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HINTS AND TIPS - THE FOLLOW ON - Hints & Tips - Reference Area. - Your Model Railway Club
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 Posted: Sat Jul 11th, 2020 11:29 pm
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xdford
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Hints & Tips No. 2312
If I designed my layout again... Pt 2
By Harvey Miller
I am generally quite pleased with the versatility of my layouts design from an operators point of view but from a visual perspective I wish I had been able to make the front of the layout a very long gradual curve rather than a relatively straight section. A couple of inches extra width and a slight realignment could in fact fix this but a house move is pending so it is on the “to do” list... if that modification will fit with the layouts new location!


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 Posted: Tue Jul 14th, 2020 11:23 pm
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xdford
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Hints & Tips No. 2313
Using Grout as Asphalt or roads Pt 1
By Rob Spangler
I use precoloured grout for all my road work/asphalt areas on my layout. Grout works about the same regardless if it is pre-mixed or you mix it yourself and comes in a coarse style and with sand added to create a smoother surface.  To some extent, all grout finishes can be sanded if you need to address surface irregularities, but doing so changes the texture.  


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 Posted: Sat Jul 18th, 2020 01:42 am
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xdford
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Hints & Tips No. 2314
Using Grout as Asphalt or roads Pt 2
By Tom Farrell
I have used sanded and unsanded grout in my scenery since I was a young modeller.
Mainly for Roads and rocks as well as barren un-grown areas with a few Tufts.
It is really interesting when you use sanded grout to create a gravel road and depress grooves in it while it is still drying.  I then use unsanded grout in a slightly different tone or two for the wheel depressions.  This adds natural shadowing and creates the seeing is believing effect on your layout. 
And the thing I liked best about grout? ... It dries flat as all get-out.


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 Posted: Mon Jul 20th, 2020 11:18 pm
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xdford
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Hints & Tips No. 2315
Cleaning around Fine Details Pt 1
By David Wolfe
I discovered that soft makeup brushes are a pretty safe and effective way to clean my locos and rolling stock, thanks to my mothers’ suggestion.I have one that is bushy for cleaning things without a lot of fine details, (like the roof of a passenger car for example) and I have a fine tipped one for getting around small details or into tight spaces.


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 Posted: Fri Jul 24th, 2020 01:06 am
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xdford
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Hints & Tips No. 2316
Cleaning around Fine Details Pt 2
By Several Modellers
I use a soft bristle brush, sometimes a short blast with a can of air.  The wife also does this to clean off some of her little porcelain and glass knic-knacs. I have some detailed locomotives, and cars, and I have not damaged anything with an air can or the brush.  (Michael Wise)
I find it is best to do the cleaning outdoors, or at least not in the layout room.  I use a 3/4" soft-bristle brush.
If I'm cleaning structures, most of which are not easily removable, the brush, in conjunction with a shop vacuum, is my choice.
For track and non-fragile scenery, I use the shop vac with its supplied brush attachment. (Wayne Toth)


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 Posted: Mon Jul 27th, 2020 04:15 am
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Hints & Tips No. 2317
Scale Width of Roads  Pt 1
By Several Modellers
The roads on my HO scale  railroad would never qualify for any real highway specs.  I use a variant of selective compression to avoid filling my limited space with roadways.  Typically, my roads are about 3 inches wide.  I do not allow parking on most of my roads, but there is room for vehicles going in both directions to stay in lane. (Kevin Beasley)
I have visited layouts or seen photos of layouts where the modeler's city scene has full width streets, to scale - and it is jarring how much space they take up.  Impressive to be sure but one street becomes dominating, and a simple complex of streets crossing each other starts to leave very little space for trains.  
My goal is to make the streets and highways plausible and to try to capture the sense that a business district street is wider than a residential street which in turn is wider than the alley where the garage is.  The goal is not to be inaccurate, but to strike a balance between accuracy and the fact that even a good-sized layout is actually capturing a pretty puny portion of the area modeled.  (Dave Nelson)


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 Posted: Wed Jul 29th, 2020 11:34 pm
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xdford
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Hints & Tips No. 2318
Scale Width of Roads Pt 2
By Dave Starr
 A real two lane road has 10 foot lanes in either direction and enough shoulder to park cars on both sides of the street.  In HO that makes 20 feet for the two travel lanes and 16 more feet to allow parking, say 36 feet.  That comes out to 5 real inches, which sucks up a lotta room.  You can squeeze things down.  Real automobiles have a track of 4 foot 8.5 inches.  Allow a little more width, say 5 foot for cars, and in HO that comes out to about 3/4 real inches.  Make it one inch, and you have a two lane road that is only 2 inches wide, but no room for parking on the side of the street. 


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 Posted: Sun Aug 2nd, 2020 12:50 am
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xdford
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Hints & Tips No. 2319
Source of Interior Suitable LED Lights 
By Ben O’Malley
For building lights, I wait till Christmas and buy festive lights.
You can get a string of 200 warm white for under $10 at Bunnings here in Australia and should be on a par with that wherever you are in the world.
 
The reason I use these is that they  have a different body shape that actually radiates the light, unlike a normal LED where the light only shines out the end.


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 Posted: Wed Aug 5th, 2020 01:04 am
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Hints & Tips No. 2320
Making Removable Mountain Tops  
By Mike Lehmann
Traditional methods such as making a sawcut into hard shell or framing have their place,  when it comes to accessing hidden areas in the event of a derailment. However I do not think there were consistently good liftouts before extruded styrofoam (the pink or blue stuff) came on the scene. It is cheap, light, and sturdy. I tend to use it for all my scenery, but you can use a piece that's just the right size to fill the hole where you need it to go. 
Any gaps can be taken up by foliage. I use a thin layer of Plaster of Paris to keep the weight down and any cracks can be 


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 Posted: Fri Aug 7th, 2020 10:50 pm
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xdford
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Hints & Tips No. 2321
 Modelling Dirty Windows 
By Bill Appleton
I work in N Scale but even so I wanted to avoid the see through look of clear styrene in my building windows.  I brushed a thin coat of Woodland scenics scenery cement on the back of the clear window material.  
After drying it was fairly transparent and added a subtle dirty look.  With a very light touch you can rub off areas to give the centre of the window a clear look leaving a slightly fogged edging.  Looks like the effect can add even more impact to HO size.  I compared a dull coat sprayed and a glue coated pane and the glue one looks much more realistic.  If you want to make it dirtier to block the view in just add a second light coat.


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