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col.stephens
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In October, 1978, The Railway Modeller published an article by Roy Link called 'The art of compromise.'  The article suggested that a blend of diorama and a working layout could provide the answer to lack of space and inertia brought about by an 'undecorated expanse of baseboard.' The author provided a plan of a small country terminus with a single short platform with run round loop and two sidings.  One siding housed a goods shed and the other coal bins.  There was also a small ground frame and a weighbridge and office.  This was all achieved (in theory) on a baseboard measuring just six feet by one foot.  The article suggested that, although it would be possible to shunt the yard using the single line in front of the station platform, the layout would be enhanced by the addition of a small fiddle yard.  I filed away the article with a view to building the layout sometime...  I often thought about the magazine article and often got it out for another read through but never actually got around to starting it. 


The years rolled by and various articles appeared in the model railway press by other people who had also got the 'art of compromise bug'.  But they all had the same thing in common.  In planning and attempting to build the suggested layout, they found it was not possible!  The author had simply shoe-horned too much detail into the width of the baseboard beyond the end of the platform.  The author had also placed a turnout exactly halfway along the six feet baseboard making it impossible to divide the baseboard into two three foot lengths for storage and transportation. 


The latest published attempt at 'the art of compromise' appeared in the October 2018 Railway Modeller by Chris Ford.  Part of the original article was re-produced along with the original track plan.  I was sufficiently intrigued to buy the magazine and decided at long last to slay this particular dragon and attempt to build it at last.


Terry


 


 

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I decided to use Peco code 75 turnouts together with C&L track as I already had these to hand.  First off I decided to alter the plan slightly and move the turnout away from the centre of the baseboard to allow it to be divided in half.  I also decided to include two catch points in the sidings where they meet the 'main line.'  I had plenty of wood to hand retrieved from previous layouts.  I also had some lengths of 5mm thick plywood which I decided to use as the baseboard surface.  The plywood had previously been cut to fourteen inches wide so I decided to utilize those extra two inches to try and achieve something akin to the original plan.  The scenic baseboard measures six feet by fourteen inches with a small board for the fiddle yard. I think it's actually thirty inches long but I can't swear to it.  I must measure it when I next visit the shed.



Nothing remarkable about the baseboards although I have for the first time used catches to join the boards together with metal dowels for alignment.  I also fitted adjustable feet as my shed floor is as level as the North Sea on a stormy day!


Last edited on Sun Mar 3rd, 2019 07:33 pm by col.stephens

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this is now on my Watch list....

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I drew out the track plan on the baseboard surface and drilled and filed small slots where the turnout tiebars were situated.  This was so that I could utilise the small hole in the Peco tiebars  for operation.  At this stage I decided to use, for the first time, point motors to throw the tiebars.  A small bit of research showed that Gaugemaster Seep point motors, PM1, contain contacts to change the polarity of the common crossing (frog).  I ordered the four motors required and set about laying the track.



The sleepers of the Peco turnouts are much thicker than the C&L sleepers on the plain track.  To arrive at a situation where the rail height is the same for plain track and turnouts, I pinned the turnouts directly to the baseboard surface and fixed the plain track to a card track bed previously glued to the baseboard.  The station platform will occupy the area to the right of the length of white card in the picture above.

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Thanks Ron.  Don't hold your breath, I'm not rushing it!


Terry

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 All track has been laid and connecting wires soldered in place. This view shows the general layout of the yard...



You can clearly see the run-round loop with a small loco spur beyond.  This goes right up to the baseboard edge so that the intended buffer stop may be removed for future expansion of the layout if desired.  Likewise, the fiddle yard board may be removed and extra boards fitted.  The siding to the right will house the coal bins and the weighbridge.  The goods shed will be situated to the right of the siding straight ahead.


Having such a thin baseboard surface means that it is not possible to screw the point motors directly to the underside.  I decided to cut small blocks of wood and drilled/filed small slots along the centre line...



The point motors were screwed to the blocks with the operating rod passed through the slot.  The idea is that the blocks are now glued to the underside of the baseboard, directly under the tiebar.  I shall probably use the poundshop version of 'no nails' for this job.  Here are the four completed blocks with motors in place.  The relevant wires to the point motor contacts need to be soldered in place before the blocks are attached to the baseboard.  I shall run the wires to nearby terminal blocks to aid quick replacement should any motor fail in service.



The right front block has the motor adjacent to the edge.  This is to be fitted to a turnout which is very close to baseboard framing.


Terry

Last edited on Thu Jan 3rd, 2019 09:34 pm by col.stephens

col.stephens
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I shall be making use of Scalescenes' buildings or scratchbuilt buildings utilising Scalescenes' brick papers.  The Scalescenes' Small Station Building is ideal for this layout and, as mentioned briefly in another thread, I have already built this with some slight alterations.  Apologies if you have already seen this picture, but for the sake of completeness here it is again...



The Scalescenes' Weighbridge Office is nearing completion.  As regards the goods shed, I have come across a drawing of an LMS type previously situated at Eckington and I'm tempted to scratchbuild it.


More as and when things develop.


Regards to all.


Terry

Last edited on Thu Jan 3rd, 2019 09:48 pm by col.stephens

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Thanks Terry, that's a great beginning which I've enjoyed muchly over the last couple of hours and am looking forward to the next episode.

Best,

Bill
 

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Hi Terry,

Nice challenge. Some of the articles on small and even large layouts from the previous century were somewhat optimistic. Looking at one from 1974 right now. And scratching my head. Definitely one from the armchair. As the author candidly states.

6 feet by 1.25 feet - acres of space.  :doublethumbGoforit. Are you doing the turntable?


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Also will be following with great interest

Last edited on Fri Jan 4th, 2019 07:54 am by GreenBR

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Something for me to follow as well Terry as I may have to go along the same lines myself. No pun intended.

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yep   i am on board too. :thumbs

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What happened to 'London Midland in the Round' Terry, or have I missed something.


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Welcome aboard chaps.  It won't be a fast build but I hope to make steady progress.


Ed. I decided that 'Midland in the round' wasn't doing it for me.  The plan was a bit of a fudge from the start.  I could see that it wouldn't hold my interest so all the buildings and most of the track was retrieved and the layout dismantled.  Still, I now have a big pile of wood for future projects. 


My current thoughts are that this current layout should be built with exhibiting in mind, but also consideration be given to extending it in both directions to make a through station.  It could then form the basis of another layout around the shed, possibly with another station on the other side of the shed, maybe something a bit more industrialised.


On the other hand, this layout might be the first of a series of small exhibition layouts which will never be extended.  However, the need to just run trains round and round could be satisfied by building a narrow non-scenic running track around the four walls of the shed.  I am undecided at the moment.


Regards to all.


Terry

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Sounds like a plan :thumbs


Ed

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col.stephens wrote:

The latest published attempt at 'the art of compromise' appeared in the October 2018 Railway Modeller by Chris Ford.  Part of the original article was re-produced along with the original track plan.  I was sufficiently intrigued to buy the magazine and decided at long last to slay this particular dragon and attempt to build it at last.


It is a problem with magazines – they start repeating themselves every 40-years or so...

Looks like you've made a good start – I will look forward to seeing it progress!

Gordon

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I managed to solder the wiring to two of the four point motors yesterday.  I also stuck them in place beneath the baseboard with a cheapo version of 'no nails' as intended.



The finishing touches have been added to the weighbridge office...



I shall wire the other two point motors later today and glue them in place.  After that, the wiring will need to be attached to terminal blocks.


Terry

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"..a cheapo version of 'no nails'...

In the UK we have a substance called "Nemesis" which is available from building suppliers.  Cheap and very very good.  Apply it with a gun as per No Nails etc.

Barry

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The SEEP point motors are installed.  I haven't yet thought about a control panel so operating switches have been temporarily fitted to test the point motors and ensure that trains will run  over all of the trackwork.  Having never used point motors before, I am finding it quite novel to flick the switch and watch the blades spring over with a satisfying thud!



I was quite gleeful when, having wired and fitted the first point motor, it all worked perfectly.  My glee was short lived however, as when testing the second point, the frog was completely dead, causing my test loco to come to a sudden halt.  That particular point had been recovered from my previous layout building effort so I looked at some others from the same source to try to understand why power was not reaching the frog.  I came across this...



The two circular holes in the centre of the picture appear to contain metal contacts to which the thin wire had been previously soldered, thereby providing power to the frog.  The wire obviously has become detached.  I wondered if the same had happened to the point which was not working properly.  I couldn't lift it to look underneath so I decided to take the bull by the horns and solder another wire from the side of one of the rails forming the frog, and connect it to the appropriate terminal at the relevant choc block.  Deep joy!  Power was restored.


The project grinds slowly forward.


Terry

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I'm following along as well, Terry.

Cheers

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Welcome to the club of powered points. I feel your satisfaction. Give it a layout or two and you’ll be installing servo motors like Max. :shock:
Marty

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I doubt it Marty.  I find electrics totally confusing.


Terry

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 Last night I decided to lay the track in the fiddle yard, consisting of a 'Y' point and two sidings...



The point and track were simply pinned to the baseboard using Peco track pins.  After soldering wires to the rails at the toe of the point to pick up the current from the next board, I noticed that one of the rails had become detached from the sleepers and was badly misaligned.  I assume that the damage was caused by the heat from the soldering iron.  The fixings at the toe of Peco points do not appear to be very robust at the best of times.  Fortunately, I have bags of track spikes left over from my O gauge days.  I decided to reposition the offending rail and drive a spike each side to hold same in position.



Terry

Last edited on Thu Jan 17th, 2019 08:34 pm by col.stephens

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I had a similar "dead frog" problem with a brand new point Terry.  It took me forever to trace it - I hadn't imagined such a problem on a new point :twisted:  My solution was exactly the same as yours - solder a new wire to the inside of the "V".

Siliarly, the problems with displaced rails on points were solved by the insulated joiners.  They seemed to hold well enough although I never thought of spikes ....................

Nice looking woodwork. :thumbs

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Thanks Peter.  The woodwork is basic but it will suffice.   Unfortunately, I can't use rail joiners at the toe of the 'Y' point as it is at a baseboard joint.  Mind you, I hadn't thought of it anyway.  I must bear that idea in mind for future use.


Yesterday I screwed a piece of mdf to the underside of the baseboard frame to act as a shelf to support the Gaugemaster 100M controller. A short length of aluminium angle was glued to the front of the shelf with the trusty poundshop 'Hard as Nails' adhesive, to prevent the controller from falling off.  The track diagram was drawn on the mdf with a permanent ink pen and four holes were drilled in the appropriate places to take the switches for the point motors.  The controller shelf will need to be detachable to pack the layout when exhibiting and also because I want to be able to fit it to the front of the layout for home use.  For the switches it became apparent that I require a plug-in connector with twelve pins, which of course I haven't got, so things came to an abrupt halt.  I ordered said connector today on ebay and took the opportunity to order more wire in various colours for future use. 


Whilst waiting for the connector to be delivered, I could get on and paint the sides of the rails.


Terry


 

Last edited on Fri Jan 18th, 2019 06:36 pm by col.stephens

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 Change of mind today.  I decided that it would be preferable to operate the layout from the front.  Firstly, one can easily engage in conversation with visitors, and secondly, you usually get the best view of a layout from the front, not peering down from above over the backscene. I have worked out a way of attaching the controller shelf to the front of the layout utilising coach bolts for quick and easy removal.  I'll show pictures when it is done.  The controller shelf will now be situated in front of the fiddle yard with the option of a walk about hand-held controller to get close to the action at the far end of the layout.


Speaking of the fiddle yard.  I have decided not to worry about changing the polarity of the 'Y' point and to rely on blade contact, i.e. use it as intended straight out of the box.  Accordingly, it just required a simple means of moving the tie-bar.  Herewith a picture of Terry's patented point lever, Mark 1...


 


As you can see it consists simply of a small washer soldered to the end of a short length of bent rail.  The washer is pushed onto the small 'pip' at the end of the Peco tie-bar and the lever is held in place with small screws, thus...



More soon.


Terry


 

Last edited on Sun Jan 20th, 2019 08:59 pm by col.stephens

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Terry, soldering a small section of rail at right angles near the tiebar, will allow you to fit as microswitch to change the polarity of the "Y" frog if you find the blade/stock rail contact plays up.

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Good idea, thanks Ron.  I'll bear that in mind for future use.


Regards,


Terry

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Additionally Terry, I'd be inclined to add an omega loop to the mechanism to absorb the "shock" as you change the point.  They're not very well secured and I think you may find it all comes adrift fairly quickly - regardless of how careful you are - there's usually quite a lot of pressure at shows.  :hmm

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Thanks Peter, I'll bear that idea in mind too.


Regards,


Terry

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Petermac wrote: Additionally Terry, I'd be inclined to add an omega loop to the mechanism to absorb the "shock" as you change the point.  They're not very well secured and I think you may find it all comes adrift fairly quickly - regardless of how careful you are - there's usually quite a lot of pressure at shows.  :hmm
Bent rail and an omega  loop won't work. The loop is intended to take up any overthrow, and as stated above, will act as a shock absorber.  Code 50ish rail is too big for a small loop, P/B wire or r/c control wire (steel) is much better. Although this is just an extension of the throw bar, not a WIT, so the point spring does the work.

Nice approach Ed (and Terry).


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Ed ?

Not guilty M'laud :lol:

But agree with Nigel, if you've got a fairly solid bar to the point you don't need an omega wire Terry.

Omega wires take up the slack/flex in WIT systems, and if the outer tube is really solidly fixed still aren't needed (sorry Peter).



Ed

Last edited on Wed Jan 23rd, 2019 02:54 pm by Ed

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:oops: :oops: :oops: :oops: :oops:

I'm standing in the corner as I write ................................................. :cry:

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No worries Peter, the best point control I had was a solid type thick gardening wire connected directly in line with the tie bar and a DPDT switch to change the frog polarity.

Very similar to Terry's set up, but using a switch as well.


Ed

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Ed wrote: No worries Peter, ...............................................


Ed


Easy for you to say that - you're not the one standing in the corner having tomatoes thrown at you ......................... :thud

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As mentioned previously, I have now assembled the shelf for the controller.  It will need a coat of paint to smarten it up but here it is...



Fixed with two coach bolts to the baseboard framing for quick removal.



Extra support underneath to take the weight of the Gaugemaster 100M.



The gap is required behind the controller as, I realised too late, the hand-held controller fits into the rear of the Gaugemaster 100M with a ruddy big jack plug and requires sufficient clearance behind the unit.  Of course I didn't think of this when selecting the depth of the shelf.  The track plan and switches are now the wrong way round as I had decided to move the controller from the back of the layout to the front.  This will all be reversed in due course and a better looking track plan will be substituted.


Terry

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Hi Terry. I have just caught up with this thread, Terrific, as usual. I really don’t know where you get you ideas frombut, everyone is a winner looking forward to more.  Best wishes Kevin 

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Thank you Kevin, very kind of you.  I am submerged in the process of wiring the layout at present but hope to post more soon.


Best wishes,


Terry

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I suppose it's poetic that "The art of compromise" must itself get compromised to be buildable.

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I like that. :thumbs


Terry

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After what seems like a lifetime, I have finally finished wiring the point motors to the switches on the new control panel.  Each point motor has six wires and the layout has four point motors. The numerical amongst you will have worked out that twenty-four wires require to go somewhere or the other!  And this is just a small layout!  The new control panel is a simple affair made from three pieces of ply...



The two triangles were glued to the underside of the ends of the rectangle with my trusty tube of 'Hard as Nails', available from the local £1 emporium in a town near you. The simple track diagram was drawn on a piece of card with permanent ink and a spray of matt varnish was wafted over it.  Holes were drilled at the appropriate places and the switches were fitted from behind.  Voila...



Not quite as extensive as the track diagram for Clapham Junction, but it works for me!


 


Here is a rear view showing the works.  The panel will be sited over the tag-strip and will be removable, being attached to the shelf via screws from below biting into the two small blocks of wood glued on each side ('Hard as Nails' strikes again!).  



I just need to cover the original holes drilled in the shelf and splash some paint over the lot to make it all more presentable.  Meanwhile, here is a general view of how things currently stand...



Terry


 

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Very nice Terry.

I know it might be a bit late but if the panel is going to move about, shrink wrap over the wire connections to the switches and tag strip could help avoid unwanted issues.

That said, still very nice work.


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Very neat Terry. :thumbs

As you so rightly say, the wires required can mount up alarmingly - as you know, DCC is only 2 wires ................... :cheers

I'm impressed with your faith in "No More Nails" - it it really that strong ?   Maybe I should re-think my screw collection............................... :hmm

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Thank you Barry and Peter. 


The 'Hard as Nails' is part of the '151' range of items sold, I think, by Poundland.  I have found it to be a very useful solution to those awkward problems where you can't use a screw, such as fixing small blocks of wood to the underside of the thin ply baseboard top.  I used it when attaching the point motors as shown earlier in this thread.  I have also fixed small blocks of wood to give me something to hang the wiring from, as you might see on the top left of this rather poor photo...



