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HINTS AND TIPS - THE FOLLOW ON - Hints & Tips - Reference Area. - Your Model Railway Club
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 Posted: Fri Jul 28th, 2017 10:41 pm
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xdford
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Hints & Tips No.1956

Making Tar Paper look a bit aged

by Gary Jansen

I make my tarpaper by spray painting newsprint with flat black spray paint. The print gives a subtle texturing. Sometimes I put a brush bead of acrylic gloss black paint to look like a seam of tar oozing out. To get the effect of it being a few years old I also use some fine ashes from the wood stove to look like stuff fell on it, maybe from rain or birds, also where water may have temporarily adhered and some dust accumulated. Where two roof surfaces come together, the soot can be rubbed more to soften it.

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 Posted: Tue Aug 1st, 2017 01:13 am
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Hints & Tips No.1957

White Glue for Small Windows

by Ted Petrie


Small windows can also be done by stretching a bubble of white glue across the opening. It does not necessarily produce perfectly smooth 'glass' like plate glass and on a humid day, it can turn white again, though that is temporary.

I tend not to do this for buildings but it makes good auto glass. Because it conforms well to the shape of the opening. It makes pretty good curved glass.

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 Posted: Thu Aug 3rd, 2017 10:24 pm
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Hints & Tips No.1958

Planning for Industries and Spur Lines

by Jeff Corbett

I check footprints of the structures I intend to use when drawing up plans. Fortunately Walthers catalogue and web site lists the dimensions for most structures. I got bit though when I put their Ice House/Loading Platform at the back of the structure. I calculated how much space I would need between the track and the backdrop based on the footprint. I failed to take into account the overhang of the roof. Since the track and quite a bit of scenery was already in place and I did not want to redo it, I simply cut the back edge of the roof overhang off to make it fit.

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 Posted: Sun Aug 6th, 2017 09:48 pm
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xdford
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Hints & Tips No.1959

Planning an Attic Layout Pt 1

by Robert Inns

Ensure that the attic access hatch aperture is able to be covered whilst you are in the attic. It is easy to become absorbed by the task in hand and step backwards to find there is no floor! I am assuming the rest of the area has been floored.

Set up good lighting, it will make all the other tasks easier.
You can not beat putting real track in place to see what it actually looks like but do not try to cram too much in.
You can loose lay the track, i.e. don't actually clip it together, while you are doing a look see to get the overall concept.
I would put the major curves in first as they are usually the main limiting factor on how the layout evolves; use the biggest curves you can get away with. You do not need all the track at this stage as you can plan a side at a time.
Mark the track course on sheets of paper laid on the boards, you can replace these if they are wrong. You can download real size templates for track from the Peco web site to avoid buying points you don't need. Incidentally, Hornby and Bachmann track is the same height as Peco Code 100 track.
When you are happy with the layout, connect it up and run a train to see if there are any issues you have not spotted such as run arounds or sidings being long enough, or passing traffic fouling each other. Put paper or card foot prints of large buildings down, do they look right?
Only when you are utterly convinced it is right do you start laying cork

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 Posted: Wed Aug 9th, 2017 09:21 pm
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xdford
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Hints & Tips No.1960

Planning an Attic Layout Pt 2

by Alan Wickens

My first suggestion is to make up 2 or 4 triangular pieces of board to fill in the right angles at each end say one foot triangles. He will find by in-filling the corners that radius curves can be greatly reduced.

I have used Peco code 75 for many years, in my eyes it does look better than code 100 but I guess this is a personal choice - and then Peco flexi track. This will enable you to put in gentle curves where set track might not fit the bill. It is easy to use, we have laid 129 yards of it in my loft!
Regarding underlay, I have found it is often better to cover a large area of board first and not rely on track-wide strips as plans change! My preferred cork is widely available 1/16th sheet.
Get one circuit running as sure as eggs the layout will develop by itself!
Lastly, remember that your arm can only reach about two feet away from you to put errant vehicles back on the track so maybe track should be laid nearer the front or middle.

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 Posted: Sat Aug 12th, 2017 11:40 pm
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Hints & Tips No.1961

Growing your Layout

by Bill Peace

Trying to get multiple tracks laid and operating could end up meaning that as you do not see any trains running for a while, you become bored and chuck the whole thing in. Do it in stages. This applies to wiring also.

If you lay even a single main line, try to put in all the points and other 'special work' on it whilst you are doing this, so you do not have to rip up bits of track later on to put in a set of
points. This would apply to all tracks that you lay.

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 Posted: Tue Aug 15th, 2017 10:49 pm
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xdford
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Hints & Tips No.1962

Cardboard Body Holders for painting

by David Rhodes

I was recently repairing some old model aircraft kits that I inherited from my uncle.

I found that one of the cardboard trays that you get from the big chain coffee shops for carrying 4 disposable cups makes a very useful cradle for putting models in while you work on them.
Due to the various undulations in the tray/holder you can position the model so that the various sticky-out-bits (technical term) do not get damaged and the model can be balanced or held quite satisfactorily.

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