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I think I have visited my doctor on two occasions, since I was 21.  I'm now 54.  I had a bit of a health scare this year, that turned out to be a cyst.  But as a result my NHS consultant (we are so lucky to have a wonderful, if under funded health service) suggested a PSA test, which has turned out to be high.  No symptoms, and all tests so far have been quite positive - I have a biopsy on Monday 18 November to check everything out.  Even if the news is bad, prognosis these days is not too bad.....
But early diagnosis, or better still, early monitoring, is even better.  My consultant wanted the tests because I have not had any medical problems, so there have been no health checks for decades.  I'm sure I'm not alone.

My father was diagnosed with prostate cancer when he was 70.  He is 90 now.......

I don't know what the outcome of the biopsy  will be..... but it has been a  shock, simply because it was so unexpected because I have had no symptoms at all...... so asking for a check is the wisest thing to do....

Michael

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Hi Michael,
 
False positives due to an enlarged (BPH) or inflamed prostate (infection) are common. An annual medical checkup with a DRE is probably a better screen.The only definitive diagnosis is a multicore biopsy. If prostate cancer is diagnosed then PSA kinetics can become an effective monitoring tool.

Routine PSA screening depends. History of prostate cancer in the family? Forty years old. No history? Fifty years old. Afro-American? Over 45 (and this does apply to the UK  - WW2 and immigration). Over 70? Not recommended here as overdiagnosis can have more harm than "watchful" observation or "watchful waiting". Same I think in the UK. 


As usual, consult your medical practitioner on a regular basis. It's a two-way process.There is a lot of misinformation out there on the internet.


Nigel


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Michael

Hope everything turns out OK

Someone told me yonks ago that tomato ketchup contained loads of stuff that was good for putting off prostate cancer.  Urban myth or truth - not sure but I make sure I get my fill of "tommy sauce"

Best wishes

Barry

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Thank you Barry.... Now if only it had been HP sauce, I'd be immune!
Regards

Michael

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Two servings a week of tomato sauce reduces the risk (protective association) especially if there is a family history. It's the primary source of bioavailable lycopene, considered to be the active compound. Known since 2002. Pizza, pasta, lasagna (tomato sauce with fat!), ketchup. Lots of other associations for increased risk such as smoking, bmi, excercise, family history...(the last applies to almost all cancers).

Nigel

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lycopene [rich] .... includes red 'bell'/'sweet' peppers. Twice a week here in curries, salads, stuffed with cherry tomatoes, garlic and black olives and roasted with the Sunday animal roast....

I await Wednesday 20th for biopsy result of a lump taken recently from my thyroid.

D

Last edited on Mon Nov 18th, 2019 03:54 pm by Chubber

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Well, I had the biopsy this morning.  Not as bad as I had feared or built up in my mind.  I have to say the NHS staff were amazing.  I sometimes think we view the NHS as an organisation.... which it is.  But it isn't the organisation alone that is amazing, it is the thousands of individuals who make it an organisation that are so special.  It was so "fuss" free....
There were a few comedy moments - I won't go into details -  but as someone who would be extremely embarrassed and awkward about such things, it proved to be a painless procedure in more than one way.

I ached a little afterwards, but that soon passed.

Results on 3rd December - hopefully an early Christmas present.

Michael

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Ah, always a pleasant surprise when your expectations are truly exceeded. It often just takes meeting a few amazing to move you to a happier place.
Bon courage Michael for the 3rd and hopefully more smiles.

Best,

Bill

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I hope all goes well Micheal, going through the motions and getting the biopsy is the first step, and a brave one.

The nursing staff all over the world seem to be angels that care for us no matter what the illness, kind, compassionate, and willing to help.

They have seen it all, believe me!

My thoughts will be with you.

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Thank you chaps, sadly not the first to go through all of this here, and probably not the last.
I'm definitely taking it all one step at a time...

