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HINTS AND TIPS - THE FOLLOW ON - Hints & Tips - Reference Area. - Your Model Railway Club
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 Posted: Wed Nov 7th, 2018 07:52 am
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xdford
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Hints & Tips No. 2110
Aligning Decals on Rollingstock Pt 2
By Several Modellers
I try to set the decal to line up with some linear feature on the model, as close as I can get it. Then I sight down the side of the model, parallel to the side. Any dips or bumps in the decal line are easy to see, and can be adjusted.
I do not use decal setting solutions until I am satisfied that the decal is set in place. (George Paine)
Instead of a line drawn with pencil I would just mark a few points measured from the roofline to help keep you on track. If they show through they would be easier to hide with weathering. (Joe Beltrame)


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 Posted: Sat Nov 10th, 2018 08:46 am
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Hints & Tips No. 2111
To Hide the Seams on Removable Buildings
By Peter Herron
To keep the ground cover from entering the joint I decided to glue and spike some thin cardboard to the base which covered the seam and could be covered with material to hide it.  I used gasket material which I had purchased to use to shim cork roadbed where needed. It is impervious to water but wetting it allows it to conform to minor contours. When it dries it is quite stiff.  Now if I have to remove the building it will require little work to fix the scenery once reinstalled.


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 Posted: Tue Nov 13th, 2018 08:35 am
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Hints & Tips No. 2112
If you want to experience using Waybill cards and need a holder
by Several Modellers

I tried out using waybills at each of my stations for my way freights. I made the holders for my cards from foam come, the first ones I used white and painted them black. The newer ones I used black foam core. They are hot glued together and lettered with stick on lettering. I mounted them with Velcro to the fascia. (Bob Reck)
I use binder clips to clip the car cards at the bottom of my fascia at or near where the car is located instead of fixed boxes. With the cards being held at their bottom edge, I can thumb through the top of them to see car numbers and destination information on the waybills. They do not stick out from the fascia like a box would and as an added bonus they are easily moveable and removable. You can also clip a card anywhere a car is currently located like on a passing siding where there normally wouldn't be a box. For the fixed industries on my layout, I plan to stencil the track ID above where the car card will normally be clipped for that particular industry. Just another option as you can set up a dozen locations for the cost of the clips (Charles Riley)


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 Posted: Fri Nov 16th, 2018 07:56 am
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xdford
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Hints & Tips No. 2113
Protecting yourself from Super Glue
by Bruce Considine
 
I learn a lot by my mistakes. The buildings you build usually are put together with super glue. If you get super glue on your fingers and thumb, it will take days to get it off. My solution is to  spend a few dollars for Nitrile disposable gloves, ten to a pack. (not latex, one size fits all.)
They are $3 for 10 pairs where I live and it will be the best 30 cents you ever spent per pair! Just throw them away when they are done or holed.


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 Posted: Mon Nov 19th, 2018 06:39 am
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Hints & Tips No. 2114
Taking Close photos of your layout
by Trevor Gibbs
 
I used to try to set my Digital SLR camera to try to get model photos of my layout until I saw someone using a Mobile Phone to take some very close ups of some flowers. I asked them what they intended to do with the image to which she told me it was for a “model” for her painting a still life of those flowers.
She showed me the image and the closeups of the veins of the petals etc were amazing. A little while later I wanted to take a few pictures of a structure on a friends layout, and noting it when I got home, the depth of field was terrific.
I tried the phone on my own layout and the pictures had more depth than I had previously taken and I was able to get it into areas I could not hope to get into with the SLR because of the slim profile of the phone.


