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SRman
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I decided that I should separate some of the things I have been doing into layout related and work bench related. Up until now I have tended to be lazy and put everything in my layout thread. To kick things off, in the Queens Birthday thread I mentioned building two Cambrian Kits SECR brake vans. Here are a couple of pics to show progress.

Also shown at left in the pics are two earlier builds of a Cambrian Kit for a standard SR style brake van - the kit allows for three major variants and I built two of them. Far left is a LH ducket even-planked version (awaiting handrails to be fitted) while next on the right is a RH ducket uneven planked version which is a rare item on my layout as it is complete! Next is the ballast brake conversion of the SECR "Dance Hall" brake van (all the parts are in the kit) and closest to the camera is the standard build of the SECR "Dance Hall" brake van. These two have only received their first coat of paint and have no glazing or handrails as yet.




Alan
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Hi Jeff

Your Cambrian Kits look good, did you have any problem with them at the building stage, did all the parts fit well, and did the instructions fully explain how to build them, I only ask because Peter built a couple of Cambrian kits, and found them hard to put to-gether.

Marty
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I didn't even know there was such a thing as an SECR "Dance Hall" brake van!
Learning something new every day is good for you they say.
Always nice to see what other members are working on.
Nice one Jeff.

SRman
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In answer to Alan's question, I found the instructions to be very helpful, including for the conversion to ballast brake van, and all the parts fitted very nicely together with only minimal filing of flash or moulding marks. The SECR vans have the newer, modified roof profile as there were a couple of mildly adverse comments about the original kit release roof being too deep and not quite to the right profile.

They were nicknamed "Dance Halls" because of the very large enclosed area. They also had reputation for being rather cold in Winter because of the huge area the stove had to try to heat. That was the reason the SR design went for a much smaller body on the long wheelbase chassis. The left-handed duckets were also a design faux pas. as they meant the guard got trapped in that area if someone opened the door off the verandah into the body. Changing the design to right-handed duckets meant the door opened away from the ducket area. In spite of this, some of the LH ducket versions survived for a very long time, certainly into the 1990s in departmental service, possibly even longer.

 

I should add that building the two SECR design vans took me around 4 hours, including cutting and filing out the extra windows for the bbv variant (the windows are marked out clearly on the backs of the side mouldings.

Last edited on Thu Jun 18th, 2009 11:12 am by SRman

MikeC
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I like 'em. And the turntable :thumbs
Is that the Ratio SR concrete shed?

Mike

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nice builds,i too like the turntable best one i have seen.

:doublethumb:lol::lol::cool:

Les
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They look good Jeff and it's great to see some Southern/SECR stuff on here. Put some more up any time you want.:thumbs

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The turntable is standard Fleischmann with the "glasshouse" removed from the other end of the table.

The SR concrete hut is indeed the Ratio one - good guessing there!

phill
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Like them and also the turntable.

Forgot about this layout and how good it was, have to revisit to refresh my memory.

Phill

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 Very nice Jeff, and loads of detail too:doublethumb

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I like the dance hall wagons Jeff i will have to get a couple of them.

Mind you i have quite a few wagon kits as yet untouched so they will only go on the pile at this stage.

And the fliechmann turntable looks very good aswell

cheers brian

SRman
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A few of you who are members of other forums will recognise this post - still, it's worth putting on here as well as it may help someone somewhere.

I have been plagued to distraction by a Hornby rebuilt West Country that developed quite a jerky motion and a click every time it paused. I should add that it started off being very smooth but developed the problem later (out of warranty!).

I tried various tweaks before completely dismantling it a few days ago. I checked the wheel quartering, the valve gear, the crossheads and cylinder slidebars, checked the gears for burrs or splits (none found) then ran the chassis without the motor by pushing it back and forth over a fair distance, and it was as smooth as silk.

Ran the motor on its own and it also was as smooth as silk with no wobbles or throwout on the worm or shafts.

Put it back together and it ran like a dog again.

I though that maybe the worm was catching on a projection inside the gear tower capping, so lightly milled that to get rid of any burrs or flash. No difference!

Over the next few days I tried slackening of various screws holding the motor and the gear tower and that did improve things a bit, especially with the body off.

Today I had an inspiration. I cut a small sliver of 20 thou plasticard and stuck it beneath the motor front bearing as a shim, using a small blob of black-tac (Homelux Bath Sealant) to keep it in position until I screwed everything down properly. Screwed the motor back down and then the gear tower capping, and it has now been running beautifully smoothly for the last hour or so, albeit still with small grinding and clicking noises.

Now, after all of that, I have to find all the missing bits of pipework off the back of the cab area, and glue at least two of the lubricators that I dislodged back on. I can also now think about gluing the brake rigging on. I might lightly glue the speedo drive back into the running plate too, since that is now quite loose from all the "offing" and "onning" of the body!

I can finally feel a bit pleased with myself as this problem really was annoying me.

If anyone else has had a similar problem, maybe this will help. I hope so, anyway. Incidentally, I tried the various cures both with and without a DCC decoder installed, on DC and DCC.

Gwiwer
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Good to hear you have more or less cured the problem Jeff but are you quite sure that it isn't the chain drive playing up in the oil bath again :question:hmm:mutley

SRman
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This one was a rebuilt version - no chains!!!! :cool wink :cool wink

I did over-oil it a bit though!

:hmm

Last edited on Sun Sep 13th, 2009 12:40 pm by SRman

SRman
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My latest projects involved buying some of the bargain Hornby models from Hattons. I bought two of the DCC-fitted class 153 units in First North Western blue livery, and some Electra Railwy Graphics vinyl overlays for them, to convert the liveries to some of the Wessex Trains Mural styles; one light blue the other a reddish pink base colour scheme. I did the first one and modified the paint schemes on the roof and ends to suit before applying the sides, with some assistance from a hair dryer. Pictures of the before and after will follow soon.

The other Hornby items I bought were two class 73s in Dutch livery - I have swapped the bodies for some of my older, cherished Lima ones in earlier liveries (two variations on BR blue) - and a class 121 "Bubble Car" DMU, which has now swapped chassis, with slight modifications, with my Craftsman conversion of a Swindon class 120 cross-country DMU (I thought the "Swindon" might get Jeff Gwent Rail in!!). I fitted decoders at the same time as swapping the bodies.

The Hornby chassis work so much better with DCC than the older Lima mechanisms and they are easier to convert (plug 'n' play!!).

I still have another set of vinyl overlays to do at the same time as hard-wiring a class 158 Sprinter DMU. These are also for Wessex Trains "Richard Trevithic" unit with murals and other graphics on the sides.

Finally, I won a class 158 two-car unit from Rails on eBay, at a good price; this one is in the livery of ... wait for it ... Wessex Trains, Alphaline version. Once I fit Kaydees to the ends of all of the units I can run them in multiple in various combinations. The only thing is, I won't have a layout to run them on for a while.

Last edited on Fri Dec 11th, 2009 09:22 am by SRman

SRman
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here are the photos of the Hornby class 153 as promised above. The First North Western one at the back shows the model straight out of the box. The front one has the new Electra Graphics vinyls applied plus some paint touches; mainly black on the driving ends around the front foot steps and light clusters and below the corridor connection level (solebar level?). The grey of the roof had to be extended down to the cant rail gutter level on this particular livery, as FNW apply their blue and gold above that line. The orange safety line was painted over as the new vinyls have this on anyway.

 

Incidentally, the instructions with the sides suggest for most liveries that BR Falcon Grey is a good match for the roof colour; for this particular livery I found that Humbrol 66 was a near perfect match - I have not repainted the centre section of the roof at all.

 



 



 



 






Sol
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SRman wrote: ............The only thing is, I won't have a layout to run them on for a while.
OK, Jeff, explain that last sentence please !!

SRman
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I have mentioned this before, somewhere: I will be dismantling the main part of the layout because SWMBO has decided that the rumpus room (read train room!) and the sitting room are going to change places. The existing sitting room is smaller but a much more practical room as afar as plain walls and door placements go. The intention is to build a new layout that I don't have to crawl under to get at the controls.

In the interim, I want to build a very simple fiddle yard to attach to the Middlehurst branch so I can play trains and keep the inspiration going until the new layout is under way. The branch would effectively become a terminus to fiddle yard layout based on a single track exit, with the existing double track second line becoming an extra headshunt. All of this would be temporary as the branch is actually the oldest part of the whole layout and a few bits of track (mainly points) are showing signs of fatigue ... a bit like their owner!!

Sol
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I now remember that now - fatigue (mental) has struck here as well.

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Very interested in this as I also got a batch of vinyls.  So far I had only done the Class 158 and was disapointed as they simply did not fit very well.  As a result I lost interest and never got around to even touching the Class 153!

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Very interested in the Class 153 conversion Jeff as I have been wondering about doing the same thing.  What is your overall opinion of the overlays? do they cover up a lot of the excellent detail on the Hornby model and how easy are they to apply?

SRman
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I have now done the class 158 and Chris is right; they don't line up particularly well. However, I persevered, and cut away the misaligned bits and the result is a stunning looking Sprinter unit. I chose a Regional Railways one to do the overlays so the base livery is not too different in shade to the overlays. Even so, I will have to paint the projections over the bogies, and more yellow on the cab fronts, and the cab side window cross-bar. Photos will follow soon.

 

As to the 153s, the overlays fit better than the 158, although there were a couple of bits of FNW blue showing through at one end and near one of the doors, plus the door open light on one side only didn't line up properly and one of the end sidewindows was a little out of whack - not too obvious with the blue livery overlaid on a blue base. The rivets come out rather overscale with the overlay in place, due to the extra thickness of vinyl all around each rivet - that's after using the hair dryer to "melt" the vinyl around all the raised details. I did all that with the body and chassis together in situ, as I didn't want to end up with a banana shaped Sprinter if I used too much heat.

 

With some reservations, I would deem the overlays a success. They allow liveries that I, and most other average modellers, would otherwise find impossible to do well by hand. The effect from normal viewing distance is great but they don't  stand up to really close scrutiny, in that the underlying details are exaggerated slightly.

 

I still have the pink liveried 153 to do, and I have painted all the possible areas where the FNW blue or gold might show into Barbie pink, which will be close enough to disguise any shortcomings of the vinyls.

Last edited on Sun Dec 13th, 2009 02:37 am by SRman

Janner
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Thanks for that Jeff, food for thought.

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It is certainly a problem Jeff, it is the only way to create some of these liveries and a few years ago we would have been more than happy!  As you say from normal viewing distance they look OK - perhaps I should have another go with the 153.

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I have now uploaded a couple of pics of each of the remaining reliveried models (Hornby class 153 and Bachmann class 158). The 153s now have one Kaydee #19 coupler each - #18s are too close, #19s a little further apart than I want. Mixing them is possible but messy! the 158s will get Kaydee or Bachmann E-Z couplings on the driving ends soon.



 




 




 


 

 



 

As may be seen, I still need to repaint the 158 cab ends as the Wessex Trains "Richard Trevithick" unit didn't have the black treatment around the windows and light clusters.


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Lovely colourful work there Jeff illustrating just how varied and complex a livery can now be with stick-on vinyl and (sometimes) the dreaded Contra-vision over the windows as well.

I take note of your comment re the 158 outer couplers as well since I am having trouble finding something suitable to join both my units together.

SRman
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I am just at the end of two weeks sick leave from work, with swine 'flu'. Coincidentally, I managed to win a DC Kits 3H DEMU kit from eBay which arrived just before I got ill. While I was recuperating I started building the unit.

I don't yet have the motor for it but I ordered a BullAnt unit from Hollywood Foundry as I wanted to try something slightly different from the Black Beetles I normally use for such projects. I know they are similar mechanically but I feel the BullAnt may have slightly better traction - will have to wait and see whether my hunch is right or not but it certainly won't be any worse (not that the Black Beetle is bad to start with).

I have constructed the basic body shells and underframe trusses (not installed in the motor coach yet as I will have to cut clearance for the motor) but I haven't done any of the finer details yet as I am still a bit too shaky for the finer work!

I have not yet decided whether to paint it green or blue but as I have done most of the previous units in green I may just plump for blue for a change. Also, I am not happy with most of the commercial SR greens as they seem a little on the dark side.

I have taken a few photos of the progress so far but they are still on the camera's memory card right now; will get them ready and uploaded soon, so watch this space!

I still don't have a proper layout to run on yet but by the time this unit is complete, I hope to have started something.

Last edited on Tue Nov 2nd, 2010 08:19 am by SRman

Gwiwer
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Good to hear from you again Jeff and sorry to hear you have been beneath the weather somewhat.

I look forward to seeing the pics when you're ready. I guess you could always compromise and paint the unit in blue with small yellow panel and white set numbers; not many models that I am aware of wear that livery.

SRman
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Hi Rick. I have considered that livery option but I think I would go for full yellow ends as the models end up rather dark and dreary with the small yellow panels - I have already done a 2EPB, 4VEP and 4REP in the blue with small yellow panel livery. Thanks for the suggestion though.

 

:hi

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Here are the pictures of the 3H DEMU under construction. The first one shows the Driving Motor Brake Second (DMBS), while the others show the two trailer coaches, a Driving Trailer Composite with Lavatory (DTC[L]) and Trailer Second (TS). The underframe trusses and bogie sideframes for the motor bogie are visible behind the DMBS.



 



 


Gwiwer
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I think Eastleigh held some of their "Thumper" motor coaches together in similar fashion Jeff!

But seriously - excellent work so far. Keep it up!

SRman
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I thought they used chewing gum and string rather than rubber bands!! :mutley

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Update: I received the BullAnt motor bogie in January and subsequently fitted it. That meant I could fit the underframe trusses as well.

I have not yet glued the motor bogie sideframes in place but will take a few pics this weekend to add to the story.

SRman
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I still have not taken the photos of the 3H unit's progress but here are some pics of a much earlier project.

This is a Southern Railway Maunsell diesel-electric shunter in BR 1960s livery, made from a Golden Arrow resin body kit mounted on a modified Bachmann 08 chassis. It is still very much a work in progress and is awaiting glazing, handrail fitment and tidying up of those wasp stripes, which I am hand-painting!

I have not yet fitted a DCC decoder, which will have to be hard-wired as it was an older Bachmann chassis.










EDIT: I forgot to resize these before posting but they seem to be OK - if they do cause problems please let me know and I'll do something about it.




Last edited on Wed Apr 6th, 2011 01:10 pm by SRman

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Hi Jeff, providing the photographs aren't too large when you upload them, and I mean large, large, then the Gallery will automatically resize them for posting on the forum.

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Thanks, Robert.

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I must post some more pics of that 3H unit. I haven't done much more to it but it does have its motor bogie installed now (and has done for some time!).

My latest little project has been a Lima Yeoman class 59, 59 005 Kenneth J Painter. I did add a Digitrax decoder to the original Lima motor but it was never a brilliant performer, although mine was certainly one of the better Lima runners.

Anyway, I recently purchased a Hornby class 59 off eBay for a very reasonable price, with a view to swapping bodies with the Lima one. Coincidentally, it was also 59 005, Kenneth J Painter, but in a later Yeoman livery. Unfortunately for Hornby, they used the wrong mouldings for this one as it has the later style 59/1 or 59/2 frontal treatments, so it made the body swap even more justifiable.

The Hornby chassis has a nice smooth running 5-pole motor and is DCC-ready but neither of the chassis had lights. I then decided i would fit lights, at least at one end. I used two types of white LED, one type with a light tower for each of the twin headlights and a slightly smaller type with a dimple rather than a "tower" for each of the marker lights, together with the necessary resistors.

I decided to drill out all of the lights, including the marker and tail lights, even though I had already resolved I was not going to have working tail lights. I worked out the clearances involved and only needed to remove parts of the front of the cab interior dash moulding to clear the LEDs.

I did have to unscrew the decoder socket and solder white, yellow and blue accessory wires to the correct sockets (matched very carefully to the plug on the decoder!). The decoder I used just happened to be spare after I installed two more sound projects, and is a Bachmann (ESU Basic) job.

The initial installation works nicely (a win for me!) but the wiring is a bit messy and goes up the inside of the cab front centre and corner pillars. They are rather too visible at the moment so I think I will re-do it with some of the LED "legs" shortened and thinner wires, plus a neater way for mounting the resistors but, for the time being, I am happy to run with it "as is".

I may do the lights at the other end soon but I will still not bother with working tail lights as they aren't really needed with this model.

I will also need to touch up the yellow panel just around the lights.

Photos will follow fairly soon, although they will show the installation without the cab interior being fitted.

The sound projects mentioned earlier, for anyone who is interested, were a class 57 fitted into a Bachmann Freightliner 57 008, and Kestrel, fitted into the Heljan Kestrel model. I also now have had my Hornby class 31 reblown so it now actually sounds like a class 31 should. All were Howes' sounds. Now I have a complete circuit to run on, I'll have to charge up the video camera! :cheers

Last edited on Sun May 29th, 2011 12:55 pm by SRman

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The lights work nicely although there is still some light bleeding into the tail light lenses at the moment, as well as into the cab interior - I haven't refitted the cab interior moulding at this point.

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I have been fiddling with a few more projects lately.

On the railway side, I have an Ayjay models resin kit for a post-war 2HAL unit, also known as a 'Tin HAL'. Some of the detailing is a little on the heavy side but it looks like a 2HAL should. I have removed the moulded jumper cables from the DTC end and will do the same at the DMBS end soon, with separate wire cables to be added. I also filed down the over-thick secondman's window surrounds. Both coaches have been primed but I still have to remove some flash from the bogies.

Sorry about the blurry driving ends - I must stand back a little further to improve the depth of field in the future.







With a view to the upcoming Model Bus Association of Australia's modelling competition in December, I have been pushing a few bus kits up the production line. I can only enter two models in each category so one of the 4mm kit-built items for this year will be the Southdown Leyland Tiger Cub with Marshall BET style body, made from a Westward Models/ABS Streetscene white metal kit with a few minor modifications. I am flush-glazing the windscreens and rear window (not happy with the driver's screen right now as I got some glue on it) but I have yet to do the side windows and doors in these photos. I am also not yet happy with the shape of the cream 'V' at the front. The other entry is the Little Bus Company resin 5Q5 of London Transport, as it appeared in the pre-war period. I haven't glazed any part of this model yet.







For future entries, I have started on further bus kits. The next four are all Little Bus Company resin kits. In order of the pics:

1. An all-Leyland Titan PD2/12 'Farington' as run by Southdown in the early 1950s with an open rear platform. Thos one is partly painted but still needs tidying up before glazing.

2. A Southdown 1957 Commer TS3 coach with Beadle Rochester body.

3. A southdown Leyland Leopard coach with Duple Commander body from the mid-1960s.

4. A Southdown pre-war Leyland Titan TD5 with post-war East Lancs body.

















Also shown with the Leyland TD is a Royal Blue Bristol LL from Weico Models. This is also a resin kit but comes locally from Melbourne.






 

Last edited on Mon Oct 31st, 2011 02:52 pm by SRman

Gwiwer
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The Hal does indeed look like a tin Hal should, allowing for the fact that they were painted in due course as well ;-) I had many short trips on those between home and school though the comfort of a 2Bil was preferred and they were often paired with one.

And a superb "rail replacement" fleet in the making as well. Southdown is quite well represented in the RtP bus market so it's good to se some real modelling of the fleet under way as well.

Last edited on Tue Nov 1st, 2011 01:39 am by

SRman
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Thanks, Rick.

I was "lucky" enough to ride the Tin HALs occasionally too although, like you, a BIL was much preferred. I have an unmade Ian Kirk 2BIL kit lurking somewhere in the mess of boxes, drawers, cupboards and shelves around here. I don't think I ever saw a pre-war HAL, let alone rode in one, so I don't have the urge to model one of those.

I have always had London Transport as my number one bus interest but I have now filled most of the gaps, although you may have noticed an LT 'Scooter' hiding behind the Southdown buses in a couple of those pics. I finished the Marshall rebuit version (Little Bus Company resin kit) but the ABS (ex-GS Models) white metal kit requires more work, not least because I'm doing it in full pre-war livery. Another unstarted LBC kit on my bench is their ST and I also have two partially finished country STLs, a 'Godstone' one I'm finishing in the very first livery and a forward entrance one also being finished in the earlier country bus light green. There is also a partly finished white metal CR to do.

Next in interest is the Southdown fleet and LBC have been particularly good at producing specific Southdown types, so much so I cannot afford them all at the time they are produced!

Having said that, Tony Asquith of LBC is bringing a Bristol MW bus for me over to Australia with him - his latest production run was for dual purpose vehicles but he is substituting a spare bus seated moulding for me. This bus will go into Hants & Dorset livery as that is the third fleet of interest to me (with the associated Wilts & Dorset and Royal Blue connections). He is also very obliging and can order other manufacturers kits on my behalf, although I try not to abuse that privilege. I did ask him to try to get me a Trystco kit Southdown East Lancs Leyland Royal Tiger (as built with centre entrance). I'm not sure if they are in production at the moment though.

Hopefully, I won't actually need to call on any of them for rail replacement though!!!!  :twisted:

Last edited on Tue Nov 1st, 2011 12:46 am by SRman

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Along the Sussex coast when we moved there all the local trains were a mixture of Bil and Hal stock with the two fleets by then being common-user. Most trains were 4-car and any combination of 2x2Bil, 2x2Hal (including random use of the tin ones) and Bil+Hal were used.

A few of the early batch of Bils (2001-10, built as 1891-1900) were still in use at the time with their distinctive white-panelled corridor woodwork and smaller brakes allowing eight full compartments in the DMBS rather than 7 and a coupé in the main fleet (2011-2152). The DMBS of 2008 later found itself a late survivor running with the DTC of 2024 and oddly taking the number of the trailer. Misformed units usually took the unit number of the motor coach.

A few workings were 2-car or 6-car, the latter more so at school times and on the peak workings to and from Brighton meaning all three types sometimes appeared in one train and sometimes in three different livery variations as well.

Many of those units went to the breakers in BR green with either a small yellow panel or full yellow end; a few early casualties retired in plain green and late survivors made it into BR blue with either a small yellow panel or full yellow end again. With the occasional reformed unit (such as 2069 which ended its days with a Bil DMBS and the tin Hal DTC from 2700 IIRC) there was plenty of variety on offer there!

The main ("pre-war") Hal fleet (2601-2692) was only to be suffered if a Bil wasn't in the train. The post-war "tin" units were 2693-9 with a short lived 2700 which was disbanded to keep other units in traffic. The DTC was similar to a 2Bil with side corridor to the compartments but with less generous upholstery while the DMBS was "horse-box" or in Australian terms "dog-box" compartment-only accommodation six-a side on hard bench seats. Even in the late 1960s us young lads were advised to avoid travelling in those compartments which closely resembled the "Sheba" 4Sub units 4101-4110 in style except those had very "cozy" 7-a side seating.

Last edited on Tue Nov 1st, 2011 01:55 am by

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In my time the Tin HALs were mostly confined to the Gatwick - Victoria run, being attached to or detached from through Brighton line trains at Gatwick. Since my stop was Three Bridges, just down the line, it wasn't too hard to swap units while the coupling or uncoupling was taking place.

That unit 2700 was kept separate from the others as it had a standard 4SUB DMBS which had (at least in the beginning) only one periscope, thus precluding it from working on its own.

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I have been doing a little more work on the 2HAL. I fitted the wire replacement jumper cables to both driving ends.





Next, a few thin coats of my specially mixed BR(S) green. It is not quite a match for the Bachmann 2EPB green (seen in the third pic of this sequence) but it is close enough for me. I have not picked out the jumpers in black, yet, nor added the handrails. Underframe and headstocks and buffers also yet to be painted.











There is also an interesting contrast with the pre-nationalisation malachite green on the Lord Nelson in the foreground of a few of these pics.

Now to the buses and coaches. I have now painted the first coat of Southdown light green on the Beadle and Duple coaches while tidying up the 'V' on the Marshall bus. The BR(S) green mentioned earlier also works well as Southdown's darker green! The first coats have been applied to the Duple coach skirts but, of course, there is a lot more tidying up to do before these will look presentable.





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Here's another pic of the HAL, this time with some more coats of the green and solebars, footboards and some of the details picked out in black. Roofs are still in undercoat and the bogies still have flash to be cleaned off before proper painting. Handrails on the cab ends and around the driver's and guard's doors are also yet to be added.

I suspect I have used too heavy wire for those main jumpers. Still they are relatively easy to change if I decide I don't like what I have done so far.


Sorry, I still don't have that focus quite sorted out. I used manual focus but I need to change the aperture priority to get better depth of field.

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Some nice looking stuff there Jeff. :thumbs

I'm not an "electric" man myself but I can see the appeal of those HAL units particularly for anyone living in "the South" of the UK.  My memories are more of A4 "Streaks" thundering through York.

The buses also are looking good and certainly some of them bring back memories of youthful days .............:roll::roll:

Regarding focus on the photos - I don't know what camera you have but if it's a "normal" digital, try taking a longer distance shot on "Auto", focus on the main subject then download the image to your computer.  You'll surely have some kind of "photo manipulation" software on the computer so use that to "crop" the photo to the area you need.  You'll find that, provided the original was sharp, the crop will also be sharp.  Trying to get a sharp picture using the zoom facility is almost impossible unless you have a very expensive lens and a steady hand.  Trying to take a close up shot is equally difficult with "everyday" cameras.  The lenses are simply not good enough even if your hands are steady enough.

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Good to see this coming along.

If you choose to use a smaller aperture (the higher numbers) the subject and background will come more into focus and it will help your image have a long depth of field.

Last edited on Wed Nov 23rd, 2011 07:57 am by ddolfelin

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Petermac wrote: Regarding focus on the photos - I don't know what camera you have but if it's a "normal" digital, try taking a longer distance shot on "Auto", focus on the main subject then download the image to your computer.  You'll surely have some kind of "photo manipulation" software on the computer so use that to "crop" the photo to the area you need.  You'll find that, provided the original was sharp, the crop will also be sharp.  Trying to get a sharp picture using the zoom facility is almost impossible unless you have a very expensive lens and a steady hand.  Trying to take a close up shot is equally difficult with "everyday" cameras.  The lenses are simply not good enough even if your hands are steady enough.

Peter, I am using a Nikon D3100 SLR, only bought earlier this year.  I do have some experience with photography, even teaching a unit on exactly the sort of things you have suggested. However, the lighting in the train room is not yet up to scratch and i prefer to kill the flash so I am still experimenting with distances and apertures versus exposure time. Ideally, I should rig some extra lighting for the photos and that would eliminate most of the depth of field problems as well as the possibility of camera shake due to longer exposures.

The other thing I could do is dig out the tripod ... gotta stop being so lazy! It's just that i want to get the photos quickly so I can post them then continue with the work. :roll:

Most of those photos have been cropped in PaintShop Pro but the depth of field is still very shallow even with all the various tricks.

Of course, everything you said and suggested is absolutely correct and worth noting for anyone reading these pages.  :thumbs


Thanks for the kind comments, guys.

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Sorry Jeff - I didn't realise you had "form" :oops::oops::oops:

This is the 2nd time on here I've dropped one regarding "photo advice" !!  I recall offering Perry some advice - he's a "Master Photographer", a member of the professional photographers organisation and a competition judge............I think I suggersted he use a bean bag. :lol::roll::roll:

My experience was also gained as a professional but nothing like the experience (or skill) he has.

Having said that, I do think I'd dig out my tripod .............:roll:

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Oops.

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More progress on the buses. I finished off the Southdown Tiger Cub and London 5Q5 for the annual modelling competition of the Model Bus Association of Australia, held today. The Southdown bus took first place in the 4mm kit built section, in spite of a few faults.

The first photo shows both of the  buses near completion. The 5Q5 has just had its windscreens glued in so the glue is still white but dries clear. The Little Bus Company kit comes with pre-printed windscreens but i put them somewhere safe, which means I still haven't found them and had to make up my own!



The Southdown Tiger Cub has its fleetnames in place but I ran out of medium sized Mackenzie script fleetnames so had to use some oversized versions. Also, I discovered a paint run on the nearside of the roof, too late to do anything about fixing it. The windscreens are now clear on the 5Q5 and I have (rather crudely) painted the red bars across them. The 5Q5 now has its fleetnames, registration numbers and badge in place.



I printed suitable destinations for both plus the Southdown registration numbers up and glued them in place. Unfortunately, the photos I took of the Tiger Cub are too blurred but the 5Q5 has come out OK. I'll post a final shot of the Tiger Cub later. You can see the slight roughness in the finish of the white areas.



Last edited on Sun Dec 4th, 2011 07:55 am by SRman

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looking good
:thumbs

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Thanks Dave.

I can see so many rough bits on the 5Q5 that I will have to do a little more work on it before I'm happy.

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Well done for taking the first prize Jeff - you must be very pleased, unless of course, you were the only entry :lol::lol:  . :cheers:cheers:cheers

Those buses do look rather neat - is the windscreen on the 5Q5 flat or is there a slope in them where the bars cross ?  If the latter, they must be pretty small pieces of perspex ...........:shock::shock::shock:


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No, there were quite a few entries in the kit-built section. Not so sure about the proprietary repaints  section though - I won that as well but I suspect that may have been a hollow victory!! It was the Southdown bus that won but the AEC Q came second so I didn't do too badly.

I should add that the competition rules mean that we can only enter two buses in any one category.

I didn't enter a diorama this year (I ran out of modelling time!) but I have won several times in the past. On a couple of occasions I entered a token entry to try to give others a chance (after winning several years in a row) only to find that I was the only entry!!

The 5Q5 windscreens have an angle in them, although I think mine might be at slightly too much of an angle. I simply scored the back of the clear plastic and bent it to suit. The line of the joint is also too high up so I will be redoing the windscreens at a later date.

Thanks for the compliments, too.  :)

Last edited on Mon Dec 5th, 2011 07:18 am by SRman

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Here is the finished product with my home computer-generated destination screens (on both) and number plates (on the Southdown bus).



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:doublethumb

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gdaysydney wrote: :doublethumb

 Snap !!!

They look great Jeff. :thumbs

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Thanks guys. :cheers

Last edited on Thu Dec 8th, 2011 11:05 am by SRman

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I have recently resurrected a part-finished project in the shape of a Silver Fox resin Class 22 'baby Warship' on a Bachmann Class 20 chassis. It has been "runnable" for some time but not complete in a number of ways.

