stuff. I thought about using .020" for the base but don't think it would be substantial enough to withstand all the solvent that will be applied when fixing the tile strips without distorting.

Whilst I was waiting for some of the solvent to dry, I set about making the first lengths of guttering - scratchbuilt of course! :lol: I employed my usual method of using a scraper on some .040" plastikard. There is a little post I did a while back on using scrapers at:
http://yourmodelrailway.net/view_topic.php?id=134&forum_id=11&highlight=scrapers
A few more small parts have been added to the office end of the building at this stage because I felt it would be easier to manoeuvre the end wall + office into a position to work on a lot more easily than the whole assembled shed which is over a foot long! :shock: These small items includes doorsteps, ramps and steps.

Once the gable end capping was fitted I cemented the gutters in place, then started tiling the roof.

For this I used Slaters Embossed roof Slates as the size of the roof on this project precludes fitting individual tiles from a time point of view if nothing else! :shock: The Slaters rooing tiles comes in roughly A4 sized sheets and has to be cut into strips. The tiles are embossed in paired rows with plain strips. The way to use these is, starting at the lowest edge of the roof, cement a strip in place with the tile part at the bottom edge. The next strip goes above this with the tile part overlapping the plain part of the first strip. It sounds complicated but it's very quick and easy to do. Just remember to overlap the tiles by half their width on each new row.

Here is how it looks with the first half of the roof tiled:







As can be seen from the photos, there are still of lot of areas that are incomplete but work is progressing nicely. :D

Perry



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 Posted: Sat Jan 9th, 2010 04:40 pm
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I decided to have a go at the ridge tiles this evening, just to see if an idea worked before I set about the main (BIG!) roof. :shock:

This is what I wanted to achieve:



...and this is how it turned out:



I think I'm fairly happy with that. :D

The main ridge tile strip is just a plain strip of .020" plastikard bent in half lengthways. I will scribe the tile lines on it later. Each tile, either plain or 'fancy', works out to be about 4.5mm long, so I cut strips from some .020" plain plastikard, one wider than the other, then marked them off at 4.5mm intervals. The wider strip then had two holes drilled in each 'tile'. The tiles were cut off the strip and the corners and middle 'V' shape cut out with a knife. The narrower strip formed the plain tiles. It was surprisingly quick and easy to do. I made a load up and put them into a little container before starting assembly. Then I took the tiles alternately and held them in place with a pair of fine tweezers (forceps) whilst applying solvent with a fine brush.

Perry




Wayne Williams wrote:Perry,
What can I say? Looking fabulous :!: :!: Are you keeping track of the hours spent building this? Just curious.

Wayne


Thanks Wayne. Sorry I didn't respond sooner. I must have missed your post somehow. Anyway, the answer is no, I haven't a clue how long I have been working on this project, but it's probably not as long as you might suspect. Working with Plastikard is usually quick and easy - which is why I use it; no patience! :roll: :wink: :lol: :lol:

Whilst I'm answering your question, may I also take time here to thank everyone else for their kind comments too. I can't keep acknowledging them all individually or I'll never get this shed finished! :D :D

Perry



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 Posted: Sat Jan 9th, 2010 04:43 pm
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Gwent Rail wrote:I reckon that's a cracking job Perry, certainly as good as anything I've seen without resorting to brass etching, which really isn't an option for one-off jobs.
Painted up, they are going to look superb.
BTW, what size drill did you need to use for that job :?: Real precision work there good buddy.


The drill bit is nominally 1mm but according to my electronic digital caliper thingy it was slightly under at 0.99mm. :roll: :wink: :lol: I didn't measure it before I started - I just picked one out of the box that looked about right. If it looks right,......etc. :D Before drilling I made a small mark at each hole location with a sharp metal point to stop the drill bit wandering. The drill bit was held in a pin vice and rotated between my fingers.

I have worked out that the main roof ridge will take somewhere around 58 tiles to complete, so that's roughly 30 of each (plus a few spares) I will need to fabricate before I start work. One thing I did learn by doing the office roof first was that it's a lot easier to work from left to right when fixing the tiles in place. This will obviously be different for people who are left-handed.

Perry




Novice wrote:Perry

Going back to the very first part of this project, when you were making the window arches, I note you used reversed brick embossed plastic card for the arches. Was there a reason for this or was it just that you had spare card available?

Really enjoying this project. I note that there have been over 1000 views of this thread. Is that a record?

