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00 Gauge - Much Murkle - Members Personal Layouts. - Model Railway Layouts. - Your Model Railway Club
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 Posted: Tue Feb 8th, 2011 07:28 pm
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Bodriggy Street
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Looking good matey, it's giving me ideas about how to do the scenery on mine, yours is very effective !



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 Posted: Tue Feb 8th, 2011 09:37 pm
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pnwood
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Thanks for all of your kind comments.

I've planted the nettles this evening at the rear of the platelayers hut. Just to make life easy I've tried to represent the white dead nettle variety with the white flowers :shock:

I'll post a photo of how it turns out tomorrow.



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 Posted: Tue Feb 8th, 2011 10:06 pm
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MikeC
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Well worth seeing again!


Really good scenery, Nick.

I think doofer hit the nail on the head when he mentioned the variety of textures you've come up with, and one thing that struck me about the photo above is the openness of the left in contrast with the right.
Cow pasture might seem a bit boring to model - and it's not easy to get little plastic animals to look authentic - but I think it would be a good idea to leave at least a certain amount of open space.
Worn farm tracks are fun to model. Add some fencing and a gate at the end and you have the chance to model overgrown grasses around the posts, with cow parsley and blackberries flanking the track.
Just some thoughts.
It looks a treat already.

Mike

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 Posted: Tue Feb 8th, 2011 10:27 pm
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pnwood
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That is a real compliment coming from you Mike, many thanks.

I especially appreciate your thoughts on the left hand area. The front of the layout is to the left of that photo so it was always the intention that the area should be open.

Leading on from your post, my thoughts are that to the left of the bridge will be a dense hedge. As this will run alongside a lane on the next board, this could have the field gate in it.

The trackside will be fenced and not too much vegetation growth so as to give a different feel to the fencing on the right hand side of the photo. As you say some thicker grass and a few brambles etc.

A large tree at the far end of the field in the corner nearest the track with perhaps a few cows sheltering on an area of bare ground under the tree in the shade. The tree will make the viewer peer around it to give different views of the station area.

The meadow, a mixture of short grazed grass and longer weedy areas with a few dots of colour to represent flowering meadow plants.

I love it when someone helps you put a plan together :thumbs

:cheers



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 Posted: Tue Feb 8th, 2011 10:37 pm
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MikeC
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Lovely plan! I'm very keen to see it develop.

Mike

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 Posted: Wed Feb 9th, 2011 04:36 am
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Marty
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...and it pretty much mirrors the suggestion that I was going to make apart from maybe splitting the field into two with a hedge/fence or wall depending upon that which is correct for the area you are modelling.

Very nice work Nick. Coming along a treat.



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 Posted: Wed Feb 9th, 2011 10:33 am
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It does look very good.



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 Posted: Wed Feb 9th, 2011 11:59 am
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:doublethumb Many thanks Nick, For showing your layout and how you do the scenic,s, Your application of different scenic flocks /colours really brings the foliage to life .

As some have said the open scene on the left, could have some cattle or sheep grazing, with maybe a gorze bush here and there to add colour along with other plants, The grass where cattle are grazing usually varies in hight, with flat grazed area,s and lots of higher grass clumps where the cattle have deposited manure ;-) nettle,s in the field here and there. The farmer maybe does not top the field very often? A fence along the trackside and at the field boundry, The fence on the boundry could have a gate and the odd broken plank fixed and maybe a bit of wire in the odd gap.

Water trough or small pond, cattle need water.

Goodluck with your Railway.

Derek


PS: Looking at your pointwork, I see you have trimmed of those big lugs on the tie bars assuming they are peco, Makes an excellent improvement from a visual perspective, I do the same, unless you need to use the odd one.

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 Posted: Wed Feb 9th, 2011 09:22 pm
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Something you don't see modelled very often in this setting is the massive West Country granite gate posts supporting big wooden gates, with hinge irons set therein by molten lead plugs, you have everything else 'just so', maybe if you think its applicable for your setting they [one or two] would make nice features. you could get two in, one each side of the end of a common hedgerow.

Doug



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 Posted: Wed Feb 9th, 2011 09:44 pm
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pnwood
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dooferdog wrote: Something you don't see modelled very often in this setting is the massive West Country granite gate posts supporting big wooden gates, with hinge irons set therein by molten lead plugs, you have everything else 'just so', maybe if you think its applicable for your setting they [one or two] would make nice features. you could get two in, one each side of the end of a common hedgerow.

Doug

 

That's a great suggestion Doug, but.......... Much Murkle is set in the Forest of Dean / Monmouthshire / Herefordshire area.

:hmm Got me thinking though that I should look for something uniquely local to use in that area to set the location. I let you all know what it is when I've found it ;-) 

Meanwhile this is how the White Dead Headed nettles have turned out. The technique is the same as used for the Rosebay Willow Herb in an earlier post. I'm quite pleased with the result.




The platelayers hut is a Wills kit made a long time ago (badly), just look at those brick courses :oops: It's temporary and will be replaced with a scratchbuilt one to a different design, although it's replacement will use the same footprint. I just need to get the scalpel going again on some of Mr Wiffens finest.