I have now fully glazed the windows, after earlier drilling and filing out the solid engine room side window apertures. I flush-glazed the windscreens a couple of years ago but I think I will have to redo one of them. I also painted the body at that time but have now finished off most of the details. An added refinement was to fit Bachmann sprung buffers. I still need to tidy a couple of rough patches on the light stripe along one side, and then give it a good coat of varnish, followed by a decent weathering.

The major operation was to fit the resin sideframes to the bogies. The kit was designed to fit the Lima Class 20 chassis but the Bachmann side frame attachments are slightly further apart lengthways which meant that the bogies became rather flimsy and delicate after the operation. One in particular broke off one end, which meant the clip-fitting mechanism didn't hold the frame assembly to the main structure of the bogie - because the coupling is attached to the frame, put a load behind it and it would fall off! I overcame this with a sort of cat's cradle of wire reinforcements and araldite which have proved quite successful, as the locomotive can now haul a train of wagons facing either way without dropping a bogie frame onto the track and derailing or just stopping dead!

I then added some 60 thou plasticard ends and bottom to the fuel tanks to give a more solid appearance, then coated the lot with matt black.

The photos show the result to date, although the camera flash has highlighted all the plastic filings still lodged in the side radiator grilles - I'll have to brush those out later!






The red thing in one of the engine room windows is the TCS MC2 decoder. A later enhancement I am considering will be to drill out the headcodes and fit LEDs to illuminate them from behind.
 

Last edited on Mon Dec 12th, 2011 09:09 am by SRman

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That looks very good work to me, Jeff.

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After putting it off for a long time, I decided to resurrect my old Bachmann London Transport 0-6-0 pannier tank. Now this model was one of the old split chassis types so converting it to DCC required hard-wiring a decoder and creating a way for the chassis halves to connect to the decoder red and black wires.

Pulling it apart was quite easy, as even the chassis halves are only held together with two screws and two spacers. There were no bits that needed grinding off as the motor brushes simply pressed against each of the chassis halves and relied on the pressure for contact.

I chose a 9 pin connector that accepts several different types of decoder and cut off the white, yellow, blue and purple wires and shortened the red, black, grey and orange ones (there are never going to be any lights fitted to this model!).

Soldering the grey and orange wires to the brushes was straightforward, remembering to include a little heat-shrink tubing to slide over the brush connections to insulate them from the chassis completely.

I drilled a couple of holes, one each to the rear of each chassis half, sized to accept a 12BA brass screw. These screws were to allow me to solder the red and black wires to the chassis halves (one wire per chassis half). One of the screws was a little tight and actually sheared off but that was OK too, as I was still able to solder the wire to the brass stub.

Before soldering the red and black wires, I reassembled the motor and chassis. This was a bit fiddly as the spacers kept shifting before I could tighten the screws but I eventually managed to get it all together. I then soldered the red and black wires to those screws (or stubs!) mentioned earlier.

This is where the 9 pin connector comes in. I tested the set up with an old Digitrax DH123 decoder that has burnt out its lighting functions but still works for driving a motor. This decoder is expendable, as far as I am concerned! Anyway, it all worked perfectly first go. I tested on the programming track first and all seemed well, then tested using low voltage DC current and the wheels went round, so then I placed it on the main lines and ran it back and forth.

Having established that all was well, I swapped the decoder for a newer Train$ave budget decoder which also uses the 9 pin connector. While a little larger than i would like, it *just* fitted into the pannier's cab. Being black it is well hidden - there was little cab detail to see anyway as the motor/chassis block intrude well into the cab to start with. I had to grind away a little of the wheel splasher mouding in the cab floor to allow my solder connections on the sides of the chassis to clear them but all wnet together smoothly after that.

It is trundling happily around the layout even as I type this. It always had a bit of a rocking motion, in spite of my trying several different wheel sets quite some time ago. I settled on the best combination of wheels I could find, hence the appearance in the phot with the centre wheels having their rims painted out but the newer replacement wheels still having polished rims.

All of that took place last night. My final tasks this morning were to replace the solid buffers as the fairly close couplings were causing derailments on tighter curves due to the buffers coming into contact. I replaced them with some standard Bachmann round sprung buffers. I had to drill out the holes a little to allow fitment. A touch of glue, some red paint on the shanks, and a bit of matt black on those shiny wheel rims and it is now complete ... until I do a little more weathering on it.

The photo shows it before I painted the wheel rims and replaced the buffers. The BR van was a stop-gap to prevent the buffer problem untill I replaced them on the engine.



Last edited on Wed Jan 4th, 2012 11:46 pm by SRman

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Just adding an updated photo pf the LT pannier tank with paint now touched up below the footplate and sprung buffers added. I have been able to dispense with the BR van with longer couplings acting as a spacer.



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Interesting little project and looks like you have managed to get it running too, which is always rewarding. I had not heard of the trainsave decoders. I wonder why they decided to put 9 pins on them as they will not fit any of the standard DCC ready locos?

Bob(K)

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The 9 pin harness is a standard connector for the decoder end of harness. The other end can be an 8 pin plug or loose wires for hard-wiring as mine was.

It is.quite rewarding to get an older model like this one going. I do also have one of the latest DCC-ready Bachmann LT panniers on the way but it is nice to have a choice of locomotives to add variety.

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I have just received my Dapol/Kernow weathered class 22, D6315. Inspired by this, I decided to start weathering my Silver Fox version. While not yet complete, it is starting to look the part - that's the Silver Fox one in front! You can also see my new retaining walls from International Models and the asphalt-effect on the platform surfaces (more coats needed yet).






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At long last, I'll have some more Underground trains to run on DCC.

Spent several hours this afternoon soldering a TCS T1 decoder into my Harrow Models F stock driving motor coach, after receiving a second Black Beetle motor and fitting that with a home made plasticard adaptor arrangement. As I have already proved with the CO/CP stock, one decoder is perfectly able to cope with two Black Beetles. The operation took rather longer than I thought it would but it works perfectly on test.

Simultaneously, I have been building and painting an F stock single-ended driving motor (unpowered) and I still have to build two (or three) centre trailers to make a four car (or later, a five car) unit.

I am also going to do the same thing with the Q23 driving motor coach, likewise now with two Black Beetle motor bogies. The wiring will be less symmetrical in this one as I intend to hide the decoder in the end non-driving (guard's?) compartment. I have had this one running around on DC with its four other coaches (another Q23, a Q27, a Q31 and a Q38, to make a five car train) quite happily now for an hour or so. Will tackle the decoder fitting this evening.

While all bar the original double-ended F stock motor are not yet glazed it is an encouraging development for me. With storage or running space for five LT trains, I can now (or, at least, after this evening!) muster four full and one half LT trains on DCC: the five car Q stock, five car CO/CP stock (with a sixth trailer still in its box), two out of four or five cars of F stock, and two LT pannier tanks with assorted wagons.

Still to be converted to DCC are two motorised tube trains of 1938 stock (EFE).

Still to be built are an A60 stock train of four cars, 2 x C69 trains of four cars (Little Bus Company and Fleetmaster kits), while still to be motorised is a four car 1959/62 tube train (EFE).

Not all of these will fit on the layout at once but I am happy to be able to have a full roster on the LT lines whenever I want to now. However, until I get the high level tracks running, the LT lines will continue to host my main line stock as well.

 

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More interesting stuff, Jeff.

(I do like the colours on that tank).

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Photos of the above (and thanks for the kind comments, ddolfelin).

First two show one of two the Q23 motor driving coaches I have - this one is unpowered and the other has the two Black Beetles on board - and the 1938 CO/CP stock. The lack of glazing shows up badly here!






These next two pics show all three passenger EMUs, Q stock at left with Q27 driving motor (unpowered) leading, Q27 trailer car next, then the powered Q23, followed by Q38 trailer and unpowered Q23 DM. The numbers refer to the nominal year the coaches were built. To the right, in the platform, are the two coaches of 1920 F stock, and on the right of the platform is are the two trains of 1938 CO/CP stock running in multiple to make a five car train.







Last edited on Sun Mar 4th, 2012 12:44 am by SRman

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Returning to the 'Tin' HAL unit, I decided that the separate jumper cables I fitted a while back were too thick so I have now fitted finer wire jumpers and repainted the affected areas. The new jumpers may now be a fraction too spindly but a layer or two of paint will thicken them up a bit.



While I had the wire, the cutters and the pliers out, I spent an hour or two doing all the front end handrails and the windscreen wipers, plus the front lamp irons. The result is shown here.



Next major jobs are to do the glazing and lower the power bogie mounting a little (the earlier SPUD motor sat  at the correct height but the replacement Black Beetle needs a cut-out in the floor.

Then, there are all those door handles to fit!


Last edited on Fri Apr 13th, 2012 01:57 pm by SRman

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That looks really good Jeff and, whilst I'm not an officianado on this "green stuff", I don't think the jumpers are too fine at all - they look just right to an LNER/LMS guy ............:thumbs

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Thanks Peter. The centre jumper should be quite a bit thinner than the outer ones on the SR units which used the 1930s electrical systems, such as the 2HAL, 4SUB, 4LAV, 2BIL and so on.

Inspired to keep going, I got up this morning (after a sleep-in!) and cut out the floor section over the Black Beetle motor bogie. I modified the seating unit to allow the motor bogie to mount onto that instead where it forms the van section floor and that seems to be sitting at the right height now. Later today I'll see about wiring a decoder to the motor and adding extra pickups on the trailing bogie.

Once that is running successfully I'll see about rigging a working coupling between the two cars. That should then inspire me to complete the glazing of the unit.

EDIT: Addendum: I hard-wired an NCE decoder with a 9-pin JST connector so I can swap to a TCS decoder later without rewiring it all. No extra pickups yet so running is a little hesitant on curves but it has completed several circuits as a 1HAL!

Last edited on Sat Apr 14th, 2012 12:59 pm by SRman

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Just thinking about that last little bit, I realised that technically, since the motor coach has no lavatory access, while it was running around on its own it was a 1NOL !

Anyway, I have now rigged extra pickups on the trailing bogie of the motor coach and, unusually for me, run the wires very neatly through holes drilled in the upper corners of the compartment partitions.

Next, I rigged a simple hook and loop coupling system using some stiff brass wire drilled into the floor at right angles to the coupling plane. This tended to swivel a little initially so a notch was filed into each headstock and the couplings seated a little deeper into the floor; this was very successful, although the distance between coaches is a little greater than I would like, it negotiates the tightest curves comfortably with just a little clearance between the inner corners of the carriages (no variable couplings here, although it would be nice to use the system Hornby and Bachmann use on their units).

A little oil on the motor gears and axles and off it went. Tweaked the CVs a little to get smooth and consistent starts and it has now been happily trundling around for an hour.

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It sounds like an elegant solution, Jeff.

Are you able to show us a photo or two?

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Hi Max. Yes I'll take a photo or two to show the progress as well as the coupling solution. They'll follow a little later today, all going well.

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Lovely.  :thumbs

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Here we are, as promised; some photos.

The first group show the coupling system bent up from stiff brass wire. The hook is a simple 'Z' (or 'N' if you prefer!) shape with one end stuck into the floor and the other projecting downwards. There is a small groove cut into the headstock to locate the hook and stop it from swivelling. The loop is also sitting in the floor and a slot in the headstock but is made quite wide to allow for the end throws of the coaches on curves - by sheer luck I got this right first time.








... and coupled together it looks like this:




The second group of photos shows the unit as running at present, still with no glazing, no transfers and some detailing still to go but operational. At the DTC end only I have fitted some Roxey Models etched brass headcode stencils, although they have picked up some of the resin filings from my work on the unit, something I hadn't noticed until I took the photo! Sorry the depth of field is not very good on these - the shot I took from the other end of the unit was unusable. The stencils needed quite a bit of trimming to fit and even now are still a little oversized for the aperture - not sure if the model is undersize or the etchings are oversize.

I am seriously considering drilling out the headcode at the other end and fitting a directional LED to light it up in the forward direction.






Last edited on Sun Apr 15th, 2012 09:40 am by SRman

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I'm sure others will like this, Jeff.  :thumbs

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While work continues on the 2HAL, I have followed a quick diversion into something more modern. On Friday I received a Bratchell Models kit for a Class 455 four-car EMU in Network SouthEast (NSE) livery. While the Ayjay 2HAL was listed as a "simple asembly" kit (which it largely is), the Bratchell kit comes pre-painted in the complex NSE livery, complete with coach and unit numbers and all logos printed on.

The first photo shows the body shells already assembled (sides, ends and roofs are all separate components), with one coach fitted with the windows (which are pre-printed with the chrome/aluminium surrounds), and the other still to be done. A few of the windows are shown in front of the coach.



These kits are largely made of ABS plastics so a good solvent is needed to join everything properly. For the windows, though, I used Micro Kristal Klear liquid glazing as the glue. Using this substance as the glue, any slips or errors will dry clear.

To motorise the EMU, Bratchell recommend two Black Beetle motors but, encouraged by the success with a previous DC Kits' 4EPB kit, I chose to use a Replica Railways motorised chassis, originally intended for their BR(S) Motor Luggage Van (MLV). For the 455, though, 12mm wheels have to be specified. Bratchell did advise that if using the Replica chassis, the bogie wheelbase would be 1mm out, which means cutting-and-shutting the bogie side frames if one wishes the axleboxes to line up with the axle ends. Because the Replica chassis bogies have clip in dummy side frames, it is quite easy to glue the modifed kit side frames to these and then file down any excess bits of plastic showing through, yet have a strong result because the original side frames are reinforcing the modified kit ones.

I ordered the wheel and coupling pack with the kit, and assembly of the bogies was reasonably straight-forward, with most of the trailer bogie sides requiring the end steps cut off beforehand. The kit instructions are mostly quite clear, although the hand-drawn diagrams sometimes leave a little to be desired.

I have temprarily clipped the bases into the sides without any additional weights, and sent the unit around the layout for a few turns.



What you see in the photo is the result straight from the kit with no painting apart from a small touch-up of the yellow at the corners of the front ends. Still to be done: fit the Scharfenberg couplings to the front ends (that's them sitting to the left of the track), add all the underframe equipment, add weights, add seats and paint the roofs and underframes, then add the front jumper cables, horns and handrails (not included in the kit). I also intend improving the printed-on lights.  I will also print up some destination screens to glue inside the apertures above the windscreens. The ride height of the Motor Second Open (MSO) coach, second in the photo, needs to be lowered very slightly.

These kits are not cheap but I am impressed with the general forethought that has gone into the design and fit of the various bits - I have done very little cleaning up of flash or moulding pips. Bratchell do advertise a "ready to motorise" assembly service for another 47 GB Pounds for a four car unit.

Further down the track, a little weathering of the front end and underframes and roofs will complete the model.


Last edited on Sun Apr 22nd, 2012 11:49 am by SRman

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Although it's a kit, they still need the care you have shown, Jeff.

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I have added a little more weight into each of the unpowered coaches now, in light of test running. Generally it is running well but there were intermittent and inconsistent derailments, which seem to have disappeared now with the extra weight, running in either direction. I put the motorised chassis in the MSO (Motor Second Open), just as in the prototype, where the MSO has all four traction motors (recovered from scrapped 4SUB units, so much older than the trains themselves!).

I have also now added the underfloor detailing, although, while clear about positioning, the instruction sheets are not entirely clear as to orientation of a few of the components.

In one DTSO (Driving Trailer Second Open) I have experimentally put some seats I bought at a swap meeting some time ago, intended for an Australian model but ideal for the 455 as it has 3 + 2 seating. They had to be cut up a bit to fit the door arrangement and raised end floor of the chassis but overall it doesn't look too bad.

I have taken a few photos but they are still in the camera right now - I'll post them in the next day or so.

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Nice work Jeff - :thumbs

your comment about derailing - I have found that with most DMUs ( including the old Triang Blue Pullman that I upgraded ) that they are prone to derailment when running with the motorised unit at the back end. Additional weight in the non-motorised cars and making sure the buffers have plenty of clearance has, in my experience reduced the number of derailments to a more tolerable level
:hmm

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Here are the new pics, as promised earlier, showing the underframe equipment fitted. I'm still not 100% sure I have it all in the right orientations, although the placings were clearer in the diagrams. The bases of the kit have locating ridges, although I had to guess more with the replacement of the MSO's chassis with the Replica one.







Last edited on Thu Apr 26th, 2012 08:34 am by SRman

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Now, to improve those printed on lights and add some of the other front-end details.

For the lights, I found I had some brass tube of the right diameter (alright, a teensy bit small for the headlight but right for the marker/tail lights!).

I cut five short sections of the brass tube and filed any out-of-square ends square again.

I drilled out the lights on the front of the coach, to the outer diameter of the brass tubing.

I then superglued the tubing into the holes, leaving the ends just proud of the front surface, except for the headlight which was mounted flush. In fact, I need to redo the tail light on the right (as you look at the front) as it is projecting just a little more than the rest, and also slightly crooked.

I painted all the brass bits in a Humbrol bright yellow but this will need toning down to match the more faded yellow effect of the Bratchell finish - a touch of thinned Humbrol primrose should do the trick.

Next, the jumpers. Using photos as a guide, I drilled holes where each jumper or connection needed to go. I intended adapting some EPB type cables but actually used some Blacksmith cast white metal cables and sockets intended for the 1930s SR EMUs, simply because they were ready to hand and looked just as suitable. In either case some adaptaion and modification is required for accuracy. I haven't modified the jumper socket on the right in the pic although it really needs to be a bit more rounded. These will all need to be painted orange, with black cables/pipes.

The pic shows the work in progress.



Next, I'll do the cab front handrails.

Then, I have to repeat all this for the otehr driving cab! :roll:

Last edited on Sat Apr 28th, 2012 12:42 pm by SRman

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A little further progress on the Bratchell class 455 unit to report. The first pic shows the jumper sockets and bits painted orange, and yellow for the air pipes, with the cables and pipes themselves painted black. There may be a few touch-ups to do yet.



Then, I added some handrails, using steam-type handrail knobs. At first I tried blind ones at the ends of the handrails but this mostly ended with more of the knobs in my caroet than were actually on the model! They do appear overscale and the handrails seem to project further than they should but I don't think I can do much better than this. It remains to paint the handrails white.



More to follow soon!


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Inspired by a "livery that never was" from a member on another forum, I have started repainting my old Triang-Hornby Hymek into a maroon "might have been" colour scheme. Please bear in mind that this is a work in progress and that there is still quite a bit of touching up and detailing to do. I also experimented with leaving the cab window surrounds white or painting them the same pale grey as the roof and lower lining band ... I think I prefer the white, myself.







The model itself has two pre-ringfield motor bogies fitted and through wired so runs remarkably smoothly and will pull the side out of the house! I have detailed it with etched brass roof fan and grille plus new wire front handrails and turned brass horns.

I am thinking along the lines of using the BR coach stock roundel as part of this livery experiment.

The yellow warning panels still need repainting as do the aluminium window and grille surrounds on the sides.

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Further progress on the maroon Hymek: I chose the coach stock roundel and some off-white numbers (I do have some etched stainless steel ones to use if I wish, though). Still to go are a few minor tweaks to the yellow warning panels, some headcodes, a coat or two of varnish and some flush glazing. It is posed beside a green Heljan model for comparison.




I must get back to finishing the class 455 after this!

Last edited on Wed Jul 25th, 2012 12:26 pm by SRman

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Hi Jeff,

Is that the early early livery for the hymek?  I had a BR blue one in the 70's-80's with a set of container wagons.  All sold off to buy better detail models.

Mark

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Hi Mark. I had actually thought along the lines that the Westerns started off in green (ignoring the desert sand one) before they experimented with maroon and the Warships all started in green, so the Hymeks may have been the next to be considered for maroon. Of course, in the real world, they had decided on blue before this could have occurred but it was an interesting idea to pursue and far more imaginative than my usual modelling!

It was inspired by D605Eagle's maroon hymek (with no grey skirts) on the NewRailwayModellers forum, so even there I can't really claim originality!  :roll:

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I do like the look of this  new colour scheme Jeff.


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I have been busy finishing or adding to a few projects in the last couple of weeks.

I have now flush-glazed that maroon Hymek (photos will follow later).

I finished the platforms (as shown in my layout thread). 

I glued the remaining ballast down (again, see my layout thread).

I tried out an alternative method for modelling the front handrails on the class 455 unit. I drilled the three mounting holes as before but this time I bent the wire to fit each end into the end holes and glued a short piece of micro-rod into the remaining hole and cut it off at the distance the handrail had to be supported off the cab front, then superglued the handrail into the holes and onto the rod. It looks much better and less coarse than the earlier effort so I'll now have to redo the handrails on the other cab end! I still have to mount the jumper cables on this end but that will be relatively easy. Again, photos will follow soon.

My Freighliner class 57/0 (a Bachmann model) has been irritating me for a while with two of the three forward lights out at one end (one marker light and the headlight). I decided to investigate a bit more thoroughly to see what was wrong. I dismantled the loco so that I could get at the lighting circuit board and LEDs. This one had sound fitted (a Howes aftermarket ESU LokSound) and I didn't want to damage the decoder (in fact I decided to transfer it to my "Purple Ronnie" 57 601) and I temporarily fitted a DCC blanking plug and tested it with an analogue (DC) controller. Sure enough, the two LEDs were still not lighting up, so I rigged a couple of AA batteries and a pair of wires to test the LEDs individually.

The white headlight lit up perfectly with the batteries, indicating a wiring problem.

The yellow marker light refused to light up, indicating the LED itself had failed.

So ... I was dealing with two separate problems! Tracing the wires back to the main pcb on the locomotive, I worked out that both the yellow and the blue wires were broken at the soldered joints on the main pcb. Having fixed those, the white and one working yellow light lit up on DC power. First problem fixed!!

I then found an approximate replacement for the faulty yellow LED, a 'lighthouse' yellow LED. To match the Bachmann item I had to chop off a little of the extension cylinder, then soldered it into place after carefully noting which way round the anode and cathode were on the original one. I trimmed the legs and resoldered the yellow wire (which had dropped off when desoldering the original LED), then tested. The yellow was a little dimmer and a slightly different colour compared to the original but I can live with that - in fact, I might even be tempted to replace the others as the new one looks rather better than the originals!

I reassembled the Freightliner 57 with the decoder out of 57 601 (a TCS M1P) with much cursing as the screws kept dropping into the wrong places and one of the tail light guides came unglued and dropped out while I was reassembling but it all tested out OK and now looks reasonable running in either direction (I had to keep it facing one way before to hide the faulty lighting). :brickwall

The sound swap into 'Purple Ronnie' didn't go entirely smoothly; I had to remove the fan group to clear the speaker and I fitted the decoder plug the wrong way round (the marking of pin 1 on the Bachmann pcb was wrong! The lights didn't work because of this), then lost one of the body screws when reassembling after reversing the decoder plug but that, too, is now running perfectly ... with sound. :brickwall

All in all, a reasonably productive couple of weeks. :cheers

Last edited on Sun Aug 19th, 2012 10:12 am by SRman

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I forgot: one more project was to fit headcodes to the Dapol/Kernow class 22. I chose some Heljan Western headcodes to fit inside the headcode boxes, which entailed removing the cab interiors by cutting the glue until they loosened sufficiently to take out. this pic also shows some of the newly completed ballasting.



The maroon Hymek with glazing.



The class 455 with the new treatment of the handrails - these have to be painted white when I am ready.



The Bachmann class 57/0 57 008 'Freightliner Explorer' lights. In the second pic you can see that one of the marker lights (the new one!) is a little dimmer.







And here is the Bachmann Collectors' Club Porterbrook class 57, 57 601, now with sound fitted (if you put your ear to the photo you may just be able to hear it! ;-) ). Enthusuasts nicknamed it "Purple Ronnie".





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I know this has been seen before but I have now converted the maroon Hymek, D7013, to DCC operation, with one TCS T1 decoder wired to both motors in parallel. It was an absolute sod to wire up: I soldered the brush feeds to brass tags but every time I threaded all the wires through, at least one would break off again! I also had to cut away the copper feed to the 'live' brush (as Triang/Hornby had originally wired it) and insulate both brush springs on each motor bogie. Anyway, after turning the air blue for a while, it all works rather nicely now.




A different project, but also a sod of a job, was doing the wasp stripes and cab end glazing on the Maunsell diesel-electric shunter. This also has been hard-wired to run on DCC but the DCC Concepts decoder was much easier to wire in and secrete behind the radiator. The tricky bit was finding somewhere to put the stay-alive capacitor but I eventually stuck it in behind the fuel tank on one side. It is still not quite sitting properly on its chassis but I'll fix that properly after I have fitted all the handrails and the footsteps. It will be numbered 15201 but it has not yet received any transfers.






The wasp stripes are still a teensy bit uneven but I am reasonably happy that they only need a few minor corrections now.

Last edited on Sun Sep 23rd, 2012 10:16 am by SRman

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Brake vans!

I received three variations of the Hornby ex-SR 'pill box' brake vans recently. The left-hand ducket version has a minor fault, in that Hornby have modelled the guard's stove chimney on the wrong side - the stove woould be obstructing access to the ducket if the model was correct! I decided to cut off the Hornby chimney. Unfortunately, it flew off into the ether ... or, at least, into the carpet!

Not too upset with this, I smoothed off the roof where it had been, then cut a small piece of thin brass tube off to represent the replacement chimney. I drilled a hole in the roof opposite where the chimney had been and superglued the new brasss tube into it.

These operations meant I had to repaint the roof, so I thought I would start weathering the model as well. The photos show the results so far, together with my Cambrian Kit right-hand ducket version, which I have also been weathering.










I think I need to blend the black patch around the chimney a little more but, overall, it is taking shape quite nicely.

With the forthcoming Bachmann C class 0-6-0 in fully lined SECR livery due soon after the New Year, I started assemblinga train of private owner wagons to go with it. However, there were no suitable brake vans for this train, either already in my collection or in ready to run form. The Cambrian SECR 'Dance Hall' brakes are too modern (although not by much!) so I had to shop around a bit, eventually settling on a Roxey Models etched brass LCDR brake van kit.

This kit required the sides to be built up from three layers of brass, something I was not too sure of doing with my own soldering skills. However, my good friend Doug (who also did the baseboard engineering) has a resistance soldering kit, so I asked him if he would mind laminating the three layers for me - I considered I was quite capable of soldering up the body box and solebars, etc. Anyway, two day after giving Doug the flat kit, he dropped in after work to present me with a complete body assembly with solebars and axleguards all fitted - he said he enjoyed doing it and got 'a bit carried away'!  :mutley

I have subsequently been adding the white metal fittings like axleboxes and springs and all the various etched brass rivetted hinges, strapping and 'T' pieces, plus a plasticard floor and extra end cross-planks. There a few etched bits still to go on, plus all of the brake gear, the long side footboards and some handrails but the photos show the progress to date. Incidentally, I use superglue to attach the rivetted bits.










One of the spring hangers on the opposite side broke off, so I'm going to have to get the low-melt solder out to fix that.

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Hi Jeff,
nice work.
I have just finished a Metcalfe Viaduct today.
Mark

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Thanks Mark.

The Metcalfe kits generally go together well. I'll look forward to seeing the results in due course. :cool:

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Not exactly on my work bench (it doesn't fit!) but I recently worked on a small diorama for the Model Bus Association of Australia's annual modelling competition. I didn't actually get it finished in time but entered it anyway in an incomplete state. Since it didn't win, I can finish it off and re-enter it next year (winning entries are not allowed to re-enter).




It was built on the remains of a previous diorama which was to the original competition rules of being 200 square inches or less (a 'squinch') but I cut another strip off of it to allow it to fit into the school library's shelves when they have a hobbies display. Current rules allow up to 400 square inches.






I have kept the scenery generic so it can represent any country area and almost any modelling era. For this entry I used a First Bus Olympian with Northern Counties Palatine II body (an OOC model) and placed my Hornby class 153 Sprinter with Electra Railway Graphics overlays on the track, so it could be a branch somewhere in the Avon/Somerset area.




Still needed are some finishing edges and backscenes, people and more fences.















I probably need to do a couple of supports for the bridge too!






Last edited on Sun Dec 16th, 2012 01:10 am by SRman

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Excellent, Jeff.  :thumbs

I really like the girder bridge.

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Thanks Max. I'm not sure what the source of the plate girders was - years ago I bought a whole heap of them and have been using and re-using them ever since. The 'H' girders are straight out Plastruct, recycled from the old layout's station overbridge.

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Yet another project started (while several others continue, unfinished!). I decided to make a start on my Golden Arrow Productions ex-LSWR G16 4-8-0T heavy shunter. I have cleaned up the resin body a bit and filled a couple of holes, drilled out the chimney, smokebox door and handrail holes, and glued in the smokebox 'dart' and the main handrails.



The kit is designed to fit a modified Hornby Stanier 8F 2-8-0 chassis. This entails sawing off a bit from the back and mounting a resin block, adding a front extension, and shifting the valve gear and cylinders forward a bit (the valve gear operates off the second axle on the G16 but the third axle on the Stanier original).



Of course there are many other details that will need to be added as I go. I have some LSWR sprung buffers to hand, a suitable whistle, and things like lamp irons will have to be fabricated and added.









At least the livery will be simple - all over unlined black!







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That's a great looking body Jeff but it seems to require quite a bit of alteration to the donor chassis. :roll::roll:  Is there nothing more suitable ?

I'm not sure if it's a typo but you say this is a 4-8-0 heavy shunter ............being fitted to a 2-8-0 chassis. :???:  Does that mean you also have to replace the bogie ?

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Spot on, Peter! A resin bogie is provided in the kit bits and pieces. I need to source a matching pair of wheels for the bogie though.

The Hornby Stanier chassis is the recommended one and this is what the extra bits provided in the kit are designed to fit. I don't relish having to shift the valve gear cranks from the third to the second axle though - the geared axle has to remain where Hornby decided it should go!

These were impressive looking machines and, apparently, were dead reliable in real life even during the war when maintenance was minimal to non-existent.

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I primed the G16 body shortly after taking those previous photos. This showed up a few imperfections so I have cleaned those up. Next stage is to spray another coat of primer.




I  also got brave and tackled the preliminary work on the Hornby chassis mods. I removed the works and cut the wring (it will be a complete rewire job anyway!). Swapped the crankpins between the third (geared) and second axles as per the GAP instructions then chopped off the rear 6mm from the chassis. The resin piece at the rear is a good push fit but needs to be glued on properly.



Tip: Where possible, I put the screws back into their respective holes after removing components as this allows me to keep better track of which screw goes where.

