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Going Small with a GWR Branchline 1890-1920 - Members Personal Layouts. - Model Railway Layouts. - Your Model Railway Club
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 Posted: Tue Jan 14th, 2020 02:10 pm
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Phil.c
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My son was thinking of buying a TVR when they were still going, when we met a salesman on the showroom, the very first words he said to us was "the roofs all leak".



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 Posted: Tue Jan 14th, 2020 06:35 pm
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BCDR
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That's why you don't drive them in the rain. And of course the small issue of 400 bhp at the rear wheels with 75% of the weight up front. 

Nigel




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 Posted: Tue Jan 14th, 2020 06:36 pm
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Petermac
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That's the GWR for you Phil ................. ;-)

Oh, sorry, you meant the car not Nigel's wagon .................... :cheers

One of our "gang" as young men had one - a Tuscan I think.  We'd all been playing snooker till late at a friend's house in the winter and there'd been a keen frost.

We left to go home, us initially in the same direction as the TVR owner but he naturally, left us standing.  We rounded a corner and guess what - he'd "lost" it on the ice.  The engine and chassis (frame) were sitting next to a ditch but tiny bits of fibreglass were spread everywhere.  The bodywork had completely disintigrated, and I mean "completely".  The scene looked like the finish line of a paper chase with tiny pieces of fibreglass spread over a fairly tight area.  He (the driver), was just getting out of the remains of the car without so much as a scratch. 

Sorry Nigel - you can have your thread back now ..................... :oops: :oops: :oops: :off topic



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 Posted: Tue Jan 14th, 2020 06:55 pm
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BCDR
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Petermac wrote: You've made a good job of that Toad Nigel, as Bill said, Mr. Rose will be justifiably proud of his great grandson.  Did Mr Rose work for the GWR or some more respected company further to the north and east  ? ............. :pedal

When I saw the mention of TVR, I thought wow - he's into sports cars as well.  :roll:  Alas, the only similarity between your TVR and the TVR I thought of is in the number of wheels.

Looking forward to seeing how the Mink turns out.  Actually, I like the Coopercraft kits - it's a pity they seem to be disappearing into history ..........


The Toad - thanks. Not perfect, it will do. Mr. Rose worked for the local narrow gauge railway in Oxfardsheer - Grub, Water and Rest I understand. I had a long chat with the owner of Cooper Craft last Friday, he's working hard on getting the injectors to match the tools. New machine, old tooling (metric versus imperial by the sound of things). Fingers crossed, order placed.


TVR. Bin there, dun that. 'Nuff said. 


The Mink is a splendid piece of kit. As is the Provender. Big problem is that with these Cooper Craft models the offerings from the RTR folks look decidedly inferior. 


Nigel




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 Posted: Thu Jan 16th, 2020 08:47 pm
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BCDR
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Hi All,

More progress on the sector plate, and some photos of the MINK being built.

Bearimg surfaces on the sector plate frame now have 1/8" thick UHMW polyurethane surfaces, glued and screwed (countersunk). This is the material used on table saws and router tables, hard wearing and a very low coefficient of friction. Nice afternoon, so the bottom of the table is getting some coats of urethane varnish.






The MINK. An eBay estate find along with the Provender wagon, advertised as vintage and sealed. Well, yes, sealed after the previous owner made a start, and taken off the bits from the sprues using a pair of garden shears. The only bit missing was the cover for the weight compartment. A new price was negotiated. $3 per kit. Not too much damage, some stress marks in the plastic (white areas), couple of breaks in the bar at the bottom of the axle bearings, nothing will be obvious once its fettled and painted. The Provender kit is in much better shape.

Cooper Craft kits are OO kits. so the rails and W irons are too narrow for EM gauge axles and wheels. Packing with styrene sheet was necessary to move them and the brake rodding out. The brake pads are now in alignment with the wheel tread. I added some brass pin point bearings. This was an early wooden MINK diagram circa 1904, sliding ventilators on the ends, covers yet to be added. Note the shape of the coupling hook plate on the beam, used in the period 1900-1920. Nice detail touch.









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 Posted: Tue Jan 21st, 2020 05:46 pm
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BCDR
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Hi All,

The Cooper Craft MINK is done and awaits a warm day for a coat of rattle can slate grey.

The mailman delivered a tasty parcel from Hatton's on Saturday, 3 Ratio Iron MINK kits, a Parkside wooden MINK (some details different to the Cooper Craft kit), plus an autocoach. Advertised as a kit, completed, body scuffed and glue marks on the windows. At £7.50 How could I resist. Wrong era of course, but maybe it can be resurrected and used as a paneled model. Turns out it is a BSL kit for what looks like an A27/28 Autocoach built in 1930-33. The kit probably dates from the late 1960's (pre-Airfix apparently), aluminum body shell, white metal and brass fittings, fine scale wheels in metal bogies, detailed underbody in plastic that looks to be not part of the kit. Should be interesting to see how this can be stripped down and refinished, and perhaps back-dated to an earlier diagram with paneled body. Would be a nice complement to the planned matchstick model.

Iron MINKS were abundant at the turn of the 20th century, 4000 had been built by 1901, and some lasted into BR days. The Ratio model is apparently a tad too high according to the experts, so as usual a bit of fettling might be called for. Or then again, not, depending on how it looks when built. Later minks were slightly bigger anyway.

Nigel

The MINK. Note holes in the solebar used for horse chains. Not sure about the roof, as it looks too thick to me, one in thinner brass might be better. See last photograph. I will check some photographs. Brass or plastic, It will need toning down to a grimy white.



Additional support for the floor. The kit uses 2 small pips either end that the floor sits on (just visible outboard of the styrene). I beefed this up with some bits of rectangular styrene either side of the coupler spring, glued to the floor and the inside of the buffer beam . Metal couplers are sprung and are from Markits/Romfords. Three link chains will be added after painting. Unfitted van, so no brake cylinder or plumbing.


Additional weight added inside the body  - steel plate. Note damage to sides where the previous owner went to to town with the garden shears on the sprues. Luckily the roof hides the damage.


Ventilator covers added to the ends.








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 Posted: Tue Jan 21st, 2020 06:59 pm
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A very nice job.... I look forward to seeing the painted article!
Michael



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 Posted: Wed Jan 22nd, 2020 01:11 am
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BCDR
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Hi Michael,
Grey is...grey.  I might sneak in some GWR red wagons to give a bit of variation. :lol:

Nigel



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