Video Archive         Recent Topics      
YMR logo

You are here:  Your Model Railway Club > More Practical Help > Scalescenes Building Kits. > RO24 Weighbridge To bottom of page
                 

 Moderated by: Spurno
Start New Topic Reply Printer Friendly

RO24 Weighbridge - Scalescenes Building Kits. - More Practical Help - Your Model Railway Club
AuthorPost
 Posted: Sat Mar 21st, 2020 02:21 pm
PMQuoteReply
link to this 1st post
Chubber
Casseroled Badger


Joined: Thu Oct 2nd, 2008
Location: Ivybridge, Devon, Gateway To Dartmoor.. , United Kingdom
Posts: 4653
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Just getting back to card modelling following a troublesome RSI caused by trying to cut 2mm grey board windows for a larger model [since failed the stamp test] I have researched various alternatives including balsa wood, and decided to go with 2mm 'Finnboard' .

http://www.modelshop.co.uk/Content/DynamicMedia/cms-uploaded/files/4D_guide-finnboard.pdf

Not the cheapest material on the market, and postage is relatively expensive, though it does arrive well packed in a rigid corrugated enclosure.

So, to try it out I have built the free RO24 Weighbridge and as usual, couldn't resist tweaking it with a rolled ridge tile detail, a little bench and scratch built leg-vice, see below.



It does make up nicely, although I'd prefer to do my own gutters and down pipes, the current run of models all seem to have the 'built-in' down pipes, I think an extra length allowance of one thickness of card plus two thicknesses of paper would have to be added to the length of the walls in order to make the roof etc. line up.

Has anyone tried to build a S'scenes model without the downpipes recently?

Best wishes,

Douglas



____________________
'You may share the labours of the great, but you will not share the spoil...' Aesop's Fables

"Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy" - Benjamin Franklin

Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Sat Mar 21st, 2020 03:08 pm
PMQuoteReply
link to this 2nd post
Longchap
Full Member


Joined: Wed Mar 25th, 2015
Location:  Saumur, France
Posts: 1621
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

I think this is possibly the first time I've seen a leg vice modelled, although I've come across several real ones in old outbuildings around here.

My father in law was, among other things, a time served joiner called Doug, a farmer, missionary in Africa and later a woodwork teacher in secondary schools and used such devices on his father's building sites before the war and this little gem brings a big smile to my face.

I'm sure many of us are most happy to see you back to structure modelling Douglas and I hope it continues to bring you much pleasure, as I know it will to us.

Welcome back and bon courage,

Bill



____________________
At 6'4'', Bill is a tall chap, then again, when horizontal he is rather long and people often used to trip over him! . . . and so a nickname was born :)

Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Sat Mar 21st, 2020 09:54 pm
PMQuoteReply
link to this 3rd post
Headmaster
Full Member


Joined: Sun Jun 2nd, 2013
Location: Faversham, United Kingdom
Posts: 992
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Hi Douglas
A neat little building and I love the outside workbench.  I made the warehouse recently, that also has the "built in" down pipes.  Like you, I'm not a fan, so I left them out.  This wasn't a problem with the construction of the walls, but the it did create a problem with the floors and ceilings, which all had to be adjusted.  Not a huge problem, just a bit more work than if I had followed the plan.  I am making the medium station building at the moment, with the same issue.  However, as I am using different brick paper to the kit, it hasn't be a problem as I could keep all the dimensions the same - I just trimmed the layer that would have been the drain pipe to the same size as the other layers and covered with the brick paper, rather than the Scalescenes drainpipe.  I did the same with the layer that created the gutters, cutting it back to go flush to the wall so I could add my own guttering.