Last edited on Sun Dec 30th, 2012 10:20 am by SRman

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And yet more progress. This is going much quicker than I anticipated!




I need to get hold of another, matching pair of wheels for the front bogie.


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And now with cylinders and valve gear fitted.




ddolfelin
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Might be easier to look for 4 wheels than two matching, Jeff.

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A good thought and one that was also at the back of my mind, particularly as photos appear to show slightly larger bogie wheels. I must check the specifications of the real G16s.

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How do they comnpare with spoked wagon wheels Jeff ?  There's a whole raft of suppliers for those .........:roll:

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These are 10-spoke 14mm diameter wheels with no pinpoint axle ends (for internal bearings) whereas most wagon wheels are 12mm with pinpoints.

I was looking on line and Rails of Sheffield now list Romford/Jackson products (they seem to be expanding their ranges to include these smaller items lately) and have exactly what I need for a reasonable price ... so reasonable I was looking for something else to order to take advantage of the postage cost!  :lol:

Last edited on Wed Jan 2nd, 2013 12:55 am by SRman

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There's a shop in Wakefield, Yorkshire, that had an impressive stock of wheels when I was last in there Jeff.

If you only want a couple of axles, they shouldn't cost too much to post.   I'll find their website and get back to you.

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'Ere 'tis:

http://www.modelandcraftcentre.co.uk

They have a great range of model railway items in all scales although I doubt they'll be as cheap as the box shifters. :cheers

Having looked at their website, it's tiny compared with their stock.  An e-mail would reap rewards I feel. :thumbs

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Thanks for that link, Peter. Rails didn't quite match the spec after all - the ones they list are 12 spoke. I can get away with this but would prefer the correct type if I can get it.
Following your link now!
Cheers.
:cheers

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After three days of ice packs on my face and pain killers I have had to have a root canal job on a tooth. Now that I'm recovering and feeling human again, I have pushed the G16 project a little further.

I have put a temporary wheelset on the bogie and given the body a preliminary coat of black.

On reading the potted history of the class in the instructions, I have realised that I need to remove the capuchon from the chimney - a few strokes of a file will fix this. I am almost ready to fit some of the small parts like the steps at the front of the footplate and te cab roof ventilator. Also before the final coats of paint go on, I need to add the wires/pipes that go diagonally from the fronts of the tanks to a position just behind those bulges over the cylinders, and add some lamp irons. The sprung LSWR buffers I have for it will go on after spray painting has been completed.

At this point it seems to be moving freely so I can consider putting the motor and intermediate gear back in.





Last edited on Thu Jan 3rd, 2013 08:11 am by SRman

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Coming on nicely.

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It looks much better in black Jeff. :thumbs

I wasn't at all sure when it was in grey - it looked a little "out of balance" ............rear end "heavy" :roll:

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Thanks guys.

I reckon it looks rear-end heavy regardless, Peter ... but then, so does the prototype!! The H16 4-6-2 tanks were similar but looked better balanced. But I do have a weakness for multi-driving wheeled locomotives; they look much more impressive for a given size. Just look at Gresley's P2 2-8-2s (which are to come in OO this year from Hornby).

:mutley :mutley :mutley

Last edited on Thu Jan 3rd, 2013 10:42 am by SRman

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:hmm:hmm

:mutley:mutley:mutley

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A brief update (no pics at this point): I reinstalled the motor and idler gear and hooked up the wires from the brushes temporarily to the pick up wires and tested it on DC test leads. It ran fine so I switched the outer circuit to DC and ran it around for a bit, minus the front bogie. There was a very slight tight spot and there is an annoying ticking noise with each revolution of the drivers but I traced that to the articulated joints on the couplng rods hitting the spacer washer on the valve gear on the second axle so it is harmless. 

Once I was happy with it I pulled it off the track again and installed a TCS M1 decoder, hard-wired to keep it simple. The chassis was again tested after checking on the programming track that nothing was amiss. I left it running for a while then tackled the front bogie, which is still sporting a wheel set from the original 8F donor and another wheel set from an old Triang-Hornby King Arhur.

I needed a spring of some sort to keep the bogie on the track so tried making a coil spring myself but this proved too thick. I thought about it for a while then remembered I had all the springy axle retainers from the EFE tube cars (I took them all out because they act as 'handbrakes' on each axle!). This took a bit of trial and error but I eventually got it so it acted on the bogie without trying to lift the front drivers off the track but still had sufficient pressure to keep the leading bogie wheels on the track.

I filed the capuchon off the chimney and added a couple of spots of filler to the odd blemish here and there. I will add the front steps, toolbox, lubricator pipe runs, cab roof ventilator, lamp irons and clack valves (I haven't figured out what to use for these last yet!), then give it a final coat of paint before adding transfers, varnish and weathering, in that order.

Finally, I added an older style Bachmann short tension lock coupler, screwed into the old tender coupling mount using the original screw. Just for effect it has been towing around one of the new Bachmann ex-Southern 'pill box' brake vans around.

So, to sum up, this has been another successful session in getting it to run and nearer to being completed. I would esrimate that I will have t completed in the next couple of weeks at the rate I'm going, and allowing for the fact I'll have to wait for paint coats to dry and transfers to set.

Once it is done I'll take a short video of it in action just to complete the picture.

Last edited on Sun Jan 6th, 2013 10:10 am by SRman

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My 14mm 10-spoke bogie wheels arrived today from Mainly Trains in England, so I wasted no time in fitting them and testing again. Before I show the pic of it with the new wheels, though, I took a photo the other day before decoder fitting but after adding the motor and works back in and temporarily hooking up the wires for testing on analogue (12V DC). This also shows the various mods and add-on bits.



And now, with the body on, decoder fitted and the new bogie wheels. The capuchon has now been filed off the chimney and a small amount of filler added to the ridge on the cab roof where there was a slight gap in the casting.



I did intend taking a pic of the bogie springing arrangement but forgot to do that before screwing the bogie back on. Haulage power is good but I reckon it'll be even better when I add some lead sheet to the insides of the side tanks!

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Only a little more progress to report on both the ex-LSWR G16 tank and on the Ayjay Models 'Tin' 2 HAL kit. I have painted the bogie wheels to better match the rest (i.e. got rid of those shiny silver tyre rims!) and given the whole locomotive a second coat of black. It is now too black as this really hides any detail (an also any inaccuracies!!). The chassis needs a small adjustment as the mounting gives the body a very slight lean to one side.



I have finally got around to glazing the Ayjay Models 'Tin' HAL Which features in some earlier entries in this topic. I use Micro Krystal Klear glazing liquid as a glue to stick clear plastic/acetate in. If any gets on the glazing itself, it can be washed off with water while wet and dries clear so any that does get missed on the glazing barely shows anyway. The first photo shows the unit in service with its newly added windscreens - the glue is still wet on the left-hand one. The other photos are more general views. I have not yet painted the seats, so that's the next job on the agenda.






Last edited on Tue Jan 15th, 2013 09:26 am by SRman

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More on the 2 HAL: I have now started painting the interiors. I know they started with a reddish-brown for second class (ex-third class) but I have no idea what colour the first class seats should be. I chose a French blue on the strength of Hornby using blue for their Maunsell coaches but this is a tenuous guess at best! I will also paint the antimacassars white or cream for first class only.

The roofs were still in undercoat before and have now had a coat of a darker grey.

The interior shots also show how I have run the wires for the extra pickups rigged in the trailing bogie, plus the lead weight over the leading end (hidden in the van section) and the NCE decoder.










I have left the extra wires at full length on the decoder because I may fit lights at a later date, and possibly a third rail flash over the leading bogie shoe.

Last edited on Sat Jan 19th, 2013 07:17 am by SRman

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How easy was it to get the bodies off those Jeff ?

I have a couple of Bachmann DMU's to chip but I understand removing the bodies is quite tricky.  Also, I'd really like to have a sound chip in at least one of them.  The problem is, they're quite heavy so postage (to my "sound engineer" in Blackwood ;-)) would be significant.

I certainly don't have the skill to install a sound chip myself ................:cry::cry:

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On these kits I haven't fastened the bodies on yet, so they are a simple loose fit, held at the cab ends by the buffer shanks protruding in behind the buffer beam. I may lose this feature if I decide to fit white metal buffers to replace the cast on resin ones.

The Bachmann DMUs are all DCC-ready. The bodies come off on the Derby 108 by undoing a screw, off-centre under the cab end and lifting and unclipping along the sides. The Cravens class 105 is even simpler as it doesn't have the screw (although the side clips are quite stiff). The decoder is 8-pin and simply plugs in (don't worry if you get it backwards as this will merely stop the lights from working (in which case you reverse the decoder plug).

The ESU decoders are too big to fit in the recess on top of the motor block so I put mine on the leading face of the block, inside the passenger saloon. I also removed the seats from the passenger bay ahead of the motor and fitted a larger bass reflex speaker which really brings out the lovely exhaust resonance on the Howes sound chip.

The first two pics show the position of the screw on the 108.





The sides then need to be spread slightly to release the clips.

This photo shows the position of the plug and socket, behind the motor casing, and how I have positioned the decoder, removed seats and placed the large speaker.



Just getting the decoder and speaker and doing it yourself will save you a lot of postage, Peter! If you stick with the smaller speaker it will fit on the seat backs, or you could remove a small section within the seat unit to seat the decoder further down.

I haven't got any of the Derby Lightweight units (early style) but the mechanisms are all but identical to the 108 and 105 units.

[Post edited with a few pics added.]

Last edited on Sat Jan 19th, 2013 10:10 am by SRman

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Thanks for that Jeff.  Maybe not as difficult to get the bodies off as I've read.  I think there's a troublesome brass contact strip for the lights just behind the cab :roll: - I hear it can be a bit of a PITA.

Also, I thought these DMU's needed either 2 decoders or a connection from the motor unit to the trailer car.  Somewhere on here, someone used a rather neat looking mini-plug/socket for the connection.........:roll::roll:

Do you buy these Howes chips ready loaded with all the sounds just to plug in ?

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Petermac wrote: Also, I thought these DMU's needed either 2 decoders or a connection from the motor unit to the trailer car.  Somewhere on here, someone used a rather neat looking mini-plug/socket for the connection.........:roll::roll:

Was it this by any chance:-




Perhaps we should try to arrange a "chipping" day here in the UK? With some combined expertise and experience, we ought to be able to do a number of decoders in a few hours. Maybe next time you come over, Peter.

(Sorry Jeff, I will let you have your thread back now)

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That's the one Geoff. :thumbs

Your offer of a "chipping day" could be one you'll live to regret having made .................:hmm:hmm  I'm planning a "UK run" in early February................

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Geoff R wrote: Petermac wrote: Also, I thought these DMU's needed either 2 decoders or a connection from the motor unit to the trailer car.  Somewhere on here, someone used a rather neat looking mini-plug/socket for the connection.........:roll::roll:

Was it this by any chance:-


Perhaps we should try to arrange a "chipping" day here in the UK? With some combined expertise and experience, we ought to be able to do a number of decoders in a few hours. Maybe next time you come over, Peter.

(Sorry Jeff, I will let you have your thread back now)

Answering Peter first: Yes they require two decoders (three if it is a three-car unit). Older releases require an 8-pin decoder in the trailer(s), newer releases require a 6-pin decoder. As they are purely for the lighting functions you can use a function only decoder or, as I do, discarded cheap Hornby decoders, which are cheaper than function-only decoders! Or, as you say, you can use a mini-connector to transfer power to the trailer lights - you would need at least a three-pin connection for this.

Geoff: this is a workbench thread so every bit of information that helps someone else (or me, for that matter!) is more than welcome.
Besides, you should read my tag line with reference to thread hijacking!  ;-)  :cool:

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Petermac wrote: That's the one Geoff. :thumbs

Your offer of a "chipping day" could be one you'll live to regret having made .................:hmm:hmm  I'm planning a "UK run" in early February................

You know you are welcome any time, Peter. When you have a firm date, send me a PM and we can take it from there. I can easily set us up to fit a few standard decoders and preloaded sound decoders, but I don't have the gear that Max has for loading custom sound projects - although I do know a man who has and who is not too far from here. He may be willing to help as well.

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I spent a short time this afternoon gluing the steps, toolbox and cab roof vent on the G16, followed by filing the rear body mounting to make it sit more levelly. The Christmas bag in the photos was to hide the glare from the TV as I decided to take the photos in the sitting room next to a window.

Still to add before painting are the lamp irons from flattened brass wire, remembering that these Southern locomotives had six lamp irons at each end, lubricator pipe runs, and the clack valves and feed pipes near the front of the boiler.

To be added after painting are buffers, safety valves and whistle, plus the cab door hand rails (to be made from modified Peco track pins, as per the kit instructions).






Last edited on Tue Jan 22nd, 2013 07:02 am by SRman

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It's a handsome fellow, Jeff.   :thumbs

It is still running OK with all the bits and bobs now in place?

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It runs fine on the larger radius curves but I need to increase the side play on the bogie just a little more for the inner radius. Otherwise, I'm quite pleased with the way it is progressing.

There is room for some extra weight to be added although it coped with its first heavy train the other day.

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Whilst "handsome" is hardly the word I'd have used Max, that TV "fill-in flash" has given it a nice metalic paint finish Jeff. ;-)

She looks like quite a beastie.  I need to read a bit about the prototype I think to see what she was really like in terms of performance.

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They were rather rugged looking machines - I'm not too sure about 'handsome' Max! However, beauty is in the eye of the beholder and I do think they are beautiful locomotives in the aforementioned 'rugged' way.  :lol: :cool:

There were only four of them, then the very similar H16 4-6-2Ts were built (all five of them! The H16s had straight tops at a lower level on their side tanks). All were based for most of their lives at Feltham.

The G16s were used for hump shunting at Feltham but also on transfer freights and empty passenger stock movements, often to Clapham Junction, so are ideal for model railway movements. The H16s were used similarly but got a little further afield, to Willesden on the transfer freights.

The G16s were reputed to be the most powerful tank engines in the UK.

Since my last post, I have taken the front bogie off and filled a little more side clearance for the mounting screw and cut off the cross extensions on the ex-EFE metal spring so it it is now essentially a strip of springy steel with two holes n it.

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Since most of the remaining painting required will be by brush, I decided it was time to add the buffers, after first painting the buffer beams and shanks red. There was a minor disaster when I dropped one of the sprung buffers and it fell apart on the floor. I fished around with a torch for extra illumination for a while and eventually reunited the buffer head, shank, spring and tiny retaining screw! I do have to check to see if that rear buffer beam should be red for its entire depth or only for the bit up to a level with the tops of the buffer shanks. One buffer seems to have drooped slightly so I'll have to reseat it before I'm done.

There is still a bit of filling and filing/sanding to do but overall the painting can proceed apace. I even started a little of the weathering finish, with dark grey (Humbrol #67) darkened with a little black painted on to the cab roof, smokebox and footplate.

Oh yes ... and I have filed down the outer sides of those 8F cylinders a bit.






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A quick diversion from G16s and 2 HALs: I decided to experiment with one of my Hornby 4 VEPs to 'fix' the problem of the first class compartments not having windows (or doors!) into the corridor (a slight oversight by Hornby!).

I rummaged through some spare seating units I had lying around until I found a composite unit with four first class compartments. I lifted the Hornby body off one of the Driving Trailer Composite coaches (DTC) - they simply clip off - and checked the compartment spacing against the potential replacement. They matched to within half a millimetre; I figured that I would easily lose that much in the saw cuts when cutting the existing seat unit. I also noted that I would have to remove about 2mm from each side of  the new unit to match the width.

Anyway, several saw cuts later plus a bit of cleaning up with a heavy file, I was able to shoehorn the new section in and test fit the body for clearances. It worked well after removing a little from the top edges to fit under the Hornby lighting unit. The only thing wrong was that the lights shone right through the unpainted plastic of the new bit!

A coat of paint soon fixed that last problem. I haven't even bothered to fill the slight gaps in the seat backs where the saw cuts went through, as the 4 VEP curtains hide those quite well.

Here are a couple of photos to show the end result. Now I only have to do this with three more DTCs!





Next time I do one I'll take a photo of the interior before clipping the bodies back on. That will also show how I avoided the wiring attached at the end of the seat unit, outside what should be the toilet.

Last edited on Mon Jan 28th, 2013 08:30 am by SRman

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Another diversion from layout building and work on the G16 and 2 HAL. I looked at my Lima class 31, 31 327 in Railfreight grey and thought I would like to do something useful with it, as the 30/31 was a particularly good model from the Lima stable. Some years ag I fitted separate handrails to the front of my blue 31 004 and repainted the yellow ends completely. 31 327 had been languishing in a drawer because it had never had the side handrails which were supposed to be supplied in the box but weren't.

I decided to shave off the moulded on handrails at the front and drill the holes (#76 drill bit) before losing track of the correct positions for the handrail ends. Bending the handrails involved a small amount of trial and error. followed by gluing with superglue (cyano-acrylate). The door handrails were just as fiddly to get right, especially the ones with the bend at the top on the edges closest to the ends.

I partially repainted the yellow using slightly thinned Humbrol gloss yellow (#69). This should not have matched fully but blended with the slight weathering I had applied at some time previously and barely shows at all.

Flushed with that success, I decided to try it on analogue DC and it ran very sweetly, even without cleaning the wheels (I'm not a huge fan of Lima's running qualities but occasionally one could get a 'winner' that ran really well - both of my class 31s are in this category). I decided to try out a DCC conversion, using an old, sidelined Digitrax DH123 decoder, which has the advantages of 1. being expendable and 2. possessing a 9-pin JST connection from the wiring harness into the decoder, allowing me to replace it in the future with a better decoder. I was pleasantly surprised with the quality of the running, even with this non-BEMF decoder, particularly in light of my previous poor experiences with Lima mechanisms on DCC, so much so that I will convert 31 004 as well in the near future.

Now all it needs is a little more judicious weathering and some etched nameplates and I'll be very happy with the result.





Addendum to the 4 VEP in the previous post: I swapped out the Hornby Sapphire decoder and replaced it with an ESU LokPilot v3.0 (rendered spare when I fitted a Zimo sound decoder with Paul Chetter's muti-drive to a class 33, D6585). The ESU decoder has vastly reduced the chatter and growl from the VEP mechanism, although it hums a little right through the speed range. I am still looking for another seat unit with first class spacing. Just had an idea though: I may be able to use one of the old Peco card interiors intended for Kitmaster coaches - I stocked up on a whole heap of these things years ago when a local shop was cearing them out at $AUS0.50 each (approx 35 UK pence).


Last edited on Fri Feb 1st, 2013 09:12 am by SRman

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Encouraged by how smoothly the DCC conversion of 31 327 went, I decided to do 31 004. This one also ran very smoothly on DC so I thought it would go just as well as 31 327. WRONG!!

The actual hard-wiring went more smoothly because I knew exactly what I was doing this time. I pulled the Digitrax decoder out of 31 327 and plugged it in to 31 004. It ran like a dog! It stuttered and stopped and refused to complete even one circuit without stalling. I thoroughly cleaned the wheels, oiled the mech, cleaned the wheels again, making sure I got the backs as well, checked the pickups and tried again. It was better but not brilliant, so I tried a Gaugemaster decoder (demonstrating the wisdom of using the JST-compatible decoders!) with BEMF but that was no better (probably slightly worse), so I put the old Digitrax one back in. The Gaugemaster decoder worked a treat in 31 327 though.

After much persuasion (both physical and verbal!), 31 004 has been trundling around the layout for an hour and a half now. Hopefully this will free it up somewhat.

I took a few photos of the hard-wiring process this time so you can see what s involved.







Incidentally, I removed that capacitor between the brushes on both models after the photos were taken.

And here is 31 004 in service. I detailed it with the separate handrails on the fronts some years ago. 31 327 was easier in some ways because it only had two handrails at each end whereas 31 004 has four, albeit they are all straight ones. It now just needs the red circle coupling codes added above each buffer (these early 31s had electro-magnetic control), some pipework on the buffer beam at the end without a coupling, and a lot more weathering added.






Last edited on Sat Feb 2nd, 2013 01:10 am by SRman

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My Dapol/Kernow class 22 has just suffered a minor disaster. Its train of parcels stock became detached and the loco ran around the circuit and into the back of the last coach, derailing its leading axle as it did so. It kept going until it got to a point where it shorted out across the leading axle. My circuit-breaker didn't trip so the axle took the load and got very, very hot. The plastic centre of the axle, including the gear, melted. The bogie baseplate and main bogie chassis/frame also partially melted around the axle.




Fortunately for me, the remaining three axles still have drive, the motor and circuitry are all fine and the ESU LokSOund decoder still works perfectly.

I have contacted Dapol's representative on RMweb (DapolDave) to see about getting the necessary replacement parts, emphasising that this is definitely NOT a warranty claim.

Hopefully I can restore it to full health soon. If all else fails, I can redeem some of it with plasticard and a 'dummy' wheel set (no gear) as the locomotive will actually still run with only three powered axles - I know: I tried it!!  :D

Last edited on Sun Apr 28th, 2013 01:27 pm by SRman

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Well, Dapol Dave has already got back to me and has not only promised to arrange replacement parts for me but has also offered them free of charge. I cannot praise his kindness enough.
:cool:

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Glad you'll be able to sort your loco, but can I suggest that if your circuit breaker didn't trip you may have a problem with your DCC wiring being too thin?  Does the coin test work at the point where the loco shorted - ie place a coin across the track and check if the booster/circuit breaker trips immediately?

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The wire thickness had occurred to me but as I'm running parallel wires to each section of track, rather than a bus, the effect should be the same as running one thicker pair. Even so, I will have to test this out while I still have the opportunity to modify the wiring - some of it will have to be altered to suit the control panels that are yet to be fitted.

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Jeff - might be worth having a read through this topic on a similar theme:

http://yourmodelrailway.net/view_topic.php?id=10667&forum_id=10&jump_to=191166#p191166

 

Last edited on Thu May 9th, 2013 07:31 am by RFS

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Thanks for that link, Robert.
I chose to use 3 amp circuit breakers even though mine is a 5 amp system. I figured that no single circuit of the layout will be required to carry the full 5 amps. The Underground tracks will have a maximum of three powered units or locomotives on each track, so I may even lower the threshold to 2 amps - I'll certainly be experimenting further, anyway!  :)

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I did a little bit of testing today. The 3 amp breakers are working, although there seems to be a bit of lag before they trip. 
I have identified one short section of wiring that may need a little beefing up to make things work a little quicker and more reliably but overall it seems to be OK.
Maybe the idea I expressed earlier will work better - using 2 amp breakers instead. I'll have to buy a couple and try them out.

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I leapfrog" my "sections" too Jeff but I'm starting the think I ought to put a proper 2.5mm bus under the baseboards.

I currently use a system of twin copper tapes to feed the tracks on each baseboard with the inter-board connections being 1.5mm household cables.

The "in" cables are shown here on the left.  The "out" to the next "tape junction" are yet to be added.  Track feeds are the thinner (16/0.2)  black and red wires.

You'll note my "link" wires are well colour coded .......it's just what I could lay my hands on at that moment.:oops::oops::oops:


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The replacement parts for the 22 arrived today, courtesy of Dapol Dave Jones and DCC Supplies and at no cost to me (even though I offered to pay since it wasn't a warranty claim), so many, many thanks to both parties.

What is more, they didn't just send me the necessary parts to repair the existing damaged bogie, they sent the whole bogie assembly. What wonderful service!

The process of swapping commenced - I had already fitted the new bogie in place when I thought to take the pictures, so the first one is actually of the damaged bogie.



The chassis with its top circuit board and plate removed (four small screws, one of which I dropped even with a magnetised screwdriver!). The wires have been resoldered and protected with heat-shrink tubing.





The top plate/retainer added back to the top of the bogie tower, after lightly oiling the gears.



After testing on the programming track to ensure all was well, it is back in servce, as good as new.


Last edited on Wed May 8th, 2013 11:04 am by SRman

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The work above was also 'supervised' by Toby, who was never far away from me ... or the soldering iron!





:mutley  :mutley  :mutley

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I hate working whilst I'm being watched Jeff................:roll::roll:

Did Toby give you a decent report afterwards ? ;-)

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Of course he did! ;-) He loves the trains almost as much as he does me! From being feral when we got him, he has turned into a very faithful boy, following me around the house almost very time I move.

Agnes (SWMBO) is quite jealous that she can call him to come in until she's blue in the face but the moment I get home, he'll trot in quite happily.

:mutley

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After a period of inactivity on the G16 project, I have now done a little more detailing work. This was to add a wire run (or is it an oil pipe run?) from the front of the tank to the bulge over the cylinders on each side plus the start of what will be the clack valves on each side. For the latter I have used a thickish brass wire with some fibre washers intended for valve gear applications. Next, I will add a little Milliput to the tops followed by another of those fibre washers. The photos show this work to date, with apologies for the blurriness of the first pic.




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As I am recovering from the back problems of the last week or so, I have now been able to start a few simple modelling projects - or continue with existing ones. I can only spend short times sitting at the workbench for now but things are improving rapidly. Besides the class 350 conversion to class 450 mentioned after this, I have finally, after much thought, come up with a way to level the LCDR brake van - it was previously sitting a little high at the compensated end.

The solution was actually quite simple. The compensated unit rocks on a single piece of wire threaded through the cradle mounted on the underside of the wagon and the separate cradle carrying the 'W' irons and the wheels and springs. I removed the wire (it was only lightly glued in place), and removed the wheel/axle/'W' iron cradle assembly. I then used a drill the same size as the wire and hole in the wagon mounted assembly and drilled the holes upwards towards the floor, elongating them into slots by a little less than 1mm - this was by trial and error to get the ride height just right.

Once that was done I reinserted the wire through the two assemblies and all was well.The other thing I did was to give the whole body a quick spray of grey undercoat, followed later by a thin coat of Humbrol blue-grey #79 as a base coat, to be followed by more thin coats of the same colour, before the final coat or two of the proper SECR grey can be applied.

I still have to sort out the brakes and brake gear. I have found the diagrams in the instructions almost incomprehensible, together with the brass 'wooden' brake shoes being too thin to be convincing, so I am going to rethink the brake blocks altogether, probably using plasticard, before I nut out the brake rigging.Here are the progress shots; please remember that the colours are by no means final.






Additionally, the vinyls to convert a Bachmann class 350/1 into a SouthWest Trains liveried class 450 arrived last week. This morning, I did a little preliminary painting on the first driving coach of the Bachmann class 350.

I have also removed the pantograph and associated insulators and conduits/bus bars from the relevant coach, Some holes will require a small amount of filling before painting but as I won't be using the vinyls here that can be done at any stage of the conversion process. I noted from photos of that coach in Modern Locomotives Illustrated that one of the underfloor modules appears to be absent when compared to the 350. I would assume that it was the AC high voltage step-down transformer and equipment. This was a rather nicely moulded separate fitting on the model and was easily levered out with a small flat-bladed screwdriver.

The vinyls come with panels to cover the pantograph well, the red and orange flashes on the roof and include a red panel for the driver's cab air conditioning unit. I decided that I would actually paint the drivers aircon unit red and dispense with the vinyl panel for that. I have also decided that I will paint the roofs, ends and skirts (above the underframes) blue. The photos show the first thin coats of red and blue. These are still very thin and do not necessarily reflect the final colouration of the panels.

The vinyls themselves may be seen on Electra Railway Graphics' website at http://www.electrara...ygraphics.co.uk .Photos are of only the first coach at this point.





I don't know how rapidly I will be able to progress with this project but I will take photos at each stage - hopefully slightly better ones than these! 

Last edited on Sun Jul 21st, 2013 02:58 am by SRman

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Two more pics of the LCDR brake van going into SECR livery - the second coat of Humbrol 79 has been applied. I have posed it with the as yet crewless Bachmann 'C' 0-6-0 in magnificent full SECR lined green.





Also visible in the upper photo is the recently repainted Dapol track cleaner which was in Hatton's dark grey and white livery but is now in simplified BR blue and grey livery.

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Just a quick update on the LCDR brake van. I have added the buffers plus several more coats of paint. The white roof in particular needs many light coats to prevent it looking too clean and white (I used a pale grey as a primary coat for that reason).



Still to be added are the footboards and brake gear, the latter being particularly frustrating for me as I can't make head or tail of the instructions! In addition, I don't like the etched brass 'wooden' brake shoes so I think I will have to use them as templates to cut them out of 40 or 60 thou plasticard with wire mounts. Even so, if I don't get this spot on, those full-length footboards will hide a few discrepancies (or short cuts!!).

I have also now added the first vinyls to the Bachmann SouthWest Trains class 450 (ex-Silverlink class 350/1). I was a bit stuck for the right shade of blue to match the SWT blue on the vinyls so as a preliminary undercoat for any exposed edges, the inner end and the roof I used a Revell dark matt blue, then followed it with some Precision Paints First Group 'Barbie' blue, which has turned out to be an almost perfect match for the vinyls.

I also pre-painted the leading end of the roof with red and orange to roughly correspond with the Stagecoach 'swoops' so that the holes in the roof vinyl overlay where the vents go through for those colours would match.

I have applied the first vinyls to just the one side at the moment so I could assess which edges need to be pre-painted on the other coaches.The instructions say to apply the roof flashes first so I did that carefully, then added the unit numbers on the cab end, over the windscreens. While I was at it, I added a destination over the relevant windscreen.





There are a few small air bubbles present and I may try the previous method used for Electra Graphics to smooth the vinyl over any raised detail, that is, I'll try the hair dryer heat on it to see if I can improve things a little. Overall though the effect is quite good. From normal viewing distance I think it looks great.One other thing I will be altering though is that front end sweep of the orange and red: the ERG version is set too low so will be cutting it off at the corner and hand-painting the remainder. The red stripe should intersect the lower part of the tail light and there should be a band of blue across the bottom of the cab front (already painted earlier when I did the roof, in fact!).

Last edited on Sat Jul 27th, 2013 10:49 am by SRman

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To illustrate what I said in the previous post, here is a photo of the front part of the red and orange 'swoops' modified to show nearer where they should be going. I have subsequently trimmed the lower orange bit and reseated it at a slightly better angle. The point of the red should end under the headlight and intersect the tail light while the orange should pass under the taillight with only a very slight overlap of the rim.



Fixing this will entail a little hand painting although that's not too bad to do. The ERG vinyls take a lot of the drudgery out of doing this livery. For completeness, I will also have to add some red stripes around the inner ends to continue the lower body stripes.