Novice


I used the reversed brick embossed card simply because I could use up some of the offcuts. I reversed it because obviously the courses of bricks don't run the right way for an arch. The 'new' courses were scribed in with a steel point. One could just as easily use some .010" plain stock but I used what I had to hand. Although I keep all my offcuts in a box it's surprising how little remains in there very long. I often find a piece exactly the size I need for a small job and don't even bother having to cut it. :D

I'm not sure about the number of views of this thread being a record, but it's certainly encouraging to know that some of our members are finding it interesting. :wink:

Perry




Due to circumstances beyond my control, my workbench is going to be unavailable for a couple of days so there probably won't be too much in the way of updates on here until the weekend. :(

However, I have managed to wangle a trip back to Essex to revisit the prototype goods shed upon which this project is based. :wink:

I thought I had photographed everything I needed to complete this model but I reckon that a few more images would be very useful, so I shall sally forth once more with my trusty 'Box Brownie' in hand and snap all the bits I want. :roll: :D


Any excuse for a trip out! :roll: :lol: :lol: :lol:

Perry



I took a briefly heart-stopping step and cemented the shed walls together into pairs this evening so that I have each side wall joined to one end wall, giving me two 'L'-shaped structures to deal with. I can now build the internal platform into one side and finish off the other internal bits and pieces before the two assemblies are joined together. I'm still breaking things down into manageable steps; it's the only way for me.

Perry




I paid a return visit to the East Anglian Railway Museum today and spent some time photographing and sketching some of the features of the goods shed that I don't have enough details of. A tape measure came in handy too, along with my eldest son to hold the end of it! :lol:

I had an interesting chat with the staff there and told them the reason I was measuring and photographing the shed. I have been asked to send them a picture or two of the finished project and they have requested permission to possibly use them in one of their publications. If this happens, I will ask for this forum to get a 'plug' too if our 'F.C.' has no objections. :wink:

Bob, if you read this, I'm sure you will be as disappointed as me that the Scammell I photographed before has gone. I enquired after it, but it seems there was a bit of a 'tidy up' going on and owners of some of the stuff stored there were asked to move it. I have no idea where it has ended up. :(

With any luck, my workbench will be back 'in action' by Saturday evening so hopefully work will continue on the goods shed then.

Perry



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 Posted: Sat Jan 9th, 2010 04:44 pm
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Robert
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sparky wrote:all good stuff perry ,very much looking forward to the finished job. re the scammell,pity about that maybe a few of us could buy it if its up for grabs .someone may know where it is ,and if its open to offers ..
with a view to restoration of course ,i would not be surprised if among our virtual family we have the skills to do it .and think of the lunch breaks :D . sounds like you struck gold with the staff at the museum to possibly get a plug for barchester . well done all of it perry :D


I would like to think the owner of the Scammell will be doing something to restore it, but the staff I spoke to didn't know where it had gone - just that it had departed during a recent clean-up operation. I believe Bob mentioned on the old forum that there is an organisation that restores these machine, so we can only hope that they are aware of this one.

Here's how it looked during my previous visit:



:cry: :cry: :cry:

Perry



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 Posted: Sat Jan 9th, 2010 04:51 pm
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Robert
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On the good news side, my workbench has been restored to it's former site and has even benefitted from a tidy up. :D I also treated myself to a new, larger, cutting mat. This goods shed is so big I can't get it all on the old one! :roll: :lol:

I'm working through this coming weekend, (not unusual, I don't get many weekends off with my shift pattern) but I hope to get a bit more done on the goods shed over the next couple of evenings.

I'll keep you posted. :wink:

Perry




The internal platform is now taking shape. I laminated some embossed planking plastikard with some .020" plain sheet to make it a little more rigid. I made sure the planks ran the right way too - across the shed, not along the length of it.



There are two sets of steps leading from track level onto the platform, one just inside each of the main doors:



Although I don't intend modelling all the interior detail because it won't be visible once the roof is on, these steps will be seen from the outside of the shed. Two rectangles were cut out from the platform to make room for these to be built in later.

The platform edge protrudes beyond the door pillar as can just about be seen in the photo, so a piece of spare track was laid temporarily through the shed and a wagon 'tested' :roll: :lol: to make sure I had got the dimensions correct and it wasn't going to foul running gear.

Six dummy brick pillars were made by laminating two pieces of .040" plain plastikard together and covering two sides and one edge with embossed brickwork. These were cemented in place along the front edge of the platform.



A supporting framework is now being built up using strips of Plastikard cut to the correct width.



By making the platform free-standing it will be easier to make any small adjustments needed to ensure the building is dead square when the walls are joined together. This should preclude any problems when the roof is built.

Perry.



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