Michael

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I missed this post whilst in UK recently Michael but so pleased the "event" turned out to be better than you'd expected.  Believe me, many of us have been there before you.  When I had my first "experience" I couldn't help wondering what my certain specialist "Dr Vladermann the Bladder Man" replied when his wife asked him what sort of a day he'd had at the office ............................

Fingers crossed for you that the results on the 3rd turn out well too.

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Thank Peter, knowing others here have been through it (and worse) is a comfort.
I hope you had a good time back in England and didn't get caught up in any of the floods!

Michael

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Had a great time thanks Michael - County Durham and Edinburgh and Angus in Scotland - visiting family.

Fortunately, I wasn't caught in the floods although my son was - a cancelled train from Rugby to York causing double loading on subsequent trains.

I did however, pass through the flooded areas on my way south coming home.  An absolutely terrible scene - more akin to being on the coast than miles inland.  I feel for them all ...........

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Well, they brought my appointment forward for the results.  Unfortunately, two of the twelve samples showed cancer, so now it is a case of choosing treatment options.  All options are available, so I have some thinking to do.  I meet with Surgeon next Monday and the oncologist some time after that.  At least the prognosis seems quite good - or as good as it can be with cancer.
I feel a bit numb about the news, but doctor and cancer nurse seemed positive, so I will share that optimism!

Michael

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Not the best news Michael but it could have been worse.

Yes, keep positive...

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Absolutely.  There will be people who receive much worse messages.  I am convinced it is essential to keep a positive outlook and be upbeat.  A lifetime of teaching philosophy has taught me to be philosophical about most things, and this is no different. 
So long as I "finish" the railway.......

Michael

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I use the story ; "him" upstairs won't take me until I finish the D&S - that is why I keep doing small changes before I get anywhere near to finishing.....

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Hahahaha!  Then I will keep a symbolic unfinished section!!
Michael

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Good to see you're taking the news and keeping positive Micheal

I kept a positive outlook even tho I was feeling very ill with the chemo, there's always someone that's worse off than yourself ! (I'd hate to see the poor bugga that's last on the list!!)

Keep your chin up mate 


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Phat Controller wrote:  (I'd hate to see the poor bugga that's last on the list!!)






That made my day :doublethumb

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Hi Michael,

Never finish the layout. Like with all cancers, the end user (that's us, remember we keep practitioners in the art gainfully employed) needs to keep abreast of what is happening. Crucial component of survivorship! 


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Not the best news in the world Michael, and not what you'd hoped for.  Unfortunately, there's nowt you can do about it.  Alternatively, what you can do, and seem well prepared to do, is keep a positive attitude.

The EPNS (if not true silver) lining is that those who know about these things are being very positive about the prognosis.  Remember, they've seen it all and so, if they say the prognosis is good, then it must be.

We all wish you the very best of luck with the treatment which I understand, can be an experience in itself ...............

I'm told, attitude of mind accounts for half the battle Michael so you must always think about that little unfinished corner of Faversham Creek ......................

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Hi Michael and I too, am sorry and sad to hear your upsetting news. However, your positive attitude is just what is needed to make the most of the opportunities for continued enjoyment of our lives, no matter where or how our journey unfolds, so keep your focus and enjoy your railway and continue to share it with your chums here at YMRC.

Very best,

Bill


Last edited on Tue Dec 3rd, 2019 07:58 pm by Longchap

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Thank you chaps.  I got the notes from the hospital today, and while it will be best to have it treated, things are nowhere near as grim as they could have been.
I've always been a glass half full person, and definitely agree that treatment begins in my head - so remaining positive.  And yes, i have a railway to finish, which will take me many, many years!

Regards

Michael

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Hi Michael
I am so wglad that the latest news sounds a little better. I have to say that I am lost in admiration at the way you are dealing with all this. Glass half full is undoubtedly the best approach but I suspect is easier said than done.