Edit: I took a quick (rushed!) photo of the corrected angle and position for those front stripes. There is too much orange showing still but it gives a better idea of what should be.







As can be seen, in daylight the 'Barbie' blue is slightly different but it's as close as I will get to being correct for now. I think it is better than leaving the roof in the dark grey it left the factory with, and likewise at the inner end it is better than leaving the light grey.

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Those look like highly complex vinyls Jeff. :shock:  What exactly do you get in the package ?  Is it a complete front end, a complete side/roof or just the coloured flashes ?

If the latter, how do you work out where to place them all so accurately ..............:roll::roll::roll:

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What you get in the pack is this:



It includes the one-piece side overlays for four coaches (the missing pair from the photo are the ones I have already used, of course!), the roof red and orange flashes, pantograph well blanks, gangway door covers, unit end numbers and a heap of destinations in dot matrix style. The vinyls are actually clear so the windows go straight over the existing ones on the model and include the interior stickers ('no smoking' and the like), all pre-cut and self-adhesive so they only have to be peeled off the backing sheets.

Incidentally, I have now done the second side on the first coach. It went on more quickly than the first (practice makes perfect!), although I think I may have stretched it ever so slightly so that the windows on the second set of doors didn't quite line up perfectly and the last two side windows had the tiniest amount of the factory colour showing at the lower edges. The discrepancies are very small and won't show when in service on the layout, especially as the underlying colour of the doors and window surrounds was dark blue anyway.

Last edited on Sun Jul 28th, 2013 08:58 am by SRman

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Last post on this topic for today!

I have added a little of the 'Barbie' blue along the bottom edges of the sides, retouched the 'swoop' stripes around the front and touched up the black on the 'buffers' and gangways. The stripes are sill very rough and the vinyls require trimming around the tail lights but it is taking shape.



That isn't a stain or patch on the sofa behind; I doctored the photo to remove a distracting red and blue bag on the sofa!

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Work is proceeding slowly on converting the Bachmann class 350/1 into a SouthWest Trains class 450,, with the second coach now pre-painted then having had the Electra overlays added.

My back has been healing slowly so I can spend longer per session at the workbench but I am still only dealing with one coach at a time. I have been painting the whole coach with a thin coat of dark blue as a primer coat (the driving coach used a Revell colour but all subsequent ones are using/will use Humbrol #15. This is followed by a coat of the 'Barbie' blue on the roof and ends and lower solebar panels.

I have now realised that the red of the doors stops a little short of the footboards so I will be painting the door bottoms red before applying the next vinyls and will have to do the existing two coaches as well.

Anyway, here are two hurriedly taken photos of the pair done so far. I do still have to redo the pantograph well and file, patch or fill the holes left over from removing all the 25kV equipment.






Last edited on Thu Aug 1st, 2013 12:04 pm by SRman

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Work continues apace on the class 450 conversion. I have taken a couple of photos showing all four cars, with the first two all but complete, the third prepared to accept the vinyls and the fourth with the first coats of red paint on the roof and lower doors but otherwise untouched.





And another two with the vinyls now applied to the third (composite) coach. I scraped the existing "first class" wording off the windows with a wooden cocktail stick before applying the vinyl sides. I have also altered the line of the red swoop on the existing driving car plus added a bit of red at the bottoms of all the passenger doors.





One driving coach left to do then I can take a few photos of it in service as a complete four-car unit. I will see about filling and patching the holes in the pantograph well in due course.

Last edited on Sat Aug 3rd, 2013 06:23 am by SRman

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I thought I would pose the class 450 on the layout as a complete unit, albeit with the last driving coach still in an interim state of finish.

I have also tweaked the swoops a little on the other driving coach, angling the orange (or tan, as Stagecoach prefers!) so that more blue shows up over the leading pair of passenger doors. I have also now cut the striping clear of the tail light, using a sharp scalpel.







Only some 'Barbie' blue to paint on now (EDIT: not forgetting to add the black on that gangway end too) and the last coach will be ready for its vinyls to be applied. I'll have to do the same to the striping/swoops at this end too.

Last edited on Sun Aug 4th, 2013 02:22 am by SRman

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The class 450 conversion from a Bachmann Silverlink class 350/1 is now all but complete. There are a few very minor tweaks and finishing touches to do but the unit is now running as a complete four-car set in one livery.

It's not perfect. I have a few small air bubbles, a couple of small lumps in the paint underneath, and I cut and partly hand-painted the front end stripes to correct the Electra printing. It still saved an awful lot of work in adding the various livery elements and looks absolutely great at normal viewing distances. I am going to suggest a few minor changes to the vinyls to Adam Warr of Electra but, even if he doesn't consider the alterations, I would still whole-heartedly recommend the product.

I have taken a couple of videos of the unit too and will edit them into one vid and post that in the next few days.In the meantime, here is the unit, 450 107, looking complete and actually in service.







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And a short video of the unit in action.

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This is my Heljan class 33/1, 33 108, with legomanbiffo sound (from DC Kits). It uses an ESU LokSound v4 and the standard 23mm round 4 ohm speaker mounted in the underfloor tanks. I have not played all of the functions here but I used several different driving techniques to demonstrate the acceleration, spool down, and idle/coasting behaviours. The horns are 'playable', using functions F2 and F3.

Also running around is the Bachmann class 350/1 converted to a SouthWest Trains class 450 using Electra Railway Graphics vinyl overlays, mentioned (shown off!) in previous posts. This will eventually receive legomanbiffo's appropriate sounds as well but is currently using a Lenz Silver+ decoder.

I fitted the sound a couple of months ago but have only just got around to videoing it in action. I chose a quiet time this morning, gave SWMBO careful instructions to not make any extraneous sounds for five minutes and got down to it. Fortunately I finished the camera work shortly before the neighbours started to cut down a couple of trees!!


Last edited on Sat Aug 10th, 2013 05:26 am by SRman

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Last weekend I went to the Australian Model Railway Association's (AMRA) annual exhibition at Caulfield race course, as a member of the British Railway Modellers of Australia's (BRMA) stand.

I took along a couple of simple Cambrian wagon kits to construct when I needed a break from operating the demonstration layout. However, that didn't happen and I spent most of the time operating, demonstrating or just talking, but not building anything!!

Today I decided to sit down and build both kits. It took me most of the morning but they were pretty straightforward. Both kits were of open wagons so I wouldn't have had to worry about prepainting anything for the exhibition and both are intended to strengthen the train of Private Owner wagons that my pre-grouping locos can pull (most notably the SECR liveried C class 0-6-0).

One was an LBSCR D1369 5-plank wagon of 1912 to 1926 build, with a choice of ends, which I built in its early guise with the curved tops and sheet rail, plus early pattern brake gear. The other was an LSWR 8-plank D1316 open of 1904 to 1925 build, done with its original doors and early brake gear on one side only (optional later pattern doors are supplied), plus the sheet rail.

The only parts of the construction that gave me any pause for thought were that early brake gear (trying to follow the instructions carefully) and fitting the Parkside NEM coupling pockets at the correct height. The latter was done with a bit of trial and error using the Bachmann Firestone wagon as a guide (itself an anachronism in the previously mentioned pre-grouping train as it dates from 1928 at the earliest, which is when the Firestone factory in Brentwood opened!). The coupling mounts were packed using some 40 thou plastic on the LBSC wagon and 60 thou on the LSWR one.

They are yet to be weighted and painted but here are a couple of photos to show the state of play so far.





Note that I had to use a little filler on the 8 planker and it hasn't been cleaned up yet in the photos.

Last edited on Sun Sep 1st, 2013 07:35 am by SRman

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Nice kits Jeff. I often look over the Cambrian kits catalogue in a veiw to possibly purchasing some oneday. They do have some nice kits and look simple enough to put together, apart from the early brake gear ofcourse !

Cheers, Gary.

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Jeff,
I have recently been looking at the Hornby Railroad Class 31, to go with a trio of suburban coaches to be a Kings Cross to Kingsmead Suburban train.
I have noticed that you have improved a Lima class 31 on this thread, and I am looking at improving the Hornby Railroad class 31, I hope to add head codes to the head code display box, remove the molded hand rails on the front and replace them with brass wire hand rails, Possibly add flush glazing, and back date the loco to pre-tops numbers.
I was wondering if there is any information you could give me on going about this?
some of the questions are
  • What size brass wire did you use for the hand rails on the nose? I have read 0.45mm on another forum.
  • how would you go about the headcode box? cut it out, or trim the detail out and put head codes over the top.
I apologies for the bombardment of questions in advance

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Hi New04db (Aaron). I'm pretty sure the handrail wire I used was 0.45, although possibly slightly thinner wire may be better as it has to be painted for the fronts of the loco.

The headcodes are solid so will need to be drilled out if you wish to add lights, otherwise just paint black and use suitable transfers. Personally, if I was doing them I would drill and file then glaze with some clear plastic and add the headcodes behind that. I may yet backdate 31 004 but since that one is a 'skinhead' the headcode idea is irrelevant! 

:lol:

The Hornby body will be almost identical to a Lima issued version and will definitely benefit from the separate handrails as per my efforts. The Hornby chassis has the advantages of better, smoother 5-pole motor, better for DCC, a DCC socket and better wheels and pickups.

And I don't mind the questions in the least. The whole point of posting these sorts of articles is to inspire and assist others ... and maybe a little bit of showing off as well!!
:cheers

Last edited on Sat Sep 7th, 2013 05:46 am by SRman

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The Cambrian kits have progressed to the paint shop. These photos show the first rough coat of paint. The photos are always one step behind progress and I have now painted the black undergear and buffers. Also in the photos is the newly arrived Heljan class 16 D8404 with Stratford style yellow panels.





Neither wagon's colour is entirely correct but they are close!

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Two more evenings of work are represented here. Painting the wagons has proceeded, with the LSWR open getting a colour more representative of the correct one. I have used a thin coat of LSWR coach umber over the red oxide base colour - it is supposed to e a purple brown shade but once weathered I think it will look pretty close.

The transfers have been applied using the HMRS (ex-PC) Pressfix SR wagon sheet, which included lettering and numbers for the SEC, LBSC and LSW Railways. There are a couple of very minor repairs to make to the lettering and numbering, plus the dots between the tare weight numerals to add.

Still to do are a coat or two of matt varnish, to be followed with a bit of weathering.
















Last edited on Thu Sep 5th, 2013 11:55 am by SRman

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The kits look quite good.

Can I ask where you sourced the transfers (Pressfix SR wagon sheet) ??

Cheers, Gary.

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Enjoyed the vids.  those two wagons look great Jeff.  :thumbs

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Thanks for the compliments again, guys.

Gary, the HMRS transfers are available from a few sources. I have had the SR wagon sheet for some time (it is an original PC Models sheet) but I have recently bought HMRS sheets from Mainly Trains and from a model shop in Preston (on eBay - look for Kitlady, or simply type HMRS in the search bar). You are looking for sheet 13, the SR goods sheet. Of course, they have other railways and BR transfers as well!  :)

I have now matt varnished the wagons but the difference in appearance is negligible, as far as photos go.

Last edited on Thu Sep 5th, 2013 12:10 pm by SRman

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Thanks Jeff, much appreciated. :thumbs

Cheers, Gary.

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For a little bit of fun I assembled the 1910 train with the Bachmann SECR 'C' class and the still unfinished LCDR brake van with its couplings fitted, using the Parkside NEM pocket mounts packed with some 60 thou plasticard to get the correct height. I then videoed it using my HTC phone, and edited it with Pinnacle Studio 12. The first vid is the 'modern' full-colour version, the second has been aged to try to emulate an early bit of film that has been 'recovered' from an attic somewhere!

The train also includes my very recently built Cambrian kits LSWR and LBSCR open wagons.



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Loved the second one Jeff,it had a nice moody effect to it.

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Thanks Alan. That's essentially what I was trying for ... a bit of atmosphere to capture the mood of the day.

:cool:

Of course, putting it into black and white / sepia tones does rather negate the colourful nature of the rake!!

Last edited on Fri Sep 6th, 2013 01:51 pm by SRman

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Here's another bit of ancient film footage, probably from around 1910, I found in the attic.



:cool wink

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Almost all done now. The two Cambrian wagons have been running in service. However, they were still a little too clean so I have lightly weathered them with mixes of Humbrol 35, 62 and gunmetal, dry brushed or washed on according to the needs of the particular areas to be weathered.

The effects are fairly subtle and only just show up in the photos.







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A few of shots of the Bachmann SECR 'C' class from my phone camera, using only the effects available on the phone. I actually took these to show off the newly painted crew, which actually look a little too glossy still - matt varnish coming up shortly! The full colour originals show the true colours, then the 'sepia' and 'antique' effects on two of the shots show how they might have looked at the turn of the 20th century. I was unsure what colours to use for them so made it up as I went!

My good friend Graham in Brisbane picked up the crew for me on his recent trip to Britain.















All that's missing are steam and smoke effects (these would not be in the spirit of the 'How realistic are your models'  thread if I was to photoshop them in but I may yet do it for my own satisfaction). I will do something about that metal coal load, too!

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Also on the workbench again is the SECR (ex-LCDR) brake van. After pondering the diagrams and thinking about how the brakes would work, I have finally worked out how to do the rigging. This photo shows the first steps, with a little black-tack holding the components in the middle.



Next items to be fitted will be the wooden brake blocks. The kit has etched brass blocks which are way too thin to properly represent the wood, so my intention is to use the brass blocks as templates to add some 40 or 60 thou plasticard, which will be glued to the brass bits then fitted to the van.

Once those are done, I can fit the handrails, lamp irons, step boards and complete the painting and decorating for full service.

Last edited on Mon Sep 9th, 2013 12:25 pm by SRman

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The sepia shots seem to give the best atmosphere Jeff.I do like those.

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Thanks Alan. I like the atmosphere in them and they seem to make the model look more realistic too.

Incidentally, I did try fitting the cab doors but they didn't like the curves on my layout so they were taken off again!

Last edited on Mon Sep 9th, 2013 12:28 pm by SRman

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I do like black and white photos,i think it goes back to the days before colour tv's when you had no choice.:thumbs

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Having found the correct SECR grey I gave the ex-LCDR brake van a quick coat. The grey is darker than I thought it would be and seems to  resemble Great Western wagon grey fairly closely. The paint will have to be touched up as construction proceeds but it is nice to get an idea of what the final appearance will be like. The Humbrol blue-grey #79 that I used as a stop-gap seemed too dark to me at the time but actually looks like a faded version of the 'proper' SECR grey - something I may use to advantage if I add any SECR wagon kits to the construction list in the future. 





I have now commenced fitting the 'wooden' brake shoes, adding them to the rigging already started last week. I have only done one side as this is extremely fiddly work and I was getting tired and clumsy as work progressed! The brake shoes are not yet fastened to the floor so look a little uneven in the photo. While the metal parts are being soldered together, the upper parts have been passed through holes drilled in the plastic floor and will be araldited into place when I am ready.





I intend adding a thickness of plastic inside the brake blocks. 

After the brake gear is finished, the next thing will be fitting handrails and footboards, glazing, then finish the painting and add transfers. It shouldn't be too long before it is complete. :)

I noted that Bachmann's Collectors Club has announced a set of three SECR liveried open wagons, so have ordered a set online already! they will sit nicely in the existing train with the ex-LCDR brake van bringing up the rear.

Last edited on Sat Sep 14th, 2013 06:44 am by SRman

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While I had the soldering iron out, for a quick and easy job I added a TCS Z2 decoder to my recently acquired Hornby LBSC A1 Terrier 'Earlswood'. The conversion went like a dream. I did the same as for my previous (Dapol) Terrier conversion and drilled a series of holes to form a slot in the cab floor below the firebox door and threaded the decoder up through that.

A quick check on the programming track, allocating the number 83 and it was off on the main lines. It went backwards so I swapped the orange and grey wires to the brushes, put the body back on, tweaked the inertia/momentum settings (CV3 = 20 and CV4 = 15) and off it went, very, very smoothly (it was already a good runner on DC power).

It's nice to get an instant result that works!  :cool:



Photo taken before fitting the decoder.

Last edited on Sat Sep 14th, 2013 09:10 am by SRman

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I managed some further work on the brake gear on the ex-LCDR brake van on the weekend. All rigging is now in place - at least, all the rigging I am ever going to do! - but the tops of the brake blocks are not yet anchored. I have threaded the tops through holes in the floor. Where I managed to break off the top strips I have soldered short lengths of wire for the same purpose. The last photo shows these projecting inside the van body and also my stove, made from a resin barrel with a brass tube stuck into it! The tops of these strips or wires will be bent over to locate the blocks at the correct height, then araldite will be used to fix them permanently









Last edited on Mon Sep 16th, 2013 09:57 am by SRman

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And now for something completely different! 

I performed a quickie weathering job on a Bachmann blue class 25, 25 276. This locomotive has lost its sound-fitted chassis to a green example. I have used the usual weathering mixes of Humbrol #62 leather, #85 coal black and metallic gunmetal, plus some matt varnish.

I have tried to be subtle on the sides, leaving some nearly pristine blue showing. As a visual displacement technique, I have carried the yellow of the front up over the centre part of the gutter to disguise the too-flat curve over the windscreens. While this is fairly obvious in the photos, it works reasonably well to the naked eye at normal viewing distances.

I may, at some stage, renumber this locomotive into the pre-TOPS style.








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Well, my GAP Z arrived today. It was a little delayed as it broke GAP's mould! Chris Meachan included a note of apology and explanation of what happened.

I immediately started a cleanup of the flash and moulding pips. I then took the Stanier body off its chassis and removed the front pony truck. The rear tender coupling was removed and the wires snipped back near the decoder socket. The Socket circuit board was filed down as per the instructions and the inside of the body cleaned up with a milling tool in the Dremel.

I carefully drilled out the chimney, starting with a small pilot hole then progressively larger drills until I got to the right diameter.

The result is not quite sitting correctly yet, currently being about a milimetre (or less) high at the back. I'll sort that out before long. The wiring will be simplified as I eliminate the capacitor and remove the tails of the wires to the tender coupling.

Anyhow, here are a few photos of the start I have made.







Note in the first two shots the Stanier 8F body can be seen in the background In the foreground is an old Triang 'Nellie' locomotive that I have decided to upgrade and detail a little as a 'quickie' project. It has gained Romford wheels and axles cascaded from my Craftsman 07 diesel shunter - that received new Markits wheels and axles. I also shaved off all the moulded handrails on the boiler and smokebox and replaced them with proper handrail knobs and wire. I had to make up a replacement baseplate from 40 thou plastic as the original disintegrated! Because I have used insulated wheels on both sides, I have to rig new and extra pickups then I may even stick a decoder into it as the chassis will no longer be live. I'll post pics of that in my when I have better light for photography - the black model with black details doesn't show up well at present. Maybe I should have taken a few pics before hitting it with the black paint!

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A little further progress on my Z. I have been adding various bits of wire of suitable sizes for the ejector pipe, clack valves (doing the same as I did for the G16), and the handrails.









It is not runnable right now because I still have the blanking plug out of it - I will have to do the wiring mods mentioned before and maybe even shift the DCC socket board altogether for clearance reasons.

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Last pics for tonight: the Z with Bachmann sprung SR/LNER buffers added (but only push-fitted until after painting!), then with steps added. A few minor repairs are needed to the step mouldings before painting. I am going to make completely new rear bunker footsteps out of plasticard as the resin ones were a bit ragged. Sorry tha last one is a bit blurred but the light was really not good by then.






Edited to substitute a clearer photograph for the second picture.

Last edited on Thu Sep 26th, 2013 01:04 pm by SRman

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One more from me: the finer detailing continues on the Z. I mixed a bit of Milliput to repair the holes and gaps in the resin castings and used that to make some crude clack valves. Once painted these shouldn't look too bad. After some digging through photographs, I have worked out that the rather delicate lifting links for the valve gear were covered by boxes on the footplate after nationalisation (or possibly even just before!). I have made boxes of approximately the right size from two pieces of 60 thou plasticard laminated together.

There was also one more little wire handrail/handle on the smokebox door to do and that can also be seen in this latest photo.




The G16 has also had my crude Milliput clack valves added.

I also have a sheet of etched brass spectacle frames, the rear ones with coal bars on, from Mainy Trains and will use these on the Z. I have also used a set on the Triang 'Nellie' project which can be sen at the rear of the photo.

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And yet one more shot of the detailing bits. The holes in the tank fronts are a fudge as the real items actually pass behind the tanks; on the model the tanks are integral with the boiler (a necessary compromise for the casting).



I will try to carve a little more detail into the clack valves rather than leaving them as semi-shaped blobs!

Last edited on Fri Sep 27th, 2013 11:14 am by SRman

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Still tweaking and refining things on the Z, I have added the strange pipework on the front above the buffer beam and the rear bunker steps, which were cut from 20 thou plasticard.

I temporarily installed a small Gaugemaster decoder, gave it the number 950 and took it to show off at PCM's BRMA meeting yesterday. It ran rather hesitantly because of the various disturbances to wiring and valve gear and a little resin dust in the pickups but after a quick lubrication job and dust off it is now (as I type) trundling around my layout.

I still need to add lamp irons and the smokebox number plate and then, I think, it will be ready for painting in plain BR black.







I have not, as yet, figured out how I am going to affix couplings!


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Every time I think I'm close to finishing this I discover more details that I have missed! I keep checking the photos for positioning of items; the last time was to add the lamp irons and I noticed two more handrails on the back of the bunker. The lamp irons have been done using round section wire, flattened a bit in the pliers (not enough though!). The bunker handrails were added. The smokebox number plate was added out of 20 thou plasticard.


"At last I can apply the first coat of primer!" I thought. I duly dismantled the body from the chassis and sprayed it with a coat of grey primer (which is still drying as I type this) and I looked at the pictures again and then I spotted the two handrails on the footplate above the front steps! Ahhh well. They'll just have to be added afterwards.


Anyway, here are two more pics showing where I am at now, but just before the painting started.





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Progress report for the Z follow: the first coat of undercoat grey (photo 1), handrails added over the front steps (no photo), second coat of primer grey (no photo), followed by two shots with the first coat of black (photos 2 and 3, front and back).










The black needs a light sanding down to eliminate a few lumps and blemishes before a second coat then some brush painting to pick out buffer beams (in red, of course!) and other details. There are still a couple of wire pipes to add around the whistle area, with the whistle and safety valves to be added last in unpainted brass.

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The locomotive has now been sanded back lightly and resprayed, followed by a quick going over with Humbrol #85 coal black satin on footplate, smokebox and tanks/bunkers, then the buffer beams and buffer shanks were painted red. I have also filed the cylinders down just a little.


The GAP G16 4-8-0T can be seen in both photos as well.







Last edited on Mon Sep 30th, 2013 06:41 am by SRman

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Beautiful job Jeff.Very nice indeed.

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Thanks Alan.

Last night I added the crests and numbers, then this morning I added glazing to the cab and ground away a couple of spots inside to allow the body to sit slightly lower on the chassis. It still looks a little high but is better than it was.





The main tasks left to do involve the whistle and attached pipework and the safety valves, plus a little painting of details and some weathering.

Last edited on Wed Oct 2nd, 2013 03:54 am by SRman

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Getting very close to being finished now! I have added the safety valves (Markits) and whistle (a Bulleid one from Markits - the only type I have to hand right now!) plus a representation of the pipework leading to the whistle area. This is only representative as some of the pipes were a bit too fine for me to cope with. I need to dig out the copper paint for the clack valve pipes and those whistle ones.



I added a partition of plasticard inside the back of the cab to separate the lower bunker from the cab area - visible from some angles looking into the cab.

Coal has been added to the bunker (some of it is still loose in the photos as I haven't shaken it out again) - an underlayer of IKEA coal followed by a layer of real coal.








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Looks good, but don't bother with the copper paint as external copper piping very soon ( within a matter of days) blackened with use, and was only cleaned if it was a top-link loco, if it's piano wire, or similar, leave it natural.

Last edited on Thu Oct 3rd, 2013 10:12 am by bike2steam

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Thanks for the comments, Paul. The wire I used was brass wire, although the clacks got painted black with everything else that was on the model at the time. My intention is to paint the copper colour then weather the whole thing. The copper may only show through a little but I always prefer to start with the correct (or as near as I can get to it) colours then weather down using photos as a guide.

For some reason the Zs seem to have remained moderately clean, judging from all the photos I can find, although those cab side windows seem to have become almost opaque very quickly indeed.

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Just to show it all works, here is a video I took on my mobile phone, edited a little. It also includes my pre-grouping goods train with the Bachmann SECR 'C' 0-6-0 hauling it.

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Superb modelling. :thumbs:thumbs:thumbs

Terry

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Thank you, Terry. I am feeling a little pleased with myself.  :)

I hope I haven't bored everyone with the blow-by-blow account of this one.

:cheers

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Excellent job Jeff.
That blow by blow account will help other,s if they decide to have a go at loco building.

Thanks.

Derek.

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I have just started on some more pre-grouping brake vans, this time from Smallbrook Studios (http://www.smallbrookstudio.co.uk/). These are all resin kits and come complete with Dapol OO wheels, white metal buffers, NEM coupling pockets on self-centering mounts with (changeable) tension lock couplings, and all the handrail wire, microstrip, styrene and other bits and pieces to makea  complete model, except for paint and transfers. The instructions seem reasonably clear and a re backed up with diagrams.

The resin parts are all packed individually in separate resealable plastic bags, all contained within a larger resealable bag.

I purchased four of these kits from Smallbrook and their Michael Rayner was extremely courteous and helpful, even when I asked question s that were already actually answered on his website (the scrolling wasn't working using Google Chrome so I didn't realise the info was there!).

I have taken a couple of quick snapshots, showing two of the kits partially assembled but unpainted and a third one in its component pieces.

From left to right: LSWR 18 ton road van to D. 1542; 20 ton LSWR goods brake to D. 1549; and the almost identical Metropolitan Railway 20 ton van (in pieces). The latter comes with optional duckets as they were removed in later life. Not shown is the LSWR 10 ton goods brake to D. 1541 that I also bought.





I don't envisage these kits taking long to finish properly but at the same time, I won't be racing through them as I did with the SR Z class locomotive - I was on school holidays then!

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Good to see these unusual brake vans Jeff. It's a great thing to have out of the ordinary vehicles in your fleet.  Resin can capture fine detail better than plastic I think but it is a bit more difficult to work with I understand.

I'm curious to see how the underframe and brake gear/rigging is treated.

John

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Oh dear! The rigging was something I was going to put off a bit, seeing as it is mostly hidden by the footboards and all.  :oops:

The brake blocks are moulded in line with the wheel treads as part of the rather complex one-piece underframe moulding.

I do like to model complete trains so having acquired the various  R-T-R pre-grouping locomotives and a good many private owner and pre-grouping operator wagons, I realised that there was a dearth of suitable R-T-R brake vans. Hornby did an LBSCR brake van a fair few years ago and I have one of those in LBSC livery and two in SR livery, but no one seems to have done any others. 

There are some suitable kits of varying complexity, with the LCDR/SECR one from Roxey being by far the most complex I have done myself. The Cambrian 'Dance Hall' vans are nice but date from near grouping time (I have built two of them as they were in BR days). These Smallbrook Studio kits seem to fit the bill well too, being reasonably easy to build and reasonably priced for what are cottage industry items. I believe there are some brass kits for some of the same vans available too but the manufacturer escapes me right now. 

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Jeff, how much or how little brake gear one does is a personal decision.  I have a bit of a thing about it so I like to try.  It helps to have drawings too.  The gear is mostly hidden by the footboards but side on you can see bits of the gubbins peeping out.

I agree, there has been a shortage of RTR brakes, although, for me, Bachmann are due to release a pair of ex MR brakes soon.

I have a few kit built brakes as well.

John

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Speaking of MR brakes, John, I was trying to get hold of the Slaters (now CooperCraft) MR 6-wheel brake kits, without success. Apparently, The SECR used the MR-pattern brakes themselves, in single and double verandah variants. CoperCraft seem to have some difficulties with their tooling, their web shop and with communications.

If I can discern any detail in the photos I have of the LSWR vans, I'll try to fake a few brake components (rigging, V-hangers, etc.). At that time they were all unfitted, of course, so no vacuum cylinders or pipework.

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I have a couple of the Slaters 4 wheeled MR brakes - lovely little things.  I wasn't aware that there was a 6 wheeler in the range though.  Falcon Brassworks have one though: http://www.falconbrassworks.com/details.php?code=WK200  You can download the instructions which, TBH, are somewhat basic.

As for brakegear, here's a pic of a Chivers LMS brake that I did ages ago.  The kit had no underframe detail so I scratchbuilt it:








I got the layout from Essery's LMS Wagon Drawings (there are 2 volumes), which is an invaluable resource.  I reckon brake gear was pretty much similar across the companies since form usually follows function.  I used the Mainly Trains brake gear etches for yokes and clasp brakes.  Note the vacuum pipe, this van is through piped (stand pipes painted red) - no AVB but the guard would have control of the train's brakes.  Manual van brakes would be actuated from the center of the van via a wheel and worm gear that would act on the gubbins in the middle. Safety loops were simply brass wire.

John

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Very nice work indeed, there, John.

:thumbs :thumbs :thumbs


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The latest projects from me: a class 450 and an update on the class 73.

The class 450 was produced using a Bachmann class 350/1 with slight modifications and Electra Railway Graphics vinyl overlays (see earlier in this topic for more details if you are interested). I have now fitted legomanbiffo's sound (from DC Kits). At this stage I have only a single round 4 ohm speaker fitted with no sound chamber but I have a few ideas to improve on this - the biggest problem is lack of space. The initil start up has the air compressor going and pantograph contacting the overhead, so that bit isn't appropriate for the third rail only class 450 but I can live with that!



The other project was to add the LEDs to my class 73, which had previously had Howes' sounds fitted some time ago (it's still an older LokSound v3.5). Bryan of Howes pre=programmed the Aux 1 output for some random flashes and sounds attached to functions F10 and 11. The locomotive has a completely repainted Lima body with a few extra details (correct jumper cables for a 73/0, for example) mounted on a much newer Hornby DCC-ready chassis. I do need to add a small shield where the LEDs project down through the chassis just above, and inside of, the bogie frames at the unpowered end. 




