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HINTS AND TIPS - THE FOLLOW ON - Hints & Tips - Reference Area. - Your Model Railway Club
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 Posted: Wed Mar 21st, 2018 07:31 am
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xdford
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Hints & Tips No. 2035
A Simple Glue Applicator/Scriber tool etc
by Dave Jewell
I made a simple tool using a pin or sewing needle and half an ice cream stick. I cut the stick in half and fit the pin/needle less its head into the flat cut end. I then glued it in place so there is a pointed end. I find this tool is great for applying glue to small points, making a starting point for drilling, scribing a line and will take about 30 seconds to assemble. If it is used for applying super glue or other adhesive, I just file the glue off once it is dry if it builds up on the tip.


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 Posted: Sat Mar 24th, 2018 07:20 am
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Hints & Tips No. 2036
Another load of cheap coal
by Greg Pendle

I wanted to add coal loads to about 30 coal hopper cars, but it seemed to be expensive to buy them or the coal so I made my own.


I bought a bag of ground walnut shells and a quart of Ebony stain. I put some walnut shells in a plastic container that had a lid and added some stain. I put the lid on and shook the container to distribute the stain and then let it sit overnight. Then I spread the walnut shells on a piece of card board and let it dry.


The results were great. I had a large supply of coal for my coal cars. I put some weight in the bottom of the coal cars and then filled the cars with coal. Once the coal was in, I added diluted white glue to the coal. After the glue dried, I added more white glue to make sure everything would stay in place.


When finished, the freight cars weighed about 5oz or 140 grams each. It was a bit messy though. Would I do it again? Maybe. If you decide to try this method, make plenty so you only have a mess once.


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 Posted: Tue Mar 27th, 2018 07:29 am
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xdford
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Hints & Tips No. 2037
Drilling Small Holes for Grab Irons Pt 1
by Bob Boudreau

I always make a starter hole when drilling such small holes. I use an old drafting compass with a very sharp tip to press in a point to start drilling. I also have a pin vice with a spiral shaft and a collar that sits on the shaft Holding the vice with one hand, moving the collar up and down spins the vice. As a bonus, this pin vice closes nice and tight around the smallest drill bits. When drilling in metal, I always add a drop of oil to the starter hole, makes progress better.


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 Posted: Fri Mar 30th, 2018 07:21 am
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Hints & Tips No. 2038
Drilling Small Holes for Grab Irons Pt 2
by Dave Nelson

I have had good (not perfect) success with a drill chuck meant for very small drill bits I purchased that fits into my cordless screwdriver -- the slower speed but good torque seems to help, and not having to move my hand (as I do with the pin vise) helps as well. The weight of the cordless screwdriver seems to apply just the right amount of pressure. I break enough of the really small bits that as a rule I am almost always using a fresh or nearly fresh one and ironically, that seemed to help too.


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 Posted: Mon Apr 2nd, 2018 07:22 am
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Hints & Tips No. 2039
Building Mockups
by Charles Boyd
My building mock ups are things like biscuit, cereal and cracker boxes, with black magic marker 'windows,' pencil line 'doors' - and full-wall adverts for the product they originally contained.

I want the mock up to be the right (approximate) size for visualisation purposes only, but so much of an eyesore that I want to get rid of it as soon as serious scenery work starts.


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 Posted: Thu Apr 5th, 2018 10:42 am
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Hints & Tips No. 2040
If you need to spray paint around a headlight lens...
by Mark Closter
I get a number of second hand locos to repaint in my own railways paint scheme and sometimes the lenses will not come out. have used little balls of blu-tac or similar in a pinch. I just rolled up a little ball and flattened it onto the lens until the lens is fully covered. Picks right off when done and apart from a little buffing it is as clean as anything.


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 Posted: Sun Apr 8th, 2018 09:49 pm
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Hints & Tips No. 2041
Representing Clam Shells by a River Scene
by George Reilly
The section of the river that runs by where I grew up on has a sandbar on the opposite bank that frequently has river clamshells on it. I wanted to recreate that on a river extension I was putting in on a new section of bench work. I got some tiny beads and fine sand. Just the glint of the "shells" was enough to visually make it work.


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 Posted: Wed Apr 11th, 2018 10:21 pm
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Hints & Tips No. 2042
Soldering Wires to Rails – getting the solder to flow
by Paul Ahrens
When soldering wires to rails, I use soldering flux (– paste not a corrosive acid flux) as it eases the flow of solder onto wires, rails, etc. I also use alligator clips next to the rail joints (which I also solder) as heat sinks to avoid plastic sleepers melting. And wipe the joints with a bit of alcohol after soldering to clean things up.


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 Posted: Sun Apr 15th, 2018 12:52 am
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Hints & Tips No. 2043
Making Benchwork more stable
by Mark Robertson
Instead of using dimensional timber to build your benchwork, use quality 3/4" plywood and rip it to create boards from which to construct the frame work. Much more stable in wild temperature changes and generally much lighter as well.

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 Posted: Tue Apr 17th, 2018 11:42 pm
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Hints & Tips No. 2044
Keeping Decal Striping Level
by Wayne Toth

When adding stripes which are not at an edge or adjacent to a moulded-in line of detail, such as a row of rivets or panel-edge detail, use a set of dividers to keep the striping level, setting one leg to either the sill or the eave line of the body shell, and the other at a point corresponding to either the top or bottom edge of the stripe to be applied, and check it often as you nudge the stripe into place.


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