Regards

Michael



____________________
Michael

Faversham Creek

"There is no harm in repeating a good thing." Plato
Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Sun Mar 22nd, 2020 11:31 am
PMQuoteReply
link to this 4th post
col.stephens
Full Member
 

Joined: Tue Feb 7th, 2012
Location: Kent, United Kingdom
Posts: 2257
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Hello Doug.  I recently made this building for my 'the art of compromise' thread.  In fact, I made it twice, once for the London Midland Region and once for the Southern Railway.  The projecting downpipes are only at one end of the building and are an extension of the interior wall which has the inside of the door printed thereon. On the first build of this model I trimmed the downpipes so that the overall width of the interior wall was exactly the same as the exterior end wall.  I then wrapped the brickwork from the end (door) wall around both walls to cover the join.
When making the second model I trimmed the interior wall back so that it was narrower than the side walls.  The side walls (window and chimney walls) were then butted up directly to the rear of the end (door) wall.  In neither case was it necessary to make any alterations to the roof length.


I hope that this makes sense.  I can post photos of the underside of both buildings if deemed necessary.


Best wishes.


Terry

Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Sun Mar 22nd, 2020 06:27 pm
PMQuoteReply
link to this 5th post
Chubber
Casseroled Badger


Joined: Thu Oct 2nd, 2008
Location: Ivybridge, Devon, Gateway To Dartmoor.. , United Kingdom
Posts: 4653
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Michael, Terry,

Thank you both for your posts, yes, they do make sense. I am currently trying to adapt the canal overbridge to be a river overbridge, the 'hump back' nature of the bridge needs taming to allow vehicular traffic, all very 'think, think, think' as Winnie the Pooh would have said. I believe John W. is hoPing to add more bridges to his stable, but placing and realising two bridges is essential if I am to progress Ursa Resurgant, so I can't really wait. Who knows, this self-isolation might end sooner rather than later!!!



____________________
'You may share the labours of the great, but you will not share the spoil...' Aesop's Fables

"Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy" - Benjamin Franklin

Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Sun Mar 22nd, 2020 06:44 pm
PMQuoteReply
link to this 6th post
Headmaster
Full Member


Joined: Sun Jun 2nd, 2013
Location: Faversham, United Kingdom
Posts: 992
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Good luck with the adaptation.  I always have to make the model "as is" first, so I can see how it can be modified - and discover any pitfalls.
How did you get on with the Finn Board?  Was it easier to cut? Do you prefer it to grey board? Judging from your model, you were able to get super sharp edges and corners- very impressive as always with your card modelling.

Miichael



____________________
Michael

Faversham Creek

"There is no harm in repeating a good thing." Plato
Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Sun Mar 22nd, 2020 07:08 pm
PMQuoteReply
link to this 7th post
Chubber
Casseroled Badger


Joined: Thu Oct 2nd, 2008
Location: Ivybridge, Devon, Gateway To Dartmoor.. , United Kingdom
Posts: 4653
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Michael,

Love Finnboard, apart from the price and postage. Had I been sure of myself and able to source a sample before ordering I would have bought enough to make postage worthwhile. Given a sharp blade, the cut edge seems almost to be polished. Caveat - 'end' grain, i.e. stacked elements á-la -S'Scenes, soak up a lot of glue and need pre-coating.

It takes watercolour very well, although absorbant, and stick adhesive soaks in and 'grabs' very quickly, so make sure you are on the ball with cover papers.I have taken to coating moderately lightly with stick adhesive, then, with a moistened finger, evening out this pre-glue layer before applying glue-sticked texture paper when I want to slide it about a bit.

Acrylic paint needs to let down with a little water if a moderate area is to be coated, otherwise it takes the moisture from the brush and rapidly starts to drag, I have discovered that letting down acrylic paint with very diluted P.V.A. forms a very resilient finish which will accept, in one coat, Humbrol enamels and full strenght acrylic. What I shall do with this new-won knowledge, I'm not so sure!

Given the comparative ease with which it cuts, [even with a feeble Swann & Morton No,11 blade,] its disadvantages above are well outweighed when achey arthritic wrists are written into the story. Adopting a S & M No.5a large plastic handle has certainly helped, as I can grasp it with more of my 'fist', and I can certainly feel less pain in my shoulder and elbow. With Stanley large and small snap-off knives, it is a doddle to cut.

Douglas

P.s. I have a waste paper basket full of brightly coloured, expensive trial pieces, but I am happy I have found the ideal 2mm 'card' material.



