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00 Gauge - Tetleys Mills - Members Personal Layouts. - Model Railway Layouts. - Your Model Railway Club
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 Posted: Mon Oct 12th, 2009 06:36 pm
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Alan
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OMG You have a pond in your garden and you are growing .............opps sorry wrong forum :roll::roll:

Dave

Outstanding modelling, like you mentioned the photo's showing all the different areas will blow our minds away, a special shot down each street and from every angle, can you tell me, did you plan the layout or build as you went, because all the buildings just seem to fit into all the spaces just right.

I guess that you have used a lot of printed brick paper ?

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 Posted: Mon Oct 12th, 2009 08:16 pm
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MaxSouthOz
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OMG  A "novice" - I don't think so.  Fantastic. :exclam



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 Posted: Mon Oct 12th, 2009 08:31 pm
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henryparrot
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Dave

you have a very lovely layout it looks as though you have captured atmosphere very well indeed .

There must been umpteen cameos across the whole layout which i look forward to seeing photos of if possible when you have time to post them

cheers Brian

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 Posted: Mon Oct 12th, 2009 08:43 pm
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gordons19
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Dave, is that a heron I can see reflected bottom left in your home/garden pic?

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 Posted: Mon Oct 12th, 2009 08:46 pm
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henryparrot
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Gordon nah it looks more like a mink to me :lol::lol:

cheers Brian

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 Posted: Mon Oct 12th, 2009 09:04 pm
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AUSSIETRAINS
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Great pic,s.

Keep them coming.

I,m an ex Yorkshire person ( politically correct ) and the atmosphere is brilliant as Petermac has said.

Regards,

John.



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 Posted: Mon Oct 12th, 2009 09:44 pm
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Gwent Rail
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Brilliant stuff Dave and well worth your perseverance in posting. Some info on what you use for your buildings and how you make them would also be appreciated. :thumbs:thumbs

A tip on adding photos   ...   when adding after a block of text, hit return not once, but twice. This will ensure that all your wording stays above the photo where you intended it to be. Also do the same when adding a number of photos after each other and a space will be left between them.

Keep 'em coming, I'm enjoying this. :doublethumb

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 Posted: Tue Oct 13th, 2009 09:07 am
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Tetley
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A quick post guys to answer a few more questions, when I get more time I'll try and find some images I took of my buildings in various stages of construction which will show just how I make them.

Gordon, no it wasn't a heron and I still haven't trapped the b---dy squirrel either, it's chewed every one of my nuts off!!!!!!!!!!!

There is not a single piece of brickpaper on the whole layout, I've used some Slaters plastic card especially their stone in both 4mm and 7mm to give the massive sizes so common in West Riding retaining walls. Some brick work on my signal boxes which is probably Southeastern Finecast. They and Slaters produce 7mm and even 10mm straight bond brickwork which is ideal for 4mm dressed stone which I now use a lot. There are areas using DAS clay which I really like and since Gordon couldn't adapt to his own purchase I've got a couple of extra packs to use. DAS is great for producing bespoke stone work if you have the patience and really perfect for Yorksone pavers, my methods will be fully described in posts to come.  I'll try and post another couple of images to brighten up the written word then I must put my Marigolds on and get stuck in to some housework.




This is my very first building and pre-dates tetleys Mills by a good few years, it is a Linka kit made up from individual plaster castings, an old and some would say out of date system but check out that roof, perfect Collyweston style stone effect roof tiles.

Maybe a little twee Pendon style for Tetleys Mills but it shows I try and adopt or at least give a try to every method.



Wrong image! However The bridge is card covered in DAS whilst the abutments are Slaters 7mm plasticard, this bridge is due a makeover this winter. The peat stained river is sand and grit covered in resin, expensive and it stinks but there is no substitute, it all gets dusty though. The ground cover on the left is home made and another money saver.



That's better. Image 334 NOT 344 ! The local Police Superintendent is having a point with the local beat copper, since I took this the Super, got the use of a flash 'new' Ford Zephyr and The Wolsey has gone back to my mate dave Bean. The Shakespeare Hotel has also been given a more conservative paint job of Black and Gold rather than the brewery's colours. The Hotel is DAS scribed wet and then further fettled when dry. The post office is DAS smoothed out to give a render effect and the two end shops are smoothed DAS with a fully dressed stone finish. The Yorkstone Pavers are DAS and the cobbled street is DAS allowed to dry and scribed with hundreds of individual cobbles. This can give me 'Repetitive TRAIN syndrome' according to the domestic staff.  The whole scene is at Barden on the branch line.

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 Posted: Tue Oct 13th, 2009 09:36 am
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ddolfelin
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Lovely work.

(If you ever need a rest from the DIY strain, Wills do a very similar cobbled street).