Regards,


Terry

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 Now the track and point motor wiring is finished I decided the time was right to paint the sides of the code 75 rails.  But which colour?  Study two different pieces of track in two localities and the chances are the rail colour will look different.  To me, it seems that the rail colour varies from dark brown through different shades of red oxide.  If you have a book with colour plates therein, have a quick look and you will see what I mean.  I dug about in my paint drawer and came across this old tin of Humbrol Matt No. 168...



It appears to me to be a deep red with a brown shade to it.  This is how it looks on the rail...



I used a brush which was wide enough to paint the chairs at the same time as the rail.  Paint finding its way onto the sleepers around the chairs is no problem.  Look at real track with wooden sleepers and note how the rust often stains the wood in the area of the chairs. 


Before getting bogged down in the chore of ballasting, I decided to glue the Scalescenes platform walls in place.  This is how the card walls look tonight, groaning under the combined weight of whatever I could lay my hands on...



Next job will be to add the ballast.  Deep joy!


Terry

Last edited on Wed Feb 13th, 2019 09:16 pm by col.stephens

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Hi Terry. Strange title that “ The art of compromise “ . I f it was my work, or lack of?, It would be apt but from what I can see you have vision and utilisation skills,and you can create exhition standard models.Best wishes Kevin 

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Thank you Kevin, very nice of you but you had better reserve judgement until it is finished.


Best wishes,


Terry

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Hi Terry. Looking at your track,reminds me at one show I asked about dirty track, and the stall holder sold me, what he either thought I wanted or what he wanted to sell? But when I got home and had a proper look at what I purchased, he had sold me “enamel track wash” by A K , more for war gamers. I think? Have you either seen this or used it?
Best wishes Kevin 

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Passed Driver wrote: , he had sold me “enamel track wash” by A K , more for war gamers. I think? Have you either seen this or used it?     Best wishes Kevin 

I think Kevin, you purchased a lemon - looked at the item - it is for weathering tank tracks. But with care and not leaving on the rail tops or the inside curvature of the rail head, it may do the job.

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Hi Ron.  Yes, I worked out that one for myself .  Best wishes Kevin 

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So, we have the Scalescenes platform awaiting a top surface...



The surface was cut from artists' mounting board and given a coat of french polish, mainly to harden the edges to stop them fraying with use.  Once dry, I drew the edging stones with a pen and scribed the same. 



Once the edging stones had been fully scribed, I gave the whole surface a spray with Halfords' grey primer.  This was supposed to be just the undercoat but when dry, it appeared to me to be an ideal colour for the finished platform surface.  It will require weathering of course.  I quickly painted the edging stones with a slightly darker shade of diluted acrylic paint.  The white line at the platform edge will be painted before the platform surface is glued in place. This how it presently looks...



You can also see from the last photo that I decided to give all of the baseboard surface a quick coating of grey/brown acrylic paint.  Unfortunately, the grain of the plywood surface is still very prominent so I will have to think of another way to camouflage the baseboard surface where it is not covered by other scenery.


Thoughts... how to install uncoupling magnets under track which has already been glued down, because somebody wasn't thinking far enough ahead...duh! 


More soon.


Terry


 

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Hi Terry. Looks excellent. Have you tried “ knotting compound ? I know that it works for balsa. As for Coupling magnets, that depends on your  skills with a steel tape and if you can drill a hole 🕳 from under the baseboard without touching the track?    Best wishes Kevin 

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Looking extremely good Terry
I must say i like that finescale oo track really does look pucker i know you can buy the finecale point kits but i would imagine they take some time to put together.
I know if i did not already have loads of track i would certainly probably use that track.


Brian

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Yes, I too like the track - much finer looking than Peco Code 100 !!

Re hiding the ply grain Terry, you could paint a sloppy plaster mix over it - when dry, it would look like caked earth.  You'd just need to paint it with your chosen base colour which in turn, would probably stop any future crazing.

Re the uncoupling magnets - been there, done that !!!:thud  Alas, I didn't learn anything from the experience........... :oops: :oops:    Why not have a look at cube magnets ?  Perry did an excellent thread on them (for Kadees) - it's there somewhere ....................... :roll:
On edit - forgot to mention it but the platform looks brilliant.  I'll bet you could stand on that. :doublethumb

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Covering ply Postcrete easy and cheap sieve it slightly to get rid of big stones pva then sprinkle it on then mist with water.


Brian

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Petermac wrote: .

Re the uncoupling magnets - been there, done that !!!:thud  Alas, I didn't learn anything from the experience........... :oops: :oops:    Why not have a look at cube magnets ?  Perry did an excellent thread on them (for Kadees) - it's there somewhere ....................... :roll:
.

http://yourmodelrailway.net/view_topic.php?id=8481&forum_id=6&page=1

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Thanks Sol.  :thumbs :thumbs

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Nice tidy and solid looking platform Terry.
I too like the grey primer as a base coat or even top coat when appropriate.


Last edited on Sun Feb 24th, 2019 01:29 am by Marty

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Hi All.  That is an excellent idea, but, me being me as you’d expect I had mixed results. It worked fine on a plain piece of plywood. So I drilled the holes in the baseboard, Voila, another failure. Best wishes Kevin 

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Looking great Terry. I love that platform edging - my eyes and hands could never scribe something so neatly and accurately.  And the track looks superb.

As to covering the plywood, there have been sound suggestions - it depends what finish you want.  an alternative is to give the plywood and good covering in water, then sprinkle fine plaster over it through a sieve, and let it dry thoroughly.  Then paint in your desired colour.  I have used this old method for anything from dry dusty roads to tarmac....

As to the magnets.... I kept telling myself, "Don't glue the track down until you've worked out the magnets, Don't glue the track down until you've worked out the magnets..... Too late, I've glued the track down!"  I think iit might be a rite of passage!


Michael

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Thanks all for your comments and suggestions.  I ordered some flat magnets online yesterday.  Rather than the hassle of lifting the track to install them , I am minded to cut through the required number of sleepers, using a new scalpel blade, gouge a small trench, glue in the magnet and then glue the part sleepers back in place.  I'm thinking that it might be less noticeable if I were to cut the sleepers just beside the chairs.  I shall do a test one where the goods shed will sit.  If it doesn't work out, the damaged sleepers will not be seen inside the shed.


Terry

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Hi Terry,

Magnets. Happens to us all. Drill holes between the sleepers where you want  it to go, give the required section an overnight treatment with a damp cloth covered in cling or foil (you did use pva, right?), cut between the holes from underneath. Or just use a Dremel a router but and leave a thin layer of the baseboard. Make sure the magnet is centered.

If this Finescale track, code 75, with thin sleepers, KD magnets could have issues with the couplers, and the steel axles used by UK manufacturers.  May need a spacer to optimize the distance. Check the website.


Nigel

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Thanks Nigel.  Interesting idea.


Regards.


Terry

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I fixed masking tape to the platform leaving the edge clear.  The plan was to give it a spray with Halfords white primer.  As you would expect, the paint ran out half way into the job.  I resorted to brush painting some white acrylic paint over the rest.



This week I put together the Scalescenes kit for the arched bridge.  A lovely model.  This will be situated over the entrance to the fiddle yard.  Some black weathering powder was dusted over.  I must do the same for the platform face.



One extra wing wall was made and will be situated just inside the fiddle yard, as shown in the picture above.  I will ballast the track for a few inches to give the impression that the scenery continues away out of sight.  Hopefully, the extra wing wall will cut down the view into the fiddle yard.  This is how it will look from the fiddle yard side.



I might even create an embankment for a foot or so to help with the illusion that the scenery continues. 


I have decided to build the Scalescenes Goods Shed as it is not very different from the LMS shed which I had intended to scratchbuild.  More on this soon.


Terry

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Hi Terry.  Your idea of “ Compromise “ or the art of. I cannot see any compromise in your work. I should be such a good Modeller.   Best wishes Kevin 

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Thank you Kevin, very kind of you.  However, best wait and see how it all turns out first.


Regards,


Terry

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Nice bridge Terry. :thumbs  I do admire the sharp edges on the pillars....as I know only too well they are not easy to achieve consistently.

Good luck with the Goods Shed

Cheers

John

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That is really coming on nicely. The station platform looks especially nice. 

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Hi Terry,

Nice idea to take the bridge into the fiddle yard. Same with the ballast and a bit of scenery?

Nigel

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Thank you all.  Yes Nigel, the ballast and scenery will extend a short distance into the fiddle yard.


 


As mentioned earlier, I forgot to install the magnets for uncoupling, before gluing down the track.  How to remedy the situation without resorting to lifting the track?  This is where the first magnet will be installed...



Three sleepers were cut through with a scalpel just in from the chairs and the pieces put to one side.  Holes were drilled in the baseboard surface to assist in cutting through the baseboard...




A small rectangle of plywood was glued to the underside of the hole with the trusty old 'Hard as Nails'.  Card packing was glued inside the hole to bring the top of the magnet up to the level of the underside of the sleepers and the magnet was superglued in place...


 


The sleeper pieces were superglued back in their original positions...


 


Job done!


Or it would have been had I not at this point realised that one magnet is not long enough to uncouple two wagons.  I am now in the process of installing another magnet just to the right of the one shown above.


More soon.


Terry

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"Or it would have been had I not at this point realised that one magnet is not long enough to uncouple two wagons."
Ouch. Le sigh.

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Isn't that just typical?!  The track is super though, and that is a very neat job - hats off to you!

Michael

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Thanks Michael.


The second magnet has been installed alongside the first...



All appears to be working well as shown below...



Terry


 

Last edited on Fri Mar 8th, 2019 07:32 pm by col.stephens

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Good job with the magnets Terry
Do you know what is the maximum distance away from the couplings they will actually still uncouple succesfully?

Brian

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Nice job Terry but is it really necessary to use such large magnets?   The reason I ask is that I use these tiny ones on my Coombe Hinton layout and they work 100%.   The fact that it's N scale may make a difference of course!   Anyway here's a very close up photo of them in situ between the sleepers and they are hardly noticeable at normal viewing levels.


Ken.


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It depends on the coupler style. With tension-lock couplers, the lengthy trip bar required to lift the hooks enough for uncoupling means that in turn it takes longer magnet sections to draw down both trip bars at once.

Last edited on Sat Mar 9th, 2019 03:36 pm by ZeldaTheSwordsman

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Hi Terry,

Two magnets? I thought, but then I saw why. Unlike KD couplers those tension lock add-on actuators need a long one. Any grab on the axles?

Nigel

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Hi Terry.  Very good, but when I tried the idea, way back when, I had a problem with the hooks falling off. I began a thread on the subject, and wrote to Bachmann and Dapol etc, telling them of the problem their response was to send me some spare couplings . Best wishes Kevin 

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Hello Brian.  I don't know .  These particular magnets are 3mm thick and are quite powerful.  I suspect that if the magnets were mounted under the baseboard (5mm ply) you would have a problem.  I am using code 75 track (C&L) and the sleepers are very thin compared to code 100 track. 


Ken, as pointed out by Brendan (Zelda), the magnets have to be long enough to cover two adjoining Bachmann couplings.  I have tried using small magnets between the sleepers and it required four in a row and even then uncoupling did not always take place.  It is far easier to use long magnets.  You won't actually see them once the track has been ballasted as they will be covered.


Nigel.  No grab whatsoever on the axles.


Kevin.  I remember your thread.  I have never had any problem with the hooks falling off in use.  If they do come off they just clip back on.


 


Next job is to install the remaining magnets on the two sidings.  Now I know how many are required at each uncoupling point (two) and that this type of magnet is quite capable of doing the task, I have ordered more for future use.  They are Ferrite magnets measuring 25mm x 10mm x 3mm.  I paid £2.79 post-paid for thirty magnets on ebay. Bargain!


Terry


 


 


 

Last edited on Sat Mar 9th, 2019 05:57 pm by col.stephens

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Bargain!!
One of these days I'm going to try eBay. sigh.

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Hi Terry.   I do like the weathering on your track, it really looks dirty in a nice sort of way, and with a shiny railhead .Would you let me, and anyone else that doesn’t know how to get such a good result into the secret???
Best wishes Kevin 

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Hello Kevin.  If you are looking at the track in post 75, that is not my photo.  Send Ken a PM and I'm sure he will enlighten you.


Disaster!  Last night I decided to get on with the boring job of laying the ballast.  Despite varnishing the platform faces, as soon as I dropped the diluted PVA onto the ballast, it wicked up the front of the platform destroying the printed brick surface.  I had no option other than rip up the whole platform, including the top surface and consign it to the bin.  A lesson to be learned here.  In future, ballast the track BEFORE fitting the platform.


On the plus side, I wasn't totally happy with the platform as the printed brick was a slightly different shade than the nearby bridge. 
I have noticed this with some Scalescenes kits.  Print two different models in 'red brick' and they come out in different shades which isn't very good if you are trying to have some uniformity across the buildings.  Or am I doing something wrong?


Anyway, I have already cut out the new platform surface and have drawn the edging stones, ready to be scribed.  It has had a coat of french polish to harden the edges.  I will try to cover the platform faces with a shade of red brick which is closer to that on the bridge, more of a pinkish red as opposed to a brown red on the previous platform.


I installed the remaining magnets yesterday.  It really doesn't take very long, about fifteen minutes from start to finish for each magnet location.


More soon.


Terry

Last edited on Mon Mar 11th, 2019 08:15 pm by col.stephens

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Oh dear!  Sorry to hear about the platform (even if it ends up being a blessing in a very cunning disguise).  I absolutely hate having to do something again because I have made a silly mistake, but it does seem as though you had taken precautions, which makes it even more galling.

As to the colour printouts, it could be the ink levels when you printed.  I have found new cartridges have a greater depth of colour, but if I am printing a lot of brick colours, they become increasingly pinkish.  Colour reproduction is one reason why I moved away from card models..... the other being that I wasn't very good at making them! I could never get the beautiful sharp edges you have made - your bridge looks superb and I know it will be even better when the scenery around it is done.... seriously envious!

Michael

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You can try tweaking the color by coloring over with a colored pencil, mind. Alternatively you could chalk the difference up to the bricks being sourced from different companies or batches.

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Right, we are back in business with the platform following the disaster mentioned previously.  I thought the previous specimen was a tad too dark, having been sprayed with Halfords' grey primer.  The new platform was also given a coat of the grey primer, but once dry was also given a spray coat of light grey acrylic paint from Humbrol.  I mixed some grey with a dollop of flesh colour to produce a shade akin to concrete.  The edging stones were painted with this colour.  The white line will be painted shortly.  Here is the platform placed in position.  This one will be kept well clear of the layout until the ballasting is well and truly finished.



Terry


 

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Very smart - glad you are back on track (no pun intended!)

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Terry i have cardboard platform faces and they are not even varnished by using the mix i used for ballasting i did not get any running up the cardboard faces on any of the platform faces.

Mix used 25% Pva  then 75% water then add then same 75% of Isopropol alcohol to the mix.

Brian

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Thanks Michael.


Good tip Brian.  Thank you.


Terry

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Like what you've done with the platform and that ballast is very neat, wins I could get mine to look that neat. Well done.

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Thanks Barney.  When the ballast is dry, I give it a gentle rub over with one of those foam sanding blocks which you can get from the local £1 emporium.  They usually come in packs of three or four.  The sanding block removes most of the ballast which is standing proud and from the sleepers.


I also clean the track with the same item.  Much cheaper than the usual rail cleaners.  Someone will probably tell me that I shouldn't do it as I will wear away the rail.  It hasn't happened so far!


Terry

Last edited on Mon Mar 18th, 2019 05:41 pm by col.stephens

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You shouldn't do it - you'll wear away the rail .................................. :cool wink :cheers

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Petermac wrote: You shouldn't do it - you'll wear away the rail .................................. :cool wink :cheers


:Red Card :Red Card :Red Card :mutley


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Headmaster wrote: Petermac wrote: You shouldn't do it - you'll wear away the rail .................................. :cool wink :cheers


:Red Card :Red Card :Red Card :mutley



Touché !!   :mutley :mutley :mutley

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Thanks for the tips Terry, I'll give it a go, with a gentle rub on the rails.


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I have so much catching up to do on this Forum, but this one has me in awe...  :cool:

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Hi Terry,

Never mind a bit of wear, it's the scratches you need to worry about. Unless you are using 800 grit or above. Big, deep scratches reduce traction and are dirt, fluff and grease traps. Which means more work in the future. Unless you are planning on battery power...

Nigel

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Progress has been a bit slow as I have been completing the boring task of ballasting.  It hasn't been helped by the glued ballast coming away in patches, presumably due to the glue/water mix being too weak.  This has now been rectified and a weak wash of brown acrylic paint has been applied to the track to tone down the rather clean looking ballast.


Earlier I posted some photos of the steps taken to fix the uncoupling magnets beneath the track, having already glued the track in place.  I thought I would share with you a picture of the end result.  I am happy to report that, in spite of being buried beneath both sleepers and ballast, there has been no ill effect on the power of the magnets.



