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on my workbench (the kitchen table) - On Members Workbenches. - More Practical Help - Your Model Railway Club
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 Posted: Mon Aug 18th, 2008 06:40 pm
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Christrerise
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Ah, the old sea life codes!

The origins are actually not known, it just sort of always happened and nobody knows who started it.  It is believed to have originated with the GWR has a method of keeping telegraph messages short by having certain code words that everybody understood the meaning of.

CAPE and PINE being two well known examples.

There are actually many many different wagons names and the practice was carried on under BR mainly on the departmental stock which had many types.

Some of the wagons can look very similar but it would be vital for the staff to know if they had sealions or seacows, or even whales, in their consist.  There were dogfish, catfish, turbots, sea-urchins, starfish, salmon, sharks, sturgeon, halibut, stingray etc.  I have managed to find a fairly complete list below for interest!



 

OK - forget that, for some reason what looked like a nice neat table came out as total blurb when I saved the message.  If you are interested try this link instead: -

http://www.btinternet.com/~second_engineering/fishkinds_and_tops.htm

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 Posted: Tue Aug 19th, 2008 11:04 am
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Les
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Ah Matt you were right - Chris to the rescue eh?

This gives the local fish train a whole new meaning.:lol:

Les



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 Posted: Tue Aug 19th, 2008 09:45 pm
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Matt
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i knew of a couple but didn't think that many existed:shock: someone thinking of a layout with a twist can make one and call it the ark and collect 2 of each wagon:cool: since my last post i have managed to complete the rake of wagons:cool::cool: i hope i have managed to capture the feel of a well worked rake.  the lucky loco in the background is a Limited edtion class 37, 37425 "Pride of the valleys" and will be the power horse pulling the rake. the wagons will have ballast added once my fiddle yard is complete so i cut down on handling. i have taken a couple of pictures of the rake then 2 pics of each wagon, 1 either side.  i have a 37$post_text in blue so i have to decide what type of wagon it will pull, comments please.

chris i knew you would come to the rescue;-) i wasn't far of the mark.

 



 






 



 



 



 



 



 



 

 



 



 



 



 



 



 



 



 



 



 



 



 



 



 

lots of pics i know:???:

as per the norm comments welcome;-)

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 Posted: Tue Aug 19th, 2008 09:55 pm
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MikeC
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They're all very impressive, Matt.
I wish they were mine.
Mike

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 Posted: Tue Aug 19th, 2008 11:09 pm
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owen69
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Matt i pass the local marshalling yard often,yours look just the same as the protos i see there !great job.
;-):lol::lol::lol::cool:

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 Posted: Wed Aug 20th, 2008 04:02 am
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Marty
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Only problem I can see Matt is that when your missus finds out you haven't named a wagon after her too :evil::evil::evil: you'll be sleeping in the layout room for a while. :lol::lol::lol:
Fantastic weathering job, you can be proud of that lot. :cool:
cheers



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 Posted: Wed Aug 20th, 2008 04:12 am
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Sol
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We  send our backscenes to MikeC to paint & now wagons to Matt for weathering.

First lot will be posted today.:razz:

 

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 Posted: Wed Aug 20th, 2008 04:46 am
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Christrerise
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Looking great Matt!

As a matter of interest the method of working these wagons during a ballast drop is that the guys on the relevant wagon shine a light to the driver who then proceeds at walking pace. They can then open the bay doors and the ballast starts to drop. When they have finished they close the doors and extinguish the light, this being the signal to the driver to stop.

Sometimes if the light fails or if it is very foggy and the driver loses sight of the light he will stop before they have closed the doors and then you end up with tons of ballast piled up around the wagon and the only way to clear it is to dig it all by hand! If it happens while the wagons are still fairly full you are in for a very long night...

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 Posted: Wed Aug 20th, 2008 05:00 am
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Bob K
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Matt
They look very realistic. You have captured the colours just right and applied the weathering perfectly. An excellent result.

Bob(K)

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 Posted: Wed Aug 20th, 2008 06:46 pm
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georgejacksongenius
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Work of genius,Matt.Especially like the graffitied ones...very prototypical.I wish I had your weathering skills.Great stuff!!

cheers,John.B.

