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Scratch building - Scratchbuilding. - More Practical Help - Your Model Railway Club
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 Posted: Mon Apr 2nd, 2018 04:59 pm
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Passed Driver
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Hi All.   Both scratch building and kit building all come down to waiting, which in my case, and many others, can be a PITA. I never seem to get anywhere ? if I stay up late I can leave it overnight to dry/ set, but then I am too tired and in the morning I have to start again, just like travelling on a slow train? I know that there are a great number of modelling experts on YMRC, could someone advise me on the best way to get cracking with my projects before I give up again like I did nearly “ Fifty Years Ago?”    Best wishes. Kevin



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 Posted: Mon Apr 2nd, 2018 06:25 pm
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Western Way
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A lot of the time it is just a case of grin and bare it, just keep in mind that it will all be worth it in the end.

I try to have several things on the go at the same time, it means I can work on other stuff while awaiting the drying time to tick by.

John :)



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Oh, Dr Beeching what have you done?
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 Posted: Mon Apr 2nd, 2018 07:11 pm
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Hi John.   Thank you for your reply. Believe or not plastic kits( started on, but not necessarily finished) are the bane of my life. As for woodwork and gluing, that works but half way through a job I realise my mistake( s) and pull whatever it is apart and start again.   Best wishes. Kevin



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 Posted: Mon Apr 2nd, 2018 07:41 pm
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Barchester
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Hi Kevin the only advice I could give is, if possible do complicated jobs in the morning when you are fresh rather than late at night when you are tired. I also try to pick at least one small, light job each day, which I do on an evening which means I'm pretty much guaranteed success. This sends you to bed on an optimistic note !   I  try to have a list of  light jobs so if the body decides its having an off day I  have a small task I can try and do, and if something just isn't going right, walk away and do something else and come back to it later.  

If all else fails come on to YMR and read what others are up to, That normally gives me a lift up and prods me to get on with things  :thumbs

Cheers

  Matt

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 Posted: Mon Apr 2nd, 2018 10:17 pm
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BCDR
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Hi Kevin,

With plastic kits most should be a 2-3 session job. Chassis/frame, body, details. Four sided bodies are usually dealt with by short/long, short/long, then join the 2 halves. Most styrene cements only have a tack of a few seconds or so, leave them for 30 minutes and they are pretty well set. Tea and digestive biscuit time! Or do the next job on another model.

I have a schedule for building (as above, chassis, body, detailing), if it involves converting a chassis to DCC with bells, whistles, lights, then it is an additional action item. I write it out, and start the session by making sure I have the right tools and materials to hand. I usually have several projects on at the same time, a schedule with action items/materials/tools is indispensable. If I miss a session or two the timetable just gets moved. Action item done, tick it off. Gold star award at the end. Make notes, always useful, and store them with the model.

Nigel



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 Posted: Mon Apr 2nd, 2018 10:46 pm
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Hi Matt. Thank you for your reply. Good advice indeed, but sometimes I make the simplest jobs complicated. Plastic models ie I began a Bogie B Passenger Brakevan with such enthusiasm , and the next day I realised that I glued a pair of doors inside out, what a twit, that kit is still unfinished. That’s the problem seeing the work of others , and thinking “ why can’t I do that”?  Best wishes.  Kevin



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 Posted: Mon Apr 2nd, 2018 10:53 pm
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Western Way
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Kevin try not to be so hard on yourself, we all make mistakes, you just get to see the things we get right.

My work is not very good at all but I keep trying.

John.



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Oh, Dr Beeching what have you done?
There once were lots of trains to catch, but soon there will be none.
I'll have to buy a bike, 'cos I can't afford a car.
Oh, Dr Beeching what a naughty man you are!
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 Posted: Mon Apr 2nd, 2018 11:09 pm
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Hi Nigel.  Thank you for your reply. As I wrote to Matt about the Bogie B Coach, it looked a good kit,I had even googled an “ how to video “ ,and it is still languishing . You mention “ Tea and Digestive “ ? once I start on tea, you can forget kits for the day.  My soldering has improved with latest wiring project , but, I don’t feel ready to “ Hard Wire my Hornby Terrier just yet. As for Tools, I try to put them away, or intend to, when I have finished. Speaking of tools? I have a 15 watt soldering iron that seems hotter than the 25 watt.  Best wishes.  Kevin



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 Posted: Mon Apr 2nd, 2018 11:39 pm
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Hi Kevin. I think you may have opened a can of worms here. A simple question but so many possible answers. It is nice to read some of the comments and suggestions though.
For my four pennies worth - it really depends on your circumstances and whether you 'have to' tidy up after yourself. I am fortunate in that I have a dedicated modelling room and if I want to leave things out then I will. I also think it all depends on how you are for time. Do a bit, check it and leave it for an hour or so. Tea and biscuits help but I can make do with just a cuppa. Get back to your job in hand for an hour or so and then sit back and chill.
You ask one person their recommendations and you get one answer. You ask two people and you get two answers Ask three and the list goes on. Our hobby is a very individual thing and whilst we all can and do learn from each other, most things are a personal choice.
Happy gluing!