My thoughts are now turning back to baseboard construction.  I need to get boards in place for the backscene and also need to work out how the layout will be dismantled for storage and transport to exhibitions (assuming it will ever get invited to any!)  Of course, all of this should have been worked out at the baseboard building stage, but having got the baseboards erected, one feels compelled to press on and get cracking with the modelling.  This morning might see me visiting the local timber merchant for some plywood for the backscene.


Terry

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Hi Terry.  Well done, slowly but assuredly you will get there, and of course with your “ Track Record “ you will get lots of invitations to exhibitions. Keep up the good work. Best wishes Kevin 

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What did you use for ballast Terry ?  It looks just about the right size from France ..................... :thumbs

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Petermac wrote: What did you use for ballast Terry ?  It looks just about the right size from France ..................... :thumbs
Hello Peter. The ballast is made by Woodland Scenics, medium grade. I believe that it is made from ground walnut shells.Regards, Terry

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The layout plods slowly on.  Today I visited the local wood merchant and bought enough 4mm thick plywood for the backscene, end pieces, and pelmet, which the chap very kindly cut to size for me.


Returning to the theme mentioned in the 64th post, I want to give the impression that the track going under the bridge actually goes somewhere and not just straight into the fiddle yard.  To this end, it will be necessary to restrict the view into said fiddle yard.  I cut a hole in the newly acquired ply end panel and propped it up behind the bridge.  I took some photos from the spectators' viewpoints along the front of the layout to get an idea how far one could see into the fiddle yard.  They look something like this...




This is roughly the area which would need to be developed in order to give the impression I am hoping to achieve...



As a start, I have painted the whole area with brown/grey acrylic paint.


Before any scenic work can progress on the layout, the backscene panels now require fixing in place.


Terry

Last edited on Fri Apr 5th, 2019 06:18 pm by col.stephens

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Hi Terry. Well done. It isn’t as though any efforts of mine are going anywhere l until I RIP and most likely then to the place where old horses go. But I am working along the same lines, except by necessity,  for the fact that I have chosen a tunnel.Nigel has pointed me in the correct direction with the walls of a cutting, to keep prying eyes 👀 out. Anyway it is all fun as long as you enjoy what you are doing. Best wishes Kevin 

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That looks very neat Terry - I do like the tunnel portal. :thumbs

No doubt a bit late now but, instead of a sloping wall on the fiddle yard side, I wonder if a level one would hide more plus, putting a roof on it would make a proper "tunnel" effect and almost completely hide anything in the yard. :hmm

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Using a tunnel to hide the fiddle yard is a good idea; I've seen it done before and it's quite effective.

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Thank you all for your constructive comments.  However, you all appear to have misunderstood what I am aiming to achieve.  It is a bridge, not a tunnel.  I could enclose the fiddleyard side in a 'tunnel' or 'tube' but that will not give the effect I am after.  The impression I am aiming for is that the track and scenery continue on the other side of the bridge. 
Regards to all,


Terry

Last edited on Sat Apr 6th, 2019 07:21 am by col.stephens

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:oops: :oops: :oops: :oops: :oops:  Ooops .........................

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:oops::oops::oops: Oops indeed Petermac.   Best wishes Kevin 

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Clever idea Terry, we often see a tunnel or the track disappearing through a building, but not often a backscene incorporating a bridge. I take it the trick will be matching the scenic through the bridge to that on the backscene ? 
 My only thought is weather the  buttress in the fiddle yard should be angled the same as those on the viewing side. . . Or weather it would make a blind bit of difference ! :hmm

Cheers

Matt

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As you can see in the photos in post 101, I have placed the wing wall on the fiddle yard side almost parallel to the track.  This does help to restrict the view.  In the final analysis, I may angle it slightly away from the track and include a bit more embankment.   However, this will all take place a bit further down the line.


In the meantime, this arrived yesterday...



And here's the rub... I had intended to model the layout as a BR London Midland offering, of which I actually know very little.  There are numerous BR layouts on the exhibition circuit but not so many set in the pre-nationalisation era.  I am minded to use this model as an opportunity to do something different and have a dip into the Brighton Section of the Southern Railway.  Some of the rolling stock may have to be scratchbuilt but that would just be a case of renewing old skills.  I have, in the past, built many wagons in both 4mm and 7mm scales.  To date, not many buildings for the layout have been completed and it would mean building the station building again (for the third time!)


Views would be welcomed.


Terry

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Hi Terry

As a modeller of the BR era late 1950's - early 1960's steam/diesel transition I am aware that there are literally hundreds of modellers like me covering this same period.  Back in the day I modelled pre-grouping MR partly out of a love of Johnson engines and partly on the back of Peter Denny's philosophy that an obscure subject would attract less critique as fewer people were experts - and it worked for a while!

These days, pre-grouping layouts are rare and pre-nationalisation layouts are uncommon.  The trends seem to follow the lead given by the big manufacturers and their output.  If there is a bit of a run of ex-LNER locomotives released, a volley of ex-LNER layouts never seems to be far behind etc etc.

The idea of LMS or SR is a good one - colour, railway heyday, variety of rolling stock etc.  I don't have an interest in either company but can appreciate your fondness for lovely little things like the Terrier.  I say Go For It!!

Barry

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After the overwhelming response (thanks Barry!) to my suggestion that the layout be modelled as the Southern Railway, my thoughts have been going in two directions.  Firstly, I have to finish the woodwork before proceeding with the scenery.  Secondly, I will have to build a couple of ex-LBSC carriages from scratch.  Etched brass kits are available at a price.  I don't do brass, lacking the necessary skills.  I like plastic.  It's easy to work and mistakes can be rectified quite easily.  In any event, I like the challenge of building my own carriages and solving the problems (not issues) as they arise, rather than having a kit designer doing it all for me.


So, this thread is going to continue with the layout build and the carriage build will start on a new thread.  Hopefully, in time, the completed carriages will join us here.


Back to the layout.  Not much done recently but today I decided to start adding the boards which support the backscene . Firstly, I thought that I would tackle the board which separates the scenic section from the fiddle yard.  Keeping this board upright has always been a problem for me.  For instance, the boards along the rear of the layout are simply screwed to the outside of the baseboard frame, as is the small board at the end of the scenic section.  But the board separating the scenic section and the fiddle yard is sitting on top of the baseboard surface, therefore no frame to screw it to.  Fortunately, there will be a road and embankment at this end of the layout so here is my solution to keep the board upright...



Three wooden blocks are fitted each side of the bridge.  The bottom block is screwed into the end frame beneath the baseboard surface, and each block is screwed onto the piece below.  Screws are driven into the wooden blocks from the fiddle yard side and all is secure.  The blocks will eventually be hidden beneath the road and embankment.



More soon.


Terry

Last edited on Sun Apr 21st, 2019 08:13 pm by col.stephens

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Don't know if these coaches are any good Terry, probably wrong era.

http://smallbrookstudio.co.uk/kits-parts/4569521210/4mm-IoW-Southern


Ed

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Yes, I saw those Ed.  I believe the 4-wheelers had been withdrawn before the 1930's.  Bogie coaches are required.  Just about to start a new thread.  Thanks for your interest.


Terry

Last edited on Mon Apr 22nd, 2019 04:16 pm by col.stephens

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Hi Terry

Any chance of an update on the Art of Compromise project - there are lots of us interested!!

Barry

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There are indeed!!!

Best title for a thread I've seen, too...

Michael

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Hi Terry,


Regarding your Post #82

I'm late to this Topic but regarding getting colour consistency, I use a lot of Scalescenes papers and get them printed at my local Office Supplies on quality paper of the appropriate weight. At around the equivalent of 35 pence for an A4 200GSM sheet I reckon its very good value. You can see some results on my topic or gallery (sorry - shameless plug!)

They have good QC so I've found the colour is reliable. Their dyes are reasonably light fast but I do coat with a matt UV varnish once installed. In comparison, home ink jet applications can be quite variable and (I think) less UV stable. The cost of professional printing has dropped so much it doesn't warrant all the fussing over maintaining your own hardware, not to mention the consumables. Consequently, colour home printing is one technology bullet I've managed to completely dodge!

Colin





Last edited on Thu Jun 20th, 2019 11:42 pm by Colin W

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Apologies for the rather long break in this thread.  Work stopped in the Summer and after some months I have ventured down to the shed once again.  Some progress of late.  The boards to support the backscenes are in place, as is the facia and pelmet.  All woodwork on show to the front and sides has been given a coat of grey paint.






I am taking the opportunity with this small layout to try some techniques not tried before by me.  The use of point motors, as previously mentioned in this thread, being one.  I thought that I would explore LED lighting as the main layout lighting.  I have seen it used on a number of layouts at exhibitions but there is virtually nothing available online to explain how to do it (well, I couldn't find anything!).  The small electrical connection poking over the end board above is the connection to the LED strip which runs behind the pelmet. (I forgot to take photos of the lighting - post some soon).  I am amazed as to how simple this LED business is.  Lasts virtually forever (as far as I know), with no neon tubes or bulbs to replace.  Gives 180 degree light. Fixed behind the pelmet with the strong double-sided tape already attached to the back of the strip.  Connecting strips of LEDs in tandem by soldering wires between them is simplicity itself.  I bought a fifteen foot strip of LEDs on Ebay, together with transformer plug and associated connections for under £10.  Bargain!  I chose 'warm white' to give a feel of a sunny day on the model. A single strip appears to be sufficient to light the model, the baseboards being only fourteen inches wide. (In the picture above, the boards are lit by the shed lights not the LED's).



Regards to all.



Terry





Last edited on Thu Jan 9th, 2020 09:26 pm by col.stephens

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I still need to dismantle the layout to establish how it can be 'boxed-up' for transporting.  I am shying away from doing so at present, but I will have to face it sooner or later.  In  the meantime I have been giving some thought to the scenery.  Last night I decided to start by cutting the road to the station from mounting board.  I have a number of large off-cuts, obtained for free by a fellow club member from a local picture framing shop.  These pictures should give the flavour as to where we are going.


The only other thing to report at present is that the Scalescenes' small station building, in Southern Railway guise, is currently under construction.  If you have followed this thread from the beginning, you will remember that the layout was to represent a station on the London Midland Region until I bought the new Hornby Terrier in Southern livery and everything changed! The recent announcement by Hattons of production of four and six-wheeled coaches is particularly useful, especially for a layout of this size.

More as the layout progresses.

Regards to all.

Terry

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Great progress Terry and happy New Year :thumbs

Ed

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Thanks for the update Terry

On a non-railway related YouTube channel I saw a guy produce lighting using 3 LED strips - Warm White, Daylight and Blue, each fitted with a dimmer.  By varying the amount of each light (using the dimmers) he created a series of "moods" that could be interpreted as times of day or even weather!

I thought at the time it was really brilliant.  Perhaps an intimate scene like yours could use such a system???

Barry

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Thank you Ed.  A Happy New Year to you too and everyone at Your Model Railway Club. 


As promised some further pictures of the LED lighting.  I fitted a sloping length of wood behind the pelmet and simply stuck the LED strip onto this with the double-sided tape which comes already attached to the rear of the strip.  Couldn't be simpler and all for under a 'tenner'. (£10 sterling for anyone not familiar with our strange way of speaking - "Gawd blimey guvnor, on me muvver's life, I di'nt no the gear was nicked!" - roughly translating as "If I am lying Officer, may God strike me blind, and I swear on my dear old mother's life that I had no knowledge that all this property was stolen, and imagine my great surprise when you told me it was!"
Anyway, enough of this nonsense.  To the photos...


As you can see in the photo above, I cut the LED strip at the layout centre point as the pelmet divides in two for transporting.  The LED strip was easily re-connected with soldered wires, these being joined together with chocolate block connectors (so useful for all kinds of wiring jobs on the layout).

And finally, the photo above shows the layout lit with the LED lighting, the shed lights being turned off. (Taken about 1pm today.  The shed windows are behind the layout).

More soon.

Terry

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Hello Barry.  That's an interesting idea.  As I am experimenting with LEDs I shall see how the scenery looks under the 'warm white' as already fitted.  The beauty of this system is that it would be so easy to add other strips of different colours.  Much better than 'faffing around' with neon tubes or bulbs.



Best wishes,



Terry


Last edited on Fri Jan 10th, 2020 02:08 pm by col.stephens

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Well, the Southern station building is now finished.  If you remember, back in post 7, I posted a photo of the Scalescenes' small station building in London Midland red and then decided to model the Southern Railway instead following the release of Hornby's Terrier.  Herewith a couple of photos of the finished building.  Additions to the basic kit are plastic downpipes, white-metal chimney and card valance.  The posters and signs come with this excellent Scalescenes' kit.

More soon.


Terry

Last edited on Thu Jan 16th, 2020 07:38 pm by col.stephens

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The time has come to make a start on the scenery.  The road, previously cut from mounting board, dictates the shape of the land on the right-hand end of the layout.  It passes over the bridge, this being the entrance to the fiddle yard, and makes an sharp turn to the left and descends steeply to the station building and then into the goods yard. Of necessity there will be a steep embankment down towards the trackbed.  The photo shows the first of the supports for the road.  Neither the bridge or the road are fixed down yet.  I am using a hot glue gun, which is certainly speeding up construction. 

Re the white line on the platform edge.  Firstly, the ramps were not usually painted, unlike mine.  Secondly, as I have decided to set the layout further back in time to the Southern Railway circa 1936, not BR circa late 1950's, as originally envisaged, the white line may no longer be appropriate.  There seems to be a belief amongst modellers that the white line first appeared during the Second World War to help passengers during the blackout. This is not strictly true.  Certainly during the war the practice appears to have become commonplace.  However, there is photographic evidence available of some platform edges being painted long before.  Coincidentally, whilst reading the April 2019 copy of Backtrack yesterday, on page 200 there is a photo of the strangely named Trench Crossing Halt on the branch from Wellington to Newport and Stafford, dated 1927.  This photo clearly shows a white line on the platform edge.  Clear evidence that the practice existed before the war. The platform ramp is not painted.

I need to do some research to ascertain what was the approach of the Southern Railway to painting platform edges circa 1936.


More soon,

Terry

Last edited on Sun Jan 19th, 2020 10:35 pm by col.stephens

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Hi Terry,

Sarsden Halt had white lines on the platform in what looks like 1910-1920 from the uniforms and age of the staff.

Nigel

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Looking good Terry - Roy Link would approve methinks!!

Barry

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Thank you Barry and Nigel.  The white line issue is interesting.  I shall probably become obsessed, searching every magazine and book to prove it to myself!


Best Wishes,


Terry

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Hi Terry.  I don’t know because I wasn’t there, but with the keen eyed young pilot on a bright night, it could have made the WW 2 bombing of a Railway Line much easier. After all they followed the Tames to the heart of London with the reflection from the water.  Best wishes Kevin 

Last edited on Tue Jan 21st, 2020 09:28 am by Passed Driver

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Thanks Kevin.



Measure twice, cut once, goes the saying.  Unfortunately, when cutting out the station forecourt area from card, I didn't measure at all!  The result was that there was insufficient card abutting the platform on which to stand the station building. I then wasted time having to add an extra piece of card, so...

I did what I should have done in the first instance and either measured the station building or took it down to the shed and offer it up against the card before cutting out.  Anyway, here's proof that the station actually fits the allotted space.  The observant amongst you will notice that this is not the actual building which is going to be used for this layout.  It is a spare.

Jobs completed this evening: 1) the white area of card painted with an undercoat prior to spraying with Humbrol Grey No.64;  2) glue applied to the underside of the bridge and same placed in position with weights thereon.


More soon.

Terry 

Last edited on Mon Jan 27th, 2020 08:40 pm by col.stephens

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Today I am singing the praises of the humble glue gun.  I have always been of the 'stick it with PVA and leave it overnight' school of thought.  However, I recently obtained a £5 mini-glue gun from Hobbycraft and what a difference it makes to construction time.  I spent a short period this afternoon gluing in place the remaining supports for the station approach road.  I may have to make some minor changes to accommodate the grass embankment, but the framework is in place...

This picture shows the road laid in place, not glued down yet, to give an idea as to how it will look...

More soon.


Terry

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Terry, slightly similar to how I used that bridge

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Uncanny Sol!  Nice layout.



Regards,



Terry


Last edited on Wed Jan 29th, 2020 09:52 pm by col.stephens

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The last job achieved last night was to apply PVA to the underside of the platform and fix it in place under suitable weights.  It dawned on me that, before too much scenery was added, provision needed to be made for the eventual installation of the starter signal.  This will be one of Dapol's superb working signals which will be wired up to the switch previously installed on the control panel.  It was a simple job to drill a 14mm hole through the baseboard at the appropriate place just before the bridge...


Here's a flavour as to how the signal will look when in place...

One of today's jobs was to paint out the white line on the platform ramps.  I also painted a thin wash over the remaining white line to tone it down.  The road was glued in place on top of the card formers and cereal packet card was used to form a lattice on which the land cover will be attached...

Last job this evening was to glue the card supports in place under the road as it meets the entrance to the goods yard...

More soon.



