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Plasticard Low Relief Georgian House - Scratchbuilding. - More Practical Help - Your Model Railway Club
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 Posted: Fri Nov 2nd, 2007 09:04 pm
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Bob K
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Perry

Thanks for the info on brick patterns. I still can't make my mind up as it appears that a variation of styles has been used. Like you I cannot see enough detail from the pictures to be sure. I have gone firm on English bond, but I may be proved wrong in the end. Tempted to go and have a look at the real thing!

Bob(K)

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 Posted: Fri Nov 2nd, 2007 09:41 pm
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Perry
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Novice wrote:The end walls are now in place. They are obviously half walls as this is to be a low relief structure. I used a couple of pieces of card, cut as right angle triangles as inner supports for each wall. The next task will be painting the brick work and adding windows and the door, before I fix the roof on. Bob (K)

As you are making this a more or less half-depth low relief model, Bob, are you going to add a false floor half-way up? Apart from the added strength and rigidity it would provide, if the model is close enough on the layout for an observer to see, it may harm the illusion that it's supposed to be a whole building if the eye can see through the upper windows right down to ground level.

I only mention this because I found it necesary to fit 'extra' floors to a building I made long ago for that very reason. It would have been much easier for me to fit them at an earlier stage of construction. Talk about learning by ones mistakes! :oops:

Perry



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 Posted: Fri Nov 2nd, 2007 10:02 pm
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Bob K
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Perry wrote:Novice wrote:The end walls are now in place. They are obviously half walls as this is to be a low relief structure. I used a couple of pieces of card, cut as right angle triangles as inner supports for each wall. The next task will be painting the brick work and adding windows and the door, before I fix the roof on. Bob (K)

As you are making this a more or less half-depth low relief model, Bob, are you going to add a false floor half-way up? Apart from the added strength and rigidity it would provide, if the model is close enough on the layout for an observer to see, it may harm the illusion that it's supposed to be a whole building if the eye can see through the upper windows right down to ground level.

Perry


Perry

Yes, I will add this after the windows and roof are in place and I intend to put a couple of dividing walls (rooms) as I think the building will be seen from an angle from certain points in the layout and it will look odd being able to see the entire length. I will also add curtains to the windows.

Bob(K)

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 Posted: Fri Nov 2nd, 2007 11:22 pm
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Gwent Rail
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Hope this won't be "teaching granny to suck eggs", but:-

For ease of working, Novice, be sure to add your curtains to the windows befor you add dividing walls and floors. It's so much easier to do whilst you have maximum space available.

I'd make sure that the front wall also has some plain plasticard stuck onto the inside surface as well. This is to stop future warping and to aid stability. I use offcuts of material from old jobs, several bits stuck on the back are fine, they don't have to cover the whole surface.

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 Posted: Sat Nov 3rd, 2007 07:19 am
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Bob K
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Jeff

Thanks for the advice. The roof, followed by windows, curtains, doors etc will be the next phase. You can't see it in the picture but I have run some 2mm square rods (like beams) along the inside of the walls. These will act as stiffeners for the outer walls and supports for the upper floor. The floor and inner walls should also act as supports to hold everything in place. Do you think it wll need more than that to prevent warping?

Bob(K)

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 Posted: Sat Nov 3rd, 2007 08:55 am
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Bob K
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The construction of the door is quite complex and it has an intricate glass fan-light above it. The first task is to cut out the inner door frame, which will form the white door surround and frame for the fan-light. I did this by marking and then cutting out the frame. Quite a delicate task as the cross bar is only about 0.8mm thick. I'm surprised that I suceeded first go:





The next task is to work out how to build the fan-light design:





Bob(K)

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 Posted: Sat Nov 3rd, 2007 12:27 pm
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Gwent Rail
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Hi Bob(K), regarding your question about avoiding warping.

If it was my building project, yes, I would be tempted to put some odd scraps of plasticard on the inside of the walls.
My buildings always have two layers to start with, as I cut out the pattern required from plain white 0.5mm (20 thou) styrene sheet and the bond the embossed sheet on top, turn it over and then cut out the required openings in the embossed sheet using the plain sheet cut outs to guide me. (Hope that's clear).
The bits we add (reveals, arches, sills, frames etc.) then form the 3rd layer, in your case this would be provided by the beams and room dividers etc.

I believe that this is the only way to ensure stability. Think of plywood, why is 3-ply the least you can get? Because 2 layers don't give stability, that's why.
There are still some of my buildings (on a friends layout) in existance that are over 15 years old, still sound and perfectly square, with no warping or distortion. Some I knocked together quickly only 5 years ago, using no laminations (for an exhibition layout deadline), are twisted and distorted beyond use.
Says it all really.