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 Posted: Thu Nov 22nd, 2018 06:17 am
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Hints & Tips No. 2115
Starting Holes Accurately In Plastic
by Ron Wood
To make a small impression in the plastic as a starter hole for the drill bit, I use easily-made tool.
Take a pencil diameter-sized wood dowel rod and drill a hole in one end the diameter of a standard sewing pin. Nip off the head and glue the pin into the dowel rod. Then you have an easily held tool with which to make a precise impression hole for starting a drill bit. I use this when making grab holes and it always works.
A Note from Trevor -  You can do a similar thing with a pin with the head cut off held in a Pin Vice or using a drawing pin


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 Posted: Sun Nov 25th, 2018 06:51 am
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Hints & Tips No. 2116


Assisting Free Rolling Capabilities of your rolling stock
By Ross Matthews
Much rolling stock is fairly free rolling but I find that the friction of a steel axle in a delrin truck or plastic bogie can eventually wear anyway.  
I have used a graphite pencil - an art pencil, not a writing pencil which has a lot of clay in its composition - to put a thin skin of lubricant on the needle points of the axle.  
I have not tried to run extra length trains as a result but feel it helps the locomotive also operate a bit more smoothly.


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 Posted: Wed Nov 28th, 2018 07:14 am
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Hints & Tips No. 2117
Using Dividers to Accurately Position Holes
by Wayne Toth
I use the pointy parts on a draughting compass, or set of dividers to "centre-punch" for drilling.  The advantage to using the latter is that you can use it to "walk-off" identically spaced drilling points.  
In fact, after a #11 blade in my X-Acto, dividers might be my second most-used tools for modelling.  They are great for doing layout work directly on a model - grabiron-style ladders on a freight car, for example:  set them in relation to the car's end and use one point to guide the tool, and the other to lightly scribe a vertical line to define the mounting position, then adjust the spacing to scribe a second vertical line indicating the width of the needed ladder.  Next, re-set the points to the vertical spacing required, and "walk" the dividers, in-turn, up the two scribed lines. The result is perfectly spaced and perfectly vertical ladders


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 Posted: Fri Nov 30th, 2018 09:13 pm
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Hints & Tips No. 2118
Using Magnets to locate structures
by Greg Josephs

I use magnetic strips from fridge calendars etc to hold structures in place so that I can easily remove them for dusting and any maintenance. The magnets need to be relatively soft as lifting the structure could tear the floors from buildings. This makes it easy for cleaning and could be applied to portable layouts as well.


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 Posted: Tue Dec 4th, 2018 07:08 am
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xdford
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Hints & Tips No. 2119
Using Duct Tape for Ballasting Points/Turnouts
by Crandell Overton
Cut a length of 2" duct tape, apply it to the under-surfaces of the sleepers along the major axis (through route), and lay the turnout right side up.
Apply a sprinkling of ballast grains along the major axis, let sit a few seconds for adhesion to take effect well, then invert and shake loose all that can be ejected from the ballast that way.  
Once the grains stop falling, insert the turnout in place in the track plan and ballast the diverging route and route around the frog and beyond to the exits opposite the points.  This leaves the points rails free of binding grains, and the throwbar as well.


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 Posted: Fri Dec 7th, 2018 06:17 am
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Hints & Tips No. 2120
Painting Cork Roadbed prior to Ballasting
by Several Modellers
If the track is already down, then I would not bother (I did not do mine, but I wish I had). If the track is not down, painting the cork either a color that generally matches your ballast or another dark color, will give the layout a more finished look (Joel Owens)
It does not matter what I use as roadbed, I always paint it so it has about the same colour as the ballast. Painting closes the pores of the roadbed so the glue does not get sucked up and hides the roadbed if there's a hole in the ballast somewhere.  Michael Rosenheim)


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 Posted: Mon Dec 10th, 2018 05:40 am
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xdford
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Hints & Tips No. 2121
Making Paint to be Sprayed from your airbrush less thin
by Brian Nelson
If you have thinned your model paint too much, make a small shallow pan out of aluminum foil and pour the paint in. With it spread out in a thin layer the solvent will evaporate very fast. Keep a close eye on it so it does not dry too much, and do it in a well ventilated area away from open flame!


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