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Replacing the single line at Long Rock - Prototype Information. - The Prototype. - Your Model Railway Club
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 Posted: Sat Sep 20th, 2008 03:44 pm
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Christrerise
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While at Penzance today to take pictures of my proposed scratchbuild prototypes I found that the main line was shut for relaying.  Thought the pictures may have been of interest.

The first stage in a track replacement job is to remove the old rails and sleepers and then dig out the old track bed.  This had already been done when I arrived.

The commencement of the work site: -



Note that the track bed has been dug away to a depth of around 4 feet although it is not obvious in this photo.

The orange devices on the left are for lifting sleepers.  They can be attached to the road / rail vehicles and used to move 8 sleepers at a time.

A further view of the worksite.  The membrane has been laid at this point but not yet covered with fresh ballast.



Portable lights can be seen for when darkness falls.  The route of the single track main line is where the black membrane has been laid.  The membrane is to prevent water and mud being pumped up through the ballast as trains pass.

The wagons in the background are one of two train loads of new ballast.  Most of this train has been unloaded at this stage.

Looking the other way we can see that the membrane has almost been totally covered with fresh ballast at this point.



Some closer views of the equipment in use: -







Below you can see three yellow and black hand operated tampers that will be used to level the new ballast before the track is replaced.  There are also some piles of new sleepers.







In Penzance station is another train of fresh ballast waiting to be called to the worksite.



A short while later it is seen making its way along the carriage loop en route to the possession



Out at Marazion is a further train with the old sleepers and rails on board awaiting clearance to depart the possession.



Later once the ballast is in place the rails and sleepers will be replaced and then further ballast added.

A Tamper will then pass along the newly laid section and correct the alignment and pack the ballast correctly.  S&T Technicians will then re-connect signals, track circuits, AWS magnets etc and test before the line is finally re-opened on Monday morning.

I will try and re-visit again later tonight to take a few more pictures and maybe again tomorrow after work if this is of interest!
 

 


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 Posted: Sat Sep 20th, 2008 03:48 pm
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FS
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Great inspiration for modelling! Thanks for sharing!

Thomas



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 Posted: Sat Sep 20th, 2008 04:29 pm
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Petermac
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Chris - what a great thing to post !!!  Very interesting to see how it's done but I'm confused. :???::???:  There isn't an Irish navvie in site !!!!  Ooops - is that racist ? :oops::oops:

Now - here's a little question.  Why are "navvies" called "navvies" ? :hmm

Answers on a coconut please !!



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 Posted: Sat Sep 20th, 2008 05:07 pm
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henryparrot
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Chris

A really interesting post nice to see how to lay track properly its amazing how they have adapted machinery to run on the railway tracks.

cheers Brian.W

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 Posted: Sat Sep 20th, 2008 06:22 pm
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owen69
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Petermac, navvie is a derivative for navigater, what the hell that has to do with picks & shovels i do not know.
:cool wink:lol::lol::lol::lol::cool:

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 Posted: Sat Sep 20th, 2008 08:08 pm
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Petermac
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Spot on Owen - you get the coconut !!!

The "navvies" were,  essentially Irish,  labourers who came over and dug the network of inland waterways during the 19th Century - hence "navigators".   Naturally, they used picks and shovels and, when the railways came, canals lost their importance many being bought by the railway companies and were subsequently closed to traffic to protect railway interests.  The "navvies" just changed  horses and continued their labouring work on dry land !!!

Ironically, there was, for a period,  a huge increase in revenue for the old canal owners from carrying stone,  ballast and timber for the railway companies to lay the tracks which eventually led to the demise of the extensive canal network.



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 Posted: Sat Sep 20th, 2008 08:15 pm
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henryparrot
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Now here is showing my ignorance again

EWS railway company

Does that mean England  Wales Scotland or have i got it completely wrong?

cheers Brian.W

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 Posted: Sat Sep 20th, 2008 08:36 pm
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georgejacksongenius
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Brilliant piccys Chris T.

Cheers,John.B.

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 Posted: Sat Sep 20th, 2008 08:46 pm
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Sol
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Very interesting Chris especially from my perspective in this part of the world.

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 Posted: Sat Sep 20th, 2008 10:25 pm
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Neil Wood
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Great pictures Chris.  Very interesting. 

 

EWS is English, Welsh Scottish however the company was American; from Chicago I believe.



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 Posted: Sun Sep 21st, 2008 03:21 am
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MikeC
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Fascinating stuff, Chris. Thanks for posting this. Can't get enough photos of this sort of thing.

Mike

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 Posted: Sun Sep 21st, 2008 07:09 am
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Christrerise
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Back again around 7pm and they have now completed laying the ballast and tamping it and they are currently positioning the sleepers.



Laid into place on the track bed the guys stand ready to put into final position with brute force, supervised by my eldest two children!





The sleepers in position.  Note the new rails awaiting installation alongside.