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 Posted: Wed Aug 20th, 2008 08:19 pm
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Dukedog
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Excellent work,
Modern image is not my scene but the weathering is brilliant.
Well impressed!

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 Posted: Wed Aug 20th, 2008 11:45 pm
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Diesel
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I will also say exellent work just got to weather that 37 now to the same standard :smile:



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 Posted: Thu Aug 21st, 2008 07:05 am
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phill
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Excellent as per norm mate.

Phill

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 Posted: Thu Aug 21st, 2008 09:23 am
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Lawrence
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Superb work there Matt, might have to get myself an airbrush (well I can add it to the list of things I need to get:roll:)

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 Posted: Thu Aug 21st, 2008 12:40 pm
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Matt
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i would recommend an airbrush to everyone. i am crap at painting and arty stuff. the airbrush makes it a lot easier as you build the paint up in layers.  i enjoyed doing these and i am getting the mix for the airbrush better which can sometimes be annoying. i my airbrush i push down for air and back for paint, you have a screw at the back that  you can adjust for the amount of paint you want to release.  for the price of a good loco you can get a decent airbrush and compressor.

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 Posted: Fri Aug 22nd, 2008 10:45 am
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Petermac
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Great shots Matt - just like the real thing.

Re the paints, you said for the huts you used "tester pots" I think it was, are these ordinary domestic colours or the "Testor" railway paints?  Just wondered if household acrylics were the same as artists acrylics - if they are, you could weather the whole network from 1 small try-out sample tin !! :roll::roll:

I've got an unused old Humbrol cheapie airbrush - might dig it out and give it a try if it's so easy !! :roll:



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 Posted: Fri Aug 22nd, 2008 12:47 pm
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owen69
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Petermac,if it is one of those plastic ones with an air can ok for practise
but very limited so dont expect too much,i speak from experience as i have one,
had to buy a proper job myself. still not expensive,about £40 inc compreessor.
:roll::lol::lol::lol::cool:

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 Posted: Fri Aug 22nd, 2008 05:00 pm
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Matt
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i would go for the compressor, i have heard bad things about the can. with the compressor you can play about with the pressure to get the best results depending on the type of paint. it was recommended on many sites on the net....

go for a gravity fed brush (paint reservoir on top) and a two action brush, push down for air and back for paint.  it also says you should buy the best brush your pocket will allow.

the tester pots i used are from b&q, they are normal emulsion tester pots and come in umpteen different colours. the colour i used was called mushroom.

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 Posted: Fri Aug 22nd, 2008 05:57 pm
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Dukedog
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Matt wrote: i would go for the compressor, i have heard bad things about the can. with the compressor you can play about with the pressure to get the best results depending on the type of paint. it was recommended on many sites on the net....

go for a gravity fed brush (paint reservoir on top) and a two action brush, push down for air and back for paint.  it also says you should buy the best brush your pocket will allow.

the tester pots i used are from b&q, they are normal emulsion tester pots and come in umpteen different colours. the colour i used was called mushroom.

Very interesting Matt,
Can you tell us what you use for thinners? I understand that water is not suitable even though they are water based paints.
I have only ever used ennamels and then not often as for the small amount of painting I do and the cleaning after isn't worth the hassle.
However if all I need is water to clean the brush out then that would encourage me to use it a lot more.

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 Posted: Fri Aug 22nd, 2008 06:36 pm
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Petermac
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owen69 wrote: Petermac,if it is one of those plastic ones with an air can ok for practise
but very limited so dont expect too much,i speak from experience as i have one,
had to buy a proper job myself. still not expensive,about £40 inc compreessor.
:roll::lol::lol::lol::cool:


Yes Owen - it is one of the plastic ones - I think about £15 many years ago.  I've never used it but had read somewhere that a workshop type compressor could easily be used provided you could limit the pressure. Also I understand, it's necessary to fit an air filter in line to remove the moisture before spraying.   I've got a garage compressor but no filter etc.   Although I've seen the large aerosol air cans, they've always struck me as being very expensive for just compressed air.

I'll have a look at what's available in the spraygun field but not prepared to spend too much just in case I foul it all up. :roll::???:



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