Video Archive         Recent Topics      
YMR logo

You are here:  Your Model Railway Club > More Practical Help > Scratchbuilding. > Painting Slaters plasticard To bottom of page
                 

 Moderated by: Spurno
Start New Topic Reply Printer Friendly

Painting Slaters plasticard - Scratchbuilding. - More Practical Help - Your Model Railway Club
AuthorPost
 Posted: Thu May 31st, 2018 12:48 am
PMQuoteReply
link to this 1st post
Ssamm
Full Member
 

Joined: Sun Dec 3rd, 2017
Location: Bribie Island, Queensland, Australia
Posts: 40
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Hi
My latest project is a small humpback bridge with a card shell and platicard stone sheets on the outside/

I am happy with the construction - by my standards. I particularly found the plasticard is very easy to work with. Even cutting a single course was done without too much trouble. Here is a photo of progress to date. The grey colour comes from the primer/undercoat I sprayed over the sheets.



But I have run into a problem with painting.

I am using a Humbrol Enamel as the base coat. I am finding the paint often fills the grout courses with the result that the stonework looses its definition. If I brush out the paint the coverage is very thin. And becomes transparent.

The enamel paint seems to be quite thick. So I was thinking I could  try their acrylic paints.

I would appreciate any tips you might like to share.

Cheers
Evan

Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Thu May 31st, 2018 03:40 am
PMQuoteReply
link to this 2nd post
BCDR
Moderator


Joined: Sat Oct 19th, 2013
Location: Reston, Virginia USA
Posts: 2455
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Hi Evan,

What color is the intended stone? It helps to get as close as possible with the primer - grey for granite, light grey for dark limestone, white for light limestone, red oxide for sand/iron stone.

Nigel



____________________
©Nigel C. Phillips
Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Thu May 31st, 2018 07:33 am
PMQuoteReply
link to this 3rd post
Longchap
Full Member


Joined: Wed Mar 25th, 2015
Location:  Saumur, France
Posts: 1179
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Hi Evan,

This is a classic example of finding what works best for you personally, but after a base coat, I usually brush on an overall diluted grout colour and wipe off the excess with kitchen tissue. Then a varied colour mix of stone sparingly is applied with an almost dry sponge and brush, slowly building up the colour until satisfactory.

You can vary the colour mix as desired and redo parts as desired.

Have fun and let us know how you get on.

Bon courage,

Bill




____________________
At 6'4'', Bill is a tall chap, then again, when horizontal he is rather long and people often used to trip over him! . . . and so a nickname was born :)

Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Thu May 31st, 2018 09:34 am
PMQuoteReply
link to this 4th post
Dorsetmike
Save oil - bring back steam


Joined: Mon Feb 18th, 2013
Location: BOURNEMOUTH, United Kingdom
Posts: 1455
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

I used emulsion match pots applied before cutting out, with a 4" roller for this terrace, no primer, dove grey and pebble mixed, I suspect handling when assembling may have rubbed off some of the emulsion to give the effect of varying colour stones. (shame about the roof, still experimenting for a better tile effect)




____________________
Cheers MIKE
How many roads must a man walk down ... ... ... ... before he knows he's lost

Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Thu May 31st, 2018 01:53 pm
PMQuoteReply
link to this 5th post
Bunkerbarge
Full Member


Joined: Wed Aug 23rd, 2017
Location:  Lincoln, United Kingdom
Posts: 74
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Enamel straight from the tin can easily be too thick and thinning a lot will loose opacity.  Acrylics have better coverage for a given thickness but are a bit of a challenge when painted by brush onto a large area when the fast drying times can lead to joint lines being created and increased thickness on overlaps.

For such a project I would use a rattle can as a primer, either a Halfords grey, red or white depending on the top coat or a rattle can primer from such as Tamiya or even Railmatch.

Over the top of that you can then apply washes for the mortar, paint on and wipe off the top with a damp wide brush after it has dried, and further weathering effects for grime and limescale etc. from washes and pigments.

If you have a bit of the plasticard left over I would do some experimenting with that before having a go on the model.

Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Sat Jun 2nd, 2018 06:58 am
PMQuoteReply
link to this 6th post
Ssamm
Full Member
 

Joined: Sun Dec 3rd, 2017
Location: Bribie Island, Queensland, Australia
Posts: 40
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Thanks for the tips. Time to do some experimenting.

Nigel, the stone will be a sandstone colour.

Evan

Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Tue Jun 26th, 2018 12:15 am
PMQuoteReply
link to this 7th post
Ssamm
Full Member
 

Joined: Sun Dec 3rd, 2017
Location: Bribie Island, Queensland, Australia
Posts: 40
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

I decided this was the perfect opportunity to learn how to use an airbrush. So I now have an airbrush.

But, of course, it is not that easy.

Buy an airbrush, need a water trap (I have a compressor). Also need adaptors to connect threaded ends to click connectors. And threaded connections need threadlocker. And then I saw disposable eye droppers - have to have those.

A perfect case of more dollars than sense, as my father would say.

Evan

Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Tue Jun 26th, 2018 06:59 am
PMQuoteReply
link to this 8th post
Bunkerbarge
Full Member


Joined: Wed Aug 23rd, 2017
Location:  Lincoln, United Kingdom
Posts: 74
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Ssamm wrote: I decided this was the perfect opportunity to learn how to use an airbrush. So I now have an airbrush.