Terry

Last edited on Thu Jan 30th, 2020 10:33 pm by col.stephens

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The remaining lattice work was completed this afternoon.  Next job is to add the land surface. This consists of torn-up pieces of paper applied over the card lattice with neat PVA.  Some people call it Glueshell.  Commonly known as papier-mâché.

Terry


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That really is looking good Terry and you're covering some ground very quickly to boot.

I have had a hot glue gun for years - bought for work - and also thought I'd try it on the railway.  Maybe it's to do with the type of glue used but I found that, whilst it stuck sufficiently to hold bits in place, it didn't really "bond" so joints cracked very easily.  When you think about how glues work, PVA "soaks" into the material then sets - rather like a weld whereas hot glue is not only too thick but sets too quickly to soak in.  The result, in my experience, a weak joint, "wedged" by the glue blobs rather than truly glued.  As I said, it could depend on the type of glue used.

Regarding the white platform edges, I'd certainly go with them. I think you're right in that the practice became commonplace during WW2 for obvious reasons.  To answer Kevin's comment about carrot-eating bomber pilots, the rails themselves were the guiding light Kevin.  Look at any moon-lit aerial photo of railways and the rails shine like strip lights.  The platform edges, although white, didn't shine.  That's why a clear full moon was called a "bombers moon";

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Hot gun glue has issues with white foam board. It attaches to the white powder, not the board. I used it for tacking then followed by glue. 

Nigel

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I'd also forgotten to mention the stringing ……………………….!!!  :shock: :shock: :shock: :shock:  :twisted: :twisted: :twisted:

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Hello Peter.  I agree with you.  I don't thing the bond is particularly strong either, but is fine for gluing the card used for the scenery.  The glue gun does produce lots of 'strings' but I have found that they can be brushed off with the hand leaving no residue on any surface.  I had to revert to using PVA to attach the bridge and the platform to the baseboard as the hot glue dries too fast for you to get it onto the bottom of the model in every place it is needed.

Hello Nigel.  Interesting comment re the hot glue not being suitable for use on foamboard.  Thanks for that.

Regards to all.

Terry 

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For newcomers to the hobby, here is a brief description of my favoured technique to fabricate the land surface.  Other methods are available but this works for me.  Apologies if I am 'teaching anyone to suck eggs'.



So, to the 'Glueshell' which gives us our land surface.  Cheap - use old newspapers, pound shop PVA, a cheap brush and a yoghurt pot (or similar) in which to decanter the PVA.  The technique is very simple and requires liberal application of the adhesive.  Tear the newspaper into small pieces beforehand.   Liberally coat the cereal packet lattice work with adhesive and push a newspaper piece thereon.  Coat the newspaper with more adhesive as soon as it is applied. Add the next piece of newspaper alongside the first, but overlapping.  Carry on until the whole lattice work is covered.  Now add a second and even a third layer of newspaper, applying lots of adhesive as you proceed.  Leave to dry and you will have a light, firm shell onto which the ground cover, grass, foliage, etc., may be applied.



A couple of photos to show the technique in action...





Right...back to the shed to carry on.


Terry

Last edited on Sun Feb 2nd, 2020 03:33 pm by col.stephens

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The terrain is definitely taking shape.  This is a quick way of making the landscape and I hope to finish off later this evening.

More soon.

Terry

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Hi Terry,

Old school landscaping, can't beat it. Darn sight cheaper than plaster cloth or HD closed density foam. Eco friendly as well..Good job!

I can still snag large brown paper bags at the local food emporiums for nothing, having taken evening classes in basket weaving I do the same using brown paper strips. Bit more robust than newspapers.

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I use a similar idea but use "J Cloths" soaked in plaster which is, in effect, "mod rock".  The plaster is cheap as are the "J cloths" - can't remember what the rest of the world calls a "J cloth" …………………. :sad:

The main advantage is that it dries much faster than "papier maché".

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Even strips of paper towel laid over the card strips & painted with watery PVA sets hard as well.

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Thank you all. Some interesting suggestions there.

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Work last night involved filling in screw holes on the baseboard surface with ready mixed plaster.  I continued the landscaping along the front of the layout in order to put some colour at the front of the layout and to frame the scene.  Of course, there will be grass/weeds/bushes on this low embankment...

More soon.



Terry

Last edited on Tue Feb 4th, 2020 06:12 pm by col.stephens

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Whilst sheltering from the recent winter storm here and not wishing to get soaked to the skin on venturing down to the shed, I decided to stay indoors and get on with one of the buildings. The goods yard will have a coal merchant's office, so why look further than the Scalescenes' model?  I paid for the model some time back but it is now offered as a free download, so no excuse for you not to give it a go.

Here is the completed building in cruel close-up.  Added features: plastic downpipes, cast metal chimney and a track pin door knob. Two pieces of metal rod have been glued to the rear of the roof sign, which pass through corresponding holes in the roof, thus giving a more secure fixing than simply gluing the sign to the roof as advised in the instructions. 


Since the last post, the embankment at the front of the layout has been completed.  Next job is to give all of the landform a coat of paint.

More soon,

Terry

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Looks good, Terry. Well done

Did you make the brackets for the downpipes.

Cheers
Evan

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Hello Evan.  Thank you for your kind comments.
The kit has the brackets printed thereon, but I positioned the plastic downpipe over the join between the side and end walls.  This resulted in one side of the downpipe having no printed bracket showing.  Therefore, I touched it in with a black pen, so you are actually looking at half a printed bracket and half inked in. 
Regards,
Terry

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The landform was painted today.  A couple of pictures to show the progress...



Terry

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I'm waiting to see the local lads race their bikes down the gradient from the bridge.... and come a cropper !

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Never mind the local lads, you wait until you see the signalman descend the bank when he's late for work!



In reality the railway company would not have built the bridge over the line. Being a terminus they would simply build a road, on the level, beyond the buffer stops.

But this layout is entitled 'the art of compromise' and one needs a visual break for the fiddle yard.
 



Regards





Terry

Last edited on Fri Feb 14th, 2020 05:19 pm by col.stephens

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Today I decided to make a start on the flora and fauna.  Static grass is my preferred method and the initial covering was completed in a very short time.  Here is my weapon of choice...


Used for the first time today and very pleased with the result.

The fibres are Summer Mix from WWS.  Here is a link to their website.  Usual disclaimer applies.

https://www.wwscenics.com/

I am currently doing a bit of research to identify a small LBSCR signal box to adorn the end of the platform above, or the area of ground just beyond the platform end.  I also have to squeeze in a water tank and the starter signal.

More soon.

Terry

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Looking good Terry

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Thanks Barry.


Last night I decided to add some ground foam to represent weeds along the bottom of the bridge wing walls.  This has the added bonus of covering any gap between wall and baseboard.

Similarly, the foam was glue along the base of the platform.

Currently I am in the process of covering the embankments with a second layer of longer (6mm) grass.  I have also taken delivery of a Peco water tank which will be placed between the platform end and the signal.  Also arrived in the post yesterday was a Wills' yard crane which will sit somewhere near the goods shed, exact location to be decided.

More soon.




Terry













Last edited on Sat Feb 22nd, 2020 10:22 pm by col.stephens

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I notice you kept ballast away from the platform wall sides. here in South Australia ( https://www.pinterest.com.au/pin/302093087477536632/ ) , ballast is right up to sides.

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Hello Ron.  It's much the same here in the UK.  However, I have previously had a problem, when ballasting the track, with the pva wicking up the front of the Scalescenes' platform and ruining same, despite varnish having been applied. I do intend fitting point rodding between the ballast and the platform, so hopefully that might distract the eye. I must admit that it would look better with the ballast right up to the platform. Has anyone any idea how this might be achieved without ruining the front of the platform? Would superglue work?

Regards,
Terry

Last edited on Sun Feb 23rd, 2020 10:29 pm by col.stephens

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I will say I had no problems with any Scalescenes papers wicking up as I had given them a few varnish coats before I applied the papers & after all finished.

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Hi Terry, use a thin layer of neat pva between the ballast already down and the platform and sprinkle the ballast on.

Like Sol, I didn't have a problem when I did mine.

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Thanks Nick, good idea.
Does anything scream Southern as much as this?  Ratio SR concrete hut.  Just a bit of weathering required methinks.

More soon.


Terry


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The Dapol starter signal was installed. Beautiful model and easy to install.  However, during operation a loud screeching nose was heard.  This was alleviated by loosening the plastic nut which held the signal in place beneath the baseboard.  I wondered if it was possible to reduce the noise even more by inserting a soft washer between the plastic nut and the underside of the baseboard.  I found these in a drawer in the shed...


I cut a large hole in the centre of one of the smaller pads and inserted it in place. 

Quite honestly, I'm not sure that it make any difference but I'll give it the benefit of the doubt and leave it in place anyway.

Terry

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I assumed that the Dapol signal would take its power from the Gaugemaster 100M controller.  Wrong!  I was confused when reading the signal installation notes that it had to be operated from a 'smoothed 'power supply.  Didn't have a clue what this meant so I emailed Gaugemaster who quickly replied with a link to the appropriate plug type transformer which they sell and is suitable.  I wired up the signal and the aspect lamp came on.  On pressing the push button switch - nothing!  It transpired that the push button switch on the control panel was faulty.  I binned it and quickly wired in another.  Here is the signal installed and working.


Terry

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Time to improve the grass embankments which looked neater and better cared for than my front lawn!  I teased out some foliage mat, in this case manufactured by WWS, other makes are available.  Using cheap extra hold hairspray, I sprayed the grassy areas and pushed the foliage mat into place.  A light sprinkle with red and white ground foam to represent poppies and daises, followed by another spray and all was done.  Here's the result


Doesn't look too bad, does it?

More soon.

Terry

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That definitely looks far more natural, good call.

D

Last edited on Sat Mar 21st, 2020 05:41 pm by Chubber

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col.stephens wrote: Hello Evan.  Thank you for your kind comments.
The kit has the brackets printed thereon, but I positioned the plastic downpipe over the join between the side and end walls.  This resulted in one side of the downpipe having no printed bracket showing.  Therefore, I touched it in with a black pen, so you are actually looking at half a printed bracket and half inked in. 
Regards,
Terry

Did you have to make any adjustments to the length of the roof components? [See my recent weighbridge/bothy post]

D

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col.stephens wrote: Hello Ron.  It's much the same here in the UK.  However, I have previously had a problem, when ballasting the track, with the pva wicking up the front of the Scalescenes' platform and ruining same,...

Regards,
Terry

Spray shoe/suede protector seems to stop that, and dries matt.

D

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Hello Doug.  Re the small building above and your query, I have added a post to your weighbridge/bothy thread.
Thanks for your kind comments and the tip regarding the waterproofing spray.


Best wishes.


Terry

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Problem? S'no problem...

D

Last edited on Sun Mar 22nd, 2020 08:16 pm by Chubber

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With reference to the Southern Railway concrete lineside hut, as shown in the 159th post in this thread.  On reflection I decided that the colour, although attractive, would not fit very well with the rather muted colours already used on the other structures.  Accordingly, I decided to give the hut a repaint and finally arrived at the right shade on the third coat!

This is roughly where the hut will be fixed to the baseboard...

Terry

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My thoughts are now turning to the lineside fencing.  I recently acquired a couple of packets of these rather nice fence posts from Scale Model Scenery...


To save time, I shall paint them a dark brown colour whilst they are still on the sprue.  I think it's amazing that the holes are so accurately positioned.  These are far superior to some of the plastic varieties which I have previously used.

More soon.

Terry

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Hi Terry,

Looks laser cut. Nice holes. How thin are they?

Nigel

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Terry, have you considered giving them a simple wash over with diluted Indian ink/smashed up black cartridge, [empty of course]. They look nice and fine, be a pity to bung up the holes etc with paint...

Douglas

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Nigel, the posts are 2mm square.

Doug. Good idea, thanks.  I have already given them a couple of thin washes of diluted brown/grey mix of acrylic paint. I blew hard on them which cleared any paint from the holes.


Regards to all.


Terry

Last edited on Mon Mar 23rd, 2020 10:14 pm by col.stephens

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Hi Terry,

I checked the website, they have proper 7 hole GWR ones. After drilling countless holes on 40 feet of posts a few years ago this looks to be a great improvement.

Re Douglas' comment: India Ink comes in all sorts of colors. Sleeper grey should be appropriate.

Nigel

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Thank you Nigel.



Last night I turned my attention to finding a suitable goods shed for the layout.
As Scalescenes' small station building is being used and the layout is quite small, I don't want a large goods shed which will dominate the scene and make it look unbalanced.  I also want a building which has character and is not the usual block with office attached.  Whilst perusing some old books I came across this drawing from 1955...


That will do very nicely, thank you.  Now, do I make it a brick built model to reflect the station building, or should it be of lighter construction such as clapboard?  Decisions, decisions!

Today's quiz:  name the author and the book from whence the drawing came.

More soon.

Terry




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Nice shed Terry. :thumbs

I wonder if it was a later addition to the station, in which case, it could have been a clapboard construction.  If it was built at the same time, I suspect they'd have used the same materials, i.e. brick ............

Re the author - my guess is it's not Joh n Ahearn - too "architect-like" and could the publication have been Railway Modeller ?  They reproduced many drawings like that ................

In other words, I've no idea ................. :roll:

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Hi Terry,

The shed at Lambourn is a nice small one. http://yourmodelrailway.net/view_topic.php?id=12190&forum_id=14#p213996






Currently on the British Model Railway Club of Montréal layout. Smaller than the one you have, and a prototype.

Nigel

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Hi Terry,

One suggestion for that signal in front of the bridge. Red on red is not good, a white painted rectangle on the brick behind the signal arm would be something different and prototypical.

Nigel

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Hello Peter.  Thank you for your thoughts on the construction materials.  Makes sense.  Unfortunately, you are wrong about the publication, and it wasn't John Ahern.


Nigel.  Very nice goods shed.  Thanks for posting the photos.   Interesting suggestion re the signal.  Something to bear in mind when I get down to fine detailing.


Best wishes.


Terry

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Re the fence posts shown in the 169th post.  On reading the instructions I find that the posts have to be spaced at 24mm (6ft in 4mm scale) and 2mm diameter holes have to be drilled in which to fit them.  Enter the patented col.stephens' fence post measurer and hole jig!  Simply hold the arrow against a previously fitted post, using the pre-drilled holes as a guide, drill four holes into the baseboard/scenery, remove the jig, glue in the posts and start again. 


More soon,

Terry

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Peco's water tank appeared to be just what was required to fit between the platform end and the starter signal.  I found it to be a nice model and simple to put together. Unfortunately, the external fittings such as the ladder are made from a soft springy polythene type of plastic.  I found it very difficult to cut flash away from the ladder rungs, it being almost impossible to get a sharp edge to the plastic. I suspect that the fittings are made from this springy plastic to prevent them from being damaged by rough handling.  Nevertheless, the kit made up into a fine model.  I gave the model a spray of Halford's grey primer, followed by a wash of runny brown acrylic paint.  This was followed by a light dusting of 'rust' weathering powder on the main tank.  The top of the tank is modelled to represent a planked cover.  I painted this with white acrylic with a hint of brown, followed by three washes of very watery brown to represent old wood. Here is the model ready to be fixed in situ...

More soon.

Terry

Last edited on Wed Mar 25th, 2020 10:27 pm by col.stephens

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Terry

Its all looking wonderful and very much respectful of the original plan.

I would guess that your Goods Shed comes from Edward Beal.  I have a number of his books, written in a wonderful style that just oozes the 1940's and 50's.  If its not him or Ahern the perhaps a very early Freezer???

Barry

Last edited on Mon Mar 30th, 2020 05:21 pm by Barry Miltenburg

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BCDR wrote: Hi Terry,

I checked the website, they have proper 7 hole GWR ones. After drilling countless holes on 40 feet of posts a few years ago this looks to be a great improvement.

Re Douglas' comment: India Ink comes in all sorts of colors. Sleeper grey should be appropriate.

Nigel

The black dries out to a silvery grey colour if the mix is not too strong, looks like weathered oak. Once dry it has the advantage of being water resistant when splashing round weathering/ballasting etc..

D

Last edited on Thu Mar 26th, 2020 07:21 pm by Chubber

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col.stephens wrote:


Thank you Nigel.

Last night I turned my attention to finding a suitable goods shed for the layout.
As Scalescenes' small station building is being used and the layout is quite small, I don't want a large goods shed which will dominate the scene and make it look unbalanced.  I also want a building which has character and is not the usual block with office attached.  Whilst perusing some old books I came across this drawing from 1955...


That will do very nicely, thank you.  Now, do I make it a brick built model to reflect the station building, or should it be of lighter construction such as clapboard?  Decisions, decisions!

Today's quiz:  name the author and the book from whence the drawing came.

More soon.

Terry




Edward Beal A&C Black Ltd, 4,5, & 6 Soho Square, London W.1. "Modelling the Old-time Railways" Page 113.

One of the harder ones to find in good condition, n'est ce-pas? I too love a good 'peruse'!

