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xdford
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Hello All,

Our prototype railways have a lot of situations that "normally" you would think could not have happened in real life but we as modellers do unwittingly anyway. What I am contemplating here is that we collect all our examples and put them in here with a word picture or an actual photo so that the scale rule Richards can be held at bay! I will put in a few examples but unlike the Hints and Tips, feel free to add whatever and whenever. Just keep the number sequence going and I for one am looking forward to your experiences.
Prototype for Everything No 1

BRASS ENGINES HAULING TRAINS
Trevor Gibbs (Melbourne Australia)
How many times has someone shown you their unpainted brass locomotive in the past happily hauling a train? It has happened on the prototype where Chicago Burlington and Quincy ran their 4-8-4 5632 painted in a Gold colour for a centenary event in either 1964 or 1965 in Illinois. The prototype in this case followed many models no doubt but it has happened! As I recall, I think Union Pacific also painted a loco in gold, I think a Challenger but as a display piece only.
From Chris Thompson ( Strathalbyn South Australia) 

Proof of 5632's paint job can be seen at http://www.railpictures.net/viewphoto.php?id=265628 … no it is not a photoshop



Last edited on Sat Jan 13th, 2018 04:32 am by xdford

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2. STEEL TRUSSES AND WOODEN TRESTLES
Trevor Gibbs (Melbourne Australia)
On the White Pass and Yukon Railway between Skagway Alaska and Whitehorse, there is a trestle bridge. Nothing unusual about that fact except that this ones centremost span is a steel truss bridge in its own right. A modeler might be told off for it by unknowing observers of his layout but it is there! https://s3.amazonaws.com/aphs.worldnomads.com/pdolan1/31366/skagway_train_150dpi.jpg


Last edited on Fri Feb 9th, 2018 04:47 am by xdford

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3. EXPRESS LOCOMOTIVES AND LOCAL TRAINS
Brian Macdermott (UK)
On the evenings of 12, 13 and 16 February 1962, the 6.25pm Hitchin-Huntingdon was hauled by A4 Pacific No.60017 Silver Fox, with the usual two coach load.

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4. BRAKE VANS DERAILING AT ENDS OF SIDINGS
Brian Macdermott (UK)
How many times have you backed an incoming freight into your yard and hit the stop blocks with the brake van, derailing it? (C'mon...be honest!) Well, there is a prototype!
In the East Coast Main Line DVD that I previewed recently at time of writing, there is a freight train with the brake van up against the blocks and the front wheels clearly off the road.
So...next time you're running an exhibition layout and take some flak from the 'know-it-all-visitor' when you hit the blocks, just say it was done deliberately to recreate an actual event!


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5. SIMILARLY NUMBERED LOCOMOTIVES AND FREIGHT WAGONS ON THE SAME LAYOUT
Trevor Gibbs (Melbourne Australia)
Two Locos with the same number side by side? Yes it has happened! In 1988 with the visit of Flying Scotsman to Australia, the New South Wales State Rail Authority had a 44 class diesel locomotive also 4472. And yes they were photographed alongside each other while "Scotty" was doing its shakedown runs. There was a story about two Garratts numbered 6042 side by side. The second 6042 was built from parts and recycled bits in 1966/67 and the urban legend extended to the two being pictured side by side at Broadmeadow but as the shopping/outshopping dates do not match it is highly unlikely to have happened... but it could have!


There was a picture of 2 boxcars belonging to different railroads Erie and New York Central, both numbered 16634 being coupled to each other in October 68 Trains magazine.
South Australian Railways went about a process of Broad Gauging what they called the South east system while still running Narrow Gauge trains. There is a Train order in the book “One Rusty Rail” where Engine Rx201 was to cross T class engine 201 on a Broad Gauge work train vs Narrow Gauge goods train... Normally they would never have had case to meet but it is conceivable that they could have been pictured side by side.
From Canadian Railway Observations.. .
http://www.canadianrailwayobservations.com/2010/12/cn2338noname.htm shows a photo of ex CN 2338, now an RPPX leasing co unit and CN 2338 together in McMillan Yard in Toronto in December 2010.


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6. EXPRESS LOCOS RUNNING TENDER FIRST
Brian Macdermott (UK)

On 4 October 1956, the loco of the Up ‘Royal Scot’ failed north of Carlisle. The train eventually arrived 62 minutes late behind Crab 2-6-0 No.42876 – tender first.


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7. EXPRESS LOCOS DOUBLE HEADING
Brian Macdermott (UK)

An unusual sight at Waterloo on 4 August 1956 was that of the Up Atlantic Coast Express double-headed by 'Merchant Navy' 4-6-2s Nos.35003 Royal Mail and 35030 Elder Dempster Lines.

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8. Double Heading of Express locos


Trevor Gibbs


The South Australian Railways rarely doubleheaded its Big Power locomotives but 525 came to the rescue of 524 hauling a train to Adelaide during the Queens visit in 1954 on an up North line train.


Also 621 came to the rescue of 620 on an up Passenger when the whistle blew off under pressure in the 1950's... the whistle was eventually found in the smokebox when the loco got back to the depot!


Last edited on Fri Jan 19th, 2018 12:45 am by xdford

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xdford wrote: 8. Double Heading of Express locos






Trevor Gibbs






The South Australian Railways rarely doubleheaded its Big Power locomotives but 525 came to the rescue of 524 hauling a train to Adelaide during the Queens visit in 1954 on an up North line train.






Also 621 came to the rescue of 621 on an up Passenger when the whistle blew off under pressure in the 1950's... the whistle was eventually found in the smokebox when the loco got back to the depot!






