Video Archive         Recent Topics      
YMR logo

You are here:  Your Model Railway Club > Reference Area. > Hints & Tips > HINTS AND TIPS - THE FOLLOW ON To bottom of page
                 

 Moderated by: Spurno Page:  First Page Previous Page  ...  84  85  86  87  88  89   
Start New Topic Reply Printer Friendly

HINTS AND TIPS - THE FOLLOW ON - Hints & Tips - Reference Area. - Your Model Railway Club
AuthorPost
 Posted: Fri Mar 13th, 2020 03:43 am
PMQuoteReply
link to this 1761st post
xdford
Member
 

Joined: Tue Aug 11th, 2009
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 3108
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Hints & Tips No. 2271
Making Your Yards look bigger in backdrops.
By Will  Annand

To make a yard look a lot busier and “fuller”etc, try laying out a string of freight cars/goods wagons and take a photo. Print the photo, cut it carefully  and use it as part of the backdrop. Of course you would have to get the camera angle and perspective correct but in this day and age of cheap photos and prints (and relatively cheap colour printing). a little experimenting could make all the difference!


Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Mon Mar 16th, 2020 06:50 am
PMQuoteReply
link to this 1762nd post
xdford
Member
 

Joined: Tue Aug 11th, 2009
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 3108
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Hints & Tips No. 2272
Mixing Paint for touchups etc.
By Mel Perry

I have had really good luck with the correct color of the True Color Paints. However  I seriously doubt if anyone could notice the difference on a handrail or a small spot even if it was off quite a bit.
 
I have hand mixed colors foFr tiny things and areas and have found that close is close enough using a variety of paints. When I am doing touchup work on something if there is a slight mismatch a bit of weathering easily takes care of it.


Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Thu Mar 19th, 2020 08:57 am
PMQuoteReply
link to this 1763rd post
xdford
Member
 

Joined: Tue Aug 11th, 2009
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 3108
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Hints & Tips No. 2273
Painting Details
By Kevin Stratton
When painting grab irons and handles on already painted cars, I go for a colour that is slightly lighter. It will just look like the sun is reflecting off of the handles and will make the details pop a bit better.


Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Sun Mar 22nd, 2020 12:48 am
PMQuoteReply
link to this 1764th post
xdford
Member
 

Joined: Tue Aug 11th, 2009
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 3108
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Hints & Tips No. 2274
Superfine Chain Link Fencing for N Scale 
By Several Modellers
 
Some specialty teas come in a very fine mesh nylon tea bag which I am planning to use on my N scale layout. Not sure how fine it is but it is much finer than tulle which some use for HO scale chain link fences. (Neil Harvie)
I saw this super fine mesh wedding veil material in the fabric section at a Hobby Lobby n the US.  I knew it would work really well for fencing after it was spray-painted. Spray painting it would make it more rigid and more pliable too. (Tom Fingleton)


Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Thu Mar 26th, 2020 01:46 am
PMQuoteReply
link to this 1765th post
xdford
Member
 

Joined: Tue Aug 11th, 2009
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 3108
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Hints & Tips No. 2275
Changing your Industries for a Different Theme - economically
By Pat Hussey
I change my “industries” over regularly to make the variety of themes possible on my smallish layout.
To start,  I make them as foamcore low relief shells with photos of windows and signs laminated on, then I could replace them later when I have the funds, but I usually add some details to each one and make different ones which when I change them over, changes the operating pattern on my layout differently. 
Add or a couple of turnouts with sidings to serve them and not only can you visibly display more rolling stock over a period, you have added a bit of operating interest without a lot of complexity.


Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Sun Mar 29th, 2020 05:10 am
PMQuoteReply
link to this 1766th post
xdford
Member
 

Joined: Tue Aug 11th, 2009
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 3108
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Hints & Tips No. 2276  
Making your Industries on a Backdrop economically
By Jeff Schultz
If you want to do industries on the cheap, you could always use photos of the buildings tacked to the backdrop or to a sheet of masonite, foam core, or similar product. 


Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Wed Apr 1st, 2020 07:04 am
PMQuoteReply
link to this 1767th post
xdford
Member
 

Joined: Tue Aug 11th, 2009
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 3108
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Hints & Tips No. 2277  
Making your Flexible Rail Joints less obvious 
By Wayne Toth
Most of my track is from Atlas, and all of it is soldered together but there is no reason this could not be applied to Peco or any other brand of flex track.  
I use a triangular-shaped needle file to file-down the portion of the tie plates upon which the rail will sit, which also removes some material from the bottom of the spike heads but leaves the spike heads pretty well intact.
I then lift the track and slide the ties into place, lowering the rails into the prepared ties.
Once the rails have been painted and the track ballasted, it's not all that easy to detect where joiners are and if you only rely on joiners, the spike heads will help hold the alignment of the rails. I also used a smaller code rail joiner because the hobby shop did not have my size in stock but narrowing the base of the rail also helped.
(A Note from Trevor - Wayne lives in Ontario and his layout is in a basement where the temperature is relatively constant. I built a layout in my teens in a shed at my parents place in late winter... a summer trip away and expansion had taken over during a very warm summer and I had to cut about 1/2” from the track section to realign it. It did not “de-expand” in the next winter. These hints will DEFINITELY need to be taken as to what best suits YOU and your location) 


Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Sat Apr 4th, 2020 09:41 am
PMQuoteReply
link to this 1768th post
xdford
Member
 

Joined: Tue Aug 11th, 2009
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 3108
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Hints & Tips No. 2279  
How I Paint My Track Pt 1
By Wayne Toth
Painting the rails and ballasting are two simple operations that give you more "bang for your buck" than almost anything else that you will do on your layout. 
I do not use a noticeably reddish rusty colour, although greys, various browns and blacks seem to work well, depending on the areas where they are used.  For most of the original portion of the layout, I do not bother painting the sleepers at all, but I do darken the ballast, using diluted India ink, at most turnouts.
Using a small brush requires dipping it frequently into the bottle for re-loading, and turns a simple task into a tedious one.  I use a 1/2" chisel-type brush for rail painting and it makes the job much easier and faster, as the brush holds more paint, requiring less frequent re-loading.


Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Tue Apr 7th, 2020 03:53 am
PMQuoteReply
link to this 1769th post
xdford
Member
 

Joined: Tue Aug 11th, 2009
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 3108
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Hints & Tips No. 2280  
How I Paint My Track Pt 2
By Wayne Toth
My usual practice was to paint 10'or 15' of track or a single turnout at a time, not worrying too much about getting it on the rail tops or the ties, then using a clean rag to wipe the top of the rails - the paint is, by that time, dry, but is definitely not fully cured, and wipes off easily - no solvent or excessive rubbing required. 
There are several benefits to using this method:  unlike spraying with a rattle can or airbrush, no masking is required, no noise is created, nor is there any requirement to "plan" a painting session....if you just got home from work and have 15 minutes before suppertime, paint a turnout or section of track,  cap the bottle and rinse out the brush.


Back To Top PMQuoteReply

This is topic ID = 5310     Current time is 09:47 am Page:  First Page Previous Page  ...  84  85  86  87  88  89     
You are here:  Your Model Railway Club > Reference Area. > Hints & Tips > HINTS AND TIPS - THE FOLLOW ON
You can type a quick reply to this topic here. Click in the box below to begin.

Or to reply to an individual post, or to include images, attachments and formatted text,
click the Quote or Reply buttons on each post above.

To start a new topic in this forum, click the Start New Topic button below.
To start a new topic in a different forum, click the Forum Jump drop-down list below.
Start New Topic


Back to top of page

           
15 Most Recent Topics

Problems with this web site? Please contact the Webmaster.

All material submitted to this web site is the responsibility of the respective contributor. By submitting material to this web site you acknowledge that you accept full responsibility for the material submitted.
Unless stated otherwise, all the material displayed on this web site, including all text, photographs, drawings and other images, is copyright and the property of the respective contributor. Registered members are welcome to use it for their own personal non-commercial modelmaking purposes. It must not be reproduced or re-published elsewhere in any form, or used commercially, without first obtaining the owner's express permission.
The owner of this web site may edit, modify or remove any content at any time without giving notice or reason.    © 2008

                 

Recent Topics Back to top of page

Powered by UltraBB 1.15 Copyright © 2007-2011 by Jim Hale and Data 1 Systems. Page design copyright © 2008-2013 Martin Wynne. Photo gallery copyright © 2009 David Williams.