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HINTS AND TIPS - THE FOLLOW ON - Hints & Tips - Reference Area. - Your Model Railway Club
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 Posted: Tue Sep 26th, 2017 12:03 pm
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xdford
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Hints & Tips No.1976
Tiny or Scrap Tile Pieces
by Bob Bochenek

A small piece of smooth glazed tile is ideal for dispensing small amounts of CA and other adhesives. Squeeze a bubble onto the tile and pick up the amount you need with a small applicator or toothpick. What makes this especially neat is that I let the unused material just dry and then just a quick swipe of the single edge razor blade makes it clean again for re-use. '
This beats using paper or cardboard which can suck up the moisture, or trying to find a scrap piece of styrene to use. You can possibly get an odd tile for free from a friendly retailer!


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 Posted: Fri Sep 29th, 2017 01:08 pm
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Hints & Tips No.1977
Making an Uncoupling Tool more visible
by Paul Cutler
If you use a skewer or similarly shaped tool as an uncoupler particularly between Kadee and other brand knuckle couplers, I recommend dipping the end of the wire in yellow or white paint. It makes it much easier to see it between the cars when you are grabbing for the “hose” or between the knuckles. The uncoupling tool works by simply hooking the tool (at the last 90 degree bend) onto the air hose of the car or loco on the left and pulling it toward you so the coupler swings away from the other coupler. You must have a small amount of slack to make it work. It takes a minute or two to get the hang of it but once you do it is really easy and you can do it anywhere you can reach.

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 Posted: Mon Oct 2nd, 2017 09:06 pm
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xdford
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Hints & Tips No.1978
Filling in small detail holes
by Mike Holly and Ross Barker

While working on detailing my diesel locos, I decided to remove some details such as the antenna on the centre of the roof. To fill these holes, I glued a tip of a wooden
skewer into the hole. After cutting the skewer flush with the surface, I sand the skewer slightly, making it flush with the area I am filling in. The rest of the skewer can the be used for scale flag poles or fence posts or downpiping so it not wasted.


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 Posted: Thu Oct 5th, 2017 08:52 pm
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Hints & Tips No.1979
Detailing with Rust and Weathering
by Mike Holly
To add local rust spots, I apply straight 70% isopropyl alcohol to the area where I want the rust. Before the alcohol evaporates I apply rust-coloured powder (chalk or powder paint ) directly into the alcohol with a size 00 paint brush. I blend the rust into the body with a wide soft brush. I add dirt to the lower part of the loco or carbody and frame using a grey powder and large makeup brush. As a last step, I secure the powders in place with flat clear-coat.

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 Posted: Sat Oct 7th, 2017 08:33 pm
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Hints & Tips No.1980
Avoiding White Chips in Plaster Scenery
by Don Sali
When I mix plaster for landscaping, I mix in an earth tone suitable for the area I am scenicking in the wet plaster mix. If part of my scenery happens to chip at all through a bit of clumsiness, then the earth tinting will show rather than the tell tale white. The cheapest dyes available from Reject/Pound/Dollar Shops. I use a flexible ice cream container and an old metal egg whip when mixing plaster. It is important that any container you use for mixing plaster is flexible – it makes it much easier to get any chunks of plaster out should I mess up and let them get hard before cleaning.


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 Posted: Tue Oct 10th, 2017 08:16 pm
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xdford
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Hints & Tips No.1981
Using Masking Tape
by Adam Bailey

Tape should be removed either immediately after applying paint while the paint film is still almost liquid - OR - after the paint is fully dried. The worst time to remove ape is when the paint is “somewhat dry”. If the tape is removed when the paint is semi-liquid then there is no tearing of the paint film.
If the tape is removed after the paint is fully dried then the paint film is torn by the tape during removal however the paint has developed enough adhesion to the painted object so as to be able to tolerate this. In between these two extremes is where edge sharpness problem during tape removal becomes a problem.

Bleed under tape is caused by insufficient pressure to the tape during application. If the surface is rough then even with adequate pressure there may still be gaps. Using ape for a paint edge works best on smooth surfaces.


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 Posted: Sat Oct 14th, 2017 03:50 am
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Hints & Tips No.1982
A Turntable Dust Cover
by Kenneth Kalitowski
I have the large Walthers HO 130’ programmed turntable. It’s about 19” edge-to-edge. Walther’s encourages keeping the pit clean and frequent comments from users on forums are that it must be kept clean to ensure proper operation. And of course, a basement is not the cleanest environment.
I used to cover the turntable with plastic bags or other makeshift covers – it looked bad and was hard to put on or take off without damaging things.  My wife suggested using a deli food tray cover from the grocery store. We went to our local Food Store and got their deli’s largest food tray cover. It measures about 18.5 inches in diameter and about 4.5 inches tall. It is really quite sturdy and clear plastic. It cost us only 50 cents and it is perfect!
It covers the pit completely, except for a small part of the very outer edges. It rests on the rails so there is a slight 1/8” or so gap on the bottom. I find the gap inconsequential, but an industrious individual might cut slots in the cover for the rails to eliminate the gap. I like that the turntable is clearly visible when the cover is on. I can easily lift the cover off with the little tab on the cover when I will be using the turntable and roundhouse. It is very easy to put back on without damaging anything.



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 Posted: Tue Oct 17th, 2017 03:41 am
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xdford
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Hints & Tips No.1983

Cheap Circuit Protection in DCC

by Joe Fugate

When there is a short circuit, the DCC system's internal breaker will shut down power to the whole layout. While a single operator can just remove the problem, it is very annoying when there are a several operators and the whole layout shuts down. Sound-equipped locomotives will go through their start-up routines when they lose, and then regain, power. Very annoying.

Eliminate the issue by setting up power districts. There are three basic methods:

1. Add boosters to the original power supply. These are the most expensive option, and most power supplies can run several trains at a time. This will not eliminate shorts, but a short in one district will not shut down trains in others.

2 Install circuit breakers for each district. These are cheaper than boosters.

3. Install 12 volt 21 to 25 Watt automotive lamps wired in series for isolated train blocks. This will restrict the current to 2.0 amps when there is a short. Excess current heats the filament and lights the bulb – warning of a problem – but the breaker does not cut out.

Operation on the other train blocks is not affected. You still need to do something about the short, but you get a warning and the short does not pull the whole system down.

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