My very best wishes

John

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Dear all, possibly my last post about this - I don't want to turn it into some sort of therapy thread!
I met with the surgeon, who spelled out the facts nice and clearly.  We have caught it early, and if I have surgery we can effectively say it is a cure.  If we act now, the most worrying side effects are far less likely.  I can watch and wait.....  maybe have the surgery in 10-15 years, but the likelihood of additional problems is also much higher.   So, I have bitten the bullet and gone for surgery, which will be early in the new year.  The surgeon's record is exemplary and even if the cancer returns later, I will have the opportunity for other treatment.  To be honest, I just want it gone! And at 54, the chances of a good recovery are very high, especially as I don't have any of the physical symptoms of prostate cancer, and good pelvic floor muscles!

I attended a fatigue clinic and was amazed to hear the nurse describe everything I have been feeling for the last 18 months - which I had put down to the job (headteacher) - but may also be the impact of the cancer.  She told me to get in the loft and build that railway, and I don't think I want to argue with her.....

I am so grateful for our NHS and a smart urologist who listened to how I felt, rather than just physical symptoms and began this whole process.  At 54 years of age, to be told I am young enough for a full recovery is very welcome news.

Obviously, I had to tell Mrs Liddicoat that her baby making days will be over, but, she pointed out - only with me!  Yorkshire women, very practical!!

Thank you to everyone who has posted here, every message has been really special.

Prostate cancer is the most common cancer for men - 1 in 8 of us - but also highly treatable if caught early and the general prognosis gets better each year.  So, I return to the title of the thread, don't be dumb, get a check up.

The rest of my posts will be about trains!!

Warm regards

Michael

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:doublethumb :doublethumb :doublethumb

Nigel

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Michael,

best wishes that all goes well for you, it sounds as if you're in excellent hands there.

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Excellent Michael, your glass half full is running over!
:cheers

Best,

Bill

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Great to hear Micheal. Hope you keep up the positivity. I like you had my diagnosis @ age 54, there's more years to be lived yet!

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That's good to hear Michael - onwards and upwards from now on !!  :thumbs

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Excellent news Michael

Best wishes

John

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The sooner it is out of you the better

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Hi all
Had surgery on 17th January and recovering well.  Sore, but nothing worse.  Hopefully will be back modelling very soon, even if not up in the loft just yet.  Catheter comes out on Thursday (hoorah!) Not that it has been much of a problem.  And a lovely nurse visits each day too!

Michael

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So good to hear your news Michael. You must be pleased.

A bit of planning then, until you can get in the loft. Anticipation is good, so enjoy some R&D and you'll be at it again soon.

I'm enjoying some splendid anticipation myself right now, as I'm in the UK later this week for a weekend model railway exhibition in Eastleigh and will also see some old chums.

Take things easy and have fun,

Bill

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Wow, I've only just seen this post - what can I say, I was diagnosed with prostate cancer a year ago following a PSA test, MRI scan and biopsy (in early December....snap!). I've since had the prostate removed and have just finished a 6 week course of radiotherapy to hopefully hoover up the remaining cancer cells that are in the 'prostate bed' area. Like you I didn't have any obvious symptoms, I decided to have the PSA test after a dear friend who'd had prostate cancer 6 years ago encouraged me to have it. Following the operation I was advised that the cancer was more aggressive than the biopsy had indicated - so I dread to think what would have happened if I hadn't had that PSA test when I did!So yes, ignorance is definitely not bliss when it comes to these things, I think all men should have the test when they reach a certain age (I'm 66 by the way).
Here's hoping all of us in this post who have been affected get back onto the main track after such an unwanted diversion on our journey.
I should add that my model railway has been a welcome distraction/therapy over last year - in fact I only joined the Club as part of my determination to kick start a life-long project that had stagnated for too long - the cancer diagnosis certainly focused my mind in that respect!
I could say so much more but I'll leave it at that and hope my observations have been helpful.

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Here in France it would appear they major on preventative medicine rather than curative so, although I have other under-control medical issues, we all have regular blood tests which includes a PSA test.  To date, fortunately, I don't have that problem unlike a very dear friend of mine in UK who started treatment for an aggressive form of the disease just a week ago.