Further back at the same worksite a second gang are beginning to position the rails in place



This is the join between old and new



Moving the rails across with another road / rail vehicle



Checking the alignment



Some spare road / railers laid up a bit further along the single line





Further still along the line another gang has started cutting the rails of the next section to be dealt with



A non-zoom view



The sleepers and rails are alongside ready for installation.  Note these are steel sleepers which I remember being one of the first subjects I posted on when joining the forum back in February!  If you look in the picture above just to the right of the 70 sign you can make out a greyish patch on the sleepers.  This is a wet spot that has been there for over 20 years!  If you go back to the first post where they have laid the membrane, this is to prevent wet spots appearing.  Much work can be done such as grouting and spot ballasting, but the only way to really cure a wet spot is to totally renew the formation.  I will try and find a picture of this spot taken years ago to post here at some point.

A close up of the new sleepers.



These would have been positioned here some time before the possession so that all the materials are already on site, leaving the weekend closure free to get as much actual physical work done as possible.

The old sections of rail loaded onto Salmon bogie flats waiting removal.  Although they are no longer of any use on the main line they will probably be re-used on a lower speed branch line somewhere.



 

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 Posted: Sun Sep 21st, 2008 07:23 am
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Christrerise
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Back much quicker than expected because I already had the picture uploaded!

Class 50 Diesel Locomotive number 50 047 named "Swiftsure" approaches Long Rock on 8th June 1986 with the wet spot very obvious!  It has recently been grouted, hence the staining on the sleepers.  This is the same stain visible in the photo described above although taken much closer and looking in the opposite direction.



A further couple of views of the train load of old track awaiting removal.




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 Posted: Sun Sep 21st, 2008 08:25 am
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henryparrot
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Chris

Great to see these photos

aswell as seeing how the work is carried out it makes a good weathering referance

When they fix the rails in the chairs are they using  some sort of clamp or those spring things they use i presume they whack in with a hammer

cheers Brian.W

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 Posted: Sun Sep 21st, 2008 10:53 am
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Les
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Fascinating insight into modern tracklaying methods Chris - thanks.

Also look at the clear blue skies so what's all this rubbish about rotten weather in the UK?

Les



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 Posted: Tue Sep 23rd, 2008 03:41 pm
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Christrerise
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Les,

We always have wonderful blue skies in Cornwall!

Brian,

That rail clip is a newer one that I have never actually seen being put in place but there would be some automatic method.  The old Pandrol clip was done by a machine that clouted them in.  There was also a manual method with a lever.

Went back on Sunday after work and all the track was in place with ballasting in progress.

The train of old rails was still there with a train of auto-ballasters alongside (the single line becomes double again between Long Rock and Marazion)



The ballast train is topped and tailed by Class 66s so that it can make as many passes as required over the new track to drop the ballast



A closer view of the two locos



A close up of the ballast wagon.  Note the internal lights to give illumination at the worksite



The tamper was making it's passes but it was getting too dark to take any more pictures.  I always find it amazing to watch a tamper at work lifting the track beneath and then shoving the tines into the ballast to jiggle it level.  It would have been great to get a video but it did not come out as it was too dark...

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 Posted: Tue Sep 23rd, 2008 03:48 pm
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Christrerise
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Found a video for anyone interested: -

http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=utwNW0h9EJE

Shows internal and external views!  If you look carefully you can see the wheels beside the tines lift and align the rails before the tines get thrust into the ballast.
 

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 Posted: Tue Sep 23rd, 2008 05:34 pm
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mojo1
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Makes my pva and water mix with cork granules look rather tame. Thanks for that insight. I didn't realise the ballast went to such a depth. Now that would be something to try and emulate in 4mm.

 



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 Posted: Tue Sep 23rd, 2008 06:19 pm
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owen69
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Chris,i really have enjoyed this post,gives an insite to the real macoy we dont normally get,it has just got to help improve modelling aspects,its certainly made me think.
:cheers:thumbs:thumbs:lol::lol::lol::cool:

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 Posted: Fri Apr 10th, 2009 05:57 pm
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Christrerise
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Quite a few months on and they have been back at it!

Penzance has been closed for about 10 days to renew two of the platform lines and the approach turnouts: -



The Tamper in use at Long Rock: -



Class 66 number 66 011 at Long Rock where the line reverts to double track: -



Note that the turnout has been replaced with concrete sleepers: -





Road railers unloading ballast



More Class 66s lined up with ballast trains





A close up of the different couplings in use.  Traditional screw coupling: -



Instanter in short position: -



Instanter in long position: -



This does give me an idea for my module.  I am thinking now of doing a four track third rail main line with two obviously connecting to adjacent modules, but the other two in the process of replacement.  Opportunity to have a tamper shuttling back and forth and other unusual rail vehicles knocking about.  Never seen anyone model something like this so it may be interesting?

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