D

Last edited on Thu Mar 26th, 2020 07:29 pm by Chubber

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Well done Barry and Doug.  Yes, Edward Beal, 'Modelling the Old Time Railways'.  Wonderful book.  Full of interesting modelling ideas.  I also have his other book, 'Railway Modelling in Miniature'.  Another excellent book full of wonderful drawings.


Regards,


Terry

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Today I fitted the water tank in place by inserting small bolts through the holes in the corners of the base and fixed with small nuts.  The bolts were trimmed and a lick of paint finished the job.  The drain was fabricated from  Sankey Scenics' items.


All that is needed now is some gloss varnish on the ground to represent the water which is always splashed around these areas.

Terry

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"Now, do I make it a brick built model to reflect the station building, or should it be of lighter construction such as clapboard? Decisions, decisions!"

Lambourne had a wooden shed almost identical to that one with a brick built station building. Watlington also had a brick built station building and a largish wooden goods shed, in dark [tarred?] clapboard although it did have an office on one end and one window overlooking the weighbridge plate.

Douglas

Last edited on Thu Mar 26th, 2020 10:03 pm by Chubber

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This is how this little scene is shaping up...


Jobs to do next:  insert the fence posts into the scenery and turn my attention to building the goods shed.


Terry.

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Chubber wrote: "Now, do I make it a brick built model to reflect the station building, or should it be of lighter construction such as clapboard? Decisions, decisions!"



Lambourne had a wooden shed almost identical to that one with a brick built station building. Watlington also had a brick built station building and a largish wooden goods shed, in dark [tarred?] clapboard although it did have an office on one end and one window overlooking the weighbridge plate.



Douglas

Thanks Doug.
Regards,
Terry

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Water tank looks 'the business' Terry :thumbs



Ed

Last edited on Fri Mar 27th, 2020 09:14 am by Ed

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Thanks Ed.  Very kind.
Terry

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I have been pondering over platform fencing.  The various plastic items available always appear to be too thick and chunky.  Step forward Model Railway Scenery who produce a finely finished product, laser cut from .75mm greyboard.  Yes, it's actually cardboard!  My initial surprise was quickly overcome when I assembled the first piece however, as it makes up into a sturdy item.  After all, you are not going to jump on the platform fencing, are you? In the pack you get 120cm of fencing, four ramp sections, and double and single gates.  Excellent value for just over £8 sterling. 






A quick spray of the appropriate colour and we are on our way!


Question?  Would the fencing be fitted with the horizontal rails facing the platform or the other way round?  I must say that the side with the horizontal rails is much more interesting.


Terry

Last edited on Sat Mar 28th, 2020 09:05 am by col.stephens

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Alas Terry, I think the horizontal rails would be on the outside.

Fences were usually erected with the supporting timbers on the opposite side from where the "pressure" was expected.  In this case, people on the platform were the "pressure".

If you look at the miles of post and rail fencing along the railways, the posts were track side because the "pressure" was expected from the "public" side.

Great looking fencing nevertheless, and a reasonanble price too.


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Pictures in these links would suggest Peter is right Terry.

https://www.alamy.com/stock-photo-sign-on-platform-of-bewdley-station-severn-valley-railway-worcestershire-17456902.html

https://www.express.co.uk/news/uk/467788/Britain-s-most-bizarre-train-stations

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-south-scotland-15021934


(Scroll down a bit to second station picture on the second one)


Ed

Last edited on Sat Mar 28th, 2020 10:15 am by Ed

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Alas, I feared that would be the case. Nevermind, the fencing will still look good once it has been painted.

Thanks Peter and Ed.


Terry

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Terry I thought Ratio or Wills did GWR spear fencing?  Not sure if they do slopes or just level bits but I have used it and its very fine and very pretty

Barry

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Thanks Barry.  The fencing shown above fits the bill nicely. It does come with four sloping pieces for platform ends, the angle of which fits the Scalescenes' platform  walls nicely. I am going to paint the fencing today. A quick spray with Halford's white primer and then a topcoat of an appropriate shade of acrylic to represent Southern Railway Light Stone. Time to raid the wife's craft shed!


Terry




Edit.  Well, I braved the snow showers (yes snow) and legged it down to my shed only to find that I hadn't any Halford's white primer.  I must have used it up.  Memo to self:  either send the wife to get some during the current Corona Virus crisis, or, wait until it is all over and go and get it myself!  Fortunately, I have a new spray can of Humbrol light grey, so that did the job instead.  On raiding the wife's shed, under cover of darkness, and rummaging through her collection of acrylic paints, I came across one which was not far off the Southern Railway Light Stone which I was seeking.  I smuggled out this paint together with a tube of white which was knocking about, just to lighten the other slightly. The painted platform fence is now dry and awaiting fixing in place.









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Barry Miltenburg wrote: Terry I thought Ratio or Wills did GWR spear fencing?  Not sure if they do slopes or just level bits but I have used it and its very fine and very pretty

Barry

Your'e right, Barry, this is some Ratio spearpoint in a non-railway setting, sorry it's only a little bit of the picture.
[Back to your thread now, Terry, sorry!]


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I recognise that building ........................ :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

Hope all's well with you and the Boss Doug. :thumbs

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All fine thanks, as I hope it is with you and yours. Oh! Isn't it good of Terry to provide this handy way of keeping in touch!!! :lol: :lol:
D

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One has to do one's bit in these dire times!


Terry

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Houston, we have a problem!  In my ignorance of all things Southern I assumed that Scalescenes' cream clapperboard, as included in the kit, would suffice for the station building, and I made the valance to match.  Yesterday the penny dropped.  Having done a small piece of research and painting the platform fencing a light stone colour, I then discovered that the cream clapperboard of the station building and valance was incorrect.  These too should be finished in the same light stone colour.  Fortunately, I always varnish the finished buildings with a matt varnish to protect the printer inks from moisture.  Accordingly, it was a simple job to give a wash of the light stone without fear of the ink running.  Here's the station building in its new colour...


Tonight I fixed part of the platform fencing in place.  Here it is together with the station building which has not been fixed down as yet...

Finally, here's a general view showing how the scene is coming together...

I'll have to check the angle of the signal.  It appears to be on the lean.

More soon,

Terry

Last edited on Mon Mar 30th, 2020 09:07 pm by col.stephens

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Very nice Terry

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Well rescued Terry and the ensemble looks very much the part, lovely in fact.

Bill

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That's a lovely "cozy" looking station area Terry.  I'd be very happy to wait for the next train there. Is the fire lit in the waiting room ?

p.s. Thanks for allowing Doug and I to exchange greetings over your fence ................... :cheers

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Thank you Barry, Bill and Peter.  I must think about platform seats to makes Peter's wait more comfortable!  Jobs for today: finish the platform fencing, assemble the Dart Castings, SR running  in board (station name board) and give it a lick of concrete coloured paint, assemble the Ratio concrete lamps, and drill holes in the platform for all of these items.
In order to complete the running in board I require a name for the station.  I might resort to the simple option of scouring ex-LBSCR territory in my road atlas, looking for a village name with no known previous railway connection.


More later.


Terry

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The signal was made vertical by slipping  some card under the base.  Strangely, it looks alright in real life but still appears to be leaning in the photos. Must be something to do with the angle from which they are taken.  The remaining fencing was glued in place, including on the station forecourt.

The running in board required a name so having consulted my road atlas, I decided on a name fairly local to my area... Farleigh.  The name was printed off courtesy of Scalescenes' station signs.  The ratio SR concrete platform lamps were then put together.  A fiddly job this but well worth the effort. A couple were enhanced with the addition of bullseye signs, again from Scalescenes.

So, this little scene is gradually coming together...

More soon.

Terry

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Now just to see some rolling stock otherwise I may think it is a deserted station.....

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Luffley work, great to see it 'growing', and not one jarring colour anywhere.

D

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An excellent job and great to see the scene develop and a great job on the valance - I know how tricky that is, even for a short section, so hats off to you!

Michael

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Thank you Doug and Michael.

Ron, I'll find some suitable stock and post a picture.





Over the last couple of days I have been trying to source some appropriate platform benches.  I eventually discovered that Dart Castings sell some etched Southern Railway benches under their Shire Scenes brand. An online order has duly been sent.





Yesterday I decided to extend the grass embankment to cover the grey painted area at the front of the layout.  I'm not really sure why I didn't cover that area earlier.  Anyway, I think the scene looks much more natural now.  Maybe just a bit of tidying up required in one or two places where the grass has encroached upon the ballast.  Compare this photo to the last.

As you can see in the top left-hand corner of the photo above, I also added more grass to the edge of the roadway as it was looking a bit thin.  The excess has been vacuumed off since the photo was taken.


Job for today:  Make a start on the post and wire fencing bordering the roadway. See the 169th and 179th posts to recap.


Memo to self:  Put a few weeds around the building line to hide the very slight gap under the station building.




More soon.



Terry

Last edited on Sat Apr 4th, 2020 08:36 am by col.stephens

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That looks much better with the grass rather than the grey Terry.  You'd often see scrubby looking unkempt grassland right up to the trackside.  All it needs now sadly, is some litter strewn amongst it ................................

A great scene you have there. :thumbs

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Thanks Peter. 
Litter.  Now that's an idea, although the layout is set in the 1930's, long before the me, myself, I era of today.


Regards,


Terry

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Terry

Its about time the Terrier had a trip to the terminus methinks

Barry

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Barry, I'll see if the Terrier can pay a visit tomorrow.



Today the contractors moved in to start the roadside fencing.  My fencing jig, previously shown, worked a treat.  I was able to drill all the holes required, correctly spaced, within five minutes.  There's something quite satisfying about dabbing a blob of glue on the bottom of the post and plonking it in a hole.  Each post has a laser cut line to show the depth of planting.


The Model Railway Scenery fencing really is an excellent product. The wire supplied is very fine and passes through the laser cut holes quite easily.  When finished, the wire will require a lick of paint to remove the bright silver finish.


More soon.

Terry

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Might you consider running the wire over the tip of a suitable permenent marker?

D

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That's a good idea Doug.  However, I have already been at work with the paintbrush. I am only painting the side viewable from the front of the layout.


Regards,


Terry

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By public demand...


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:thumbs :thumbs :thumbs


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col.stephens wrote:



By public demand...




Not "public demand" !!!  I'd never, ever ask to see something that doesn't say either LNER or LMS on the side.................. :Red Card :Red Card :Red Card :mutley :mutley

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:It's a no no:It's a no no:It's a no no

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Terry

Notwithstanding the colour of the Terrier, I like it!!

Barry

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I have no problem with the Company name or colours but those huge couplings spoil it IMO.

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This morning I gave the fence wire a lick of brown paint and added a dab of brown/grey paint to the posts to lighten them slightly.  I'm quite taken with this product from Model Railway Scenery and will definitely use it in future.


Today's post brought the SR platform seats from Shire Scenes as sold by Dart Castings.  They are on an etched brass fret(three seats) together with four handcarts and barrows.  As you would expect the seats are quite fiddly but with patience and a blob of superglue applied with a cocktail stick, they make up into fine models.  I thought that a little styrene jig might help the proceedings along a bit.

One more seat to make for this particular station.

Terry

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The fencing does look good Terry - how did you keep the wire taught enough whilst the glue set ?

I'd mentioned eyesight on another thread somewhere and my word, it needs to be good for the benches !!  Having said that, they look much better than the "soft" plastic offerings one sees on many layouts.  One concern - will the brass look a little thin or does it look "solid" enough ?  I'm thinking especially about the framework which would have been cast I'd imagine.

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Hello Peter. The wire is quite stiff so doesn't sag. It was a fairly easy, if time consuming, job to thread it through the holes in the posts with a pair of long nosed pliers. Once threaded, a cocktail stick was used to drop super glue on some of  the points of contact between posts and wire. Lastly, the wire was trimmed at the end posts.The seats look very delicate but with a couple of coats of paint I think that they will look the part.   Certainly better than some on the market, such as this monstrosity...






Regards,


Terry












Last edited on Wed Apr 8th, 2020 07:54 am by col.stephens

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Thanks Terry.

Those seats look excellent - much "meatier" than they appeared in the raw brass state.  :thumbs

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:lol::lol:

Here's the real one...

Terry


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That's very much, ''That'll do nicely sir!''

Bill :thumbs

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Thank you Bill, very kind of you.

Presently, I am painting some Peco bufferstops retrieved from my previously abandoned project.  After that I really can't avoid it any longer, I must make a start on scratchbuilding the goods shed!


Best wishes,


Terry

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Petermac wrote: col.stephens wrote:



By public demand...


Not "public demand" !!!  I'd never, ever ask to see something that doesn't say either LNER or LMS on the side.................. :Red Card :Red Card :Red Card :mutley :mutley
"would I ever want to detract from anything GWR" ('E sed it).


Whether by design or accident, a great looking photo on a misty morning.

Nigel

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Thank you Nigel.  It won't be so misty when I get the backscene fitted!


Regards,


Terry

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Don't you just love the Southern Railway?  Most other companies were quite content to paint their buffer stops red.  But with no thought for the poor 4mm scale modellers who would follow, the Southern decided to paint their buffer stops white with a red stripe along the centre.  Thanks for that!  No matter how steady your hand with a paint brush, the red stripe is never going to look right, is it?  Right, no point in prevaricating.  I painted the faces of the Peco buffer stops with white acrylic paint purloined from the wife's crafting shed, whilst she was busy social distancing in the long queue for Waitrose.  While I was there, I pinched her red paint too!  It's seven paces from the back door to the wife's shed, so that's my daily exercise completed too!  I had a rummage around near our computer and found a pack of self-adhesive address labels intended to go into the printer.  Here's the plan:  paint one of the labels red, slice off a thin strip with the scalpel, and stick to the centre of the  white buffer face.  Well, it was three separate strips actually, plus touching up the corners and ends with red  paint.


Ready for weathering and planting on the layout...

Terry

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Hi Terry,

Well I never knew that the Southern Railway painted their buffer stops in a two tone scheme. Well done SR, as it looks really cool. I wonder if the others just copied the GWR?

You're a brave man though Terry, for raiding the wife's shed. Fortunately, what she doesn't know can't kill you!

Best,

Bill


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I told you to model LNER ..................... :roll: :cheers

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Petermac wrote: I told you to model LNER ..................... :roll: :cheers

I found a foreigner in the bottom of a storage box yesterday Peter. It had tried copying GWR colours, but despite that, it's a pretty little thing this J72. Not sure how it got there though, have you lost one perchance?

The box says it's a mainline loco, but frankly it should never leave the branch, probably confined to the yard :hmm

Sorry for the slight hijack Terry

Take care,

Bill


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Ah ha - the J72 Bill - that well known wolf in sheep's clothing ...................


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I seem to remember that the Mainline J72 was a nice model for its time.  It would probably still hold its own against some of today's offerings.  Shame it was owned by the LNER!

Anyway, here are two of the three buffer stops in situ on the, as yet, undeveloped goods yard end of the layout.


Regards to all,

Terry

Last edited on Thu Apr 9th, 2020 09:00 pm by col.stephens

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They look the bees knees Terry.

What did you use for the weathering ?

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Terry, I'm also interested in a similar goods shed to that shown in the Beale book, building and siting one will determine the layout of the rest of the terminus area.

Here is a link to the Lambourne shed,

http://lambournvalleyrailway.info/stations+crossings/lambourn/lambourn-3.htm

I'm imagining something in between the two. Any thoughts? As I'm now in 1950 I wonder if the GWR colours applied or whether the Station Master at Ursa was a progressive sort who insisted on adopting the new BR Western Region colours of chocolate and cream? [If that's right for non-passenger buildings..]

Of note, in the link picture of the loading bank are the two 'portable' fence sections, obviously to make loading arrangements more flexible, I've never seen them modelled...

D

Last edited on Thu Apr 9th, 2020 09:29 pm by Chubber

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Amazing how many people can't spell Lambourn correctly ;-)

Looking forward to seeing how two excellent modellers face off against each other in the Goods Shed Challenge :lol:

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col.stephens wrote:

I seem to remember that the Mainline J72 was a nice model for its time.  It would probably still hold its own against some of today's offerings.  Shame it was owned by the LNER!

Anyway, here are two of the three buffer stops in situ on the, as yet, undeveloped goods yard end of the layout.



Regards to all,

Terry


Super!!

Michael

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Thank you all.



Peter.  The weathering is a mix of grey and brown acrylic paint dry brushed with a large brush.  I was using the paint to cover parts of the goods yard surface and thought I would ' kill two birds with one stone'.  I am trying to restrict myself to a limited palette to give the layout some visual cohesion.



Doug.  Thanks for posting the link to Lambourn.  It looks to me that Beale may well have based his drawing on this goods shed.  Does the same style of shed appear elsewhere on the GW system?  Interestingly, in the book he doesn't attribute the drawing to any particular railway company, which gives the impression that he has made freelance changes, such as three doors on the trackside elevation.  Most other drawings in the book are attributed to particular locations. 

In order to give some visual cohesion with the station building at the other end of the layout, I am toying with the idea of making a brick plinth from ground level up to the bottom of the loading doors, and using clapperboard for the rest of the building. This might give the impression visually of reducing the height of the building.  I don't want the goods shed to dominate the layout.