The big C touches most people during their lives, one way or another.  We are told that, with enough research, most forms could be conquered;  It annoys me that sufficient funds are not made available for this critical research.  I'd rather have a couple of cancer forms defeated than knock half an hour off the journey time from London to Birmingham !!!

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PVilly wrote: Wow, I've only just seen this post - what can I say, I was diagnosed with prostate cancer a year ago following a PSA test, MRI scan and biopsy (in early December....snap!). I've since had the prostate removed and have just finished a 6 week course of radiotherapy to hopefully hoover up the remaining cancer cells that are in the 'prostate bed' area. Like you I didn't have any obvious symptoms, I decided to have the PSA test after a dear friend who'd had prostate cancer 6 years ago encouraged me to have it. Following the operation I was advised that the cancer was more aggressive than the biopsy had indicated - so I dread to think what would have happened if I hadn't had that PSA test when I did!So yes, ignorance is definitely not bliss when it comes to these things, I think all men should have the test when they reach a certain age (I'm 66 by the way).
Here's hoping all of us in this post who have been affected get back onto the main track after such an unwanted diversion on our journey.
I should add that my model railway has been a welcome distraction/therapy over last year - in fact I only joined the Club as part of my determination to kick start a life-long project that had stagnated for too long - the cancer diagnosis certainly focused my mind in that respect!
I could say so much more but I'll leave it at that and hope my observations have been helpful.


Really sorry Phil, I have only just picked this up.  I hope you are progressing well.  Our stories are really similar - my prostate was removed and the biopsy was worse than originally thought.  Like you, I am pleased I acted when I did, or who knows what was in store further down the line?  Recovery for me has been great  and I am back at work in a new job and coming to terms with both a cancer diagnosis and an all clear!

I was never one for listening to the warning of others..... but I am so pleased I had a consultant who made me go check and then took me through the whole process.  I thought a diagnosis might be a life sentence, but it isn't.  

So how is the modelling going?

Michael

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Petermac wrote: Here in France it would appear they major on preventative medicine rather than curative so, although I have other under-control medical issues, we all have regular blood tests which includes a PSA test.  To date, fortunately, I don't have that problem unlike a very dear friend of mine in UK who started treatment for an aggressive form of the disease just a week ago.

The big C touches most people during their lives, one way or another.  We are told that, with enough research, most forms could be conquered;  It annoys me that sufficient funds are not made available for this critical research.  I'd rather have a couple of cancer forms defeated than knock half an hour off the journey time from London to Birmingham !!!

Likewise, I have just picked this up.  Your comment about journey times is most appropriate Peter - it says something about our values, doesn't it?  However, I will just say that regardless of the politics, I would not be talking about being cancer free if it were not for the observation, listening and wisdom of an NHS consultant who put together a string of seemingly unrelated "symptoms" and suggested a quick check up.... and then made me  do it (which is perhaps the crucial part).  I'm impressed that France has this as a routine...... we could learn a little here.

Michael

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Hi Michael,
Good to hear from you and yes, our cancer journeys do seem to have followed a similar path. I'm due to have a PSA test tomorrow followed by a meeting with the consultant in early April to hopefully receive good news - as I'm sure you will understand, a PSA rate of next to nothing will be ideal! Hopefully the other 'C (virus)-word' will not delay the meeting!

You may recall I joined the club about a year ago following the prostatectomy. I've since made sporadic progress due to the distractions of the ongoing cancer monitoring and treatment. I have however really enjoyed developing the area round the terminus and goods yard, including construction of various key buildings such as the goods shed, yard offices, signal box and shops/houses in the station approach road, mainly courtesy of Ratio and Scalescenes. I've named the station 'Ashbury' - a subtle blend of Tewkesbury and Ashchurch which is the area where this fictional LMS/GW line is based.
All good therapy when you're going through health issues. If we do have a lockdown I hope to speed up the modelling process - 'every cloud.............'  

I plan to post some pictures soon.

Kind regards

Phil

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Hopefully good news for you Phil.  My first test was zero---- I have the second in April.
It would be great to see some photos of the progress you are making with the modelling.

Michael


                 

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