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 Posted: Tue Oct 13th, 2009 10:01 am
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Tetley
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I've got a small area of Wills cobbles.  It'''''''''''''s Ok BUT.

Expensive, not that easy to cut without a piercing saw, small areas, and once it is glued down it starts to bow as the impact glue dries out, much cheaper, easier to use and I believe pretty good looking is Metcalf's cobbles, I've used them on some of my platforms and goods yard, weather them and they are very passable cobbles.. Please note in goods yards the cobbles didn't usually but up to the rails, more common was lengths of old sleepers and then cobbles, I'll post an image or two in due course.

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 Posted: Tue Oct 13th, 2009 11:41 am
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Christrerise
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Great pictures Dave, I have just edited the post slightly to include a return before and after each picture as the text was wrapping incorrectly as originally posted.

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 Posted: Tue Oct 13th, 2009 01:24 pm
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henryparrot
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Dave more lovely piccys

Your tree in the river scene i asume the use of wire and more Das clay there to to create the Trunk and branchwork

It is an extremely good looking tree

cheers Brian

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 Posted: Tue Oct 13th, 2009 04:39 pm
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Tetley
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Trust a parrot to be turned on by a tree!

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 Posted: Tue Oct 13th, 2009 05:27 pm
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Tetley
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I especially like this image, the retaining walls are 7mm slaters and all removeable as is the scenery to access a tunnel, I can remove all the tunnels for this purpose, takes more time to build but so much easier in the long run, there is now a large extension to the meat factory hiding the wall. The station building is Townstreet, I fell in love with it although not quite right for the area, I justify it by suggesting the line hit a clay seam during construction and they built a brick works having fallen out with the local stone quarry. A bit tenuous but hey, I've seen worse and it also justifies the brick boundry wall covered in those lovely enamel advertising signs, out of date but too expensive for british Railways to remove. The 'flighty' looking lass underneath the lamp post is waiting for her beau who's slaking his thirst across the road in The Shakespeare Hotel, meanwhile the workman is making his way to the same hotel at the end of his working day. The pavements are again DAS as is the road with a few more hundred cobbles.

 




 

More DAS. This time used to render  a failing wall but the render has it's self failed and fallen clear. Another problem with Wills sheets can be spotted on the hotel roof, you cannot get a decent run of tiles, the white line is not a bad join I deliberately had two roof lines with a 'cement' haunching to weatherproof it





 

Rotten Row. A group of houses on the hillside above the canal. Each of these buildings includes an odd angle so they fit into the scenery rather than 'on' the scenery. I will do a seperate post in the future to explain how they were built. Removeable and very robust but even close scrutiny will not reveal any shadow lines, I think the dog is contemplating a quick round of Hop Scotch.





 

A dreaded overhead shot but it does illustrate the DAS Yorkstone pavers and the cobbles.

Prime the surface with PVA and allow to dry. Roll thin long sausages of white DAS between the palms and spread onto the primed surface. With a wetted plastic tube or smooth wood spread the DAS DO NO NOT ROLL LIKE PASTRY (I once saw a demonstration by a guy doing this and a, it costs a fortune and b. it takes an age to dry and c. it's too thick.) With practise you can get the DAS down to about 1mm depth consistantly over the surface. When dry scribe the lines and do your cobbles.  The pavers a slightly different.

 Once I've done the cobbles I staple 1.5mm photo mounting card formers to act as a pavement boundary this way you can have nice curves as well. Spread your sausages of DAS and smooth with your roller and flush with the cardboard former, whilst still damp I then drag a dry spatula across the surface which gives a slight rippled or riven effect. Carefully remove the cardboard former having run a sharp knife allong the joint line and leave to dry. Next scribe your individual pavers not forgetting long thin kerb edge stones. I paint individual flags with a slight variation of colour and when dry I matt varnish the lot. When the varnish has dried I give a weak black wash which allows the joints to fill slightly with the black paint whilst toning down the harlequine effect of the individually painted pavers.

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 Posted: Tue Oct 13th, 2009 08:16 pm
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henryparrot
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Dave

thanks for the description how you did the road cobbles and pavement i may actually try that myself in my town area i am working on at the moment what you have achieved there is very effective obviuosly with a bit of practise first.

I can now see how Gordon got the inspiration for his walling he has done on his eastwood layout im sure he left your house with that idea using the 7mm slaters engrained on his mind.

cheers Brian

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 Posted: Tue Oct 13th, 2009 08:57 pm
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Alan
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Dave

I just think that the trouble you go to to make you buildings and roads etc, makes all the difference, do you think somethink else like palster would do the job as well, or have you tried that.