But, of course, it is not that easy.

Buy an airbrush, need a water trap (I have a compressor). Also need adaptors to connect threaded ends to click connectors. And threaded connections need threadlocker. And then I saw disposable eye droppers - have to have those.

A perfect case of more dollars than sense, as my father would say.

Evan


You are probably better doing a bit of reading first to try to determine which is the best airbrush for your purposes then what accessories are necessary as opposed to those which may be a "Nice to have".  For instance to start with do you know whether you have a double acting or a single acting airbrush and which one you would prefer?

The first thing you should put money into is the airbrush itself.  A cheap one will lead very quickly to frustration and dissolusionment so you should be looking at spending somewhere in the region of £100.00 (or Austalian dollar equivilent) if you want something reliable and capable of doing what you want it to.

I don't know if you can get hold of any copies of Tim Shackleton's weathering books over there but, if you can, I would strongly recomend that you get one and read through it.

You are right the plastic droppers are extremely useful, along with some glass dishes for the thinners, but one of the main starting points is where you are going to use the brush and whether you are going to set up a booth with a filter unit or whether you are going to wear a mask.  I purchased a portable fan and filter unit with a multistage filter so I do not need to vent to outside but this cost three times the price of the airbrush!

Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Thu Jun 28th, 2018 10:44 am
PMQuoteReply
link to this 9th post
Petermac
Moderator


Joined: Sat Oct 13th, 2007
Location: Nr Bergerac, France
Posts: 16207
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

I'm with Ssamm on this one.  The airbrush itself is just the start !!!  Add on all the "necessary" bits and bobs and it doesn't come cheap.  The other thing I dislike is constantly having to clean the darned thing. :twisted: 

IMHO, you either need to be spraying something big or have an assembly line of smaller bits requiring spraying to make the exercise practical.

I haven't used mine much at all because of that but, in the right hands, and with some practice, they do make a superb job.

Regarding this bridge, as others have said, paint the mortar lines first with an overall colour, wipe it off the block faces then "pick out" the blocks themselves with dry brushing or individually to vary the colours a bit.



____________________
'Petermac
Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Sat Jun 30th, 2018 06:35 am
PMQuoteReply
link to this 10th post
Ssamm
Full Member
 

Joined: Sun Dec 3rd, 2017
Location: Bribie Island, Queensland, Australia
Posts: 40
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

I have collected a couple of books about weathering in my travels that have a lot about airbrushing. Then there is YouTube which seems to be a never ending source.

One thing I have noticed is that the war gaming fraternity seem to be a very good source. They seem to be a lot more into it than us.

Yes, Petermac, I know I am going to have to get into the cleaning habit. And that will be a challenge. A drawer full of stiff paint brushes attest to my rather slack approach.

Thanks also for the painting tip.

Cheers
Evan

Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Sat Jun 30th, 2018 10:54 am
PMQuoteReply
link to this 11th post
60019Bittern
Full Member


Joined: Thu Dec 27th, 2012
Location: Plymouth, United Kingdom
Posts: 1702
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Myself I have used a thin spray of Halfords Grey Plastic Primer then watered down Artist's Acrylics (Cheap ones from the Works). When all dry a thin wash of watered down white for the grouting and finish off with coloured pastels (ground down on coarse sandpaper and used as a dust then spray the while thing with a matt varnish. Will dig out the Wills Goods shed I've been building and not quite finished yet and take a couple of pics to show the effect and post them up here.

Here are the promised piccies

Wall with just Halfords Plastic Primer and start of brick lintel paint



Other wall with all treatments done



Gable end with just the primer and a start on the other treatments



Other end almost finished



Hope this helps.



____________________
I'm old, that's why I'm allowed to change my mind, when I can find it.
My Flickr pages: https://www.flickr.com/photos/120909355@N05/
My Website: http://www.dcminerals.co.uk
Transport Pics: http://www.viewbug.com/member/23537119
Back To Top PMQuoteReply

This is topic ID = 15640     Current time is 11:14 pm  
You are here:  Your Model Railway Club > More Practical Help > Scratchbuilding. > Painting Slaters plasticard
You can type a quick reply to this topic here. Click in the box below to begin.

Or to reply to an individual post, or to include images, attachments and formatted text,
click the Quote or Reply buttons on each post above.

To start a new topic in this forum, click the Start New Topic button below.
To start a new topic in a different forum, click the Forum Jump drop-down list below.
Start New Topic


Back to top of page

           
15 Most Recent Topics

Problems with this web site? Please contact the Webmaster.

All material submitted to this web site is the responsibility of the respective contributor. By submitting material to this web site you acknowledge that you accept full responsibility for the material submitted.
Unless stated otherwise, all the material displayed on this web site, including all text, photographs, drawings and other images, is copyright and the property of the respective contributor. Registered members are welcome to use it for their own personal non-commercial modelmaking purposes. It must not be reproduced or re-published elsewhere in any form, or used commercially, without first obtaining the owner's express permission.
The owner of this web site may edit, modify or remove any content at any time without giving notice or reason.    © 2008

                 

Recent Topics Back to top of page

Powered by UltraBB 1.15 Copyright © 2007-2011 by Jim Hale and Data 1 Systems. Page design copyright © 2008-2013 Martin Wynne. Photo gallery copyright © 2009 David Williams.