____________________
'You may share the labours of the great, but you will not share the spoil...' Aesop's Fables

"Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy" - Benjamin Franklin

Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Sun Mar 22nd, 2020 07:56 pm
PMQuoteReply
link to this 8th post
Headmaster
Full Member


Joined: Sun Jun 2nd, 2013
Location: Faversham, United Kingdom
Posts: 992
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Thank you Douglas for a detailed review..... I had seen it before, but not known anyone who had used it.   I think I will give it a go.  I have found grey board can vary a lot in quality, even when purchased from the same company.  It will also be interesting to see how my Cameo cutter gets on with it.
Many thanks for taking the time to answer my questions

Regards

Michael



____________________
Michael

Faversham Creek

"There is no harm in repeating a good thing." Plato
Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Sun Mar 22nd, 2020 08:30 pm
PMQuoteReply
link to this 9th post
Chubber
Casseroled Badger


Joined: Thu Oct 2nd, 2008
Location: Ivybridge, Devon, Gateway To Dartmoor.. , United Kingdom
Posts: 4653
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Headmaster wrote: Thank you Douglas .....  It will also be interesting to see how my Cameo cutter gets on with it.
Many thanks for taking the time to answer my questions

Regards

Michael

Your'e welcome, Michael, I will aslo be interested to see how your machine copes with the 2mm stuff, I have promised myself such a device if I could be sure it would cut out S'scenes stuff without too much faffing about...

Douglas



____________________
'You may share the labours of the great, but you will not share the spoil...' Aesop's Fables

"Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy" - Benjamin Franklin

Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Sun Mar 22nd, 2020 11:31 pm
PMQuoteReply
link to this 10th post
Headmaster
Full Member


Joined: Sun Jun 2nd, 2013
Location: Faversham, United Kingdom
Posts: 992
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

It won't do 2mm.  The deep cut knives can't cut right angles.  You could cut a square, but not one with windows.  I was thinking of getting the thinner card and laminating.  It adds to the cost, but is achievable.  Given your model making, I wouldn't bother, if you just want to cut card..... although in time it might be something you consider.
Michael



____________________
Michael

Faversham Creek

"There is no harm in repeating a good thing." Plato
Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Mon Mar 23rd, 2020 07:02 pm
PMQuoteReply
link to this 11th post
Chubber
Casseroled Badger


Joined: Thu Oct 2nd, 2008
Location: Ivybridge, Devon, Gateway To Dartmoor.. , United Kingdom
Posts: 4653
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Thanks for that info, Michael. I've just bought 100 S&M No.11 blades so I better get on with using them....Oh, feeling faint now I've written the 'B' word :oops:
D



____________________
'You may share the labours of the great, but you will not share the spoil...' Aesop's Fables

"Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy" - Benjamin Franklin

Back To Top PMQuoteReply

This is topic ID = 16347     Current time is 11:35 am  
You are here:  Your Model Railway Club > More Practical Help > Scalescenes Building Kits. > RO24 Weighbridge
You can type a quick reply to this topic here. Click in the box below to begin.

Or to reply to an individual post, or to include images, attachments and formatted text,
click the Quote or Reply buttons on each post above.

To start a new topic in this forum, click the Start New Topic button below.
To start a new topic in a different forum, click the Forum Jump drop-down list below.
Start New Topic


Back to top of page

           
15 Most Recent Topics

Problems with this web site? Please contact the Webmaster.

All material submitted to this web site is the responsibility of the respective contributor. By submitting material to this web site you acknowledge that you accept full responsibility for the material submitted.
Unless stated otherwise, all the material displayed on this web site, including all text, photographs, drawings and other images, is copyright and the property of the respective contributor. Registered members are welcome to use it for their own personal non-commercial modelmaking purposes. It must not be reproduced or re-published elsewhere in any form, or used commercially, without first obtaining the owner's express permission.
The owner of this web site may edit, modify or remove any content at any time without giving notice or reason.    © 2008

                 

Recent Topics Back to top of page

Powered by UltraBB 1.15 Copyright © 2007-2011 by Jim Hale and Data 1 Systems. Page design copyright © 2008-2013 Martin Wynne. Photo gallery copyright © 2009 David Williams.