Last edited on Sun Nov 10th, 2013 01:34 am by SRman

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Inspired by the newly arrived Kernow/Dapol Western locomotive, I decided to try to upgrade the brake gear on my Heljan example. This involved cutting the plastic pull rods off and substituting wire, as well as shortening the mounting lugs to narrow the fittings down. More work is still needed as it doesn't quite go around the sharper curves yet. I need to fiddle around more to get the clearances right but the improvement in appearance will be worth the effort, I think.

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A test run showed that the Heljan Western in the form I left it above would not go around my curves, inner or outer radius. I had to remove a bit of material from the shoes and hangers and the body skirts. This meant losing some detail from the shoes as well but this is all about the art of compromise and the hangers are mostly hidden from view anyway. However, they are needed to support the end of the wire pull rods.

After grinding away a bit, Western Talisman has completed a circuit of the outer radius facing in one direction without derailing but failed when turned around 180 degrees. This means I am on the right track (a pun??) but more work is required. Once complete, I'll paint and weather the filed edges to disguise them and blend them back in.



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As a quickie project, I bought a Hornby class 60 on eBay for a quite reasonable sum with the intention of updating the old class 92. I made a previous attempt to improve it with a 5-pole armature and DCC decoder but it still didn't run as well as I would really like. In some ways it is almost a shame to lose the EWS 60 as the only fault with it was the windscreens were broken (easily replaced if I wanted to).

The real class 92s used a very similar body shell to the 60s and after examining the 92 shell and 60 chassis, I decided that it would fit, provided I removed the PCB. I also found after test fitting that I needed to grind a little metal off the two metal 'towers' along the edges f the chassis block - only about 1 millimetre was removed.

The body shell, cab interiors and lighting blocks fitted very neatly , with a small amount filed off the mounting spigots and spacer moulded on to the clear plastic lighting blocks..

Next I have had to remove the class 60 fuel tanks, compressors and battery box mouldings, then cut off the class 92 electric equivalents file down those to fit the 60 chassis. I fitted one of the choke mouldings (I think that's what it represents) to fit over the metal ridge on the chassis (also ground down a bit). The other bits still await filing and fitting but I have made good progress, considering I only started this on Christmas Day and it is now Boxing Day!

I have to rewire the beast but that's not difficult. I intend reusing the small PCB with resistor and diode from the class 92 but if that doesn't work, I have plenty of resistors suitable to wire each end's lights separately to the decoder white and yellow wires.



Here is a photo posed on the temporary workbench. I'll post one of the chassis separately next time and of the finished product when it is done.

I have already added the etched tunnel rings and will shortly be ordering the Shawplan BR arrows and Charles Dickens nameplates.

I'm looking forward to having a class 92 model that will actually run very smoothly and haul trains that suggest the 5,000-odd horsepower available on third rail!



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I have made good progress on this project.

I wired the chassis back up, initially for a quick test on DC power, which involved tack soldering the feed wires to the brush wires. It ran perfectly, so the next step was to wire in a decoder. I chose a TCS M4 that I happened to have lying around. While I am only using two functions at the moment (for the headlights), it leaves the way open to improving the lighting later with separately worked tail lights or cab lights, if I so choose. One correction from the last post: the PCB I referred to did not, in fact have a resistor; it had two diodes and the actual lighting is provided by incandescent grain of rice bulbs. This meant I could discard the PCB completely from this project and wire the lights directly to the decoder.

The presently unused purple and green wires were left intact and secured out of the way. The blue, yellow and white wires were also tacked temporarily out of the way and the red and black wires were shortened and connected to the track pickups and the orange and grey wires were similarly shortened and connected to the brush feeds. I removed the capacitor at the same time. The decoder was secured to the top of the can motor with a piece of double-sided thick tape that also acts as an insulator. I tested again on the programming track, and it all read properly. Address 9222 was allocated (for 92 022).

A quick track test proved it ran very sweetly indeed. You can also see the shiny bits where I ground the height down a little.



After that test, the lights were wired, noting which way the locomotive had run, so the white wire was connected to the forward bulb and yellow to the rear, with the blue common return connected to both.Photo with lights on at the forward end:



... and photo with the light off so you can see the wiring a bit better.



The body was clipped back on and it had its first run around the layout, minus couplings.








The lighting is fairly crude and is crying out to be improved ... later! The whole cab is illuminated at the moment when the headlights are turned on, as are the tail lights in white. It works as well as I had hoped, though and that's the main thing.

There are still a few minor things to do. I did fit couplings immediately after the last photo. It could do with some handrails on the ends. The cab interiors need painting, which would also reduce the lighting effect. The body is still sitting about 0.5mm too high on the chassis.

I made a small error with the undergear and stuck one small bit on the wrong side so will fix that later too. I suppose my only other problem with it is that I cannot tell which is the front (for DCC operation purposes)!

Told ya it was a quickie project! :mutley

Last edited on Thu Dec 26th, 2013 11:34 am by SRman

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Hi Jeff,

Nice bit of grafting and a great project for the break. As or figuring out which end is the front for dcc, why not just weather one end and not the other, or place a driver and observer in the front end and only a driver in the No.2 end.

Cheers, Gary.

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Yes, I'll have to do something to identify the ends.

I have now painted the undersides of the cab mouldings with black, and the outsides of the rear bulkheads with light grey enamel, and that has considerably reduced the light bleed into the cabs. I'll extract the mouldings next and paint the interiors, which should improve things further still.

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Class 92 lights tamed somewhat by painting the cab interior mouldings, both inside and out. This satisfies me for the time being, until I can rig something more sophisticated using LEDs.



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You are making great progress Jeff.
Getting down to the nuts and bolts of railway modeling.
Have a great New Year.

Derek.

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Thanks Derek. Wishing the same to you too. :cool:

I may spend New Years Eve at a friend's place. He has Exeter Central in OO scale under his house, so we can amuse ourselves between fireworks displays - his house is on the side of a hill and has views all around Port Phillip Bay and across the city of Melbourne, so we can see multiple fireworks displays, albeit at a distance.

Going back to the class 92, I have taken a little bit of video footage to show just how smooth and quiet it is with the more modern chassis in it. This is the lowest quality clip to keep the file size down a bit, so is a little grainy. My faithful companion, Toby, wanted attention while I was videoing as well - I left the little squeak in! Next, I'll consider getting sound for it! Both Howes and Legomanbiffo (through DC Kits) offer class 92 sounds, and from the YouTube clips, both sound good. I'll have to see if I can find an 8-pin LokSound to have reblown.

Note also I have experimentally rearranged the walls to fit the signal box in down at track level. What does everyone think?



As usual, apologies for the shaky camera work.

Last edited on Sun Dec 29th, 2013 06:39 am by SRman

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We had our first postal delivery since Christmas Eve today (Monday), and look what the postie delivered! My Bratchell class 319/1 kit in Network South East livery! I pre-ordered this kit back in May and got the special advanced order price, which saved me over £50.

The body shells go together very quickly and easily, so I have glazed and assembled all of them already and slipped the motorised chassis into the PMS coach (that's Pantograph Motor Second!). I still need to remove the moulded on footboards but I'll leave that until I am ready to adjust the height it sits at.

Now here's a question: does anyone have a good photograph of a 319 pantograph well (319/0 or 319/1 will do), please? I will need to recreate the insulator and bus bar runs as well as mount the panto in the right place.

Here are a couple of photos of the first bit of my progress.




Last edited on Mon Dec 30th, 2013 10:19 am by SRman

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Hi Jeff,

Take a look here, http://www.porterbrook.com/downloads/brochures/319%20Brochure.pdf  On page 8, there is a silhouette of the pantograph if that helps !

Cheers, Gary.

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Thanks for the link, Gary. I have saved the brochure for other detailing but it still doesn't show the pantograph well, the equipment and electrical lines within, or even the pantograph mounting, which are all details I don't currently have (pun not intended!). I do have the correct pantograph itself.

I have copied pictures from the SEMG site which show the various underfloor arrangements for each type of coach in the set but none show the pantograph from above.

Last edited on Mon Dec 30th, 2013 04:37 pm by SRman

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I have started on the motor bogie sideframe modifications on the class 319 to suit the Replica Railways motorised chassis. Because there is a 1mm difference between the motor bogie wheelbase on the chassis compared to the kit sideframes (accurately modelled), I have removed approximately 0.5mm from the sideframes on either side of the central airbag and spring plank.

I file down the Replica blank sideframes to match the profile of the kit versions then glue the lot together with solvent. The Replica frames support the kit ones so there is no problem with weak joints.

Photo 1 shows the first one with the ends of the sideframes glued in place, lined up carefully to the correct axle centres. The centre section could then be trimmed carefully to fit neatly between the outer bits.



Photo 2 shows the first frame done and the second one in bits with the Replica frame behind partially filed down.




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Another, much older, project was the 2 HAL I started and had running some time back. Up until now it hasn't had any markings or insignia on it at all. I have now added the first class yellow stripes above the relevant windows and numeral 1s on the doors, plus small yellow warning panels on the cab fronts.

I will have to hand paint some of the fiddly bits on those front yellow panels before adding the black triangle on the one at the van end (the driving motor coach). The coach and unit numbers in yellow will follow and later, I will add the first class and no smoking stickers on the relevant windows.

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Work on constructing the Bratchell class 319 continues: I have now assembled all of the bogies as per the instructions and installed them under the correct coaches.

I drilled out the head and tail light apertures on the Driving Trailer coaches and tacked some red and white LEDs into them. These will be made to work later. I will have to touch up the WIPAC panels as they chipped slightly during the drilling process.

I posed the four car unit on the layout for one photo, although it has no undergear at this stage. I will also have to install weights into each coach and I am not entirely sure I have posed it in the correct formation: the Pantograph Motor Second car (PMS) and Auxilliary Trailer Second (ATS) are correctly formed and oriented but the Driving Trailer Second (DTS) and Driving Trailer Composite (DTC) may possibly be at the wrong ends of the unit. I'll check this when I am ready to assemble the full unit for real. Note also that the ride height of the PMS car is wrong, and will remain so until I trim off those footboards on the Replica chassis.

Last edited on Fri Jan 3rd, 2014 11:02 am by SRman

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Thanks for the video Jeff,
Your trains are running well.
Toby sounds in good form demanding attention.
My lady is recovering from major dental work and she is very bad tempered when it comes to giving her medicine.
All claws but not many teeth.
regards,
Derek.

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Toby loves it when I work on (or play with!) the trains. He's still a relative youngster, heading for six years old. Teeth do become a problem when they get older ... just like we humans, when you think about it!

:mutley

Continuing the workbench saga, I seem to be splashing yellow paint (or transfers) everywhere at the moment! I have been adding yellow panels and first class stripes to Hornby BR(S) green 2 BILs, my 'Tin' 2 HAL, plus, while I had the yellow out on the brush, the ends of the jumper cables and lamp irons on my previously untouched Heljan 'Dutch' class 33/1. 33 108.

For the 2 BIL and 2 HAL first class stripes I have been using ModelMaster yellow stripe transfers, but for the BIL corridor sides I have taken to hand-painting them as the transfers are too fiddly to cut around the corridor windows. Similarly, I have used the ModelMaster yellow warning panels but have to hand-paint a few fiddly bits around the jumper receptacles, particularly on the HAL.

Unfortunately, I have run out of proper warning panel yellow paint and I am unlikely to be able to get any more in the foreseeable future, so I am using Humbrol gloss yellow #69, which is a little paler in shade - rather like a faded BR yellow. I can add a hint of orange to the final coats.

The Heljan class 33/1s have black plastic lamp irons and jumper cables/receptacles which are good mouldings but need a little bit of paint to bring them to life and make them more convincing. While I had the yellow paint out, I put the little extra touches of yellow on the cables on 33 108, having previously done the BR blue D 6520 some considerable time ago.

Here is a pic of the progress on the 2 BIL and the 33/1 - the 33 looks a little 'fat' because of lens distortion.The BIL started off as the Hornby model of unit 2134, which was a duplicate of one I already had (this one came from one of Themodeller.com's regular sales and was at a very good price). Doing a little digging for green full yellow end 2 BILs from this later production batch revealed that possible unit numbers could be 2137, 2141 or 2147 (for DCC purposes I had referred to it as unit 2135 temporarily). I have still to retouch the jumper cables in dirty black, after one more coat of yellow (this was the second coat in the pic).

I am now able to run combinations of three 2 BILs (2134, 2135, NRM 2090) and the 'Tin' HAL 2694. I intend to add one of the blue BILs when they come from Hornby (I was considering repainting this one until their announcement) plus one or two of the forthcoming Hornby 2 HAL units.






Last edited on Sat Jan 4th, 2014 07:16 am by SRman

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The Hornby BIL has now had the final coat of yellow on its ends, this time with a hint of orange added to closely match BR's warning panel yellow shade. My initial attempt failed as I mixed too much orange in! I started again with the paint mixing before I was happy enough with it to actually apply it to the model.



I have also applied a wash of the new Humbrol weathering washes grey to the roofs.

Next, I have to retouch the jumper cables and add unit numbers, plus amen the coach numbers.

Last edited on Mon Jan 6th, 2014 07:55 am by SRman

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Jumper cables painted black, unit numbers and black triangle added to the Hornby 2 BIL. It is now unit 2147 but I haven't corrected the coach numbers to match, yet.

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Back in April 2012 (see page 4 of this topic) I started building a Bratchell Models class 455/8 unit, number 455 835 - from the first batch with the really ugly front end! Most of the build has been covered in my layout thread in the main forums but it really belongs here on the workbench blog. The unit has actually been running on the layout for some time.

I started the handrails on the leading DTS car using handrail knobs but this looked much too coarse when compared to photos of the real things. On the trailing DTS, I used shaped wire handrails with an intermediate support made from plastic rod, and this looked much better. I have now revised the leading car to match. By way of explanation, even though it is an EMU, for DCC purposes I need to designate a front and rear for the train, so the number 1, or leading, car is the one immediately ahead of the MS car with the Replica motorised chassis installed. The trailing, or number 4 car is the one behind the TS car, which itself is also behind the MS car. Formation is DTS(#1)+MS+TS+DTS(#4).

In the meantime, I had fitted the jumper cables and receptacles (adapted from Blacksmith Models EPB jumpers) to the leading DTS but not the trailing one. That also has now been updated to match.

Turned brass horns were fitted over each cab.

DTS #1 has some seats installed but none of the other coaches has an interior fitted yet.

Last edited on Wed Jan 15th, 2014 04:04 pm by SRman

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Looking good Jeff,
All that detail work really enhances your loco,s and rolling stock.
regards,
Derek.

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I wasn't entirely satisfied with the way the headcodes looked on my Dapol Western. You may recall that I mounted some Heljan class 53 headcodes inside the Dapol headcode boxes but the font is not right on those.

I have now redone the headcodes, using Heljan headcodes supplied with their Western diesels. These were mounted on bits of 20 thou plasticard, approximately 17mm x 6mm which were then stuck inside the headcode boxes using a little Black-Tack (actually Homelux Bath Seal). The font typeface and size are both better than the class 53 ones but don't suit the size of the internal aperture quite so well.

While I had the headcode light boxes out of the locomotive, I polished the outer 'glass' faces a little with some T-cut, to remove the sprayed on weathering (mine is a Kernow special).

I'm still not entirely convinced by the end result but I still prefer it to externally stuck-on bits of paper or vinyl.






Also visible in the background is the lit up signal box, now with an extra resistor in series with the first, and a light coat of Humbrol primrose over the plasticard light baffle (which actually seems to have produced a slight greenish tinge).

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Further to yesterday's entry, I have now fiddled with the CV settings on the Dapol/Kernow Western, with a view to dimming the excessively bright lighting in both headcode panels and cabs.

I downloaded the full manual from TCS's website and eventually deciphered it to work out what changes were necessary to the CVs in the EU621 decoder fitted to D1030 Western Musketeer. I set the following values, using the TCS Constant Dim level 2 setting):

CV49 (forward direction headcode/headlights, forward direction only) to 66
CV50 (reverse direction headcode/headlights, reverse direction only) to 82

... and the following values, using the TCS Constant Dim level 1 setting):

CV51 (cab light, no2 or B end, both directions) to 44
CV52 (cab light, no1 or A end, both directions) to 44

The lights are now much more acceptable to me, and there is less obvious light bleeding around the headcode panels. Compare these two photos to the previous entry.



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I have recorded and edited no less than seven new videos today. They all come with my trademark dodgy camera work!! 

:mutley



There are still a couple of (relatively) recent additions/reblows I haven't recorded yet, but these should be enough to go on for the time being.

From legomanbiffo, I have added reblows to a Hornby class 08 and a Bachmann class 25. The latter has also undergone a transformation from blue 25 279 to green D7638, by the simple expedient of swapping bodies! I also had a class 205 2/3H decoder reblown to legomanbiffo's new MPV sounds, having bought a replacement with his sounds on for the 205 from DC Kits earlier.

Also new was a class 42 Warship and a Bulleid Q1 0-6-0 from Howes and reblows included class 92 sounds over the class 53 sounds previously bought from Howes (the sounds were fine but I thought they were just too similar to the Western sounds - same engines but diesel electric instead of diesel hydraulic). The Q1 has the decoder and standard round speaker in its tender, which had to have all the Hornby weight blocks stripped out and some lead pellets added under a load f real coal to compensate.

I wanted sound for my Bratchell class 319/1 s well and, while no one actually offers a 319 sound project, legomanbiffo's class 321 is as close as I'm likely to get for the time being. I had a 21-pin decoder spare but the Replica Railways motorised chassis has an 8-pin socket. I have two Hornby Sapphire decoders in service and both did not require the 8-to-21 pin adaptors, so I utilised one of those to use the 21-pin decoder in the 319. It was a little loose so I added some black-tack to hold it firmly in place. The unit runs fine here but the trailers do still require a little more weight to be added for reliability.

The Bachmann class 25/legomanbiffo




The Hornby class 08/legomanbiffo




The Bachmann MPV/legomanbiffo




The Bachmann Warship/Howes




The Hornby Q1/Howes:




The Bratchell class 319/legomanbiffo 321




And the oddball - the Heljan class 53 with class 92 electric sounds. I know it's a bit incongruous!!



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Recently on the workbench were two pristine Corgi Trackside Ruston industrial machines, a crane and a back shovel. They are not pristine any more!!! I have weathered them both down a bit. There may be a few more touches to do but overall I think they are coming up well and don't look too glossy and toy-like. See what you think. :)



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Another project started and a little further progress on existing projects: I have started on the first of two Cambrian Kits Sturgeon A wagons, their kit C82 (the ones with the side doors still in place). Progress will be slow because each wagon has seven doors per side, with two handrails, two door springs and two door bangers per door! Thats 28 of each item per wagon!.






Work is also continuing slowly on finishing the buses and coaches. The green Little Bus Company Hants & Dorset Bristol MW/ECW now has the main painting completed and windscreens fitted. It is also shown with the red Wilts & Dorset one I completed a couple of years ago.






At this rate, it might take a little while but I'll have a whole heap of models all completed at the same time.

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Putting the sides together for the sturgeon A wagon. Each side is made up from four pieces (three double doors and one single), which are supposed to go together in a particular order (marked with tine pips on each part). I put these together using a steel rule to keep them straight.

Next, I have started adding the handrails. I have done 14 (not yet glued in) with another 14 to go for this wagon, and another 28 to do for the second wagon! Also in the photo is the bending jig I used, using the 7mm setting to bend all of these, although the Cambrian instructions also include a template intended for a piece of wood and some pins.




After this, there are 28 door springs and 28 door bangers to add to each wagon, again, 14 per side.

Last edited on Wed Apr 30th, 2014 04:56 pm by SRman

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Well, I have now done 14 of the door springs, so one side done! It is extremely fiddly fitting the small, semi-circular bits of plastic! I was using my Opti-visor with its built in light to see what I was doing, and two thirds of the way through this process, we had a power cut! I just carried on while the ladies in the house squealed and muttered something about finding some candles. Fortunately for everyone else, the power came back on after a few minutes!



Next jobs are to do the other side, add the bangers to the solebar sides, fill any minor gaps in the floor of the wagon, then glue the sides on and lastly paint it all ... after repeating all the previous steps for the second wagon! I'll probably do one in early black and the other in the slightly later olive livery, then weather it all down again.

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After a bit of a gap, I have now added the door bangers for the second side of the Cambrian Kits Sturgeon A. Both sides are now glued into place. After I finish this one, I have to repeat the whole process for the second wagon!







The lighting was poor so I turned the flash on on the phone camera for the first two shots. None are ideal but they'll do for now, to show progress.

The rail load is actually made up from the steel rails that came with the first issue of that magazine everyone was talking about a little while ago: I bought four for the cheap coaches, so had four pieces of straight track. Of course, I will paint the rails before sticking them in properly. The Sleepers will also be cut off their runners and used elsewhere (maybe even for the second wagon!).

Last edited on Sun Jun 8th, 2014 04:37 pm by SRman

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For something completely different, I purchased some improved lighting parts for the headcodes on Heljan's class 17 'Clayton' diesels. The kit arrived a few days ago and I have now fitted it to my one and only Clayton, D8612. It involved unsoldering two wires at each end of the PCB and soldering the two wires on each replacement unit in their place. The old lighting units just lever out (they were a push-fit) and the new ones slot in and are held in place with a little black-tack.

Getting the new lights working was easy. Fiddling around trying to find the windscreen I dislodged and pulling the light units out again to clear the misplaced black-tack were what tested my patience a little!!

At this stage I still have the original headcodes but I may try to improve on these later.




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A better photo of the Cambrian Kits BR Sturgeon A wagon, still under construction and unpainted, awaiting fixing the door stops being attached to the underframes.

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Coming along nicely Jeff.

Cheers

Neil

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School holiday jobs: I have re-chassised my green Hornby Brush type 2 (class 30), D5513,  as the original was one of those with the dreaded metal "cancer". That was all right, except I got the bogies at the wrong ends, initially; the difference is in the wire lengths! I had carefully noted the wiring before disconnecting all the wires from the pcb but, on reassembly, I found that the lights weren't working properly on DC or DCC (I started with the decoder removed and the original Hornby blanking plug inserted, to ensure I didn't blow up the expensive sound decoder!).

After several attempts, where I had tail lights at the no 1 end and either all, or no lights at the other, I pulled it apart and started again. This time only the tail lights at the number 1 end didn't work, which is probably due to the cab contacts not sitting quite right. I'm not too worried about that, to the point that I might even disconnect the over bright tail lights from the other end as well, next time I take the body off!

It ran perfectly every time, it was just the lights that defeated me! Anyway, once it was OK on DC, I inserted a cheap Hattons decoder and tested with that on board, then refitted the LokSound decoder and speaker. 

Then I repaired the small cracks in the body from the original chassis expansion.



Then I moved on to the Lima class 31 004 that I had previously detailed up and shown here. I was not happy with its Lima motor's running characteristics on DCC and managed to score a cheap Hornby RailRoad class 31 (R3067). The chassis swap is straight forward as both bodies fit either chassis. However, the Hornby model is a little bit of a hybrid of characteristics from earlier and later days of the type, and the chassis lacks the fairings around the buffer beams and below the cab ends. I filed the detail on the Hornby chassis smooth and cut and shaped some fairings from plasticard, using the D5513 and the Lima chassis as guides. While these are not quite exact, once painted blue they will give the right character to the model.

At the stage shown in the photo, I am leaving the solvent to set properly before filing the lower parts of the buffer beams to match the sides. I also forgot to file those little pointy extensions back a bit so the outer surfaces are inboard of the main fairing, which should continue the straight line angled up towards the cab doors. That will be corrected when I remove the body later.

I have also removed the BR arrows and cab numbers so I can repaint (patch painting) those areas and renumber and decal to represent an early blue example from the later batch, which means BR arrows on each cabside and pre-TOPS numbers on the bodysides behind the cab doors. It will most likely become 5539 or 5555, both of which are from the later blue star series, both with the green livery style number typeface, and both without the 'D' prefix, in or around 1969 and 1970.

Last edited on Wed Jul 2nd, 2014 10:26 am by SRman

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Looking good Jeff,

Cheers

Neil

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Thanks Neil. 

Looking at the photo of the green one, I really must redo the numbers - you can see the angle I have got them on very clearly there!

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See what you mean Jeff, not the end of the world though,i,m sure you will make short work of that.:thumbs

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Yes, it won't take all that long ... I can do it at the same time as I do the renumbering of the blue one, as long as I have enough 5s! EDIT: I just checked my notes and 5528 may be another suitable candidate for the renumbering ... that'll save me eight 5s from my stock of transfers!

I have seen pictures of BR blue locomotives with crooked numbering but never green ones, possibly because they used transfers for the blue ones but painted numbers on in earlier days. Could anyone confirm that thought?

London Transport had all sorts of templates for their bus transfers so they were applied consistently and straight to all types of bus. Presumably that also applied to the trains. BR didn't seem to have quite such a rigorous approach when it came to their stock in blue days.

Last edited on Wed Jul 2nd, 2014 05:05 pm by SRman

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A few months ago, I bought a Hornby BR early green N15, 30737 King Uther, at a very reasonable price, with the knowledge that it had a little damage on the tender rear, including missing a buffer and the lower corner of the buffer beam, plus a bit of the upper fairing being broken.

I have slowly been repairing this damage using plasticard and filler and a pair of Bachmann sprung buffers. Repairing the damage was relatively easy but touching up the pre-weathered paintwork took a little bit of fiddling, particularly as my BR locomotive green was a slightly yellower shade than Hornby's original paint work. I have used washes of dark earth and one of the Humbol black wash enamels to try to match the effects as closely as possible. I think I have managed to get pretty close to a realistic effect while closely matching the original.

A touch of red paint on the buffer shanks blended them in.

I topped it off with a layer of real coal to complete the job.













Sorry about the poor quality of the photos: all were rattled off quickly on the mobile phone between jobs.

Last edited on Thu Jul 3rd, 2014 07:33 am by SRman

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Continuing with the class 31 where I put a Hornby RailRoad chassis under my previously detailed Lima 'skinhead' body.

I added the buffer beam cowls as shown in my previous entry a few posts back. Then, after filing the lower cowl shapes down to clear the couplings, I removed the numbers and central BR arrows, which also entailed removing a bit of the paint work. Fortunately, Humbrol/Hornby's BR blue acrylic paint is a very close match for the Lima shade so I was able to patch paint.

Once I complete the weathering, the patches won't be noticeable anyway.Here I have not only painted the cowlings and the patches, I have also started weathering the roof and below solebar levels, but not the main body sides yet, as the replacement transfers have to go on before weathering.



Then, I applied the new transfers from Fox (the BR arrows) and Cambridge Custom Transfers (numbers). I have deliberately used the old-style numbers, minus the 'D' prefix, because in the early days of the blue livery, many of these locomotives received the 'wrong' style - it was supposed to be the new Rail alphabet style. The CCT numbers come as pre-made up numbers for a range of diesels. The number I chose, 5528, wasn't on the sheet but I was able to combine parts of two pre-made numbers, 5547 and 8128. Doing it this way makes it easier to align the numbers and keep the whole number straight.







There is still a little bit to do. Blue star coupling codes over the buffers, a little more weathering is needed on the sides and roof, and a coat of satin varnish (sides) and matt varnish (roof, bogies and underframes), plus I STILL haven't added the handrails that go on top of the gangway door bulge, and the little 'ears' for the windscreen washers. Edit: And replace the missing handrail that I knocked off earlier in the task!!Overall, I am pleased with the effect so far, and the running is so much better with the Hornby chassis.

Last edited on Sun Jul 6th, 2014 05:26 pm by SRman

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The transfers have now all been added and weathering improved/added to. There were a couple of minor setbacks: the matt varnish on the roof dried a lot glossier than the satin varnish on the sides, and one of the numbers dissolved in the satin varnish (I was probably too rough with the brush!).

I have reapplied the missing number and added blue star coupling codes on the ends. I revarnished the roof area using a Testors lacquer, which tends to dissolve any paint layers beneath it if one dwells on the spot too long, leaving one or two spots that need re-weathering.

For the first photo my phone camera somehow decided to turn the flash on (I always leave it turned off) so, while it is not a good photo as such, it does cruelly highlight any errors or omissions in my modelling. In this case it has picked out the bright yellow plastic interior of the body, so it looks like I'm going to have to source some cab interiors and paint the insides of the body too.



These next shots show it in a better light (no pun intended but it works!!) and I think it has come up looking OK.







Looking at the front end, I need to do a little weathering around the doors and seams, flooding a little black wash into them to eliminate the slightly plasticky look.

Last edited on Tue Jul 8th, 2014 06:13 am by SRman

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I have spent some time over the last two days fitting a lighting kit to a Bachmann class 20. The wiring up was complicated by the fact that it has sound fitted (reblown by Howes), a bass enhanced speaker and a pair of wires leading to a two-pin socket which allows a second, de-motored class 20 with a larger bass reflex speaker to be semi-permanently attached.

The lights include separately wired marker and tail lights at each end plus a cab light. The sound decoder is an ESU LokSound with only four external functions for five lights. I wired the nose-end marker lights (i.e. the headcode disc lights) and cab-end tail lights together, auto-reversing with just the tail lights at the nose end, so that's two functions used.

The marker lights at the cab-end are wired to the aux 1 output, F11 on the decoder.

The cab light is wired to the aux 2 output, F12 on the decoder.

To run with the nose end leading there is no choice in having the tail lights showing at the cab end if the leading marker lights are lit. Other than that, leaving F0 on but hitting reverse so the cab-end is leading results in the nose-end tail lights coming on; pressing F11 turns on the cab-end marker lights. Turning F0 off leaves the marker lights on F11 turned on but means there are no tail lights showing, for use when in multiple or hauling a train.

Overall, I believe I have achieved the maximum versatility/best compromise from having five lights on four available functions.

The class 20 has been lightly weathered and actually has a cab swapped from another disc headcode model where I had modified the side windows from the original Bachmann recessed sliding ones to being flush mounted but fixed. It was renumbered to D8058 with the earlier style numbers (as per a photo of the real locomotive).

The lighting kit came from an eBay seller under the name of Stickswipe, who was also very helpful.











Last edited on Wed Sep 24th, 2014 01:49 pm by SRman

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Having modified the livery and renumbered one of my Hornby 2 BILs so it represented a unit getting near the end of its life I decided that the bogies and underframe and its equipment were much too clean and shiny. In fact, this applies to all of the units, BIL, HAL, CEP, EPB and MLV! However, one at a time is the way to go, otherwise I get bogged down and lose interest again.