Thanks for posting such interesting posts with the photos and all the text explaining how you have built things :thumbs

Guess I got it wrong when I asked how much printed paper had you used, sorry :oops:

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 Posted: Wed Oct 14th, 2009 04:45 am
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phill
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This layout is amazing Dave. So much detail, it takes you age's to move to the next one.

Phil

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 Posted: Wed Oct 14th, 2009 10:36 am
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Gwiwer
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I have been aware of this layout from its well known profile elsewhere and some stunning images posted of it.

These add substantially to that record of a superbly crafted layout.

If I was a hat wearing person I would take mine off to you Dave but instead and more in keeping with my style I'll raise the blunt end of a bottle of red loopy juice and celebrate your workmanship with what comes out of the narrow end :cheers:cheers:cheers

Sterling work.

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 Posted: Wed Oct 14th, 2009 05:05 pm
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Tetley
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First to Alan.

I'm not in any way offended by the suggestion of brick paper, check out Gordons19 and his recently purchased ex-Alan Downes buildings, I am a regular visitor to their original owner and his layout and they really are as good as they look and covered in brick paper, Gordon's new MPD is finished in Yellow London Brick Stocks and I think it would be very difficult to convincingly re-create them in anything other than brick paper. My comments merely relate to my current layout which is of a stone building style but I certainly would not hesitate to recommend GOOD QUALITY brick paper.

Second response to Phil.

 

You are right, it will take some effort to re-house the layout but I can remove, clean and replace ALL of the buildings in a day, what will take the time is re-wiring and those fine detailing jobs. When I do move into the planned new house it will be a completely new build layout to fit the new railway room but I will use as many buildings as possible. I'll have the new layout up and running within 18 months of starting. I already have the layout plan but I don't want to flood the forum with Dave Shakespeare's projects.

 

Another member asked if I had considered using plaster for my structures. Well the answer to that is the previously posted Linka pub image which is built from plaster wall and roof modules. Secondly, check out my new viaduct. That is a prototype for a much larger one on the new layout. I made the arch, the pillar and plinth as three seperate items, made silicone rubber moulds and then cast about 13 of each so far. I fettle each arch and plinth and add slight variations to stone pattern but once the initial work has been done I can whip off castings pretty quick and my new layout will feature a main viaduct 13 feet long! I'm sold on plaster mould making and I will develope some more moulds for dry stone walls and other repeat items.

A few more images for those interested.

 




The lighting has really caught the 7mm plasticard retaining wall to perfection. Note how the lower wall leans backwards to resist the thrust from the ground behind.  Too many modellers just stick some plasticard on to a sheet of hardboard or MDF and stand it vertically to finish off the layout edge and then wonder why it doesn't look right. Spend some extra time with the detail and anybody can create attractive cameos. The grounded coach is the ubiquitous ex Triang GWR Clerestory, sprayed satin black to represent bitumin protection whilst the rooof is matt black 'tired' roofing felt, I've blanked out some of the windows to suggest seperate interior rooms. Any coach resting on the earth would not last five minutes so I've raised mine up on some old balsa wood sleepers so of course, steps are needed for access ofh and remember a chimney for the stove. Not many porters, shunters had a car in the 1950's so add a bike shed. An afternoons work and you've got another interesting cameo scene.





This is an old scene and shows the previous alignment of the main line which now has a sexy curve across the viaduct and also four tracks instead of two but a nice shot of two WD's on loaded and empty coal trains which was an almost costant procession  along most West Riding rail routes.

 




Unless you are modelling a one engine in steam branch line, small single Airfix / Dapol engine sheds with an A4 or GWR Castle sticking out of it are well naff and more Thomas the Tank Engine so, since I don't have space for a proper MPD I only have engine servicing facilities and a few holding tracks the MPD is elsewhere. I knocked up this coaling stage during a wet winter's afternoon and used all my odds and ends, it cost very little but does add interest without I hope looking out of place.

 




An ancient Airfix Royal Scot re-numbered and named for a Bradford Low Moor Duke of Wellington' Own Yorkshire Regiment (or similar) seeing her fianal years out on mundane parcels hauling duties.  The footbridge was inspired by a similar one at Ardsley Station between Wakefield and Leeds, it took a whole weekend to make but was necessary to break up the long plate girder bridge which deliberately bisects tetleys Mills station area. It prevents you seeing everything in one view, I want visitors to have to investigate various nooks and crannies some regular visitors are still discovering little jems and ginnels (Yorkshire alleyways)

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 Posted: Wed Oct 14th, 2009 05:32 pm
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Petermac
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Dave, I'm interested in your experiences with Linka.  I have the moulds and have played around with them a bit but not with too much success.  The castings seem fairly brittle and, whilst I can snap them along the stone course lines, trying the other way, or cutting around where I want windows etc,  usually results in disaster.  Is there a trick I'm missing ?



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