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HINTS AND TIPS - THE FOLLOW ON - Hints & Tips - Reference Area. - Your Model Railway Club
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 Posted: Wed Jan 24th, 2018 11:10 pm
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xdford
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Hints & Tips No. 2016
Making a Whip Antenna and other ersatz details
by Malcolm Baker
The nylon joiners that are used for pairs of shoes and socks can be used to make ersatz detail parts into whip antennas for service vehicles and some locomotives. The nylon end bulbs can be used for representing gyralights or “firecracker antennas”.


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 Posted: Sat Jan 27th, 2018 01:53 am
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Hints & Tips No. 2017
Making a Simple Jig to make Tinning Wire Easier
by Bill Brillinger
I made a simple jig to hold my wires especially for droppers while I tin them. I drilled a short length strip of plywood with a few holes slightly bigger than the wire, and nail the plywood to a short length of 2x1 (45x19mm) to act as a stand. I thread the stripped wires into the holes and use the block/plywood stand as a third hand and no warm wires to hold.

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 Posted: Mon Jan 29th, 2018 09:59 am
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Hints & Tips No. 2018
A cast iron pipe as a paint stand
by Jason Reis
When airbrushing, a good stand really helps. I find cast iron pipe works great. Use a short piece with one end threaded and put a base flange on it. It is sturdy and stable and $5! Then just blue tack your models to the top end of the pipe.


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 Posted: Thu Feb 1st, 2018 11:29 am
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xdford
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Hints & Tips No. 2019
Cleaning the Mess
by Charles Hepperle

Here is a way to keep messy stuff from causing problems. I made it after fine powder and unpleasant fumes from a solid-cast resin HO vehicle suggested it would be best to work outdoors with a respirator and have
something to contain the dust for easy clean-up afterward.
I used a heavy-duty corrugated cardboard box that was just large enough to comfortably work inside. Mine is 20" (500mm) on the long dimension with a 12" (300mm) depth and width. It was a clean box that apples had been shipped in. To allow more light in, I cut an opening in the top and attached a piece of scrap clear acrylic sheet with a hot-melt glue gun. It works really well. A second use for the box is to contain overspray when doing small, and I mean small, airbrush jobs with water-based paint. After swabbing it out with a damp rag to get rid of dust, you can do a little spraying – say weathering one pair of trucks – without having
to use a formal paint spray booth. The waxing of the box makes cleanup very easy and when the box is “spent” just recycle the lid onto another box!


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 Posted: Sun Feb 4th, 2018 11:30 am
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xdford
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Hints & Tips No. 2020
Stopping Vehicles from Rolling
by Several Modellers
I held a motor tool roughly parallel with the rails and made a slight dip that was the same radius as my freight cars wheels (a smooth notch) in each rail. The notch should be just big enough so that the first wheel of a car or cars on the siding will rest there and will not roll past it unless it is pulled by a loco. (Richard Morrison)
I have a steep grade where I need to set out cars. I drilled a hole beside the rail big enough to fit the stick part of a cotton-tipped applicator. I positioned the hole in front of a fence post so I could find it. When I stop the train, I put the dowel in the hole and back the train slowly so the car on the uphill side of the grade rests against it. That also bunches the slack so I can uncouple. When the locomotive returns and couples to the train, I pull ahead slightly to make sure it coupled and remove the stick. It works great and is hardly noticeable. (Brian Green)
At a local club we have several "blue flags" for industries. They are pins with a blue plastic handle. Those are pinned into the middle of the track when cars are left at industries, particularly at industries where cars would roll to foul the main if left without being secured. (James Ogden)

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 Posted: Wed Feb 7th, 2018 10:35 am
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Hints & Tips No. 2021
“Rusting” Link Fencing
by Several Modellers
To avoid filling the holes with paint, I use a Brown India Ink. You can get it at art shops around my part of the world. India Ink is well, thin. The India Ink does not add thickness or rigidity to the chain, and adds a great effect. I usually do multiple applications to get the effect I like. (Michael Watson)
I take brown, orange, black and red chalks to a piece of sandpaper to get powder.  Mix together and dip brush into Iso alcohol and dab primered/flat black/grey chain.  When you get desired effect seal with cheap hairspray and dry with hair dryer. (Jim Mulvaney)


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 Posted: Sat Feb 10th, 2018 10:06 am
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Hints & Tips No. 2022
Blue Rope Led Lighting as Night simulation
by Daniel Rust

I use blue rope lights along my ceiling in my train room. shut off the main lighting and its night time but you can still see to operate and it’s nice to see it looks like the real world with all the building lights


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 Posted: Tue Feb 13th, 2018 08:05 am
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Hints & Tips No. 2023
Some Green Scenic Hints
by Several Modellers
Use fibre optic cables to illuminate tunnels, buildings, and other accessories. This reduces the number of bulbs or LED’s needed, therefore electrical current usage.
Recycle wine corks. You could paint them to look like industrial shapes storage tanks, pillars, bases, etc Place a small brad tack in the end and they can be picked up by magnet at end of crane or derrick. Mushroom shaped champagne corks can be painted and coated to be transformed into trees, shrubs, etc.
Split rubber or vinyl or PVC tubing down the middle to create troughs or gutters or aquaducts that are easily contoured and in larger scales or outdoors, you could use real water in them.


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 Posted: Fri Feb 16th, 2018 08:18 am
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Hints & Tips No. 2024
Easy Chimney
by Brian Pretty
A 1/4 sq dowel or plastic rod (preferably recycled) painted brick red. Make horizontal lines with a very fine marker 1/16″ apart than make vertical lines in a staggered pattern looking like laid brick. Top with a 1/4 in piece of round toothpick painted black. You can then top off the toothpick with a piece of cotton ball touched with a grey marker to look like smoke.


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 Posted: Mon Feb 19th, 2018 07:38 am
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Hints & Tips No. 2025
Recycling Plastic Tube
by Trevor Gibbs
The local hardware store often gives out promotional balloons on plastic rods which are often in the car park with balloon attached. These can be used for point rodding ( which I use a lot as I use mechanical rods rather than point motors), as a conduit for wiring protection, as small culvert pipe under track or roads, a flag pole in a larger scale, pipe loads in various scales, Pipes to a fuel loader, Down pipes in larger scale houses, cut to length for barrels and/or cans in larger scales and (although I have not actually tried this at time of writing) an armature for tall trees after it gets a skin coat to represent bark.


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 Posted: Thu Feb 22nd, 2018 08:34 am
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Hints & Tips No. 2026
Scratch Building with Scale Timber Tips
by John Everard

For adhesive when I am scratchbuilding with North East timber etc, I use yellow carpenters glue when working with wood. I bought a 16-ounce bottle, for its applicator tip, and then I refill it from a one-gallon jug. I purchased these at a home improvement centre.
To prevent warping I use weights as much as possible while the sections are drying. I learned that if you cover your work area with wax paper, carpenters glue will set and any over spill from gluing will peel away from the wax paper. If I use spring clamps I cover the clamp faces with green masking tape that resists the glue from sticking to it.
As far as staining I feel it should be done before assembly. I use a one-gallon zip top freezer bag (thicker than the standard zip top bag), put the items to be stained in and add as much stain as I want. I then shake thoroughly to achieve the desired result and then with Nitrile gloves I remove the pieces to several layers of newspaper to dry. If the stain is too thick you can always wipe off the excess with a gloved hand.


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