Regarding the paint schemes. Referring to my copy of 'Station Colours' by Peter Smith (available on Amazon), he states that 'some wooden goods sheds were not painted' (which infers that others were painted), 'but the wood was finished with a preservative such as creosote which gave a black shade when newly applied, which weathered to a mid-grey over time.  Doors and windows, etc., were still painted in the usual way.' Apparently, interior walls were painted white.  Generally, the GW used two shades of stone colour, available from Precision paints as P21 GWR Light Stone and P22 GWR Dark Stone.  As you rightly say, cream and brown for BR Western Region although no particular reference to goods sheds is made in the book.  Apparently, this paint scheme may well have been started by the GW in 1947 and possibly was just continued by BR.  The new colour scheme quickly spread and few stations survived in GW colours beyond the mid-1950's.  I hope this helps in some way.

Regarding the portable fences shown in the photos of Lambourn shed.  As the picture is taken from within the cattle dock, I assume that the fences are for use in loading/unloading the livestock vehicles.  Like you I have never seen this feature modelled.  One for the memory banks.



Nick.  Thanks for the compliment but I would never presume to challenge 'The Master'.



Best wishes to all.



Terry

Last edited on Fri Apr 10th, 2020 08:10 am by col.stephens

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"Beale may well have based his drawing on this goods shed.  Does the same style of shed appear elsewhere on the GW system?"


That's a question I'll have to look at, get all the branch line books out again!






"...finished with a preservative such as creosote which gave a black shade when newly applied, which weathered to a mid-grey over time..."


That seems to point towards Scalescenes TX35 PLain Clapboard as an excellent choice, with, say cream windows and brown doors. Thanks for that info.

Douglas

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Hi Terry,

Lambourn goods shed is not a GWR design. It was the original built by the LVR in 1898. I used the plans in Great Western Branch Line Termini when I built a model of it. The canopy arch on the track side has the dimensions of a loading gauge apparently. 

Nigel

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It's to be hoped any goods in the goods shed was well packaged if the cladding was treated with creosote. 

It has a fabulous smell but taints everything within smelling distance ..................in spite of that, it's probably the best wood preservative known to man - and as such, they ban it !!!!  :twisted:

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Thanks Nigel.  I hope Doug isn't spending hours looking through his books for the answer!


Peter, rather like removing the lead from solder.


Regards,


Terry

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col.stephens wrote: ............................................................


Peter, rather like removing the lead from solder

Absolutely Terry.  If they got rid of humans, nothing would be dangerous anymore...........................

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col.stephens wrote: Thanks Nigel.  I hope Doug isn't spending hours looking through his books for the answer!


Peter, rather like removing the lead from solder.


Regards,


Terry

No problem, Terry, Paul Karau's excellent branch lines book gave me the answer yesterday. Lambourne Valley Railway. But why can't a shed designed by the same team exist elsewhere? [IMMR}

Doug

Last edited on Sat Apr 11th, 2020 06:31 pm by Chubber

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pnwood wrote: Amazing how many people can't spell Lambourn correctly ;-)

Looking forward to seeing how two excellent modellers face off against each other in the Goods Shed Challenge :lol:

Sorry Woodye, I missed this...

D

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Chubber wrote: pnwood wrote: Amazing how many people can't spell Lambourn correctly ;-)

Looking forward to seeing how two excellent modellers face off against each other in the Goods Shed Challenge :lol:

Sorry Woodye, I missed this...

D
So did I. Of course, if the shed at Lambourne , Essex, is being modeled...If it's a shed at a halt, should that be halte? I used to live at 32 The Bourne, so I always throw in an e just to be sure. You never know.

Nigel

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Hi Terry,

Further to our emails, herewith the relevant pages from 'Modellers' Guide to the GWR'

Reproduced by kind permission of SLP and Trevor Booth.













They do seem to offer a compact solution to goods handling for compact layouts, making the point that a station might have started with a small building such as that in the lower half of the upper picture, and a 'store' added later. A nice bit of variety. I think I would have the goods shed on a two-three brick [or stone] plinth if I wanted to tie it in a little with other buildings.

The wooden trestle supports look like a good exercise in matchstick modelling.....

Doug

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Very interesting buildings.  Thanks for posting Doug.




Re the Edward Beale drawing.  I notice that in the text he says that the drawing 'is an actual instance' so maybe it's not based on Lambourn as it has three doors trackside as opposed to Lambourn's one door, and a small exterior platform.




Best wishes,





Terry




















Last edited on Sun Apr 12th, 2020 12:10 pm by col.stephens

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I don't know whether to go for a 'shrunk' Beale or an 'expanded' Lambourn [no 'e'] each either with or without a Pain's barn shed......

I think more red laughing water is needed.

D

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Look here....

http://www.cornwallrailwaysociety.org.uk/uploads/7/6/8/3/7683812/lyme-regis-1961-copyirght-steve-richards-copy_orig.jpg

http://www.disused-stations.org.uk/l/lyme_regis/lyme(1903)regis60.jpg

Interesting?


D

Last edited on Sun Apr 12th, 2020 12:46 pm by Chubber

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...and there is more...

http://www.disused-stations.org.uk/l/lyme_regis/lyme%20regis_phill_tatt(8.1963)8.jpg



Doug

Perhaps we ought to delete this one [the photo] as I don't know the copyright status...

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Most of not all small goods shed (and this applies to engine sheds and signal cabins) on branch lines that we consider as "GWR" are not. They were built by whatever underfunded company was responsible for being foolish enough to get a government charter in the hope they would be bought out by the GWR for a profit. Hence the wide variety of sheds. The bigger mergers and takeovers of mainline companies also resulted in new styles coming in.

Perusing Great Western Branch Line Termini (volumes 1 or 2) reinforces this. The only real standards were those set by Brunel. My "line", the BCDR, had at least 4 different styles, depending on who built what, where, and when. The section from Banbury to Hook Norton had identical designs, Chipping Norton was different, being built by another company, Kingham didn't have one (it had an extensive goods platform), onward to Cheltenham there were another 2 different styles. The Fairford Branch Line, originally the EGR, was built in 2 sections by different contractors at different times. The engine shed at Fairford was however a Brunel designed wood affair, brought in from elsewhere following the gauge change.


The GWR was collecting branchlines for less than 50% of the original cost of building them in the latter half of the 19th century (as many as 6-11 a year), the only thing common after that was the paint.


Nigel

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Chubber wrote: ...and there is more...

http://www.disused-stations.org.uk/l/lyme_regis/lyme%20regis_phill_tatt(8.1963)8.jpg



Doug

Perhaps we ought to delete this one [the photo] as I don't know the copyright status...

If you have done your best effort, acknowledged where it same from,  and it is in the interests of research and education, you should be OK.

Nigel

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I have used such information as is available [I work on the principle that if someone wants to be asked for permissions, then they should provide a path therefore...] as I did many years ago for the permissions I have from the inheritors of JS Ahern's rights,[Two years research]  WB McKay [building construction] etc, but with this last picture, the path ends in a 404, so I am content to post it.

There is an accepted line of thought amongst practitioners of copyright law [an ex member here was one such, we corresponded severally and often] that if small parts of a work were used [a stated case involved three sentences from a paragraph of nine sentences] then as long as the copyright holder loses no  credibility and ? and ? (I forget the details) and the publisher seeks nor seeks to receive a  pecuniary advantage then no injury exists.

So, it all comes down to the decision of the person who will ultimately get it in the neck if  Messrs Hackem, Choke and Strangle LLB Calcutta [Failed] have a hissy fit, i.e. Spurno, and to him I leave the final word. Olé!

Poop-poop!

Cor, what a waste of electrons..

Douglas

Last edited on Sun Apr 12th, 2020 04:02 pm by Chubber

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Doug, that last coloured picture of Lyme Regis goods shed also shows the signal box.  In a mad moment I made a 2mm scale version from styrene sheet when I was dabbling with 2mm Fine Scale.  I wanted to see if it was possible to use the same construction methods as 7mm scale from which I had just departed.  If I can find it I'll post a picture or two if anyone is interested in seeing it.  It has nothing to do with this thread, other than being on the Southern.


Regards,


Terry

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Here we are.  Lyme Regis signalbox in 2mm scale scratchbuilt from styrene. Length across roof= 36mm, Depth of roof= 28mm,  Height from base to top of chimney= 33.5mm.  Enjoy!


Regards to all.

Terry

Last edited on Mon Apr 13th, 2020 08:34 am by col.stephens

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Not even an inch and a half tall Terry and you've also fitted out the interior.

Does the clock work by chance?

Impressive, including your eyesight!

Bill




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Blimey! That's impressive, I didn't know that you were a watchmaker in a previous life....

D

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Someone is a masochist then ! Bl@@dy well done Terry.

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Thank you all.  Having made it I decided that the jump from 7mm to 2mm was just too much to get my head around so I settled on 4mm instead.  I'm still quite fascinated by the miniature size of 2mm scale and still have some items.  Maybe I should start a 2mm scale 'lockdown' project.


Regards,


Terry

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Hhm...he's planning something, I just know it.....

D

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Quick update on the layout.  As the weather has been exceptionally warm and sunny for this time of year, I have spent a lot of time on gardening duties.  However, a start has been made on the goods shed.  I usually construct my buildings so that they are complete from whichever side is viewed.  However, in order to speed up construction, and as the rear of this building will not be seen when in place on the layout, I decided not to include any detail which will not be seen. 

Here is the progress so far.  The upper part of the building is not yet fixed to the base.


More soon.

Terry

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I just knew he was up to something!!

D

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Chubber wrote: ...and there is more...

http://www.disused-stations.org.uk/l/lyme_regis/lyme%20regis_phill_tatt(8.1963)8.jpg



Doug

Perhaps we ought to delete this one [the photo] as I don't know the copyright status...


https://www.flickr.com/photos/96859208@N07/16484369185/in/dateposted/

Try this one Doug, can be suitably credited   Oh and this KDH Archive is a veritable goldmine, hours of browsing through almost 100 pages of old photos

Cheers

Matt


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Some brilliant photos on there Matt - I could grow a beard browsing that site !!!

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I've got the dratted beard, and still got very little modelling done thanks to a certain 'linkmaster'....

Douglas

Last edited on Wed Apr 29th, 2020 11:53 am by Chubber

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:mutley

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Quick update.  Work on the goods shed is slowly progressing.  The upper part has been fixed to the brick base and all doors have been fitted...

There are six doors on the front (railside) and this next photo shows how I cheated with the four centre doors, making each pair from one piece of card...

Interior roof detail has been added.  The roof trusses were printed from Scalescenes' Single Road Engine Shed, modified to fit the goods shed...

Windows were made by the self-adhesive label technique, which I think was described elsewhere on YMRC by Chubber…

The roof has been fitted and this is where we are currently...

Next job is to add slates to the roof.

Terry

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Very smart.  I love the doors.  I've never been able to do windows that way - very impressed!
Michael

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A good sturdy looking building there Terry.  At first, because it's so perfect, I thought it was a computer generated image.  My right-angles are usually an approximation and verticals allow for the prevailing wind ......................... :roll:

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Thank you both, very kind.



'Lockdown' gardening is currently getting in the way of progress, plus I have been asked to conduct a 'Buildings Masterclass' via Zoom for my fellow model railway club members.



When this current pandemic is over I will give serious thought to retiring in order to catch-up with all of my modelling commitments.



Regards to all.



Live long and prosper.



Terry





Last edited on Thu May 7th, 2020 09:30 am by col.stephens

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Update on the goods shed.

It's not quite finished yet but a good proportion of the work has been completed. I pondered over the wooden brackets supporting the awning, not really wanting to revert to using plastic if possible. How to cut thin strips of card without it delaminating and ensuring it was firm enough to hold the shape of the bracket? Then I remembered Doug's (Chubber) tip about applying superglue to harden the card when making chimney stacks.


Once painted and glued in place they really look the part. Here is the building as it currently stands...

More soon.

Terry

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Luffley!!

D

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That looks great Terry - and really strong too.  :thumbs

Interesting tip about toughening card with CA.  ;-)

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Thank you Doug and Peter.


Terry

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Way back in the 64th post I said that I had produced an extra wing wall for the fiddle-yard side of the bridge.  My intention was to give the impression, when viewing the bridge from the scenic section, that the scenery continued on the other side.  This was knocked-up last night and finished off today with grass, etc…


It can be removed when transporting the layout.  This is how it looks when in position in the fiddle yard...

And this is the illusion created from the scenic side of the bridge...

Terry

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The awning is super and I am impressed that you have stuck to card throughout the build.
The bridge scene is great too, all very realistic.

Michael

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Thank you very much Michael.

Regards,


Terry

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Back to the goods shed. The wooden platform on the rail side was fabricated from a strip of 1mm greyboard covered in Scalescenes' clapboard to match the floor of the shed.  The supporting wooden posts were cut from mountboard and coated with superglue to harden them before painting.  They were glued in place and aligned by eye.

 Problem requiring a solution:  how to represent the open wooden steps at each end of the wooden platform?  I required some thin (but not too thin) card.  A discarded tissue box was ideal.  Firstly, I took some measurements from the model to work out the length and width and to establish the correct angle of the stairs.  The measurements were transferred to the card and a simple diagram was drawn.  A strip of the card was cut off and from this two sides and five steps were cut.  The sides were offered up to the diagram and the angle of the steps marked thereon.  The procedure was repeated for the second set of steps.

One end of each step was glued to one side on each pencil line and levelled-up by eye.  When dry, the other side was glued in place.  Once the second side was firmly attached the whole staircase was given a light covering of superglue, using a cocktail stick.  This was to harden the card and to firm-up all joints.

Both staircases were given a couple of coats of paint and glued in position on the model.  Job done!

More soon.

Terry

Last edited on Sat May 23rd, 2020 08:22 pm by col.stephens

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Terry - thats a fine bit of modelling

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Excellent result Terry.  :thumbs

The steps are a masterpiece - other then the superglue "tempering", what did you use to stick the card ?

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Thank you Barry and Peter. Very kind of you.

Peter, for card modelling I use a white acrylic adhesive called 'Cosmic Shimmer '. My wife put me onto it. It is much used by the lady crafters when making greetings cards. I like it because it is quite thick and does not run out of control. Also, any excess can easily be removed with a toothpick leaving no residue on the surface of the model.

Regards,

Terry

Last edited on Sat May 23rd, 2020 10:36 pm by col.stephens

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Petermac wrote: Excellent result Terry.  :thumbs

The steps are a masterpiece 

I quite agree, and your simple description of the process belies the skill and patience required.  What could have been a simple little building has turned into a masterclass.  Thank you!

Michael

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Thank you Michael, very kind of you.



Best wishes,



Terry


Last edited on Sun May 24th, 2020 08:32 am by col.stephens

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The grass on the embankment has been extended onto the fiddle-yard board to visually bring the two baseboards together.

The surface of the goods yard has been bugging me for some time.  I had simply painted the baseboard surface and every time I looked at it, I could see the grain of the plywood clearly showing.  This afternoon I decided to do something about it.  I dug out an old tub of pre-mixed plaster filler and applied it to the baseboard, scraping it over the surface to leave a thin coat.  Once dry a quick rub over with sandpaper smoothed out any high spots.  I mixed together some grey and brown acrylic paint and it was a quick job to paint the whole area.  The shade of paint is a tad more brown than the previous coat so it was necessary to touch-up all the grey areas on the whole layout, which actually didn't take very long.  The advantage of a small layout!  The plywood grain has now disappeared and I feel much happier to press on and detail the goods yard end of the layout.  The small areas between the tracks need to be re-grassed to re-establish the colour after receiving a dab of paint.  A quick job for tomorrow.


I really need to finish the goods shed and get it into position in the goods yard.

Terry

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Hi Terry
It's amazing how little things can really bug, but a sense of achievement when we do something about them.  More nice grass work too...

Michael

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Very true Michael.  Seeing the ply grain would have made me wince whenever I looked at it.  I should have sorted it sooner.  Thank you for your kind comment.


Terry

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At long last the goods shed is finished and is ready to go onto the layout. 

Barrels (rear left) by Base Toys, milk churns by Peco, sacks (front left) made from modelling clay, and the packing cases made from mount board.  I'll add some staff at a later date.

And here is some detail added to the layout a few weeks ago...

Terry

Last edited on Tue Jun 23rd, 2020 07:20 pm by col.stephens

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Lovliness Terry!

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I'm in total agreement with Barry and the figures, in due course, will bring the shed to life.
Bill

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The shed looks good but to my eye, the awning is too big - almost looks like the shed could topple over.

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Looking forward to seeing it in place

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Thanks all.  Very kind.

Ron, don't forget that you are looking at a close-up picture with the awning nearest and just a few inches from the lens.

In real life the actual shed appears to be more substantial than the awning.  You will have to pop over to see it!



Best wishes to all,



Terry


Last edited on Wed Jun 24th, 2020 09:24 am by col.stephens

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A picture to illustrate my last point...


More soon.


