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Lighting up a Hornby Class 47 - Electrics - DCC - Getting You Started. - Your Model Railway Club
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 Posted: Sat Oct 4th, 2008 07:31 am
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mikenencini
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Lighting up Hornby Class 47’s

 It’s good to break up the work on the layout with a bit of variety, a long time spent on the same job does my head in.  So, I thought I'd have a day on the bench and out of the loft to catch up on a loco lighting project that’s been kicking around for a while.  I had a couple of class 47’s without lights, one BR blue/large logo and one Virgin.  For this project I decided to use lighting kits supplied by Express Models.

 

 

 

The kit provides a set of two marker lights (yellow), two tail lights (red) and a headlight (bright white) for each end of the loco.  There is a choice of using a two function decoder giving simple automatic forward/reverse lighting or a four function decoder enabling the red tail lights to be switched independently.

 



 

I used four function decoders, a TCS T4X in the BR loco and an already installed Hornby in the Virgin.

 

No special tools are required.  A very sharp pointed scribe was used to mark the hole centres before drilling pilot holes – it’s worth taking a lot of care with this critical task so that the fully enlarged holes are as central that you can get them in the light mouldings.

 



 

This is the original front with the fairly crudely painted dummy light lenses.

 



 

The two marker lights came mounted on a pcb.  The instructions say “Drill out the dummy lenses centrally with a small drill…..”  Learning from past mistakes on my class 43 I checked the LED spacing against the loco before assuming I could just drill in the middle of the dummy lenses – just as well as the Express Lighting LEDs were significantly closer together.  To get the right spacing I made a simple card template and used this to mark out for drilling on the loco.

 

 

 

You will see the difference in spacing on this picture showing the marked up front panel.  Centering the red tail light holes is more awkward as the moulding is domed and either it has to be flattened before drilling or marked with a very sharp pointed instrument like a scribe.

 



 

 Then pilot holes were drilled using a 0.8mm drill in a pin vice.  The tail lights required the holes to be opened up to 1.6mm but I did this in two further stages using a 1.2mm drill before the final drilling to 1.6mm.  The headlight required a 2mm hole and the marker lights 2.4mm.  I found opening up the holes in stages with increasingly larger drills gave more control and allowed corrections to be made if the hole was seen to be drifting off centre.  It meant more drilling but it was worthwhile.

 



 

With the lights in place you can see how much the centres were off.  This left a little bit of touch up work which will be done when I’m happy all is working well.  Express Models recommend sticking the lights in place with a touch of super glue – I never do.  If you get the holes right the lights are a snug fit and seem to stay in place ok.  Also, it would make things difficult if I needed to replace any LEDs or do some detailing on the cab interior.

 



 

The PCB board with the limiting resistors and wiring harness is stuck to the body roof with a double sided sticky pad.

 



 

To assemble, the cab moulding needs to go in first followed by the lights.  Express Models instructions say “It may be necessary to remove some plastic from the front end of the cab interior mouldings to clear the rear of the lamps” …. NO KIDDIN’  :brickwall   I have highlighted on this picture part of the surgery that needed to be done and they didn’t mention having also to cut a few lumps out of the chassis front which you’ll see in later pictures.  A lot of trial and error was involved in getting the first one right but after that the other cab ends were straightforward.

 

 

 

The next two pictures show the front of the chassis before and after surgery.

 





 

Having completed the necessary surgery the chassis drops in ok as long as you make sure that the wires are taped to the body sides and routed through the slots at the rear of the cab moulding.

 



 

:doublethumbAfter all that, the final result made the day worthwhile – two well lit up Class 47’s.  Well pleased. :Happy

 

 

 



 

 And finally, the four function decoder allows the rear lights to be switched independently so they can be on when running light engine and off when hauling stock as you would expect.  The hedlight and marker lights are switched on/off with the usual '0' key and are on auto forward/reverse.  The tail lights are switched on/off with keys '1' and '2'.

 

 



 

After a day on the bench away from the loft it’s back to scenic work on Warringford.  Hey Ho a modeller's work is never done .......

 

:pedal:pedal:pedal

 

 



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 Posted: Sat Oct 4th, 2008 07:53 am
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Robert
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Very nice job Mike and another good tutorial for the Forum Index



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 Posted: Sat Oct 4th, 2008 07:54 am
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henryparrot
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Mike

Great tutorial description even our most unelectric members should be able to follow what you have created in this thread

thanks very much

cheers Brian

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 Posted: Sat Oct 4th, 2008 02:13 pm
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Matt
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Mike

spot on, i was looking at these for my 37.  first question is do you neef a seperate decoder to operate the lights? i couldn't work this out on the web site. also if the loco is dcc ready ie 8 pin decoder how do you wire this? i have a lenz silver in my 37. thanks mike for posting this:pathead