:cheers  



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 Posted: Thu Feb 10th, 2011 03:39 am
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John Flann
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Nick, I've been following along and admire what you are achieving,  I wouldn't bother with that kind of detail you are now pursuing.

But a thought, in those days part of a PW gangs duty on their length, and most were exceedingly 'house proud' was to cut the grass inside the railway fence, and I wonder whether your vegetation would be allowed to flourish as it is doing.There was that prize length competition.

Not a criticism, just a comment.



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 Posted: Thu Feb 10th, 2011 10:21 am
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Chubber
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How about modelling the 'Buckstone'?   :lol:


See  http://www.oldukphotos.com/gloucestershire_forest_of_dean.htm



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 Posted: Thu Feb 10th, 2011 08:47 pm
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pnwood
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dooferdog wrote:
How about modelling the 'Buckstone'?   :lol:


See  http://www.oldukphotos.com/gloucestershire_forest_of_dean.htm


In a word Doug....No

:hmm but maybe the field could be the home of the mythical stone circle of Much Murkle where it is said that in times gone by, the Druid Muirkeldridd over-indulged on the local apple fermented beverages and gave the village it's name. :lol:



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 Posted: Thu Feb 10th, 2011 08:56 pm
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pnwood
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John Flann wrote:
Nick, I've been following along and admire what you are achieving,  I wouldn't bother with that kind of detail you are now pursuing.

But a thought, in those days part of a PW gangs duty on their length, and most were exceedingly 'house proud' was to cut the grass inside the railway fence, and I wonder whether your vegetation would be allowed to flourish as it is doing.There was that prize length competition.

Not a criticism, just a comment.


Hi John and thanks.

Even if it was criticism I would accept it as being constructive:thumbs

It's an interesting point and I must admit when you look at photos of railways taken in the 30's and earlier it is striking how often there is little vegetation at all around the railway. Whether this was due to PW gangs keeping their length tidy or just that most pictures seem to be taken around the station and yard areas I don't know.

When you say that there you wouldn't bother with that kind of detail, I have to say that there are elements that I admire in your layouts that I would overlook and may not even consider, so we all take differing approaches to pursue what interests us most.

The scenic treatment of Much Murkle may not be a strictly accurate depiction of the times it is set in but I feel it gives the layout a bit more character and it pleases me. I suppose the latter is what most of us strive to get out of the hobby ;-)

Please don't stop the comments coming.


:cheers



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 Posted: Thu Feb 10th, 2011 10:01 pm
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Petermac
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I believe there was a legal requirement for the railway companies to cut the grass between the fencing to prevent serious fires resulting from hot cinders etc. falling from the locos.  This was especially true during the dry summer months when crops were ripening in the fields.  I think they made the grass into hay for the railway horses.

Can you imagine hand scything the line from Edinburgh to London ..................................both sides !!!! :shock:



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 Posted: Thu Feb 10th, 2011 10:08 pm
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pnwood
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Peter

You may well be right, it seems perfectly logical.

Good job then that it is not yet high summer in Much Murkle, the crops haven't ripened and the guys with the sythes are due to arrive next week in perpetuity :mutley

I'm making it up as I go along of course ;-)



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 Posted: Fri Feb 11th, 2011 08:57 am
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Petermac
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And you're doing a pretty good job of making it up Nick. :thumbs



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 Posted: Fri Feb 11th, 2011 11:17 am
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phill
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Petermac wrote: I believe there was a legal requirement for the railway companies to cut the grass between the fencing to prevent serious fires resulting from hot cinders etc. falling from the locos.  This was especially true during the dry summer months when crops were ripening in the fields.  I think they made the grass into hay for the railway horses.

Can you imagine hand scything the line from Edinburgh to London ..................................both sides !!!! :shock:


Peter is right. I used to work on the heavy cleaning gang when i was on the railway and one of our jobs was to clear the grass from the fence line to the track and also the halts platforms. This made picking up rubbish easier to spot and also any sparks from the train would not easily ignite or fag ends, (in theory).

Phill

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 Posted: Fri Feb 11th, 2011 12:27 pm
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phill wrote:...................................................
Peter is right. ..............................................................


That's a phrase I've become very used to during my life Phillip ..................:roll::roll::roll::mutley:mutley:mutley  Just as long as you remember ...........:lol::cheers:cool wink



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 Posted: Fri Feb 11th, 2011 01:36 pm
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The law on this is quite clear, in the case of Rylands v Fletcher (1868) it was held that '...he who brings a dangerous thing on his land is responsible it it escapes...' I can't remember the exact wording but that was the gist of it, and under it railway companies were liable if a spark from an engine caused a fire in crops growing adjacent. To help prevent this the grass was cut as Phill said, up to the railway fence in an effort to lessen the risk.

I might add that when I was with the Estate Department of LMR in the Liverpool District Surveyor's office in the 1950's settling farmers claims for loss of crops and any subsequent damage from fires caused by sparks or cinders from passing locos was a very pleasing job. Particularly out in delightful parts of the district as along the CLC in rural Cheshire, or rural Lancashire for that matter. I enjoyed my time in that office covering a widespread and very interesting district.



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