The techniques used on this one were simply to use thin washes. My usual colours for this are Humbrol coal black (#85), dark earth (#29) and rusty browns (#100 or #133), and sometimes a bit of leather brown (#62) as well. I have also recently acquired some of the weathering washes so have been experimenting with those too.

However, having said all that, I chose to use only a few of those for this project. For the roofs I used the Humbrol dark grey wash, which came up quite nicely. Buoyed up by the success of that, I tried the dark brown wash on the underframes and bogies. This was less successful as it dried very glossy, in spite of my having mixed and shaken the jar well.Next was a wash of Humbrol #66 over the bogies, underframes, equipment, buffers and beams, and inner ends. I also did a very thin wash of the same along the lower body edges.

After that was a thin wash of a colour I hadn't used for weathering before, a Revell dark reddish brown #84. Again this was done over all the same areas that had had the grey (except the previously done roofs). I also used this colour in less thinned form for the brake blocks and brake rigging. Again I applied a very thin, tapered wash up the lower sides to the waist moulding, thinning the colour right down to almost non-existence at the waist mouldings.

I also carried the very thin washes up the yellow ends to the waist level jumper sockets.

The effect is quite good and I am not inclined to do too much more to this one. I did apply slightly thicker grey #66 to the step boards under the doors to emulate where people's shoes scuff them.

The trick with all these washes is to build up the colour in layers, rather than applying it all at once.









I noticed that the driving motor coach body was not properly seated at the inner end and fixed that up after these photos were taken.

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More weathering! I bought one of the new Hornby extra long ex-LNER CCTs in BR crimson. It is a very fine model but way too clean - these types of vehicle rarely saw anything like a carriage washer between overhauls and repaints.

I used the usual weathering techniques and colours (much the same as the 2 BIL in the previous post but with heavier weathering on the vehicle sides) but wanted to try a patchy effect on the roof. My attempts at that failed so I ended up repainting the roof with Humbrol #66 but thinned it towards the edges, allowing a little of the previous colour to show through.

This is pretty close to the final result - I think I am happy with the overall effect.





I must do this with a few more of the SR style CCTs/PMVs/Van Cs!

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:)Hi Jeff,Great progress on your varied loco,s and rolling stock.

Your railway is looking nice and busy as well.

Hows life in Aus these days on the railway front.

regards,

Derek.

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Hi Derek.
Progress on the railway goes in fits and spurts of activity. I'm in no hurry, although as I keep accumulating more stock I keep reminding myself that I should make an effort to get the upper level running.

Every so often I have to turf some stock off the layout as it gets more and more congested!!

We're now heading for Summer and a longer holiday over Christmas and New Year (I get school holidays now), so if it isn't too hot, I hope to get a bit more serious building work done then.

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Getting into the swing of weathering parcels stock! I have now done a Hornby BR crimson (ex-SR) 'Van C', with a Hornby bogie 'Van B' and Parkside Fruit D on the workbench to follow shortly.

I posed the two Hornby 4-wheelers with a Bachmann ex-SR 'N' class 2-6-0, 31860, I weathered many years ago. Both vans have been weathered using the same techniques.



Last edited on Sun Oct 26th, 2014 06:32 am by SRman

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Personally I think the roofs are the hardest to weather, but your model does look good. :thumbs I never really know what colours/tones to paint the weathering effect with. Do you go a grotty brown/grey or just a black wash ?? Hmmm...

Cheers, Gary.

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Hi Gary.

Roofs are difficult. For the LNER CCT, my failed attempt at a patchy effect used a lighter grey and some of the Revell brown #84 brushed and stippled on, followed by a wash of dark grey. In the end, I used Humbrol #66, a very good all round weathering and roof colour - good for tyres on road vehicles too.

For the SR Van C I used the same grey #66 at full strength, then a very thin wash of the Revell brown #84.

The next two have variations on the overall weathering, with the roofs using thin washes of Humbrol #66. The Fruit D (a Parkside kit I bought second-hand already built) had an all over wash of Humbrol #66 followed by a thin wash of Humbrol dark earth #29, then a little of the Revell #84 brown partly washed and partly dry-brushed around the door edges and lower sides, plus the underframes. The SR Bogie B had a similar but lighter treatment on its sides, plus a little dark steel around the axleboxes, springs and brake linkages.

All of the vehicles had their wheels and brake blocks painted with the Revell brown.

The Fruit D and Hornby bogie B are shown below, together with a pristine bogie B, untouched by my paint brush ... so far!

Last edited on Sun Oct 26th, 2014 02:42 pm by SRman

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They look great Jeff. :thumbs Thanks for the tips on colours, much appreciated.

Cheers, Gary.

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Your rolling stock and railway is coming along a treat Jeff.
You sure have progressed a lot. My regards to Toby and thanks for the pics.

Derek.

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Thanks for the compliments and wishes, Derek. Toby always smooches around my feet while I am at the workbench. he's fascinated with everything I do to the models.

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Another new project started: a 2 HAP unit of the 5601 - 5636 batch built to the Bulleid style.

This is based on the Ayjay Models resin kit, bought through Radley Models. As I intended to use Hornby 2 BIL running units and chassis, I asked Phil Radley if he could sell me just the body shells and seat units. He very kindly did this and threw in the floor/chassis as well as he wanted only the bogies for other uses.

Having adapted the same manufacturer's 2 HAL unit to the 2 BIL chassis recently, I had a fair idea of what to look for this time. Modifications involve cutting some notches out of the sides of the seating units, removing part of the seating unit on the motorised coach, and removing the buffer beams and fittings from the body shells. I also drill and ream out various holes in the floor or under the seats to clear some of the projections from the Hornby chassis and also the Lenz decoder. These holes can be covered over with a bit of thin plasticard later, before painting occurs.











The 2 BIL buffers will be replaced with non-sprung white metal castings for BR retracted buffers - this will be consistent with BR practice and also with the Bachmann 4 CEP or 2 EPB units with which this one will be able to run.

At this stage, I am planning to finish the unit in plain BR blue with full yellow ends, but I could change my mind before getting to that stage of the construction.

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I have now adapted the DTC seats to fit the Hornby underframe, so have a matching set which can now run, even in this raw state!








​p.s. I have also been adapting the Southern Liveried 2 BIL body shells to sit on the erstwhile Ayjay 2 HAL underframes. This means I'll have a Black Beetle powered unit in SR livery - it won't run smoothly in multiple with the BR liveried units but I am not likely to want to do that anyway!

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That looks a good model build Jeff.
Those resin kits look very well molded.
Oh whats resin like to paint,Any special preperation?.
Glad Toby is keeping tabs on things.My boss Meow has taken a liking to the railway build.Or it could be the heater taking the chill out of the room.
All the best,
Derek.

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Hi Derek.
The resin used for these kits allows quite a bit of nice sharp detail, although I find some of Ayjay's detailing a little on the heavy side (roofs and ends mainly). Even so, each kit I buy seems to get better and finer. The 2 HAP end details look slightly finer than the very similar 'Tin' HAL kit I did before.

As for taking paint, I find it varies from kit to kit, even from the same manufacturer (I have done quite a few resin bus kits as well as railway ones).

Generally, a quick scrub with water and Jif (or toothpaste if desperate) followed by a thorough rinse in water and proper drying time will then allow the surfaces to accept a spray of automotive undercoat. After that it's plain sailing!

Tony Asquith of Little Bus Company reckons his kits should not be cleaned with the Jif, but I still find it slightly better to do this as greasy finger prints accumulate with handling of the parts. It also washes off any of the releasing agent used to stop the parts sticking to their moulds.

As for cats and heaters: they do seem to be able to absorb unlimited amounts of heat, sometimes at the expense of everyone else in the room! If you have central heating vents in the floor, the cats do seem to like blocking those off. 

:mutley  :mutley

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:)Many thanks Jeff,For explaining Resin and painting prep.

While I am concentrating on steam.I have been looking at a guy at Mousa Models who is producing resin kits for pregrouping rolling stock and your reply will come in very handy.

I can see an order for some nice LNWR wagons going in soon.

Cheers, Derek.

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Last weekend I bought a cheap Hornby N15 at our local swap meeting. It was missing its dome but it ran sweetly and all other bits were present, including the Hornby bag of bits. It was the NRM model of 30777 Sir Lamiel, in BR late crest livery. I have memories of a ride behind Sir Lamiel on the Scarborough Spa Express back in 1984, when it was in SR green as 777.

After scouring eBay and the spares suppliers like Peters Spares (and others) and not finding any spare domes or even spare or damaged bodies, then the various component suppliers (247 Developments, Craftsman and so on) , I have to build my own dome.

I have made a start using Milliput. It is slightly undersized and a little crude at the moment but I will add a bit of filler and file it back to shape once set. It's a start





What I should do is separate the dome from another N15, like 30737 in the front of those photos, then use it to mould resin replacements. Maybe later. 

:roll:

Edit: Another photo added, this time with 30799 for comparison. It occurred to me that I should compare the domes of two Maunsell locomotives rather than using the Urie Arthur. I'm not sure if there was a difference; if there was, I can't see it in the photos.

Last edited on Sat Nov 15th, 2014 02:06 pm by SRman

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Adding a couple more pics of progress. I have tidied up the dome shape a little, although it is still a bit crude at the moment.



A wash of green paint to highlight any dips or high spots.

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The diameter is a little small, the top is too rounded, it's a little lopsided, and the base is still a little rough and crude, but it is starting to look like an N15 dome ... sort of. It is only roughly painted to show up any faults more easily than the stark white of the Milliput.



I will be calling South Eastern Finecast to see if they can supply a cast N15 dome, but in the meantime, this is still better than not having a dome at all.

Edit: addendum: I phoned SEF and they were extremely helpful. A cast white metal dome from one of their N15 kits will be winging its way to me very shortly. That also means I won't do anything further on Sir Lamiel until that arrives.

Last edited on Thu Nov 20th, 2014 04:00 pm by SRman

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Thats good news about the dome Jeff.
Although full marks for having a bash at making one.Domes are tricky jobs to get those curves right and one can end up with a bin of rejects before getting one you are happy with.
Thanks for the photo,s.
Derek.

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Thanks Derek. :)

Now for something different again: when visiting Peter Mantle's (PCM on RMweb) Llanbourne layout for the monthly BRMA meeting yesterday (gratuitous photos included below), I took along two locomotives that were recently reblown with legomanbiffo sounds. One, 37 698, behaved perfectly (although I noted that I have at some stage lost the horns at one end, probably when transporting it to an exhibition). The other, class 40 D211, disgraced itself by dropping the bogie frame at one end. I was still able to run it and show off the sounds but it looked rather odd - like one end was floating on air!






The cause of the class 40 bogie frame falling off was the inner end transome actually breaking off. Unfortunately, the centre part of that transome is what clips over a lug on the end of the bogie's metal chassis.

I worked into the early hours of this morning fixing it, after thinking about how to repair it so that it would regain some strength.

The answer was to use a 2mm wide strip of 60 thou plasticard, reinforced with handrail wire drilled into the ends through the bogie side frames (just visible in the first photo, beside of the sandbox, plus more wire drilled and bent around the attachment points for the bottom part. This was then superglued thoroughly as well to retain all the wire bits and strengthen the joints.





It works perfectly on test and seems to be very strong. All that remains is to apply a coat of black paint, to be followed eventually by a bit of weathering on the whole underframe/bogies and on the roof.

Last edited on Sun Nov 23rd, 2014 05:43 am by SRman

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Thanks for the photos of Llanbourne Jeff, looks like a great layout.
The repair on the class 40 looks very firm, glad you were able to sort it.

cheers
Marty

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Thanks Marty.
Llanbourne is a superb layout. Lots of tiny details everywhere one looks. It was exhibited in the UK many years ago but is now permanently set up here in Australia. I have suggested that Peter join YMR but he says he can only cope with one forum and even with that he runs out of time!

A quick update on the class 40: I have now painted the repairs black and while I had the black on the brush, did some initial weathering on the roof.

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The Ayjay Models 4 SUB kit has arrived from Radley Models. Oddly, it came with four trailer bogies and four motor bogies. I contacted Phil Radley and he immediately offered to sed out the two missing trailer bogies. I also asked if he wished the extra motor bogies returned but, as yet, he hasn't replied to that. Excellent service, as always, from Phil.

With this kit, I am using the Hornby 2 BIL motor chassis but will have to use the Ayjay resin chassis/underframes for the remaining three coaches.

I have cut off the buffer beams from one of the DMBS bodies and sat it loosely one the Hornby underframe.

The semi-saloon seating unit will have to be cut to suit the Hornby chassis configuration, losing one seating bay in the process to clear the motor housing.

I have not yet chosen a unit number but am probably going to select one from the 4355 to 4363 group as these had two 10-compartment trailers to match what was supplied in the kit. That also means I will retain the foot steps over the front buffers and add handrails above and either side of the front at windscreen level (similar to the 'Tin' HAL).




This also shows the interesting contrast in front ends for what were otherwise almost identical body shells for the DMBS vehicles in the 2 HAP and the 4 SUB. The roof details also differ somewhat.

It also shows that I have thinned the lower roof edge gutter on the HAP to improve the appearance.

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School holidays for Christmas are here. I am hoping to get a bit more modelling done over the break, including getting the 4 SUB and 2 HAP completed, wiring and more tracklaying on the layout, and some weathering on more of the Hornby ex-SR units (2 BIL and 2 HAL).

The first move on this has been to scrape and file off the moulded on pipes on the Ayjay 4 SUB and replace them with separate wire fittings.




Next job is to add lamp irons, windscreen wipers (both of these items to be from selectively flattened wire), and handrails on the cab and guards' doors.

I'll be cutting those roof-mounted horns off and leaving the whistle in place, as many SUBs still had their whistles in the late 1960s.

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More details added to the fronts of the Ayjay 4 SUB. Lamp irons and windscreen wipers added, horns removed from the dummy motor coach but not yet from the motorised one.

I must change the wire gauges used for the jumper cables. The ones I used match the resin moulded-on ones but they are really too coarse - I seem to recall I discovered this when I did the 2 HAL previously. I think most would agree the effect is still better than moulded-on detail though.






Also visible in the photos is the small section of electrical conduit I had to repair after the paring and filing of the jumper cables. The body is not sitting correctly in the photos but I only noticed that after posting them!

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I decided I just had to fix the overscale jumper cables. The wire used originally for the centre cable is now the thickness used for the outer ones, while much thinner wire, from some multi-strand cable, was used for the centre one. I am now much happier with the effect.

Last edited on Tue Dec 23rd, 2014 08:04 am by SRman

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I wasn't sure what to do about adding couplings within the 4 SUB unit. The motor coach, using the Hornby 2 BIL chassis, already had NEM pockets; a rigidly attached one at the driving end and a swivelling one at the trailing end. I have a few of the NEM pockets, as marketed by Bachmann and Hornby, so thought I would experiment a bit with these.

I filed a gap in the resin bogie ends and superglued the pockets in. I wasn't too worried about exact distances as I was going to experiment with different couplings to start with. 

As it was, I started with Hornby tension lock couplings but these held the coaches too far apart. Similarly with the Hornby close-couplers. The 2 BIL rigid couplings were too short, as well as being less practical for handling a four-car unit. Kadees seemed like the way to go. I have settled on combinations of #17 and #20 couplings to get reasonable coach spacing while allowing for my tight-ish curves. 

Once I have settled everything properly, I'll reinforce the pocket-bogie joints and cut off the dropper arms from the Kadees within the unit (no need for automatic uncoupling in a permanently formed EMU!).




I can't settle the exact spacing until I fasten the floor to the body shell, because of the gaps at the underframe ends which will need to be filled with some plasticard. No doubt the mismatch was due to shrinkage in the resin as it set.

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Hi Jeff,
Best of luck with this experiment.I am thinking Kadee coupling use myself.Never tried them.
I must find their site.My railway build has 36 inch min radius curves so it would be nice to get the right couplings.
Now its back to glueing down track.
Cheers,
Derek.

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http://www.kadee.com/

There you go, Derek.   :cool:

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As mentioned earlier, I have experimented with Hornby/Bachmann NEM pockets superglued into small recesses in the bogie frames and these seem to be a success, using Kadee #17 and # 20 couplings. The couplings will have their dropper arms cut off within the units (Who needs automatic uncoupling within an 'indivisible' EMU?).

The reason I had to use the odd mix of Kadee sizes was because I needed to keep the coupler heads clear of the headstocks, and each type of coach has slightly different overhangs from the bogies. 

Here is a short video of the unit running temporarily as a three-car 3 SUB.

http://vid98.photobucket.com/albums/l265/jslynn/Rail/3SUB%20test_zpssxckqxrl.mp4

Marty
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Great video Jeff. Those EMUs are looking right at home.

Marty

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Yay! It makes the right noise, too. "Ter-ting-terting, Ter-ting-terting..."


D

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I haven't been able to reproduce the sort of ringing, jingling noise the shoe gear made over point work, yet!

:hmm  :mutley

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Agree they look a bit ghostly Jeff, but do sound good.


Ed

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A little while back, I bought a Hornby N15 that was missing its dome. A quick phone call to South Eastern Finecast secured one of their white metal N15 domes, which arrived well before Christmas.

A few minutes' work with the drill and files on the N15 boiler cleared the area to allow the new dome to be glued in. Two coats of Humbrol HS 172 BR standard locomotive green (a very old tin of enamel from the old railway range of colours), including both the dome and the boiler segment between the bands has produced this, just awaiting a little weathering and toning down to blend it in properly.




Progress has also continued with the Ayjay 4 SUB, with painting of the unit. All parts were given a coat of grey primer, followed by a coat of matt black on the underframes and bogies, and a pale metallic blue on the coach bodies - the latter because I needed a base coat before brush painting the special green I have for Southern Region EMUs (mixed up for me by Haymes Paints in Nunawading). The pale blue was used because my green spray can had gone off! I include a photo of one of the bodies in this colour just for curiosity value - does it look weird, or perhaps it looks like a might-have-been (well, they did paint CC1 / 20001 in a pale silvery blue at one time)? The green is an acrylic but was not really formulated for painting models, so has to be applied in several thin coats. A few more coats are needed yet but the unit is starting to look like an SR/BR(S) electric. I ran it under test as a full four car unit and all works exactly as it should.







Last edited on Thu Jan 1st, 2015 06:11 am by SRman

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Feeling pleased with myself, having finally converted a Bachmann Lord Nelson to DCC. 30861, Lord Anson, now sports a TCS M4 decoder, mounted just in front of the chassis block. I was able to use the solder pads on the front to connect the red and black wires, as this one is an early release with extra pickups on the front bogie. It read straight away on the programming track, suggesting that I got it all right as far as insulating the split chassis halves and the motor brushes from each other.

I didn't pause to take any pictures of the conversion while the body was off or the chassis dismantled. Next time I remove the body I'll take a couple of photos to show how it was completed. The TCS M4 is really a little wasted as I don't need any functions at all for this one, but at the time I bought the decoders, there were none of my more usual M1 decoders available but the shop sold me the M4s at the same price.The weathering was done when it was relatively new, a good many years ago now.



Last edited on Sat Jan 3rd, 2015 01:46 pm by SRman

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A little lighter relief: I should start a new thread "How Unrealistic are Your Trains?".

I bought three pre-grouping vans from the local swap meet, all Roxey etched brass kits and well made, although a little battered from unsympathetic handling. Each cost me $20, (compared to the £27 each for the flat kits, still currently available) and was fitted with EM gauge axles and wheels. I have slowly regauged or replaced the wheels and axles, with two of the vans retaining their compensation at one end, while the S&DJR van had to lose its compensation unit as it was too wide to fit within the OO gauge wheelset.

I fitted NEM pockets from Parkside, with a 60 thou packing piece to negate the Parkside requirement for cranked couplings, and plugged in some tension lock couplings.

The S&D milk van is in a blue colour, which I may retain, while the other two LCDR/SECR luggage vans were in a rather insipid green colour. One is now in EWS red (a reasonably close match to what I can ascertain is SECR  red/maroon), while the other is in Humbrol leather colour to represent a teak finish, as used by the LCDR. All require further work before adding transfers, and two of them are rather stiff runners, so more work required there too.

Making up a rather unlikely combination, I have posed my two LSWR M7 tanks with the three vans plus the previously worked on SECR (ex-LCDR) brake van. It does make for a colourful combination, although the purists are probably screaming in the background!




(Edited to replace the photo with a slightly clearer one.)

Last edited on Thu Jan 22nd, 2015 02:48 am by SRman

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Still fiddling and fettling the three pre-grouping vans, I have now freed up the running of the S&DJR milk van, and started trying to achieve a wood grain finish on the teak LCDR luggage van (second in the previous pics). Looking at Roxey Mouldings' website, I cannot decide whether the van is an 1878 or 1880 design; Roxey offer both but they look the same to me! Neither of the built up examples on the Roxey website has the torpedo vents, so mine is either wrong or represents a later modification. Either way, they will have to go!

As per the previous photos, I started by painting the who;e body in Humbrol leather colour. 

I have now dry-brushed some Revell dark brown on all panels, vertically streaked on the main panels and horizontally streaked for the waist and cant level panels.

This was followed by a coat of gloss varnish. The first photo shows it before varnishing, the second, after varnishing.






For a first attempt at a wood grain finish, I don't think I have done too badly.

Last edited on Mon Jan 26th, 2015 08:57 am by SRman

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Does anyone remember the two Cambrian Kits SECR 'Dance Hall' brake vans I started sometime in 2009 (or maybe even before that)? No? I posted a few photos of them sitting on the old layout at Middlehurst, minus glazing, couplings and handrails. Here's a reminder:




I have had them sitting on a shelf above my workbench, reminding me every time I sit down there that I need to finish them. Well, I finally fitted the glazing, added the handrails and added couplings, utilising the Parkside NEM adapters packed up with a piece of 60 thou plasticard to eliminate the requirement for Bachmanns cranked couplings, and allowing for alternate couplings to be fitted at the correct height if I so desire.

The first two shots show the standard brake van finished in BR light grey (slightly faded) with the handrails unpainted. The Ballast Brake conversion behind still awaits its handrails. There are a few minor paint touch-ups required but they are almost complete.






The third photo shows the handrails painted white. Both vans will be lettered appropriately to complete them.

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Very nice, well finished sir!:)

Ron

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Thanks Ron. The close-ups are quite cruel and show up the rough edges a bit.

:cheers

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I'd call that gentle weathering!!:)

Ron

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And here are two photos of the Ballast Brake Van conversion, the first with the handrails just fitted, the second with them painted white.



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They look like heavy beasts!

D

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Yes, they were 25 tonners, like most of the 'pill box' brakes that followed in SR days. The nicknmae 'dance hall' came about because of the very large internal area, which was actually hard to keep warm in Winter, hence when the 'pill box' type was designed, they made the body quite small (and cosy!) compared to the frame length.

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The ex-SECR brake van kits are very nearly complete now. Just a few minor paint touches to fix up and some varnish and weathering to go, and they will be finished.

I have used the Cambridge Custom Transfers sheet 2b/c to add the lettering on the two vans, although some of it was just guesswork as to where it should go as there is a distinct absence of good photos of them in BR days (non-preserved state). They have both ended up as van S55476/DS55476 but I can doctor one of those numbers later.


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Great progress Jeff,
I like your conversions and getting old locos running on DCC.
Keep up the good work.
Derek.

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Result, Jeff.  :thumbs

They look great.

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Thanks, Max and Derek.

I do seem to go for a bit of variety, don't I!

:cheers

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I ran my Bachmann sound-fitted Silverlink class 150/1, 150 123, yesterday and was irritated that it kept stopping every so often, with the resultant engine restarts after every stop. I decided to investigate the cause, thinking maybe a pickup wire had come loose. On dismantling it, I found that it had the same pickup arrangement as on the much later class 40 I dealt with recently. The fix was to add wire pickups bearing on the wheel backs, just as I did for the 40, and also to add hard-wired connections between the bogie contacts and the PCB.

Having done that one, I decided to do my other class 150/1, a BR Provincial sector liveried unit, 150 148 to match. This one had a history of resetting its decoder randomly, probably due to the same intermittent pickup problems.Dismantling is relatively easy, once the three body fixing screws are removed from the chassis. Two very small screws hold the PCB in place, and two larger screws retain the bogies. A flat-bladed screwdriver at the inner ends of the bogie side frame mouldings will release those (easier to do before removing the bogie retaining screws), and the axles just pull out with a small amount of force.

This is what you should have before any soldering occurs:






Insulated wires are prepared by tinning the ends, and the copper pickup strips on the bogies are also prepared with blobs of solder - one up near the step, another just above the "tee" formed with the strip along the bogie sides. The wires are soldered at one end to the strip. Meanwhile, some brass (or copper or phosphor-bronze) pickup wires are prepared by cutting to length (a little shorter than the bogie wheelbase) and the centres are tinned with solder.




The pickup wires need to be bent outwards and slightly downwards to bear on the wheel backs when the axles are reinserted later.The insulated wires are fed up through the slots in the chassis block. The wires can then be soldered to the springy strips that bear on the tops of the bogie strips.










Reassembly is mostly the reverse of dismantling, although I found it better to screw the bogies back on as soon as I had soldered the wires to the PCB. Axles and sideframes were clipped back into place, ensuring that the wires go behind the wheels. From outside, one would never know there was anything different!




After a quick test, the body is replaced and the unit is ready for service, with no more hesitations or flickering lights. I', not too sure whether the Provincial liveried units would ever have run in multiple with Silverlink ones, but here are the two units posed together, regardless!



Last edited on Sun Mar 29th, 2015 12:39 pm by SRman

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After leaving it aside for quite some time, I have now got around to glazing the Little Bus Company Bristol MW/ECW bus. I have opted, like with the previous Wilts & Dorset one I did, to glaze it using the outside mounting method, which meant cutting each piece of glazing material to fit each of the window apertures.

The photos were taken in fairly poor light, but the first one emphasises that I need to redo the driver's side windscreen as it is not straight and also not sitting correctly.

I use Micro's Krystal Klear to glue all windows in as it dries clear and also fills in any gaps I may have left by over-trimming the windows. A couple of the windows in the photos show the Krystal Klear hasn't quite dried and is still milky white, but rest assured, the glue will be invisible very soon after the photos were taken.






There are a few things left to do before I can say it is complete: one of the headlights needs a little filler, there are some very minor paint touch-ups to do, and then the transfers may be applied, including that for the front grille.

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Well, the Little Bus Company Hants & Dorset Bristol MW has taken another step towards completion. I filled the ragged edges on the driver's side headlight and touched up the paintwork there.

I have put the grille, Bristol 'wings' badge and fleetnames on, leaving just the registration numbers and destinations to add, plus painting in the tail light clusters.

The photos show up a few ragged paint edges rather cruelly, but overall it doesn't look too bad. I will try to fix up the worst bits before I declare it "finished".



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Bratchell Models had a sale recently, offering £30 off the cost of their class 456 model in Network SouthEast livery. I quickly ordered one of these units, together with the wheels and coupling pack.

While Bratchell's kits are not exactly cheap, they are well thought out, well moulded and well finished (for their pre-painted ones). They build into robust and usable items for normal model railways. As such, I have already built (and documented here) the class 455/8 and class 319/1 kits from them, which are in service on Newton Broadway, although both awaiting a few finishing detail touches.

My class 456, 456 007, is intended as a dummy unit only, to run in "multiple" with the 455 835, which has a Replica Railways motorised chassis, which has more than enough power and traction to deal with hauling itself plus five coaches.

456 007 arrived in kit form on Thursday. By Thursday evening, I had fitted all of the windows, using my usual Micro Krystal Klear as the glue. For those who haven't read my previous entries, Krystal Klear is intended as a glazing medium itself, for smaller windows or apertures (head and tail light 'holes' are ideal for this) but it also makes a good glue for any clear glazing material, since it is sticky like a glue but can be thinned or washed off with water and dries clear. Two of the window apertures at the leading end of one of the coach sides needed opening out slightly to allow the glazing to pop in properly, but all others were perfect fits right from the start, making this a relatively quick and simple job to complete. The windows were left to set overnight.

Today (Friday), I have assembled the now glazed body shells and the bogies, and put them together with the baseplates push-fitted in.

They will require some added weight, and the underframe details are yet to be added, but I couldn't resist a quick photo on the mobile phone.




The front ends will need quite a bit of extra detail added (not in the kits) for the jumper cable boxes and other bits and pieces. I will also be drilling out the lights and adding LEDs later, plus end coupling to allow for use with the 455 unit.

Last edited on Fri Apr 17th, 2015 07:52 am by SRman

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Continuing on with the Bratchell class 456, I have now fitted the underframe details as supplied in the kit. 

I have posed the nearly complete unit with the Bratchell class 455/8 on my layout, although this is a little bit of a cheat, since neither unit has yet been fitted with end couplings!



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Both the previously shown Bratchell Model kits of classes 455/8 and 456, in Network Southeast livery, running "in multiple" departing Newton Broadway LT station. I had just fitted the unit ends with Parkside kits NEM coupling adapters and Kadee #18 and #20 couplings, respectively. Unit 455 835 has a Replica Railways motorised chassis, while 456 007 is actually unpowered.

Both videos are straight off my mobile phone but I will try to get some better footage later and string it together into a single, more coherent clip.




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Looking good Jeff :thumbs


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I recently ordered one of the Realtrack Models class 143 units in First Great Western Local Lines livery. To go with it, I decided that I wanted a class 150 to complement it. Bachmann have already produced a class 150/1 in FGW plain blue livery, although that seems to have sold out. I may still be able to get hold of one in the future, so there is no point in doing one myself ... yet. That leaves a 150/2 in the more interesting, but superseded 'local lines' livery.

With that in mind, I kept an eye on eBay for a relatively cheap 150/2 that I could use, having already ascertained that Electra Railway Graphics (ERG) produce the necessary vinyl overlays.

I located a Regional Railways unit in Rails of Sheffield's eBay shop and made an offer, which they accepted. At the same time, coincidentally, I bought a Bachmann Silverlink class 350/1 from Rails website shop on special for £99 or so, with a view to doing a second class 450 conversion, also with ERG vinyl overlays.

The two sets of vinyls were ordered from Adam at ERG, and he very kindly offered both sets with postage at an inclusive price.

So far so good! The 450 conversion has been dealt with in my previous blog entries, so I need say no more on that. I commenced work on the 150/2 by removing the bodies and pushing out all of the door glazing, with a view to pre-painting the doors in pink. The ERG vinyls include overlays for the doors but I prefer to simply paint them. I used an initial coat of a standard Humbrol light pink, followed by a coat of the correct 'Barbie' pink.