If you enjoy your scratchbuilding enough to continue, I would highly recommend you spend a tenner on Ken Ball's book. It's like my plasticard bible. Here's the details:-

Publisher ... Cheona Publications
Title ... Modelling Buildings The Easy Way
Author ... Ken Ball
ISBN No 1 90298 19 8

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 Posted: Sat Nov 3rd, 2007 12:49 pm
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Wayne Williams
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OK, I'm following you so far, but one thing puzzles me. How do you cut out the curved line. As I understand it you are supposed to scribe the plasticard a few times then snap it apart. How do you snap the curved line?

Wayne



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 Posted: Sat Nov 3rd, 2007 12:51 pm
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Bob K
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Jeff

Thanks for the tips. I will wait and see if will I venture further into the scratch building business, after I have finsihed this project - there's still plenty to go wrong yet :!:

Bob(K)

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 Posted: Sat Nov 3rd, 2007 12:54 pm
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Bob K
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Wayne Williams wrote:OK, I'm following you so far, but one thing puzzles me. How do you cut out the curved line. As I understand it you are supposed to scribe the plasticard a few times then snap it apart. How do you snap the curved line?

Wayne


Wayne

I am sure Perry or Jeff will give you the correct answer. I simply mark what I want to cut out and using a craft knife I gently scribe along the line. Do this 4 or 5 times and the piece just drops out. It needs virtually no pressure at all.

Bob(K)

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 Posted: Sat Nov 3rd, 2007 01:01 pm
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Wayne Williams
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Ahh, it just takes patience huh? :cry:

Thanks,
Wayne



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 Posted: Sat Nov 3rd, 2007 08:23 pm
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Bob K
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My efforts today have been largely focussed upon getting the fanlight sorted. Whilst pondering this problem I have attached some of the decorative stone around the windows, some guttering and the brick detail which is prominent at the end of each wall. The building has been given some base coats of paint before putting in the windows:




With regards to the fanlight, thanks to a suggestion from Sparky, I think I have found a solution. I printed a picture of the house almost to scale, then with some clear plastic laid over it I scribed the fanlight design into the plastic. Next, I painted into the scribing. wiping off any excess. I used a little black to highlight. I think it works OK.





The brick detail on the wall ends was constructed from individual bricks glued together to form the support shape:




Almost ready to fix the roof - just got to work out how it goes on!

Bob(K)

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 Posted: Sat Nov 3rd, 2007 09:02 pm
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Perry
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Novice wrote:The construction of the door is quite complex and it has an intricate glass fan-light above it. The first task is to cut out the inner door frame, which will form the white door surround and frame for the fan-light. I did this by marking and then cutting out the frame. Quite a delicate task as the cross bar is only about 0.8mm thick. ............Bob(K)

It worked beautifully Bob, but I can't help feeling you did it the hard way. I would have cut out the arched doorway in one whole piece and then put in a crossbar made from microstrip. That way I would be sure that the crossbar would be of an even width across the whole piece - something I probably wouldn't have been able to do cutting it out as you did.

It just goes to show there are several ways of achieving the same end result.

Perry



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 Posted: Sat Nov 3rd, 2007 09:04 pm
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owen69
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hey i like the boarded up windows,very modern!! (joke?).
a really smart job i think it looks great, that fanlight idea
paid off, neat.
:) :) :lol: :lol: 8)

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 Posted: Sat Nov 3rd, 2007 10:26 pm
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MikeC
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A really nice job, Bob. Who makes the downpipes, please? Is it Wills?

Mike

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 Posted: Sun Nov 4th, 2007 12:34 am
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Diesel
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It,s really looking good Bob :)



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 Posted: Sun Nov 4th, 2007 06:00 am
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Bob K
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MikeC wrote:A really nice job, Bob. Who makes the downpipes, please? Is it Wills?

Mike


Mike

Yes, I used Wills Building Details Pack A (Ref SS 46). It has all sorts of small detail paits for roofing, drains, gutters and chimneys.

Bob(K)

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 Posted: Sun Nov 4th, 2007 07:01 am
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Les
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Owen wrote hey i like the boarded up windows,very modern!!

Brilliant Owen, just brilliant. :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

On a more serious note the amount of talent on this forum is quite staggering. This scratchbuilding section is proving to be so educational and an inspiration to us real "Novices".

Les



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 Posted: Thu Nov 8th, 2007 09:45 am
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Bob K
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Well, over the weekend I have manged to attach the roof. It has yet to be painted. Also, some of the windows are now in place. Bit of a delay here as the Wills pack, which is full of windows, only has 4 of each type - I need 5. Doh! :oops: My local model shop is out of stock, so I have some more on order.

I have also given the building a wash of white/sand mix to highlight the mortar. The gutters and downpipe are now painted too.

The next task is to glaze the windows and install the interior detail of curtains, followed by upper floor and inner walls.




Bob(K)

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 Posted: Thu Nov 8th, 2007 10:57 am
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MikeC
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You're doing a fine job on that, Bob.

Mike

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