Terry

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It looks excellent Terry - a very nice bit of modelling you've done.  :thumbs

I do understand what Sol means about it looking too big and yes, to a certain extent, it was down to camera lens distortion.  However, looking at your latest shot illustrating your point, I do wonder if, in real life, there would have been some kind of stay running from near the front edge of the canopy back to somewhere up near the ridge on the roof.  I can't tell what the measurements are but there's an awful lot of weight pulling down on where the canopy is attached to the shed and any supporting beams don't appear to run further than the shed wall so the twisting moments at that point must be enormous...................particularly when covered in a decent layer of snow. :hmm

To me, a metal (plastic) rod at each side taking some of the weight would look great.  :cool wink

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That goods shed is just a superb example of great modelling. Wonderful character, and unique. Amzed at the skill and attention to detail. 
Very nice indeed!

Ian

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Thank you chaps.


Point taken Peter.  However, the model is true to the drawing and Farleigh, like most layouts, is set in perpetual summer so snow won't be a problem! :lol:


Best wishes,


Terry

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Prototypical. Have a look at Lambourn shed.On

Nigel

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Of course, if it were to snow, presumably the whole roof area of the shed would be subject to the same amount of snow, therefore the weight distribution would be the same as if there was no snow, and the stresses would be much the same.
Where are the physicists when you need them?


Terry

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Quick update.  The Goods Shed is now in position on the layout.  A small grassy bank is also in the process of being constructed behind to frame the scene.

I decided that a small signal-box or ground frame is required.  I assume that it should be located somewhere near the bridge end of the layout in order for the imaginary signalman to exchange the imaginary staff or token with the imaginary driver or fireman of all trains arriving or leaving.  A box mounted on the platform would be ideal but is probably out of the question as the platform end near the bridge is already rather crowded.  That leaves the area of ground which is currently occupied by the lineside hut. I am pondering whether to locate the box adjacent to the hut.

:hmm

Whilst perusing my copy of Southern Signals by G.Pryer, I came across a beautiful 'Brighton' ground level signal-box formerly situated at Adversane Crossing, situated between Billingshurst and Pulborough.  In the photo, the signalman is obligingly stood outside the box which gave me a rough idea of the dimensions.  Here's a rather cruel close-up of the box under construction.  The box measures 44mm x 38mm.

If the box is situated adjacent to the lineside hut, the observer will be looking at the plain back of the structure and ends will also be on view.  Sadly, the front will not be seen.

More soon.


Terry

 

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That's a natty looking box Terry.  Still room for a kettle no doubt !

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Definitely Peter!


Terry

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I had an interesting conversation with fellow club members last night on our virtual club meeting.  it was generally felt that the signal box should occupy the position currently occupied by the lineside hut, as shown here...

The hut could be re-located further along the track, assuming it can be prised from the baseboard without damage.  It's glued down with PVA.  I also picked up some useful information regarding point rodding, signal wires, facing point locks and ground signals, all to be put into effect at a later date.

 
More soon.
 
Terry

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The lineside hut, which had been secured to the baseboard with pva, proved surprisingly easy to remove.  I pushed a metal scraper tool under one corner and applied downward pressure which saw the hut suddenly spring off the baseboard and shoot across the layout.  Fortunately it was still in one piece with no damage.  I have had an interesting idea regarding the relocation of the hut, but more on this later.




The signal box is finally finished...



Sadly, the last picture is how the box will be mainly seen as it will sit on the front of the layout, facing the platform opposite.  All of the detail on the front of the box won't be seen.  I was tempted to leave the front without detail but I'm a bit of a sucker as regards signal boxes.  I feel that they are crying out to be super-detailed.  Likewise, I was tempted not to add any interior detail but I realised that it would be patently obvious from the side view.  In any event, I figured that the box might eventually be recycled and pushed into use on a future layout, so it seemed prudent to finish it properly.  All interior detail was made from card except for a row of headless Peco track pins to represent the levers. Interior detail consists of lever frame, shelf with block instruments, etc., Tyer's No.6 Tablet Instrument, desk with Train Register, chair, stove and a clock.  All details derived from the book A Pictorial Record of Southern Signals by G. Pryer (OPC).

Constructional details: 1.5mm thick mount board mainly used, covered in Scalescenes' white clapboard paper, varnished and painted with a self-mixed stone colour in acrylic paint. Roof slates from Scalescenes.  Postcard for barge boards.  Windows made from discarded plastic packaging with thin card frames and self-adhesive label glazing bars. Gutters and downpipes from plastic strip (Evergreen). Fixing brackets on downpipes from self-adhesive label.  The rather fine fire buckets together with supporting brackets come from Dart Castings.  The finials presented me with an interesting problem.  None appeared to be available commercially during the Covid-19 lockdown period, so I resorted to using my mini-drill as a lathe and did a spot of miniature wood turning. They are made from the ends of wooden cocktail sticks, secured in the mini-drill and fashioned with needle files whilst being turned.  Strangely, quite an enjoyable experience.






More soon.



Terry 

Last edited on Wed Jul 15th, 2020 09:41 pm by col.stephens

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Terry

It appears that there is no compromise, just art.  Lovely stuff.

Barry

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Thank you Barry, very kind of you.


Terry

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The completed signal box was taken to the railway shed and placed on the layout.  That's when I noticed that the clapboard colour looked too pale compared to the platform awning and fencing immediately opposite.  A trudge back to the house followed and a quick repaint was undertaken.  A delicate operation considering the amount of green framing on the building, which had to be avoided with the brush.  Back to the shed only to find the colour was still too pale.  Repeated the process once again and satisfied with the result.   Here is the box in position, not fixed down as yet just in case of any slight relocation might be required.

I previously mentioned an idea for the new location of the lineside hut.  I feel that if it is placed alongside the signal box that part of the layout will look a bit cluttered.  My idea is to remove it from the scenic side of the layout altogether and place it in the fiddle yard, just beyond the current small scenic section.  Extra scenery will be added around the hut to blend it in.  It will serve to help block the view into the fiddle yard and will enhance the illusion that the scenery carries on into the distance.  Something like this...

Any views?

Terry

Last edited on Sun Jul 19th, 2020 09:38 am by col.stephens

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The true meaning of "held together by the paint" Terry !!!  :lol: :lol:

It looks great and, as you say, the hut would have resulted in a slightly cluttered look.  What's at the other end of the layout ?  Could it not go there to balance this end ?

It's a lovely little hut so seems a shame to effectively have it "hidden" slightly off stage .................   Having said that, it does look quite good viewed through the bridge and suggests the bridge is not just an "end of layout" effect.

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Thanks for your comments Peter. Here is a picture taken this afternoon showing the other end of the layout...


Neither the  coal office or the coal bins are fixed down as yet.  I am trying to ascertain the best position for both.  Possibly the lineside hut could be positioned to the left of the far point in the run-round loop.  That might require a low retaining wall in the embankment on the left, which might look good.  I have another, as yet unmade, lineside hut which could be positioned in the fiddle-yard.  They came as a pack of two huts.  Good old Ratio!

Terry


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For loco lovers, a couple of visitors at Farleigh this afternoon.

Adams' radial tank 4-4-2 No.3520.  I must admit that this class of loco is my all time favourite.  Victorian splendour!  Model manufactured by Oxford Rail and a lovely runner.  How about a close-up?



Here's the second visitor, ex-LBSCR 0-6-2 E4 class. Beautiful runner. An excellent Bachmann model.

Whilst short wheelbase 0-6-0 Terriers will be the mainstay loco fleet, when planning the layout I was careful to ensure that there was sufficient length at the end of the loco run-round for longer wheelbase tank locos.  Nothing like a bit of variation in the running, is there?



More soon.



Terry

Last edited on Sun Jul 19th, 2020 05:54 pm by col.stephens

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Super Luffley!
Speaking as a pretend signal man on the S.D.R. I'd be pressing the railway for a walkway to get to and from work, and, will there be any token exchange going on?
Those locos are beautiful.
Doug

Last edited on Sun Jul 19th, 2020 07:58 pm by Chubber

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Hello Doug.  I have a sleeper crossing on my 'to do' list to enable the signalman to cross to the platform for the token exchange.


Regards,


Terry

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Noted!D

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Just to keep Doug happy...


Made from three pieces of 1mm thick greyboard, scribed and painted.  Easy-peasy!

Terry


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Huzzah!
D

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Doug, you will be pleased to know that I also have it in mind to construct a small latrine, for the convenience of the signalman!


Terry

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I'm not sure if this building is often modelled, but I caught sight of it in the background of the photograph of Adversane Crossing signal box.  My Lords, Ladies and Gentleman, I give you...the signalman's privy...

As usual, made from mount board (1mm thick), postcard door and corners with a Peco track pin as a door knob.  Scalescenes' papers for the clapboard and slate roof. Painted with thinned acrylics.

Just some slight weathering required using watercolour paints. The base is a square measuring just 24mm.



Terry

Last edited on Sun Aug 2nd, 2020 03:46 pm by col.stephens

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Hi Terry,

It's amazing what one can fit into a square inch and I feel sorry for so many 4mm signalmen who's company directors gave never a thought to their comfort.

Thank goodness you modelled it with the door closed!

Well done,

Bill


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Thank you Bill.


Another item not often modelled is a coal bin for the signalman's stove  Watch this space!


Terry

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Continuing the saga of Farleigh signal box.  I observed this in a photo in the book previously mentioned,  hiding under the stairs of a Southern signal box.  Modelled in card with Scalescenes' clapboard paper.  Measuring just 16mm x 16mm.  Somewhere for the signalman to keep his coal.  Just needs topping-up with coal and a handy shovel nearby.


Terry

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We had a coal bunker just like that in Princetown in the 60s and it was my job to keep the front room scuttle full of coal from it, as the coal fire was the only method we had for hot water and heating in the house. Oh happy days! 

Thanks Terry, a great little model and slice of social history.

Bill

Last edited on Wed Aug 5th, 2020 09:42 am by Longchap

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Thanks Bill.


Terry

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Details of the signal box area...



Terry

Last edited on Tue Aug 11th, 2020 08:33 am by col.stephens

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I finally decided on the positioning of the coal bins and coal office.  The bins are situated as per the original article in the Railway Modeller.  I have moved the coal office forward adjacent to the track from its original position against the backscene.  Models from Scalescenes.  Coal from layers of black carbonaceous rock consisting of layers of partially decomposed vegetation deposited in the Carboniferous period!  Oh yes, and hit hard with a hammer!


 

Terry

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A visitor to Farleigh...


What a beautiful beast?

Terry

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That coal seems very old Terry - was it usedf on a previous layout ?  :lol: :lol:

It looks great - love this shot - very "believable" but, as has been mentioned before, it's a pity we can't see the front of the signal box :



Oh yes, as for the Fairburn (I p[resume it's a Fairburn ...) - brilliant model.  :doublethumb

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Hello Peter.  Yes, I thought long and hard about the front of the signal box not being seen.  Unfortunately, I just couldn't squeeze it in on the other side of the track.

Yes, well done, the loco is a Fairburn tank.  A very nice Bachmann model and a smooth runner.  I didn't realize until I read the back of the box, but some did find their way onto the Southern Region to work on non-electrified lines.  That's useful to know when it comes to 'ringing the changes' during operation  of the layout.


Terry


Last edited on Tue Aug 11th, 2020 09:29 am by col.stephens

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This whole area has turned out looking very lovely.  :pathead

Barry

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Thank you Barry, very kind of you.


Terry

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More detail slowly being added.  This SR loading gauge is constructed from a Ratio kit which I picked up secondhand at a show some time ago.  Best 50p's worth I have had in a long time!


Turning my thoughts to further detailing of the goods yard including yard gates and fencing.  I need some Westinghouse ground signals but am not totally happy with the commercial offerings. 

From what I can see they are either etched brass and too complicated or cast metal and look a bit rough and ready.  I don't intend them to be working models so I might resort to scratchbuilding them from styrene.  Today, I came across some very good drawings of same in 'Southern Signals' by G. Pryer.  A project for a rainy day.

Terry




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I have been intending to extend the small piece of scenery in the fiddle-yard which is supposed to give the impression, when looking under the bridge from the scenic section, that the scenery and track carry on into the distance. I thought that the lineside hut, originally placed where the signal box now resides, would enhance the view under the bridge.  Well,  I finally got around to the job and here it is...

The track ballast was also extended further into the fiddle-yard.




This is the view from the scenic section…

Much better than a view of bare boards, operator's hands, spare stock and tea mugs, don't you think?

Terry

Last edited on Sat Aug 22nd, 2020 06:04 pm by col.stephens

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Time to tart-up the facia...



I am tempted to say that I hand painted this very professional looking lettering, but I didn't.  These are 100mm high self-adhesive vinyl letters, obtained from ebay for just over £6. Delivered in three days!  Applied in about sixty seconds.  When ordering, I typed the eight letters in the correct order - F A R L E I G H - .and they arrived in that format, correctly spaced, sandwiched between two pieces paper.  It was a simple job to remove the backing paper, revealing the sticky backs of the letters, pull the front paper taught, and position the complete word, rub down the letters and gently remove the front paper. A bit like giant Letraset (for the older members present).  I gave the entire facia a coat of matt varnish just to ensure the letters don't peel off at sometime in the future.

Thoughts being turned to a telegraph pole near the signal box with the wires disappearing under the bridge, but that may have to wait until the point rodding and signal wires are installed.

Terry

Last edited on Sat Aug 22nd, 2020 06:05 pm by col.stephens

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Beautifully modelled scene, Terry. Do you have a mirror you could place opposite the box so that we can see a view of it from the platform side?

Doug

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Thank you Doug.  I'll take a photo.


Terry

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One for Doug. Point rodding and signal wires to be installed.


A new addition to the rear of the box.  For use by the S&T staff when climbing the nearby (yet to be installed) telegraph pole.

Terry

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It has been suggested to me that the area around the coal bins in the goods yard looks rather cramped.  Also, small stations didn't always have bins.  Often the coal was just shovelled off the wagon into a heap, awaiting distribution by the new owner.  The absence of coal bins also freed up the siding space for other purposes.  I thought this might make for interesting operation and have been experimenting with removable coal heaps.  The idea is that a wagon, with a removable coal load, is deposited in the siding.  The load is removed using a magnet, and one of the coal heaps is placed in the yard.  The empty wagon is transported away leaving the coal heap.  When this is deemed to have been sold or shipped away, the coal heap is then removed via a magnet.



Take a small piece of mount board and cut to shape for the base. Glue some small balls of screwed up newspaper to the base.  Cover in kitchen roll and soak with the 50/50 pva/water mix used for ballasting the track.  Allow to dry and paint with black acrylic paint.  When dry, coat with pva and sprinkle coal thereon.  When dry, cut a hole in the base and remove some of the paper.  Glue in a steel nut so that it is just below the tissue.  If you are clever and forward thinking, you will cut the hole in the base at the beginning of the process.  I am not clever or forward thinking!
My Lords, Ladies and Gentlemen, I give you...coal heaps...


Off to the bathroom now for a scrub!

Terry

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Great modelling Terry. I have been catching up with your layout thread and the attention to detail throughout is great.:thumbs

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Thanks Kev, very kind of you.


Terry

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col.stephens wrote:



One for Doug. Point rodding and signal wires to be installed.






Luffley! Thank you.

D

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It gets better and better Terry. Great attention to detail ! Doug beat me to it with the mirror suggestion but I wonder if its worth keeping a small one on hand for when you have visitors so they can 'take a peak' 
Cheers

Matt

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Beautiful modelling - very precise and the little details are great - the whole scene is developing very convincingly.  I do like layouts where the modelling has a recognisable style and yours definitely fits that mould.  I love the bicycle too - is that your handiwork too?  (painting rather than making.  If you tell me you made it I'm putting in an order!!)
Michael

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Thanks Matt and Michael.  I have a small mirror doing nothing at present.  Good idea to have it on hand for visitors.  The bicycle is an etched brass kit by Shire Scenes, obtainable from Dart Castings. It comes off the fret as a complete model, just requiring folding to shape.  The pack also includes minute brilliants to represent the front lamp. The pack includes gents' cycles, ladies' cycles and tradesmens' cycles.  Highly recommended by me.  I previously used one from the same pack on Poppy Lane...



Terry

Last edited on Mon Sep 7th, 2020 10:19 am by col.stephens

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Hi Terry.   I am uncertain about point motors/blades insofar as the “Satisfying thud” is noticeable by its absence on my planks, wether that’s good or bad is up to the individual? But I am for the quiet life.

Best wishes Kevin 


The SEEP point motors are installed.  I haven't yet thought about a control panel so operating switches have been temporarily fitted to test the point motors and ensure that trains will run  over all of the trackwork.  Having never used point motors before, I am finding it quite novel to flick the switch and watch the blades spring over with a satisfying thud!

I was quite gleeful when, having wired and fitted the first point motor, it all worked perfectly.  My glee was short lived however, as when testing the second point, the frog was completely dead, causing my test loco to come to a sudden halt.  That particular point had been recovered from my previous layout building effort so I looked at some others from the same source to try to understand why power was not reaching the frog.  I came across this...