I then used one of the side overlays to test out what areas would need any paint touches. The vinyls seem a fraction short, so I used First 'Barbie' blue to paint all of the necessary end and door edges to blend them better with the vinyl overlays. I know that the 'Barbie' blue is not quite correct but it is close enough to do what I need from it.




The other vinyls will follow once the paint dries. Here is the initial one that I did, though.




As usual when I am trying to do these jobs, I have just snatched the photos somewhat hastily on the mobile phone camera, so the quality is not the best. It does show what I am talking about though, so they will have to suffice. Once I complete the job, I'll take some better ones of the finished product.

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Further progress with the Bachmann class 150/2 re-livery, using Electra Railway Graphics vinyl overlays. The job is nearly complete, with just a few finishing touches required.

I haven't used the door overlays, although I intend to use the driving cab door ones, once I can remove the handrails. At present, they are First 'Barbie' blue blending into the Provincial/regional Railways blue!

Application of the vinyls generally went smoothly, although the toilet window doesn't line up properly. There are a few bubbles I missed and the gutters over the doors gave me a few problems, but from normal viewing distance, it looks fine to me.

I missed pre-painting the filler recesses in the middle of one side on each coach. Will fix that later.

Last edited on Tue May 12th, 2015 12:19 pm by SRman

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As described in my layout topic (it probably would have been better in this one!), I swapped chassis and cab interiors around between Bachmann class 150 units, so that the new First Great Western unit now has the old solid block chassis in the motorised coach, while my Silverlink unit now has the new chassis with lights. I also swapped the sound decoder back into the Silverlink unit, with a new 100 ohm speaker installed as I didn't feel like dismantling the old chassis to extract the speaker from under the motor!

The result is that I can run the two First Great Western units in multiple without the oddity of having one with an opaque motor coach and no lights and the other with lights in both coaches.

The FGW units, 150 128 and 150 219 (the one I added the Electra Railway Graphics vinyls to) are seen in the storage loops, so not a great photo, while the Silverlink unit, 150 123, is shown in all its new glory on the tracks below.






Meanwhile, my order for some transfers and etched plates from Modelmaster arrived a couple of days ago. The first candidate for improvement was my Hornby Gresley P2, Cock O' The North, which now sports etched nameplates. I think these are an improvement over the printed ones, and even more so compared to the plastic ones Hornby supplied.




Finally, for this session, I have been adding coal loads (Wagon Essentials drop in loads from Model Railways Direct) to a few wagons and weathering some of them as well. The photos below tell at least some of the story. The Dapol Saxa Salt wagon was already weathered, but any others are ones I have done. All of the bright red ones were particularly lurid to start with. A wash of dark brown and some matt varnish have helped tone them down a bit.













Last edited on Wed Jun 3rd, 2015 04:07 pm by SRman

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Was it really as long ago as November 2013 that I first reported on this and another LSWR 'road' van from Smallbrook Studio (see post 206)? I have taken all four of the kits I purchased (LSWR and 'Met' versions) along to a couple of exhibitions with a view to continuing construction but ended up operating the BRMA layout on each occasion, with no productivity as far as kit construction went!

Anyway, continuing with the pre-grouping theme, I dug out the previously started LSWR 18 tonner and fitted the handrails last night, followed by the glazing, roof, gutters, chimney and couplings tonight. There is still a bit of painting to do and transfers and weathering to go, but it is now very close to being finished.

I have posed it with the Bachmann LBSC E4 0-6-2 tank locomotive for effect.






Next to complete will be the diagram 1545/9 20 ton van.

Much later, I'll do the as yet unstarted Metropolitan Railway version of the 20 tonner, and the D.1541 10 ton brake van.

Last edited on Mon Jun 15th, 2015 04:57 pm by SRman

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I have made further progress with finishing the Smallbrook Studio LSWR 18 ton 'road' van (D. 1542) - the right-hand van in the photos below. Transfers from HMRS have been applied, although much of what I have done was guesswork, based on photos of other types of brake vans in LSWR livery, since all of the photos I have been able to find of D. 1542 vans were in BR grey, in various states of decreptitude! I used the smaller LSWR lettering as the panels are a bit tighter in dimensions than the other vans.

The D. 1545/1549 20 ton van has had a few more paint touches applied and all the holes for the handrails drilled out, and couplings fitted, but otherwise looks the same as before - middle van in the photos.

I commenced work on the D. 1541 10 ton van and it has now caught up to the 20 tonner, apart from the roof not being painted. This is the single-ended van on the left in the photos. I pre-drilled all the handrail holes before fully assembling the shell on this one. Both this and the 20 ton van's roofs are only black-tacked on at the moment, pending fitting the glazing.






The 18 ton van will have a coat of matt or satin varnish applied and some weathering, although it can already now run in traffic if I wish.

Last edited on Sun Jun 21st, 2015 02:15 pm by SRman

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I recently scored a Hornby DCC sound class 08 off eBay, from a reputable dealer acmodels2 in Eastleigh, for £75 including postage to Australia. This was described as running well with working sound but in poor condition with "lots of detail missing" and unboxed. This was still a bargain as the sound decoder alone was worth in the region of £100.

When the model arrived, it was missing all of the footsteps, one handrail for the footsteps with the others being loose, and the cab roof ventilator hatch. The condition was much better than I had anticipated, notwithstanding the accurate and detailed photos posted on the listing and, after straightening the coupling rods slightly, a quick test run on the rolling road showed that it behaved impeccably well for both running standards and the not very good Hornby sounds (easy to get reblown!). All in all, I'm very happy with this purchase.

I have ordered some PHD Designs 08/09 footsteps, although I could have tried to knock some up from plasticard. The roof vent has already been covered with a piece of 20 thou plasticard cut to match my Hornby D3963 (which was reblown a while back with legomanbiffo's sound project), and the missing handrail will be replaced with a piece of wire and fine handrail knob in due course.

I have ordered a Zimo sound decoder (21 pin) with Paul Chetter's sounds on for the 08 as I have rather fancied his version of the 08 sounds with the lovely exhaust rasp. I also want a BR blue 08/09 but all of mine are so far have been either green or in post-privatisation liveries, so here was an excuse to do a repaint as well. The yellow wasp stripe ends were already applied and this one had yellow buffer beams so I don't have to do anything to the ends of the loco at all.

The ESU sound decoder from the 08 will be reblown and fitted into something else.

Here are a couple of pics of the 08 after a first coat of BR blue. It requires a second coat before numbering in pre-TOPS style, followed by a good dose of weathering. I will, of course, repaint the handrails after the next coat of blue. I have yet to decide which number this locomotive is to become.






The ESU sound decoder will go into another suitable candidate in the near future after a reblow from either Howes or legomanbiffo.

Last edited on Fri Jul 24th, 2015 10:00 am by SRman

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Hi Jeff, very nice! I have a Bachmann 08 with one of Paul's sound files on, it's a great sound file and very realistic!

Cheers
Ron

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nice job Jeff Ihave two both Hornby they do run very well
:thumbs;-):cool:

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Thanks. I like both Hornby and Bachmann 08/09 shunters, but the Hornby ones have the edge on fine detail.

Now, onto another quick project, unfinished from before: I decided to resurrect my Hornby Stanier Black 5, which had been playing up last time I ran it. I tested it on DC analogue after removing the Hornby decoder and it ran perfectly for several hours on the rolling road. I added a Hattons decoder and that ran perfectly.

Next, I decided to continue with the weathering process I started before it played up. Doing the dirty bits is not difficult; the problem I have is with matt varnishes not drying matt. I have used several different brands, all shaken and stirred thoroughly, but the results are very unreliable. At present, it is still not right but looks reasonable (only reasonable, not especially good!).

Here it is on the late 1950s/early 1960s parcels train at Newton Broadway






Definitely more work needed on the Black 5. The weathering still needs refining a bit. Then I have to do battle with the varnishes again!

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I gave the blue 08 a second coat of paint, then later touched in the white cab handrails.

I gave it a quick test run on the layout and it completed one circuit before coming to an abrupt halt with one coupling rod detached. 




To see if I could recover the missing crankpin, I sent another 08, D3963 around with a neomagnet (intended as a Hornby Dublo ringfield replacement magnet) attached with some Blu-tack. It came back with two track pins and a few bits of magnetic detritus attached!




In the absence of the correct crankpin, I quickly ascertained that the thread for the pin is 12BA, so used a short 12BA countersunk head screw to secure the coupling rod. I put a small smear of glue on the thread beforehand to ensure it wouldn't unscrew accidentally. The screw head is a little on the large side but once it is painted it won't be all that obvious.

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Some time ago, I purchased a couple of C=Rail's bulk container packs, one with 40' box containers, the other with five 20' tank containers.

I have built and decorated three of the box containers, with two still being completed (delayed by a bad can of primer that left lumps stuck to the surfaces). These are now awaiting their transfers, plus the locking bars on the white one.

The tank containers were only partly assembled, to make painting easier, before putting all the fiddly bits on. I completed the painting to my own satisfaction, even though a couple of bits are still a little rough. The detailing bits (walkways, tank fillers, ladders, etc.) have now all been added, although, looking at liveries of the real things, I should repaint the red framework one into black. The GCatainer item is the first to be completed properly, although there were only a limited number of images I could find to assist with the positioning of the transfers (which also came from C=Rail). I think it looks reasonable, regardless of the accuracy of positioning some of the transfers.








They are posed here with a couple of C=Rail's professionally finished tank containers, which also gave me some clues as to where some of the markings might be placed.

And these are the previously finished examples of the 40' boxes.

Last edited on Tue Aug 25th, 2015 05:17 pm by SRman

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And another tank container with transfers applied, this time for Stolt.

Marty
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Nicely put together Jeff... Not sure if you've got room for a container terminal on your layout though?! Just through traffic?

Marty

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Is that bus in there holding the tanks up? :mutley:mutley:mutley


SRman wrote:
And another tank container with transfers applied, this time for Stolt.


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Marty wrote: Nicely put together Jeff... Not sure if you've got room for a container terminal on your layout though?! Just through traffic?

Marty

Thanks Marty.
Most of these will be on container wagons, but there are a few 'spares' so I can ring the changes. I'd love to have a proper container terminal but, as you said, there's not enough room, so 'through traffic' it is! 

:mutley

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D_Will wrote: Is that bus in there holding the tanks up? :mutley:mutley:mutley

It looks like it, but the bus is actually several inches behind! That one is actually a new London Buses Metroline Optare Spectra bought on special from the London Transport Museum.

Last edited on Thu Aug 27th, 2015 03:15 am by SRman

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Continuing with the C=Rail containers, I have decorated a couple more of the tank containers, plus a 40' hi-cube container, and finished off a previously started 40' hi-cube one.

Starting with the box containers, I completed the Hanjin one, which had already had the main large side logos and names applied some time ago, I added all the remaining details such as the numbers and end logos and information panels. The OOCL one was just a bare, off-white box! Both still require the locking bars to be applied ... unfortunately, I can't find where I have put those at the moment!






Turning to the tank containers, I decorated the Stolt and Seabrook ones. Both are visible just behind the Brisbane City Council Leyland Panthers (resin models from Brisbane's Model Buses), which are another project (I have just added the fuel and water filler detail on the closer bus).




SRman
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Frustrated by my own lack of motivation in building my London Transport train of 1920 F Stock, I ordered one resin body shell for a single-ended Driving Motor from Radley Models. I still have the older Harrow Model Shop white metal kits to build and one double-ended Driving Motor already built (also white metal). The resin shell was intended to speed the build of one more coach so I could at least run half a train with driving cabs still at both ends. However, having painted the resin shell red with grey roof, and assembled two bogies and an underframe from one fo the white metal kits, that's where it stopped again. All that was quite a few years ago.

I have had a few days off work with a chest infection, but got bored and decided to attempt further work on the single-ended car to bring it up to a stage where it matched the existing "finished" double-ended car. This involved painting black around the window rims and down the door centre divides, plus painting the interior with green (I use Humbrol #88, which has a suitable bluish tint to pass muster), the floor dark earth colour, with plasticard strips hiding any holes, then glazing the lot. All that doesn't sound too hard, except my hands were shaking rather a lot and I had a nose bleed half way through! At least it matched the red exterior colour!

Anyway, after a few trials and tribulations, I only have to glue some of the underframe bits and pieces in place to complete a two car set.




​Next, I have to construct two white metal centre trailers. I'll try not to let it take so long this time.

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Having nearly completed the two driving cars for the London Transport F Stock, I decided to make a start on the two trailers. Bearing in mind I am on an antibiotic and a little under the weather still, so my hands are a bit shaky and my stamina is low, I decided to just do little bits at a time,

The two trailers i have are original Harrow Model Shop white metal ones, which means there are three double doors plus four separate sections per side, two halves of the roof joined with a bridging piece (plus the vents to add later), and an underframe that has two extra end headstock pieces to stick on, it is just a little bit more complicated than the one piece resin bodies of the later kits from Radley Models. After that, both types of kit require the underframe details to be added and bogies to be assembled.

With so many separate parts to the sides, I came up with a method long ago that used Blu-tac, a steel rule, a flat, hard surface and 5-minute Araldite glue, plus a modicum of cursing and swearing.

That's jumping ahead a little. For starters, after cleaning up all the relevant bits with a file, I glued the two roof halves to their bridging piece, for each of the two trailers, and left those to set on a flat surface.

Next, I glued the headstock pieces to the ends of the two underframes, while at the same time, gluing two coach ends to each of the roofs and propping those to dry with the coach ends held vertically.

That's where I am up to now. The photo shows the two roof/ends sitting on the two underframes loosely. As you can see, the alignments are perfect.




The sides will be next, and the reason for assembling the roofs and ends is so that I have the correct lengths to work to for the side assemblies. With so many separate pieces to fit and room for small movements relative to each other, it would be quite possible to end up with sides that are too long or too short by a few millimetres.

Last edited on Tue Oct 20th, 2015 02:37 pm by SRman

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Following on from the previous post, here is a pic showing the elements that make up each side. On the left I have left the items spaced out, while on the right they are positioned very close to the final effect. You can sort of see what I meant about the possibility of getting it even slightly wrong so making the sides too short or too long, with possibilities of being crooked or with bits out of alignment as well.





The double-ended driving car had two more components per side (the cab side doors), while the single-ended driving car (motor or trailer, depending on period modelled) had one extra door per side - all that is rather academic if you build the resin kits from Radley Models as the body moulding comes with sides, ends, roof and internal partitions as one single casting.

Last edited on Tue Oct 20th, 2015 10:41 am by SRman

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The LT F Stock trailer construction continued tonight. The side and door sections have been glued together and glued to the roofs. Both cars are still sitting loosely on their underframes.

Has anyone ever wondered what the F Stock from 1920 would have looked like if they had been built in aluminium and left unpainted? Well, here you go!






I suppose the next thing to do is to build the bogies and mount them on the underframes. I could also glue the roof vents into position too. 

A curiosity of the F Stock was that those vents proved rather too effective, so were blanked off fairly early in the life of the stock.

There is a small amount of weakness in the centres of the sides, reinforced by the underframes and the tabs and recesses there. Once the interior partitions go in, they will strengthen things further, in spite of the fact that they are fairly soft and flimsy themselves. The whole is stronger than the individual parts.

Last edited on Wed Oct 21st, 2015 04:00 pm by SRman

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Sorry to hear that you are crook... nasty things infections and I do hope it clears soon Jeff.
But...you are making some railway progress, albeit shakily... so it can't all be bad :)
1920's F stock eh?... the things I learn from this forum... Nice builds, keep it coming.

cheers
Marty

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Thanks Marty. I finished the antibiotic yesterday, now it's a waiting game to see if it has cleared up the infection or if it will hit back again. It has been frustrating.

I like the F stock, and always thought it looked more modern than the following clerestory roofed 1923/27/31/35 stocks (which became part of the Q stock). The complexity of the sides make them tricky to build, at least in the form the white metal kits come in. Not quite as bad, perhaps, as GWR 'concertina' coaches, though. :roll:

:cheers

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And now, here they are with bogies assembled and fitted, plus the roof vents in place. The painted bogie was recycled from the double-ended DM when I put a second Black Beetle into it, and needed a little adaptation and packing to get the ride height the same as the others.




Next to do are the interior partitions, couplings and underframe fittings (which are fairly sparse on the trailers).

Last edited on Thu Oct 22nd, 2015 02:32 pm by SRman

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And today just a few more minor touches: the couplings and underframe bits have been glued on. In this form, it can actually run on the layout, although still incomplete visually.

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Hope you are on the mend. Those cars are a real labour of love, but the results are excellent. Looking forward to seeing the whole set painted and up and running. There is something fascinating about the underground - I think it is because it is so busy with trains coming every few minutes.

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Thanks. I am on the mend, and getting more energy to do the modelling in the evenings after work.

I gave the four-car unit a quick test run and it ran successfully apart from dropping the last coach in the tunnel. That was easily fixed by bending the coupling slightly. It all ran perfectly after that.

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Glad to hear your feeing better Jeff :thumbs

When travelling to School in the late 60s, I used to pick up a District Line train which invariably had a 'silver' car somewhere with in it. Sometimes the entire train was silver and at the time I never knew if they were intended to be like that or nobody had got around to painting them red.

I've since found out it was deliberate, but obviously more modern trains than your F stock.


Ed


(PS: totally irrelevant, just thought I'd mention it)




Last edited on Fri Oct 23rd, 2015 07:16 pm by Ed

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Hi Ed.
The only trains that would have been mixed red and silver would have been the R Stock, with the flared lower skirts. They were in the process of being painted silver, grey or white (steel cars) or returned to unpainted aluminium for the rest in the early 1960s. The reason was to avoid staff confusion with the incompatible but almost identical looking CO/CP Stock, which remained red.

The last of the F Stock ran in 1963 on the East London Line, which gives me a good link to the SR lines at New Cross and New Cross Gate. The East London Line trains were of four cars, which also fits what I have been building!

I keep wondering if I should stick to the 'correct' train red for my F stock, or try for a rather lighter, more faded shade as they were towards the ends of their lives. Having painted the two driving cars LT train red already, I'll have to do the two trailers the same colour first, then maybe work on lightening it a little, perhaps with a little yellow mixed into a matt varnish - experiments may follow.

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The two trailers have had a little bit of filler applied to the roof joints, followed by a coat of primer. After removing any rough bits that showed up, another light coat of primer was followed by a coat of bright red (as a good base colour for the train red that will be brush-painted on afterwards.




What this photo also showed up more obviously than before is that the side panel closest to the camera is not straight and needs to be removed and remounted. This demonstrates that taking progress pictures is not only for my own ego in showing off the models, but also a useful tool to show up any little errors or omissions before it's too late to fix them.

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Keeping the ball rolling, here's the four-car set with the centre cars painted in bright red, but the roofs have received their first coat of Humbrol #66 grey.

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I have posted a couple of pictures of the F Stock in running condition (although still not fully finished) on my layout thread. All four cars are now in the same colour (LT train red).

For Melbourne Cup Day, we have a public holiday here in Melbourne, so I have put in a little modelling time this morning, decorating a couple of items of stock. 

First up is the Hornby class 08 shunter that I repainted into BR blue a little while back. I have not heard any more from PH Designs regarding the etched steps (I transferred the money but nothing seems to have happened at the other end), but in the meantime, I found the plastic steps I had removed from the Bachmann 08 chassis I used under my SR 15203 shunter. With a small amount of trimming and drilling of holes, these are now attached to the Hornby chassis. I am still missing one shunter's handrail at the front but that will be easily replaced with a handrail knob and some wire. I then numbered it as D3272, which (so far) is the only 08 I have found pictures of on the Southern Region that seems to match the configuration of the model, although even now I'm not 100% sure it's right.




I also replaced the single 'sugar cube' speaker (the last one I had in stock at the time) in this locomotive with a matched pair in parallel with a double mounting, from DC Kits. The sound from the Zimo decoder (Paul Chetter/Digitrains sounds) is much better now.



For quite a while, I have owned a Dapol track cleaning car, which came from Hattons with their own branding on it in grey and white livery. I repainted into blue and grey, and arbitrarily assigned a DCC number to it (1074), which I kept forgetting. I have now given it a fictional Derby test livery with white edging to the grey (wider stripes than standard) and a red band below the waistline. It is now called Laboratory 26 and numbered RDB905090 (5090 for DCC purposes, lthough I could have used the '26' instead). I'm not sure what the real Lab 26 was, or what it was for, and it almost certainly wasn't RDB905090, which probably also exists, but since the whole shebang is fictional anyway, it gives an illusion of legitimacy to it!






As this vehicle is sometimes propelled in front of a locomotive, I may add some wasp stripes to the ends at some time in the future.

Edit: I trimmed the excess red stripe off at the ends after the photos were taken.

Last edited on Tue Nov 3rd, 2015 12:56 pm by SRman

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Some considerable time ago, I started work on a Maunsell 0-6-0 diesel-electric shunter, using a Golden Arrow Productions resin body kit and a slightly modified Bachmann class 08 chassis. It has been operational for a while, and painting and glazing is all but complete, apart from a few very minor touch-ups required, although without numbers or BR crests.

This will be 15203 with late style crests when done. 

Today, I have added most of the handrails. A quick check of photos of the real thing showed that I have a couple of small handrails to add on the bonnet top, The door locking handles and the lamp irons are still to be added, but this still marks a good step forward.

While drilling holes for the handrails, I decided to use short lengths of the handrail wire to reinforce the joints between the edges of the running boards and the plasticard extensions. These will be hidden with a little filler before repainting the sides.

The resin steps have also been added but these are a little weak, so may require the same trick of using handrail wire to reinforce the joints.

Eventually, I will have to scratchbuild the front steps out of plasticard.









Last edited on Sat Nov 7th, 2015 11:49 am by SRman

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The handrails were given a quick coat of black paint to tone them down. Eventually, all the bonnet-side ones will be in green to match the rest of the paintwork.

Close-up shots like this are extremely cruel, but show me what still needs doing, very clearly! Obvious things to do include straightening up those handrails a bit, so they are all in line, filling the keyhole slots in the buffer beams, somehow extending the footplate/running board at the front and widening the buffer beam to match, and fixing up the black and yellow stripes at the cab end, which are still a bit rough.

Looking at the photos and comparing them to the real thing, those prominent ridges along the engine top cover also need to be filed down and eliminated - the real ones are almost unnoticeable.

Still, overall I am quite pleased with the way it is coming along. Once all the body works have been completed, I can do something about sitting the body down properly on the chassis.



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A fresh coat of paint, some numbers and crests from HMRS pressfix transfers, removal of those raised lips on the engine cover, and a further effort to straighten and align the bonnet handrails have resulted in these two pics.



Last edited on Sun Nov 8th, 2015 10:05 am by SRman

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I have been doing bits of work on various projects lately. 

The Maunsell 0-6-0 d-e shunter 15203 has been sat down a bit on its chassis and a few more paint touch ups done. One handrail seems to have gone back out of kilter but I will fix that again soon.




I have also commenced some weathering on these projects. I must emphasise that these are only the initial attempts and all need more work before I am satisfied with the effects. 

The S15 4-6-0 has had a crew fitted and some Humbrol black weathering wash applied to tone down the brightwork, cab roof and smokebox. Lots more work to do here with browns and greys before I will be able to claim it is finished!




The O2 0-4-4T has had the pipework fitted at the front and all the brightwork toned down with the black wash, plus a wash of brown on some of the brake gear. Again, more needs to be done before it is convincing. A crew has also been fitted in the cab.




And finally, the blue 08 has copped a heavy weathering using the black wash, some oily stains and a white 'dust' wash (which was not successful in representing the chalky paint effect I wanted! It got another thin black wash to compensate). Again more needs to be done but I am happy with the effect so far. I do want to redeem a little more of the blue again but that can be done by dry brushing. I also want to add a driver and a couple of shunters hanging on to the front steps and in an open cab door. After a bit more research and digging through photos, I think I need to renumber this one to D3219, which has a better match to the features of this particular model.





Last edited on Sun Nov 15th, 2015 06:08 am by SRman

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A quick renumber, using the same Replica Railways rub-on transfers as before, and D3219 stands in full sunshine with a very cruel close-up to show me what I need to do to fix the weathering. This time, I used a strip of masking tape below the baseline of the numbers to make sure I got them straight on both sides.



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This is just a progress report on weathering projects. The photos were taken in fairly dim light with my HTC phone, so are not the best but illustrate what I have been doing and indicate to me what the next steps should be.

I have slightly unweathered the Hornby 08 by dry brushing some BR blue back over the black washed edges and roof panels. It still needs a lot more work before I am happy with it, but I think it does look a little better than before.




The Hornby S15 has had a little more Humbrol black wash added, over the smokebox, cab roof, footplate and running boards, tender top and cylinders, plus a very thin application along the boiler top.






The Kernow/DJM O2 has also had some more of the Humbrol wash added to similar areas to the S15, plus the tank tops and bunker rails.




At risk of boring everyone with these slow step by step illustrations, I hope to show that weathering is best built up slowly, in layers, which is pretty well how it occurs on the real thing.

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Continuing with building up (and decreasing, in the case of the 08) weathering effects, here are some more progress photos, taken on the layout near Newton Broadway station.

In the case of the O2 I also 'doctored' two of the photos to resemble older images in black and white and sepia tones. They then give me some comparisons with the photos I am working from in various publications.

The 08 shunter has had a partial wash and partial dry-brush effect with grey, Humbrol #66 (called olive drab). I had to use a cotton bud and turps to feather the edges over the top corners of the bonnets. I also used a few dry-brushed strokes of rusty brown along the lower edges of the frames and brake blocks and rodding.










And to the O2, with a lot of grey (#66 again) washed and dry-brushed over most of the areas below the footplate, plus the running board top surfaces and smokebox.








And the black and white versions of two of these:






And the sepia tones. I think these look particularly effective, myself.






As before, these are still works in progress, but I am happy with the way they are going, at present.

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Hi Jeff, I have tweaked your very nice picture to make it a bit more 'vintage' by increasing contrast and brightness, there is someone on here who is an eggspurt in these things, but hope you dont mind,

I think you should be justifiably proud!

Doug

Last edited on Thu Nov 19th, 2015 06:02 pm by Chubber

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Thanks for that Doug. I'll have to save that one. It looks great.

I was going to experiment a bit more myself, and add a few scratches and other artifacts that creep into old photos.

:doublethumb

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I hope you don't mind, Doug, but I have posted your version of my photo in a couple of other places online.

In the meantime, I have played around with it further myself and got a few other effects. My last attempt was to add smoke and steam - not entirely convincing yet but I am on the right track. I won't post any of the other attempts until I have something that is sufficiently different or significantly pushes the idea forward.

The actual idea was to make the model convincing without too much phototrickery; adding smoke and steam violates that idea just a little but it also gives the proof that the earlier versions may, indeed, be realistic.

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No problem!

D

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Update on the Maunsell diesel-electric shunter: I have added a little microstrip to the top of the running board extensions and tidied up a few rough edges and joints. I also milled out a little of the insides of the body shell to get it to sit down that last half millimetre. I straightened up the odd slightly crooked handrail and retouched the paintwork. This is the result as it stands now.



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I have continued with the weathering of my Hornby S15, thus ruining Hornby's beautiful pristine black finish! I have been using two colour photos in the book The Heyday of Nine Elms and its Locomotives (Colin Boocock) for reference to the degrees of weathering 'suffered' by the S15s. The first pic is of 30839 outside the 'New Shed', the other is of 30829 on a local passenger turn.

After the initial Humbrol black washes, I added a wash of their dark brown. This actually came out a bit more patchy than I wanted, but it was still a step in the right direction






I then decided that for a more even finish, I would revert to my older technique of mixing up the grunge colours and adding some matte or satin varnish. I used Humbrol 62, leather, Humbrol dark grey wash, and Humbrol satin varnish stirred very well, then added some Humbrol coal black 85. I do not mix this thoroughly, allowing the brush to pick up various shades and mixes of brown shading to dirty black. This was all thinned down with some mineral turps, before using the weathering wash the boiler and smoke deflectors, cab floor, cylinders and steps, some of the valve gear, all wheels and visible frames and pipes, the tender sides and steps, and a few other minor bits and bobs. I left the crests on the tender with a slightly thinner covering, as if they had been cleaned off in the ast but had gained a newer layer of dirt.

This has dried much more evenly, and I am much happier with the effect so far




The overall finish is just a tad too brown at the moment, so now needs a wash of dark grey shading to black to finish off the main weathering. That will be followed by a few rusty and limey streaks around the cylinders and firebox washout plugs. Then I will have to see if there are any final adjustments or additions needed to make it as near completely convincing as I can.

The eagle-eyed amongst may have spotted that I have not done anything about the slightly slanting cabside number (as all of these models have, from the factory). That may be something I'll tackle at a later stage ... or maybe not!

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Back in post #327, I was lamenting not being able to find the locking bars for some C=Rail containers I was building and decorating. Well, I recently placed an order with C=Rail for some of their new Freightliner containers, plus some extra locking bars to complete the previous builds.

The two 40' containers for Hanjin and OOCL are now complete, apart from possibly a bit of weathering.




The pre-finished Freightliner containers from the late '70s and through the '80s are shown here mixed in with some more modern containers. The finish on them is superb.




I still have two of the kit-built tank containers to finish off in there!

Last edited on Mon Dec 14th, 2015 11:11 am by SRman

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Approaching Christmas and the holidays, I decided to start a small tidy-up. One result of this was these two unusual wagon loads of people ready to be distributed around the layout or added to locomotives as crew. they are in suspended animation but will resume their lives once I find appropriate places for them. :)

One man has already found his way into the cab doorway on the 08 shunter!



Last edited on Sun Dec 20th, 2015 03:42 am by SRman

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Has it really been a year and a half since my last entry on the Cambrian Kits Sturgeon A? I have been putting off doing the fiddly door springs for that long. I have now fitted the springs on one side. One more side to go ... then there is a second wagon to build!





After this, painting is next.

Last edited on Tue Dec 22nd, 2015 10:42 am by SRman

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The actual building phase of the Sturgeon A has finished with the addition of the door springs on the other side, handbrake wheels and 'V' hangers (representing an air braked wagon). I have only fitted the outer 'V' hangers, but have not mounted the corresponding inner 'V' hangers as they would interfere with the bogie swing.