Gary



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 Posted: Tue Apr 3rd, 2018 12:54 am
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Hi Gary.    Thank you, dedicated model room? Even though I put things away, I still lose track of them . If I was anymore chilled I would be asleep. But I will persist.  Best wishes. Kevin



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 Posted: Tue Apr 3rd, 2018 03:11 am
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That's the spirit Kevin   :thumbs    Keep at it, Little and often.  Just pull that kit out and do just one bit, then put it way again !    Don't  Think you have to finish it in one go   :)  Just remember for every success you see on here there is probably a drawer or cupboard full of part built, or failed builds  (shuffles over and closes cupboard door )
Keep on keeping on   :doublethumb

Cheers
  Matt

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 Posted: Tue Apr 3rd, 2018 10:48 am
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Hi Matt   That is Okay , but that particular kit from “Ratio”, ( Bogie B Passenger Brake ) has got so many wafer like etches that would require a pair of tweezers and the patience of a Saint, and “ I ain’t no saint” . I only wish that I had a Hornby version, as crude and inaccurate as it was, where if I was modelling in “ N “  gauge I would have purchased a Bachmann model.Best wishes. Kevin



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 Posted: Tue Apr 3rd, 2018 10:22 pm
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Hi Kevin,

Inside out, upside down, detail bits in the wrong place. Plus detail bits lost somewhere, essential components broken (I snapped an irreplaceable bushing from its spring last night, that was an "oh @$#!?¥¢ dear moment"). Add wiring wrong way round (Surprise! It goes backwards when it should go forward), burnt decoders (I recently toasted the amplifier chip in a sound decoder with the soldering iron). Plus dropping locomotives on tiled floors and spending the next month putting it right. One of the great things about this hobby is that it is a learning process. We've all bin there, dun that. And will continue to do so.

I do not have a hobby room, the kitchen counter is my workbench, the patio my spray booth, so knowing where things are is important. And I have to tidy up when done or risk some pithy comments. I have an IKEA trolley that I keep the tools in, plus totes for soldering, metal working, plastics, solvents and glues, paints and supplies...pull them out when needed, put them back afterwards. Plus some trays for individual projects. That way the right bits go where they should.

Nigel



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 Posted: Tue Apr 3rd, 2018 10:42 pm
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Hi Nigel.   I have a stash of cardboard , glue sticks, plastic sheets and angles etc. Than a load of odd bits of plywood.I don’t intend to bounce things off the floor , but it happens and they don’t bounce. I also have plans for several odd jobs? the latest is the cutting and shutting of Triang Clerestories , and I expect them to be a PITA, and very brittle.
Best wishes. Kevin



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 Posted: Tue Apr 3rd, 2018 10:48 pm
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Nigel said... . Plus some trays for individual projects. That way the right bits go where they should.


Now that is a great tip Nigel. I have some plastic A4 trays with a decent lid (holds a ream of A4 paper) they come with a plastic rack that holds 5 trays. I bought them as they make ideal stock containers but I can now see one rack used to hold ongoing projects. Nice one  :thumbs

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 Posted: Wed Apr 4th, 2018 12:02 am
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Hi Matt.   Are you trays from “ Really Useful “ ?. As it happens I have so many boxes, I think that is why I lose stuff.Best wishes.  Kevin



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 Posted: Wed Apr 4th, 2018 12:32 am
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It's  These    Kevin. Aprox £15 + p&p  but if you buy 4 then postage free, so 4 gives you 20 trays (4 stacks of 5)  they are just higher than a standard loco or coach and if you want to know how much stock you can fit in just take an A4 sheet of paper and put stock on it to work that out. You can buy individual trays with lid from Hobbycraft for £4 but I wanted a few plus the racks so ordered online. The big cardboard boxes they came in are great for cutting down into padding/dividers and the smaller boxes each platpack kit came in actually take a fully built rack  with 5 trays back in for storage or moving from place to place etc (extra protection). I have a fair bit of unboxed loose stock so although not cheap initially they work really well

Cheers
 Matt

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 Posted: Wed Apr 4th, 2018 12:49 am
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Now I'm building more than I used to, I've had to organise materials, parts, tools and adhesives, as I prefer to build rather than search.

Much to my surprise, a single plastic storeage box bought in Hobbycraft to easilly get things home proved so useful, that I got another three of them on my next visit.

These are about about laptop size, but about 3'' or 75mm deep. That's not so deep that you have too much stuff in them and therefore difficult to find and they've proved the most useful than other types or sizes.

Top tip Kevin - put labels on them with their contents, where you can see then when staked on a shelf.

Bill



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 Posted: Wed Apr 4th, 2018 01:43 am
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Hi Bill   Thank you. Three of my “ Too Big “ boxes have “A “, “ B “ & “ H “, that equals all sorts, Bachmann and Hornby  I think the All Sorts Box needs re defining? And I do need to recycle the cardboard boxes. I never got oganised after Mum died.   Best wishes. Kevin



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 Posted: Wed Apr 4th, 2018 10:00 pm
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My trays come from IKEA - decent size. Good lip, $1.99 each over here. "Smula". £1.50 in the UK. White or a tasteful blue/grey plastic, 20 x 14.5 x 1.25" deep. Hand grips in the sides. Bit like a tea tray. Big enough to actually work in with a small cutting board. My 15" deep shelves hold two trays each.

Cardboard boxes tend to conceal small bits, or they drop through, never to be seen again. Use plastic shoe boxes instead.

Nigel



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