The two circular holes in the centre of the picture appear to contain metal contacts to which the thin wire had been previously soldered, thereby providing power to the frog.  The wire obviously has become detached.  I wondered if the same had happened to the point which was not working properly.  I couldn't lift it to look underneath so I decided to take the bull by the horns and solder another wire from the side of one of the rails forming the frog, and connect it to the appropriate terminal at the relevant choc block.  Deep joy!  Power was restored.

The project grinds slowly forward.


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Hello Kevin,

                   Thanks for your post.  I'm glad that you are back to railway modelling after your recent health problems.  I have always used wire in tube or rods for point control and will probably do so again in future for small layouts. However, I still find it strangely satisfying to hear the clunk of the point being thrown at the flick of a switch.  Fitting point motors on Farleigh was a first for me, but I will certainly use them again.  The Dapol signal also adds to the noise with its loud, whining motor.  However, once again I am fascinated at watching the signal move at the flick of a switch and will buy more in the future. Actually, I already have some Dapol LMS signals in stock for a future layout.




Best wishes,




Terry




Last edited on Wed Sep 9th, 2020 12:05 pm by col.stephens

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I use a mixture of SEEP, Tortoise and Servo motors.

That "clunk" produced by the SEEPs - or indeed, any solenoid motor, is indeed very satisfying and, no matter where you are around the layout, you know a point has thrown.

That's not the case with either the Tortoise or the servo - particularly if, like me, you have sound locos running.

I suppose it proves nothing is perfect - the risk of shaking your precious point apart with all that violent clunking or not being sure the point has thrown with the other 2 systems I use.  That's why, where it matters most, in my hidden storage yard, I installed the LED route indicators on the control panel.

p.s. It is indeed good to see you back in modelling mood Kevin - just don't rush into things - you've been laid up a long time.

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Hi Terry.    Thank you for your reply. I have a Peco 3 way asymmetric point, and I was considering electric point, whatever, motors are the best, but only to make the operation simpler.By the way I noticed that you are using catch points,are these bought as or converted from regular points, and are they worked by WIT or point motor?
Best wishes Kevin 

Last edited on Wed Sep 9th, 2020 05:31 pm by Passed Driver

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Hi Petermac.    Thank you for your PS. After a recent visit to hospital, theA& E doctor said wasn’t you here last week? So I must take it slowly, one step at a time. Best wishes Kevin 

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Passed Driver wrote: Hi Terry.    Thank you for your reply. I have a Peco 3 way asymmetric point, and I was considering electric point, whatever, motors are the best, but only to make the operation simpler.By the way I noticed that you are using catch points,are these bought as or converted from regular points, and are they worked by WIT or point motor?




Best wishes Kevin 






Hello Kevin.  The catch points are Peco products, as bought. Although they are capable of being operated I have installed them just for show, so they are not connected to any operating system.



Terry


Last edited on Fri Sep 11th, 2020 09:22 am by col.stephens

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Some recent developments on Farleigh.  Fencing has been fixed along the rear of the yard and a gate has been installed.

I decided to install the signal cables, represented by 0.25mm nylon thread, which is almost invisible to the naked eye.  The pulleys are 3D printed products available from here:

https://3dprintingcorner.co.uk/

There are two signal cables, one leading to the starter signal and the other disappearing under the bridge to an imaginary home signal.  The foot crossing had to be re-modelled to give clearance to the cables.




Thoughts now turning to telegraph poles, telegraph wires and point rodding.

Terry

Last edited on Tue Sep 15th, 2020 05:32 pm by col.stephens

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Some work has been done on the telegraph wires.  A pole (altered Ratio item) was glued in a hole near the signal box and insulators, cut from the same, were attached to both the arch of the bridge and the station building.  The telegraph wire is a product called EZ line which apparently stretches up to 700% when pulled, thus preventing it breaking or the telegraph poles being damaged.  here is the line to the signal box.  The other line will cross the track to the station building but is being delayed until the point rodding is installed.


The new Terrier from Rails of Sheffied/Dapol arrived this week and a beauty she is.

She joins her stablemate from Hornby and both will form the basis of the motive power for the layout, with an occasional visitor.  Here they are together.

Interesting that both manufacturers have a different version of olive green, as shown below, Rails on the left and Hornby on the right.

Personally, I prefer the Hornby colour, although, in my opinion, this may have a tad too much yellow in it. Of my two models, the Hornby item is a better runner being smooth and fairly silent.  The Rails/Dapol version is noisier and is sometimes hesitant.  Further running-in is probably needed but I suspect it will always be noisier than the Hornby version.

Terry

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Having been putting off all thoughts of painting the backscene, I finally decided 'to take the bull by the horns' and make a start.  Some months ago I bought online a fifteen feet roll of canvas from an art shop, for the princely sum of £20.  I estimated that I would need approximately nine feet so this was cut from the roll and nailed to a wall inside the shed.  A pencil line was drawn along the canvas at the required height to match the height of the rear scenic boards.  I armed myself with various cheap tubes of acrylic paint and made a very thin wash of cerulean blue.  I quickly applied the wash to the canvas using a household paint brush.  As the acrylic paint began to dry I wondered if it was possible to use a similar technique to that used in watercolour painting to depict clouds.  I screwed-up a ball of kitchen roll and dabbed at the blue paint and was pleased to find that the technique also worked with acrylics.  The kitchen roll removed the paint to reveal the white canvas beneath.  It is possible to make quite pleasing clouds by this method.  I touched in some runny mauve paint at the bottom of each cloud on the right side, the sun being imagined to be on the left.  A small dab of cadmium yellow was applied to the top left side to represent the sunlight bouncing off the tops of each cloud.  Unfortunately, the photos taken under the shed lights look rather drab and do not give a true reflection of the actual colour.  However, if you look closely it is possible to make out the cloud formation.


Terry

Last edited on Sun Nov 15th, 2020 08:32 pm by col.stephens

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As the layout is set in south-east England, I wanted gently rolling hills in the distance.  I walked down the length of the canvas with a 2H pencil to draw the wavy horizon line.  Next, I applied a wash of sap green to the land mass from the horizon to the lower edge of the canvas.  The lower 2cm will be hidden behind the baseboard frame.  When dry, I mixed up a lighter green using sap green and titanium white.  This was applied to the horizon line to a depth of about two inches. This was all very experimental at this stage. I was basically hoping that all would come good in the end!  I hasten to add that I have no experience of painting scenes in acrylics and have only dabbled in watercolours, with no great success.  Needless to say, John Constable's reputation as a leading exponent of painting rural scenes is not under any threat by yours truly!



Terry

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I have just spent an enjoyable half hour or so reading about your layout . It is looking very good and the detailing you are adding is icing on the cake.

I like the backgrounds. Others prefer photographic quality but I think that something suggesting atmospheric perspective works just as well.

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Emboldened by my success so far, out came the pencil again and the field boundaries were quickly sketched, with smaller fields near the horizon and getting larger towards the bottom of the canvas. 



At this stage I decided to try to eradicate the hard line between the two greens and painted another coat of green, mixed to resemble the static grass used on the layout, over the lower part of the canvas.  I then used a stiff artist's brush (of the cheap ten brushes for £2 variety), and used water to scrub away in an effort to blend the two colours.  Very forgiving stuff this canvas.  I then mixed sap green with a very tiny amount of black and, using a small flat artist's brush, started to paint over the pencil lines to represent the field hedgerows, the lines getting thinner as they receded away to the horizon.  Whilst still damp, I worried the painted hedgerows with a damp stiff brush to remove some of the paint, in an effort to reduce their intensity.  Some of the fields were given a thin wash of yellow ochre to represent cereal crops. 


Terry

Last edited on Mon Nov 16th, 2020 09:19 am by col.stephens

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Thank you for your kind comments Warren. 



Today, I decided to move things along by adding some trees to the landscape and to enhance the hedgerows.  All achieved by dabbing a sap green/black mix onto the canvas with a small hog's hair brush. Plenty of work of this nature left to do so I probably won't be updating this thread for a short while.  Here is where we are at present... (please excuse the horizontal lines caused by the shed lighting)...









Thanks for reading about my humble efforts... more soon.



Terry



P.S.  I must record here that I have derived much inspiration from the book 'Creating a Backscene' by Paul Bambrick and John Ellis-Cockell.  Unfortunately, I obtained this marvellous book too late to incorporate a 3D backscene as expounded by Paul, but have found the photos and text inspiring in the production of my 2D backscene.

Last edited on Mon Nov 16th, 2020 01:31 pm by col.stephens

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That is super Terry.... Some painted backscenes try to do too much and end up looking like.... a painted backscene.  Your hedges and trees and just enough to give the right impression and you clearly have some skill with a paintbrush because it is very convincing.  Looks like a lot of scenes I see from the train window!
Michael

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Terry, I think Petermac will want you to do his then you can come to Oz to do mine please... I have a spare bed. ( well I can get one)

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Headmaster wrote: That is super Terry.... Some painted backscenes try to do too much and end up looking like.... a painted backscene.  Your hedges and trees and just enough to give the right impression and you clearly have some skill with a paintbrush because it is very convincing.  Looks like a lot of scenes I see from the train window!
Michael

Juss woteesed!
D

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Chubber wrote: Headmaster wrote: That is super Terry.... Some painted backscenes try to do too much and end up looking like.... a painted backscene.  Your hedges and trees and just enough to give the right impression and you clearly have some skill with a paintbrush because it is very convincing.  Looks like a lot of scenes I see from the train window!
Michael

Juss woteesed!
D

Total agreement :thumbs

Bill

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Thank you all for your kind comments.  I am just taking my time and not rushing anything.  I want the backscene to be 'in the background' so to speak, with the viewer's attention focused on the modelled scene in front.  I am keeping the colours fairly subdued in the hope of achieving this.

Sol , I have booked the flight!

Terry

Last edited on Mon Nov 16th, 2020 09:28 am by col.stephens

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col.stephens wrote:
Today, I decided to move things along by adding some trees to the landscape and to enhance the hedgerows.  All achieved by dabbing a sap green/black mix onto the canvas with a small hog's hair brush. Plenty of work of this nature left to do so I probably won't be updating this thread for a short while.  Here is where we are at present... (please excuse the horizontal lines caused by the shed light

excellent work Terry!
(I'm haunted by the image of a hairbrush belonging to a small hog...)

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Thank you Shaun.

Terry

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col.stephens wrote: Thank you all for your kind comments.  I am just taking my time and not rushing anything.  I want the backscene to be 'in the background' so to speak, with the viewer's attention focused on the modelled scene in front.  I am keeping the colours fairly subdued in the hope of achieving this.

Sol , I have booked the flight!

Terry


You have definitely done that Terry and I think they will set of the models superbly.  I think it's really difficult to keep a subtle colour palette, and I know I would be inclined to add too much.  Loof forward to seeing them in situ!

Michael

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Thank you Michael.

Terry

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Hi Terry.     Another question. The scenic break behind the bridge at Farleigh, have you got any ideas on how you will finish off the bare plywood ,  I had intended to decorate the plywood on Inglenook junction as a cliff face, but that idea isn’t going well and now I am looking for another idea, can you please advise me. Best wishes Kevin 

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Hello Kevin. My backscene is long enough to cover both ends as well as the rear of the layout. May I suggest that you buy a photographic backscene and glue part of it to the plywood?

Regards,


Terry



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Still painting my way along the 9' long backscene. Field boundaries mostly painted.  Gradually adding more hedges and trees. 

I had previously fitted a single strip of 'warm white' LEDs behind the pelmet but became aware that the lighting was a little on the dim side.   I recently bought another strip of 'cool white' LEDs for under £10 on the 'bay'.  These are much brighter so, in order not to completely swamp the layout in bright light, I stuck these above the original LEDs in small clusters along the length of the layout.  It was simplicity itself to run connecting wires from the original LED strip to the new clusters.

Terry

Last edited on Thu Nov 26th, 2020 11:10 am by col.stephens

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Hi Terry.   Looking forward to seeing the results on your Background Painting. Best wishes Kevin 

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Thanks Kevin. 

Terry

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Hi Terry.  Yet another reply. I don’t know if I did it wrong, but, I used “Gesso” to prepare the plywood background?Please advise. Best wishes Kevin 

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Hello Kevin,

I think you are ok with Gesso.  Apparently, it is also good for priming mdf before painting.  I must investigate it further for possible uses in  the model railway arena.

Regards,

Terry

Last edited on Mon Nov 30th, 2020 04:36 pm by col.stephens

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With reference to the layout lighting.  As previously stated, the LED strips are fitted behind the pelmet.  An unfortunate result of this is that whilst the roof of the goods shed is well lit, the front of the shed, under the awning, is rather shaded.  Having gone to the trouble of making packing cases and sacks to adorn the shed floor, I thought it would be nice it they could be seen from the front of the layout.  I don't usually install lights in my buildings, generally viewing it as a waste of time as I have no intention of running my trains in the dark.  Nothing shouts "unrealistic" as much as model buildings in which the lighting is so bright, you would think the occupents had bought up all the redundant searchlights from World War II!  

Anyway, back to the goods shed.  How to cast a smidgen of light onto the front of the shed?  What if I could redirect some of the light coming down from the pelmet? Maybe a small mirror to reflect the light? How would I fix it in position so that it wouldn't be seen?  On the rear of a building?  The mirror idea was a non-starter simply because of the difficulty in obtaining one so small.  In any event, I didn't want a building obscuring the view of the goods shed.  


If not a building, what?  I needed a small structure which was large enough to hold a small reflective surface of some kind.  I was thinking laterally by now and the answer came to me - ballast bin!  Would it be possible to make a lineside ballast bin which could hold a small strip of reflective material?


A quick search of the RM Web revealed a thread on 'chippings bins' in which the prototype measurements of a Southern Railway bin were kindly provided.  Out came the card and it was a quickly built and given a coat of acrylic paint. And the reflective surface? A strip of very shiny silver plastic from the bag in which the LEDs were packed! Recycle and save the planet!


Here it is...



I cut a small gap in the low embankment at the front of the layout, opposite the goods shed and glued the bin in place.  A small amount of ballast was glued at the base of the 'mirror' at the front of the bin.  Here is the bin in position looking from the rear of the layout...




And the contents of the goods shed gently lighted. Not brilliantly lit but just enough to see the goods...



More soon.


Terry

Last edited on Mon Nov 30th, 2020 08:30 pm by col.stephens

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A brilliant intervention Terry in the reflected lighting department :thumbs.

Just incorporate some smoke now, to go with the mirrors and you'll have earned true wizzard status!

Best,

Bill

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Ha! Ha!  Thanks Bill. :lol:

Terry

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I haven't managed to get on with the backscene in the last week or so, but a friend reminded me that, as the signal was sited in front of the brickwork on the bridge, a signal sighting board should be considered.  This either took the form of a white board fitted to the signal post so that it formed a backdrop to the signal arm, or the brickwork behind was simply painted white, usually a square or rectangle.  I fancied the latter.  However, painting the Scalescenes' brickwork white would not achieve the desired effect as the printed brickwork would simply disappear beneath the paint.  Step forward Scalescenes' Painted Brick.  It was simplicity itself to cut out the desired shape (two in this case), run a lead pencil around the edges to kill the bright white of the paper, and stick in place.  I used a UHU glue stick.  The brick courses don't quite match-up but is not noticeable from normal viewing distance.  The Painted Brick paper gives the subtle effect I was looking for.


More soon,


Terry

Last edited on Sat Dec 12th, 2020 09:43 pm by col.stephens

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That looks good Terry - as does the grass bank in close-up.  :thumbs

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Thank you Peter.

Terry

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col.stephens wrote:Anyway, back to the goods shed.  How to cast a smidgen of light onto the front of the shed?  What if I could redirect some of the light coming down from the pelmet? Maybe a small mirror to reflect the light? How would I fix it in position so that it wouldn't be seen?  On the rear of a building?  The mirror idea was a non-starter simply because of the difficulty in obtaining one so small.  In any event, I didn't want a building obscuring the view of the goods shed.  


If not a building, what?  I needed a small structure which was large enough to hold a small reflective surface of some kind.  I was thinking laterally by now and the answer came to me - ballast bin!  Would it be possible to make a lineside ballast bin which could hold a small strip of reflective material?


A quick search of the RM Web revealed a thread on 'chippings bins' in which the prototype measurements of a Southern Railway bin were kindly provided.  Out came the card and it was a quickly built and given a coat of acrylic paint. And the reflective surface? A strip of very shiny silver plastic from the bag in which the LEDs were packed! Recycle and save the planet!



I cut a small gap in the low embankment at the front of the layout, opposite the goods shed and glued the bin in place.  A small amount of ballast was glued at the base of the 'mirror' at the front of the bin.  Here is the bin in position looking from the rear of the layout...




And the contents of the goods shed gently lighted. Not brilliantly lit but just enough to see the goods...



More soon.


Terry


Sheer genius!!!

Doug

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Praise from 'The Master' is praise indeed!

Thanks Doug, much appreciated.


Terry


                 

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