This wagon is now ready for painting. It will go into either very dirty black or very dirty departmental olive green.

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looks very impresive,it will be even more so painted.
:thumbs;-):cool:
Owen

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It is actually a nice kit that goes together well. It's just that there are many repetitive bits to deal with that make it tedious - not Cambrian's fault, just a side effect of the real thing's design (28 handrails, 28 door bumpers, 28 door springs!).

If I paint it in pristine black, the detail will be almost lost, but once I weather it heavily, I think the detail will be enhanced.

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The Sturgeon A has now had the first coats of paint. After masking off the couplings, I sprayed some automotive grey primer, followed by matt black from the same source. This will eventually be followed by various shades of black, grey and rust colours to weather it down a bit.

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Normally after spray painting an item, I would brush paint the final coats of paint to fill in any holes or gaps in the spray coats. However, because I want to model the Sturgeon A in a heavily weathered and slightly battered condition, I didn't bother with more black paint, instead going straight to the greys (Humbrol #66 and #79) and browns (Humbrol #29, so far) in washes and dry brushed streaks.

The initial results are shown in the next two photos.






While I should have added the transfers before weathering commenced, it doesn't matter too much with this build, as there are more layers of weathering to go on. This is the stage it is at at the time of typing this post. Still to do: more rust is needed on the metal parts (of the real thing - they are all plastic in the kit!), more shades of grey and brown for the insides and outsides of the wooden planked bits, and more weathering on the floor, before adding the rail load I have earmarked for this wagon.

Last edited on Sat Dec 26th, 2015 08:32 am by SRman

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Great looking kit Jeff. As it is a reasonably long wagon, I would like to know how the couplers are fitted to this wagon ? Are they body mounted or someway connected to the bogies, although they are in from the ends a long way.

I trust you had a great Christmas !

Cheers, Gary.

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Hi Gary. We had a nice quiet Christmas at home but caught up with friends and family on days either side of Christmas Day.

The Couplings are *sort of* NEM pockets on long extensions from the bogies and take standard NEM couplings with the fishtails, and they swing with the bogies. The pockets are formed during the construction but may be a little delicate for repeated plugging and unplugging of couplings. The extensions can be left off if the builder wishes to mount couplings directly under the floor (such as for some Kadee types.

I haven't actually taken any photos of the undersides of the wagon, so I will try to get one or two once the light is better.

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Answering Gary's query about the coupling arrangements on the Sturgeon A, here is an underside shot of it. The NEM 'fishtail' couplings slot into a pocket formed during construction. I'm not sure it is robust enough to stand repeated plugging and unplugging of couplings, but it does allow for future changes, perhaps to NEM type Kadees (numbers 17 to 20). As can be seen, they are mounted on long extensions of the bogie top members, and swing with the bogies.




Now, to a different project: I have been contemplating the Hornby S15 and the weathering to date, which came out just a little too brown for my liking. I mixed up some Humbrol coal black #85 as the predominant colour, with a tinge of Humbrol #66, olive drab, and even less Humbrol #62, leather. The whole lot was then mixed with some matt varnish and 'watered' down with turps to form a grey, almost black wash.

I am much happier with the result, but I'll leave it to you to judge for yourselves.



Last edited on Sun Dec 27th, 2015 04:03 am by SRman

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looks very good to me,spot on
:thumbs;-):cool:
Owen

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Thanks, Owen.
:cheers

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I still prefer them in clean  Maunsell green, that's why I model mid 1930s, no Bulleid malachite, no smelly diesels, still some of Adams's beautiful 4-4-0s and 0-4-2s   about.

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No smelly diesels, Mike?




The three Maunsell diesel shunters date from 1937.


:twisted:   :twisted:  :twisted:

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And just about complete, now. The Sturgeon A with some additional rust coloured weathering, and with a rail load added, using some cut lengths of rail and some plasticard strips cut to represent wooden battens. Just a few minor paint touch-ups to go and it is ready for service with my model Engineers Department.



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Very nice Jeff. The weathering came up well. Quite a unique vehicle.

Marty

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The wagon looks brilliant and the weathering is superb. Thanks for the reply on the couplings. I had a feeling that they may be attached to the bogies, but saying that, the bogies looked a long way in from the end of the wagon making the draw bar (?) very long. I thought there may have been issues with this method especially through points and tighter radius corners. Then again, what do I know ? ;-)

The S15 on the other hand, well its another stunning piece of work. A well worked locomotive showing signs of heavy use. Now, do I send my locos to you for weathering...?? :cool wink

Cheers, Gary.

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Thanks for the compliments, guys.

Gary, send me your locos and I'll keep whichever ones I like!!

:cool wink  :mutley

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I have been doinga comparison of the new Sutton's Locomotive Works (SLW) class 24 against my already modified Bachmann one to see what further work could be feasible to bring the Bachmann model closer to being accurate (or at least, looking accurate).

I have previously modified the gutter line over the cab windscreens, and have been aware that the windscreen shapes were wrong, although they are the hardest thing to correct without having to do a complete repaint. The centre door could be beefed up just a little.

Looking at the models, the roof looks easy to correct, with the Bachmann model needing a little backdating of the exhaust details. It could also do with the addition of the 'flaps' over the boiler water fillers, although these went missing on the real locos quite early on. My modelling period for the 24s is the early 1960s, when around 15 of them were on  loan to the Southern Region for several years. The "L" shaped panel will be easy to produce in plain plasticard.

As the Bachmann model side grilles are correct for the majority of class 24s, but I needed any of the first 15, I had arbitrarily chosen D5014 for my original renumbering. As it turned out, that was not a good choice as D5014 was one of the early ones with an extra grille on each side (as correctly modelled by SLW on D5000). Also out of contention were the first six locos, which had the horizontal divider in the main radiator grille (again, correctly modelled by SLW for D5000). Chacking photos (which were unavailable when I first renumbered the Bachmann one) showed that D5009 0r D5011 were built without the extra side grilles - there were others as well - and D5011 was the easiest renumber because I only had to change the last digit.

The rest is not too bad. The thing that spoils the character the most on the Bachmann model (the windscreen shape) is also the most difficult to correct, so I will have to consider my options on that. The rest should be easy.





(Note the extra grille on the upper level behind the main radiator on D5000 at the rear in the above photo).









Well, it's something to contemplate for a project this year.

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A few years ago, I picked up a Hornby green class 50 with aftermarket sound. 50 007, Sir Edward Elgar, was fitted with Olivia's Trains' sound, and was in generally good nick, apart from a little of the orange lining rubbing off.

This particular model was a limited edition version with red name and number plates, representing 50 007 as preserved. I was not at all happy with the Olivia's sounds, so the decoder was reblown and fitted into something else completely different, and a Lenz Standard+ decoder was fitted in its place. I decided that I would order Fox Transfers lining transfers and etched nameplates with black backgrounds to put Sir Edward back into service as she/he was in active BR service before preservation.

The original Hornby lining was scraped off with a wooden lolly stick and a little water - this doesn't mark the original paint finish or the plastic of the model's body. The new lining transfers slid easily into place, apart from trimming one side slightly to shorten it, and the etched plates were trimmed easily off their frets with a sharp pair of scissors. A little PVA-type glue smeared lightly on the backs of the etched components allowed them to sit perfectly over the printed plates and crests.

I will varnish the sides to preserve the transfers and also seal the edges of the etched components, but it is best to leave them to dry out thoroughly first. Here are a couple of photos to show the results so far - sorry one is a little blurry because I can't take the camera any further back from that side.



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a very smart model Jeff,I like it a lot
:thumbs:thumbs;-):cool:
Owen

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I got brave and decided to try hiding toning down the vertical bars on the main cooling group grille with a little bit of black wash. While I had the paint out, I also toned down the white pipes on the bogies.The photo actually shows the grille bars too well, but from normal viewing distances and angles, the vertical bars are far less obvious than they were.

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I have had a rolling program of upgrading printed name plates with etched ones over the last few years. I put in two orders to Modelmasters just before Christmas to cover most of the remaining diesel and electric models I have, although a couple were not available for various reasons (either not made or out of stock).

The following photos show the ones I have fitted so far.

London Transport (ex-Metropolitan Railway) Bo-Bo no. 8 Sherlock Holmes has benefitted from having its over-thick plastic plates replaced by the etched versions, although I have to say the Heljan version was not too bad at all.




ViTrains class 37, 37 428 David Lloyd George needs a little more work to patch up the paintwork at either end of the new plates - that's where I had to scrape off the slightly longer printed versions. This locomotive had its yellow bits overpainted with a deeper (correct) colour, plus some black paint inside the noses to reduce light bleed. It has the TTS sound chip in it from a Hornby RailRoad class 37, with a home made speaker enclosure to house the speaker.




I like my Lima class 73s for their liveries, but the running qualities were nothing to write home about. All of my operational ones except one now have Hornby mechanisms (the odd man out has a ModelTorque motor fitted). 73 125 Stewarts Lane 1860 - 1985 looks much better with the etched plates instead of the printed ones. It would benefit further if I weathered it lightly.






Another hybrid locomotive is class 59, 59 005 Kenneth J. Painter, with Hornby chassis and Lima body. I experimentally fitted LED head and marker lights at one end only - something I would rate as entirely successful but I need to tidy up the internal wiring a bit. The plates are black, where I think they should be blue for the earlier condition. I may flood some blue paint into them at a later date, but they still look good now, as is.




And finally, for the name plate fittings for this session, Hornby class 09, 09 012 Dick Hardy, now sports the etched plates. The printed ones were just a tiny bit longer, but I didn't modify them at all; you don't see it from normal viewing distance, and only notice if it is pointed out at closer viewing distances.








Since placing the order for name plates, I have landed a few more models, two of which are named! I'll have to order plates for them next time I place an order.

First up is Heljan BR blue class 47, 47 508 S.S. Great Britain, bought second-hand but almost unused. I spent yesterday evening gluing the buffer beam pipes and coupling hook in, then cut them all off at a level just below the bottom of the buffer beam to clear the model coupling swing. I still think this looks better than having a bare buffer beam.






Also from the same source, and almost unused, was BR blue Heljan class 33/1, 33 117. This one is not named (whew!) but needs some buffer beam detailing and weathering.






And finally, from eBay, sound-fitted Hornby 08, 08 844 Chris Wren 1955 - 2002 in EWS livery.



Last edited on Sat Feb 13th, 2016 10:20 am by SRman

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Some minor tweaks to two of the locomotives shown in the previous post.

I have touched up the BR blue paint on the ViTrains 37 at the ends of the name plates. Using Humbrol's acrylic BR blue, the shade is a fraction darker than ViTrains' shade, so I lightly streaked it down the sides in several places, particularly where there might be water runs at the edges of windows and grilles.

The result looks like light weathering but barely shows up at all in the photo.




The Heljan 33, 33 117, has benefitted from some extra paint touches in yellow, plus the start of the weathering process. As it comes out of the box (first photo repeated from an earlier post), the EP pipes and jumper cables are plain black plastic, as are the lamp irons. I have painted the attached ends of the cables and jumpers, plus the sockets, in Humbrol's bright yellow as a primer, to be followed later by proper BR warning panel yellow. The cocks at the tops of the air pipes will get a touch of red paint later on. 

I mixed up my usual weathering colours of Humbrol 62 leather, 67 dark grey (although I often use 66 olive drab here) and 85 coal black, with a blob of matte varnish, all thinned with turps. this was brushed in thin washes onto the whole of the under-gear except for the sides of the solebars, which I had previously painted BR blue. I also used the weathering mix on the jumper cables and air pipes.

The roof is way too clean at the moment. Apart from painting the fan grille BR blue, I haven't touched the roof at all yet. That too will eventually get some weathering washes.

Progress so far is shown in the second photo. Where before the black areas were almost lost in shadows, the new weatherd effect brings out any detail to advantage.



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The one I forgot to include in the earlier post: Hornby 60 077 Canisp in Mainline's adaptation of the Railfreight two-tone greys, with etched name plates fitted.






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A steam man myself but but must admit that looks a smart motor,great colours
:thumbs;-):cool:
Owen

Last edited on Tue Feb 16th, 2016 11:38 am by Silver Fox

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Back to D3219, the Hornby 08 I have been painting and weathering. I finally got round to painting the various handrails white. Unfortunately, this has now emphasised any kinks and bends in the handrails, plus showing up a few odd bits of fluff and cat hair that have stuck to the previous paint.

Still, the effect is not too bad, and the cruel close-up allows me to make the final adjustments to produce a convincing model.

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Jeff looks fine mate,and when was the last time you saw a straight hand rail ??:mutley
by the way if you are inerested I have a box of loco wheels,all sizes and types including romford, jackson, etc plus ponies and bogies
free to a good home just postage needed,
:thumbs;-):cool:
Owen

Last edited on Sat Feb 27th, 2016 05:17 pm by Silver Fox

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Hi Owen.

Thanks for the compliments. I know the real handrails did get bent but I just don't find it convincing on the model. I think it has to be a lot more subtle before it looks realistic.

I wouldn't mind all those Romford wheels, as I have quite a few unfinished projects on the go. I'll PM you later with details.

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Every so often, when I show photos of my layout progress, someone will observe and comment on the cream coloured, raw resin 2-car unit sitting on some track in the background on the upper level. This is a Bulleid-style, BR-built 2 HAP unit, utilising resin body shells and seat units from Ayjay Models (bought through Radley Models), sitting on Hornby 2 BIL chassis bought cheaply when Kernow Model Rail Centre had the Southern Railway liveried examples on sale.

I have finally started cleaning up the body shells and seat units with files, and primed and painted them. I have also cut off the moulded on jumper cables on the cab fronts, although these are not too badly done by Ayjay. I still prefer to use finer wire for the cables.

This unit is going into BR blue with full yellow ends. I would prefer the full blue and grey, which suited these trains quite well, but for the time period I wish to represent, blue fits better, drab as it is. The yellow is not yet the final shade as I have used Humbrol #69 for the base coats. I'll use proper BR warning panel yellow for the final coat. I have painted a wood colour for the interior walls and partitions (not sure if they were wood or plastic finishes on this batch of HAPs), and a light green for the cab interiors, but haven't done the seat colours yet. I thought perhaps a mid-grey for the second class seating (BR's 'Trojan" pattern) but am debating what colour for the first class upholstery: blue, black or orange, maybe?

I am still to add the handrails for the cab fronts and guard's doors, as well as the jumper cables. I may replace the moulded on horns with brass or white metal versions I have in stock. The kit comes with both horns and a whistle moulded on, so the modeller just has to cut off the bits he (or she) does not want.

Anyway, enough waffle; here are the photos as it goes until now. Please note that I have perched the freshly painted bodies on the wrong chassis for the last two photos in this sequence!










The seat units had to be modified a little to fit the Hornby chassis. This mostly involved a milling wheel on the Dremel tool to grind away the clearances, but also included a couple of holes drilled to clear the projecting components of the Lenz decoder sitting under the seats of the DMBS.






And finally, one photo with the body shells on the correct chassis!




Once the Bachmann BR Standard-style 2 HAPs become available, I look forward to mixing the types together in multiple. The Hornby mechanism makes this a lot easier than if I had used the original resin chassis and Black Beetle or Tenshodo SPUD motors.

Last edited on Sun Jun 12th, 2016 10:49 am by SRman

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For my pre-grouping goods trains, I have quite a few colourful private owner wagons, plus a few southern area railwy owned wagons (SECR, LBSCR and LSWR) but in reality, wagons from other railways found their way over most of the British mainland. The problem for me was that most of the available kits or ready to run wagons are too new - I wanted wagons from around 1910 or earlier. With this in mind, I ordered some GWR wagon kits from Parkside Dundas.

Today was officially the first day of the mid-year school holidays, and coincidentally, the three wagon kits I ordered arrived this morning. The kits were for a Mink/Mink A of 1907 build onwards, a Mink D of 1906, and a 10T 5 plank open built from 1909 onwards.

I got stuck into doing the Mink D almost straight away, and have completed the build, plus a coat of grey primer all in this one day. The paint is still drying, so no photos of that, but here it is in 'raw' form.






All in all, a nice simple kit to build and the instructions are fairly clear. Painting in GWR grey will also be a relatively simple job as the GW painted everything grey, except perhaps the wheels and buffer heads, and of course, the white roof. At the time I want to represent, the GW lettering should be 25" size where it would fit (not sure about this on the Mink D), but I only have the next size down lettering available anyway. I'll be making do with that for the time being.

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And a quick snap of the Mink D in grey primer.

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Work on building the Parkside Dundas GWR 10 ton 5-plank wagon has commenced. There are still some components to fit, but progress on the kit was again rapid (like the Mink D I did yesterday).





Adding weight to open wagons is always problematic if one wishes to leave the interior detail visible. I am using some lead ball bearings here, glued on with a liquid contact cement. A few of the balls have stuck in the wrong places but I will clear them out before long. There is still not sufficient weight in this wagon, so I will have to fill a few more spaces in the underframe. I left the end areas clear so I could do my usual NEM coupling arrangement, using two spacers of 40 thou plasticard and the Parkside adapters (actually included with this particular kit). The Hornby fishtails fit better than Bachmann ones, which tend to be bit loose.To fix that problem, since most of my couplings are Bachmann ones, is to add a small blob of mastic in the fishtail slot.





Obvious items still to add include the tarpaulin bar, the door bumpers, handbrake levers, and the tiebars between the axleguards (actually moulded on the kit but they broke when I was cutting the parts off the sprues, so I will replace them with some microstrip).

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Here it is again, all but complete now, apart from painting. Parkside include a length of plastic rod to form the tarp bar, but I decided to substitute some brass wire for this, glued into place with a superglue.


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they do look good as is Jeff,can`t wait to see them finished
:thumbs;-):cool:
Owen

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Thanks, Owen. I'll wait until I have  finished all three wagons then I'll batch paint them.

So far I have managed one Parkside wagon kit per day for two days, and started the third one today, albeit rather later in the day, so it is only half completed. :D

The GWR Mink van has its body shell and underframe with wheels fitted, but no brake gear or buffers yet. the roof is only sitting loosely until I put some lead sheet in for weight.

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The 1907 GWR Mink van has now been completed. The photo was taken before I fitted the couplings (using the same methods as before). One addition to this and the 10T open wagon has been to use some brass wire to replace the very fragile tiebar between the 'W' irons.




The next job will be to paint all three GW wagons in the standard grey (or as close as I can get to it).

Last edited on Thu Jun 30th, 2016 11:35 am by SRman

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Continuing with the trio of Great Western wagons, I have now painted them: a coat of grey primer, followed by a coat of matt (or satin) black, then brush-painted with Humbrol #79 blue-grey, and a coat or two of SECR wagon grey (which is the closest colour I have to GWR wagon grey). I removed the wheels and couplings before painting the wagons. The van roofs have had one coat of white primer sprayed over the grey primer, followed by a coat or three of Humbrol #34 matt white.


The photos show them after the black coats then after the first coat of wagon grey. I'll continue until I am happy with the result, then I'll decorate with suitable transfers (more pictures will follow to show these steps).













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Coming along very nicely Jeff.


Marty

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Now just awaiting transfers and maybe a little weathering.

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The first lettering has now been added. As I said earlier, the pre-grouping period GWR wagons really should have 25" lettering for the "G W", but I only have 16" lettering available. This is probably correct for the Mink D, but not for the other two, but it will have to do until I can get hold of something better. I haven't any of the small weight and number transfers in the script typeface they used, so they too will have to wait.

This, then, is how they currently look, posed with my Hornby LSWR M7 0-4-4T and a Smallbrook Studios LSWR 18 ton road van.





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I know the platelayers huts were made at Exmouth Junction concrete works, but I've been searching for when the huts were first produced, I had thought they were introduced after grouping. I'm modelling 1930s so I'm OK with using them, just intrigued as to when they first appeared.

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Mike, I was hoping no one would notice that! I should have removed the hut for the photos. I think you are correct about them dating from the thirties.
:cheers

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All you need to do is refinish the M7 and road van in SR livery. :hmm  :cool wink

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:tongue :tongue :tongue

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Well, thanks to a fellow BRMA member, who very kindly sent me some spare PC/HMRS pressfix transfers he had, I now have Great Western transfers of the correct size and style to not only do the "G W" lettering but also the numbers and weights. I have made a start on the Mink wagon, removing the prevous smaller "G W" letters, and replacing with the scale 25" letters. I have also added the weight and tare inscriptions on both sides, but not the actual wagon number, yet. The close-up photo also highlights a couple of very minor paint touch-ups required.






Incidentally, I was wrong about my SR concrete hut being movable: I have, at some time, glued it down to stop me accidentally knocking it all the time, so it has to stay for all photos!

Last edited on Sat Jul 9th, 2016 10:07 am by SRman

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Very nice Jeff. I reckon it looks better with the bigger letters too.
Marty

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Thanks Marty. I think so too. :)

I think the open wagon will also look better when I get around to doing it. I'm fairly sure the smaller letters are correct for the Mink D, though, but if anyone knows better, please advise me.

Last edited on Sat Jul 9th, 2016 05:39 pm by SRman

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I do like HMRS transfers, a great variety and accurate.

Modelmaster are expanding their range into pre-nationalisation so they're worth a look.

John

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I agree with you wholeheartedly, John. I still have quite a lot of P.C./HMRS pressfix and methfix transfers for BR and SR stock, and also quite a few Modelmaster transfers - they have useful ranges of numbers made up for particular types of locos and units, which save quite a lot of mucking around with individual digits.

Fox also have a useful selection of transfer.

All three brands are easy to use and give good results.

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Quite some time ago I started building a London, Chatham & Dover Railway (LCDR) brake van from the etched brass Roxey Mouldings kit. It was 95% complete when the build stalled due to my problem in effectively attaching the footboards. I have now done so using wire hangers bent to support the boards. The upper ends of the hangers are hooked and superglued into holes drilled into the brass solebars, while the step boards are soldered to the lower supports. 

The smaller steps under the guard's doors are also soldered, although one of them took me several attempts before it stayed solidly put.

The whole lot is painted South Eastern & Chatham Railway (SE&CR) wagon dark grey with black below the solebars. Lettering has commenced with HMRS pressfix transfers, but is not yet complete. I have glazed the various window openings but I'm not sure that all of them should have "glass" in them - it's not at all clear from the drawings I have or any of the limited number of photos I have seen.





Last edited on Tue Jul 12th, 2016 11:51 am by SRman

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The Parkside GWR 10T Open has now had its 'G W' transfers replaced with correct scale 25" lettering, and the load and tare markings put on. It joins the Mink in awaiting only its 5-digit number on each side.

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Must be a right raffle trying to get the decal to sit straight over the diagonal strapping?

You've done a good job though. It looks great.

Marty

Last edited on Mon Jul 18th, 2016 02:56 am by Marty

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Yeah, can be a challenge to get transfers to sit down.  I've got three wagons to do shortly - not a job I look forward to.

John

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The decals are of the pressfix type which are a little easier to get to sit over raised detail. Even so, I brushed a little decal setting solution over them to soften them and settle them over the strapping.

Notwithstanding that, I think I managed to get the 'W' on this side very slightly crooked.

Last edited on Mon Jul 18th, 2016 08:45 am by SRman

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Way back, almost lost in the mists of time, I started a Golden Arrow Productions ex-LSWR G16 4-8-0T, using a Hornby Stanier 8F chassis (sort of appropriate since the G16s finished their lives rated as 8F). While it has been operational for some time, I haven't finished the painting and decorating. That has taken a leap forward this evening, because I have put on all of the transfers except for the Feltham shed code and the overhead warning flashes. It is now numbered 30495, the last of the batch of four of these machines, and one of two to survive well into 1962. Up to now, the TCS M1 decoder has been left at address #3, but I can now give it a proper number (#495).

If you think the glossy smoke box door looks odd against the rest of the smoke box, it is because I needed a glossy surface for the waterslide transfers I used for the number. The rest of the transfers are from P.C./HMRS, of the pressfix type. The tiny 8F power classification above the numbers on the bunker side really taxed my eyesight!






Still to do on the G16 are varnishing the whole thing to protect the transfers, add lamp irons, glaze the cab spectacles, put some coal in the bunker, and weather the lot.

The ex-SR 'Pill Box' brake van is built from a Cambrian kit and pre-dates the Bachmann model.

Last edited on Fri Jul 22nd, 2016 05:36 pm by SRman

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Hi Jeff. Have you ever considered fitting Kadee to either your Kits or RTR wagons? as I am still considering both projects ie Kits and Kadee, and it might be easier to do a Kit with Kadee first. all the best. Kevin

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Hi Kevin. I do use Kadees for a few different purposes. 
I use them within my kit-built multiple units, with the droppers cut off (EMUs and DMUs are not normally split withhin their units for everyday running purposes). Some of the Underground kit-built types also have them within the sets.
I also use them at the outer ends of all my BR EMUs, both kit-built and ready to run. 

They are used within fixed rakes of coaches, such as the typical sets the Southern Region used, but I leave tension lock couplings on the outer ends. I have rakes of Maunsell and BR mark 1 and 2 coaches made up this way, as well as many Pullman coaches.

There are fixed rakes of modern wagons, like Bachmann's TTA, TEA, HHA and HTA wagons which normally run in block trains. Again, they have tension locks at the outer ends.

Similarly, the Bachmann Intermodal pairs of container wagons, which all have Kadee #17s fitted within the pairs. Many of these, and many of my other container wagons, like the Dapol FEA-Bs, pocket wagons, and Megafrets, have Kadees fitted at the outer ends, with a few left with tension locks at one end only. I can mix and match these wagons a bit, with the proviso that ones with tension locks has to go at the outer ends. Of course, it is possible to marshal two with tension locks 'face to face' within the rakes as well.
The vast majority of the Kadees I use are the NEM 'fishtail' types, numbers 17 to 20. I do have some #5 types (or similar) fitted to kits like the London Transport Q stock and my DC Kits 4 EPB, usually on the bogie ends.

I can see most of my class 33/1 diesels getting Kadees fitted and being semi-permanently allocated to the forthcoming 4 TC units I have ordered from Kernow Models. Maybe one or two of the class 73s may get this treatment as well.

At some stage I may consider doing the older style wagons to allow for shunting movements, although the tension locks also allow for remote uncoupling, but not the rather nice delayed uncoupling the Kadees allow.



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Hi Jeff. Thank you, at the moment, I am concentrating on the wagons, but with the buffers( a necessary evil) two #17's together clash and I cannot put #17 at one end and #18 at the other end, they have to be a longer version, whatever number that may be??
Following on from the wagons, I'll need to do the loco's , but, as I have said already the Decoder and Speaker complicate things and with my hands I don't trust myself to reassemble the loco afterwards.
I have considered running a 2BIL with a 2HAL but again I don't know how to. In another lifetime? I would like a three coach "Thumper".
all the best. Kevin

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The HALs and BILs are easy, because they have NEM pockets. I use #19s generally, to give enough clearance for the buffers, although the earlier release HALs from Hornby had a fault in the driving trailer's pocket, where people had to apply various solutions to get them able to hold a coupling: my solution was to lop approximately 1.5 mm off the end, and use a #20 coupling.

Couplings withing the units are better off being left with the Hornby rigid ones, but as there are no lights in the HALs and BILs from Hornby, you could try #17s, with the dropper arms cut off (not needed as you would not usually split coaches within units during normal operations).

The Bachmann EPBs, CEPs and Thumpers do have internal lighting and also the headcode lights, so you'll have to retain the rigid couplings unless you want to lose the electrical connectivity. These generally work well with Kadee #18 or #19 couplings at the cab ends, depending on your curves. This applies to their MLVs also.

Here's a video i took of four of my units running "in multiple" (actually in a DCC consist, although they work perfectly well under DC analogue as well). Apologies for the resolution; I got the conversion wrong!

Last edited on Mon Aug 8th, 2016 03:33 am by SRman

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Hi Jeff. Thank you , it still looks good all the same. The Brick Wall at the back looks very good too. I have looking for a brick wall, with wooden gates at a "Scale 10 feet tall" , Just like the perimeter of the former
Bricklayers Arms Goods Yard. all the best. Kevin

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Inspired by RMweb's Simon0r's two SECR 6-wheel brake vans converted from Parkside's MR 20 ton vans using LNER 10' wheelbase chassis (see  http://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/topic/112617-buildingbodging-some-secr-brake-vans/), I have attempted my own version of the bodge.

I only wanted to do one van, but as the conversion uses axleboxes cut from a second LNER wagon chassis, I had to order two of the LNER chassis, leaving me with a spare pair of axleboxes for possible future use. Simon cut four planks out of the MR van sides from the centre, but I wanted to retain the moulded rivet and bracket details, so cut two planks from either side of the centre section. Unlike Simon, I used the original MR chassis/floor moulding, shortened by a similar amount as the sides. In fact, I got it about half a millimetre longer, so bodged that by adding a section of microstrip at the non-verandah end of each side.

I also wanted to do the earlier single verandah version (which would later be modified to two verandahs, but after the time period I wanted to represent). To this end, I cut the end door top and side but left the bottom in place at one end of each side, and shortened the roof to match.

I filed a recess inside the solebars in the middle, and also filed the solebar thickness down for the extra axleboxes, so they could sit aligned with the outer axleboxes with the full thickness of the solebars intact. Once glued to the floor unit, it all becomes quite strong. I used Romford 12mm spoked wheels, which have no clearance problems with the chassis cross-members, although I prefer the appearance of the slightly larger wheels Simon used. I may try out some Hornby or Bachmann wheels gauge the effect later.

Pictures of my progress to date follow.



















 The roof is not glued on in any of these shots. I have added some lead weight to the floor and some rectangular fillets of plastic to fill the gaps between the solebar ends and the insides of the headstocks/buffer beams.

A quick test revealed that the wheelbase is so short it will go around any of the tightest curves I can find.

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Just a couple of small changes have been made since the first part of this build.

I have added the turned brass buffers (as per Simon0r's suggestion in his topic), and I have substituted some slightly larger diameter Hornby spoked wheels, which somehow look more spindly and archaic, and entirely suit the style and character of the SECR brake van, in my opinion. With these wheels it runs even more freely than with the Romfords. I suspect the Hornby axle length is a tiny fraction shorter and therefore has slightly less friction in the bearings.

I have also removed the moulded gutter lines from the roof, although I have retained the moulded stove chimney, at least for the time being.



Last edited on Wed Aug 17th, 2016 04:52 pm by SRman

Markeg
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Joined: Sun Jul 22nd, 2012