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 Posted: Sat Oct 4th, 2008 06:41 pm
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mikenencini
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Matt - unless you are doing complex lighting control like independent switching of each light you won't need a separate decoder.  I don't know how many functions your Lenz silver has as they come in different varieties: 2,3 and 4 function but no matter which it is there are enough functions to operate a basic lighting installation

Take for instance a basic 3 function decoder where you will have the following connections available to you on the standard 8 pin plug:

Pin 1 - Orange wire = Motor right

Pin 2 - Yellow wire = Rear light

Pin 3 - Green wire = Function F1

Pin 4 - Black wire = Left rail pickup

Pin 5 - Grey wire = Motor left

Pin 6 - White wire = Front light

Pin 7 - Blue wire = Function common positive

Pin 8 - Red wire = Right rail pick up

If you have a four function decoder there will typically be a separate loose wire, probably purple, coming from the decoder.

For basic lighting you are interested in the yellow, white and blue wires.  Remembering which is the front end of your loco .... the front, white lights, are connected to the white and blue wires.  The rear, red lights, are connected between the yellow and blue wire.  The lights at the trailing end of the loco are wired in reverse i.e.  white wire to the red lights and yellow to the white headlights. The blue is the common return for all the functions. This will give the correct lighting no matter which way the loco is travelling.  Remember LEDs will need to be connected via a limiting resistor.  Lighting wired this way can normally be switched on/off with the '0' key

If you had another light, say in the cab, you could switch that independently by connecting it between the green and blue wires and that would be operated with the '1' key on your control.  There is plenty of guidance elsewhere on the forum on correctly wiring LEDs so I won't repeat that here

There are function only decoders and they are used either in non-powered cars of DMUs to switch lights or in locos where you want to switch a number of features including complex lights and other effects.

If you have a dcc ready loco that doesn't have lights then you'd have to check the printed circuit board to trace how they have wired pins 2, 6 and 7.  For instance, they may have already fitted limiting resistors and provided connections for you to connect the lights.  If the pins are blank i.e. they appear to nowhere, then you would fit the lights and wire directly to the pins on the pcb as I described above.

You'll find some info on fitting a decoder in a Bachmann class 37 via this link
http://www.electricnose.co.uk/dcc/dccbachmann37.html

Express Models do a few different kits for 37s it's just a case of picking the right one - if in doubt give them a call for advice.  They do come with step by step instructions just make sure you check out each instruction before you do anything drastic.

Hope this helps.



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 Posted: Sun Oct 5th, 2008 05:02 am
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Matt
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THANKS MIKE

Why can't web site explain things like that:Happy that has cleared a few things up. the silver decoders are a 4 function decoder. can i snip the wires before the pin and solder to these. so you would have pick up and motor wires to the pin like normal then the lighting wires seperate?

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 Posted: Sun Oct 5th, 2008 10:38 am
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mikenencini
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Matt, you certainly can.  In fact if I am in doubt about what the manufacturer has done with their pcb board and wiring harness I take a demolition approach i.e. clear the site first and then hard wire the decoder in - that way I know where I am.  

As you have 4 function decoders in place you have the option to wire up the two spare functions as I did on the 47's so that you can switch the tail lights off when the loco is hauling stock and have them on when running light or "pushing" during any shunting operation.  All adds to the fun.

 



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 Posted: Sun Oct 5th, 2008 12:03 pm
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Matt
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thanks mike

i shall order one in the week and see how i get on:thumbs

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 Posted: Tue Oct 7th, 2008 11:43 am
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Petermac
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Great explanation Mike - maybe even I could do it.

One concern I have - you said you don't need any specialist tools and produced a photo of your workbench and tools.  Where is the sledgehammer, felling axe, lump hammer and cold chisel ?  Anything smaller than that is, to me, micro-surgery !!! :lol::lol::lol:

Seriously, I do think you've made it look simple.  I'll have to re-read it in stages to try to get my head around some of the jargon ("common function return" springs to mind !!)  Yes, I admit it, I'm a total dummy when it comes to electronics - plug it in, if it works - great, if it doesn't - take it back for repair !!!!



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 Posted: Tue Oct 7th, 2008 05:45 pm
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mikenencini
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Petermac  :lol::lol::lol::lol::lol:  no felling axe but the others you mention I do have in the shed just in case I ever venture in 0 gauge garden railways :roll::roll:

Like everyone on this forum I'm always happy to help if you fancy having a go at a project like this, including some jargon busting ... just ask.  Compared to some of our members I'm a rank amateur in the electronics field so if I can do it ..... and, there's always someone who will have the answer.

:cheers



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 Posted: Wed Oct 8th, 2008 03:29 am
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Petermac
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Thanks Mike.  That's one of the great things about this forum - there's not only all the skill anyone could ever need, but help and advice is freely offered to those of us who don't have either the competence or the nerve to "go it alone".

 



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 Posted: Mon Oct 31st, 2011 06:40 am
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rbhatla
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Very useful post. Just what I was looking for. Thanks

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