?

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Sorry about that... I got the order wrong and only half corrected it,
Cheers

Trevor

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9. BITS THAT FALL OFF Pt 1
From Brian Macdermott (UK)

Modellers often report that bits fall off today’s highly detailed models. Well – it is prototypical! On 1 July 1956, the 9.54am Liverpool Street-Cambridge, hauled by K3 61873, pulled up suddenly just as the engine was about to enter Bishopsgate Tunnel. The Fireman went back and rescued the cab door which had fallen off!


Last edited on Fri Jan 19th, 2018 12:47 am by xdford

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10. BITS THAT FALL OFF
from Brian MacDermott


In a similar incident, on 21 September 1956, the nameplate of Castle 4-6-0 No.5076 Gladiator came adrift whilst heading the ‘The Bristolian’ at speed through Reading. The plate was quickly recovered and sent up to Paddington on the following 11.00am from Penzance (due Paddington 7.10pm). It was handed to its rightful owner prior to departing home at 8.05pm, and stored in 5076’s tender for the journey. It was re-fitted overnight, but, apparently, still showed signs of being in the wars with the beading somewhat buckled.


Last edited on Sat Jan 20th, 2018 01:06 am by xdford

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11. BITS THAT FALL OFF
From Trevor Gibbs



A South Australian Pacific locomotive no 608 had its headlight mount break while hauling the Blue Lake Express in 1955 or 1956. The crew mounted the headlight on the head stock/pilot of the loco and completed their journey. The corner of the cast brass number plate was chipped when it fell off and that chipped number plate stayed with the loco for the rest of its days.


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And for those overunning the buffer stops.


Allan


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12. WHEN DECALS DON'T SPELL CORRECTLY
From Brian Macdermott (UK)
For some months in late 1955 and early 1956, WR coach No.W4611W ran with a roofboard with a town name spelt thus....SRHEWSBURY.
A further error was noted in August on coach W8115W bearing a board reading PADDINGTON, OXFORD and WORCSETER.


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13. WHEN DECALS DON'T SPELL CORRECTLY Pt2
From Trevor Gibbs
On the railway line between Gawler and Roseworthy on the old South Australian Railways circa 1971, there was an electric signal numbered with a three facing the reverse way... kept the drivers alert late at night when pointing it out to me!



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14,   BUFFERS GETTING RUN INTO...
From Robin Johnson (UK)
In the early 1980s I spent a fair amount of time on Norwich (Thorpe) station. Incoming expresses would arrive, the loco pulling right up to the impressive pneumatic buffers and the loco (usually a Class 47) would uncouple. While this was happening, a station pilot (Class 03, always with a match wagon) would have buffered up to the coaches at the rear.
The 03 would then ease the coaches back a few yards, just enough to clear the scissors crossover at the concourse end, via which the train loco would then begin its run round manoeuvring.
Once the station pilot's driver had confirmation that the train loco was clear and the crossover points were re-set, it would then gently propel the carriages towards the buffers, the signal to stop being when the train actually hit them (thus creating room at the 'country end' for the 03 to beetle off and for the train loco to pop itself back on the front and be inside the signal)
This hitting the buffers routine was always at extremely slow speed, of course (and I never saw a derailment), but I saw it happen many times. Even all those years ago I was a bit taken aback at how Heath Robinson the arrangement was. Still, it explained why the buffers were so heavy duty!
Whacking the buffers in a scenario that features a mixed rake of Mk1s and non air-conditioned Mk2s, Stratford silver-roofed blue 47 and a blue 03 with match wagon is, therefore, entirely prototypical!


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15. WAGON SIGNS BEING IGNORED...
From Jeff Lynn (Melbourne Australia)
There were plenty of instances of things like Lowfits, clearly marked "Not to be loaded with containers" carrying containers! A Lowfit is a four-wheeled flat wagon with effectively a single plank surrounding the floor; ideal for containers (of the older style used by the Big Four from the 1930s onwards) made by Bachmann. One can often see advice in the model press saying don't put containers in this or that type of wagon, Lowfits being one of the types mentioned. Unfortunately (or fortunately, depending on your viewpoint!), railway workers used whatever happened to be convenient, regardless of inscriptions to the contrary!


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16 WAGON SIGNS BEING IGNORED
From Trevor Gibbs
I was an apprentice at Islington in Adelaide in 1973 where there were a few Western Australian Railways vehicles clearly marked “Not to work East of Kalgoorlie” - about 1270 rail miles to the west as the crow flies and a change of gauge (at the time) away!!!


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17 WAGON SIGNS BEING IGNORED


From John Smithers
Most of the bogie brake vans of the Victorian C, ZLP and SAR/ANR 8300 vans carried radio equipped stickers,above the toilet windows or to the centre of the van concerned. On one occasion in Mount Gambier (in South Australia) I noticed a 8300 class brake van that, had a Victorian Railways radio equipment sticker and on the bottom sill a stencil said “not to run in Victoria” ... go figure.


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18 . Class 47 pushing single wagon
From Tony Pritchard (UK)
This happened in the early 1970s, where a Class 47 would push a single wagon loaded with ball clay to Abenbury Brickworks on the single track, former Cambrian Railways Wrexham to Ellesmere line. Abenbury was situated after Hightown Halt and before Overton. I assume it came back pulling a wagon full of bricks, or an empty wagon but I never saw that happen.


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19 . Foreign Locos hauling your trains
From Bob Fleming (UK)
February 1954, and BRCW, Birmingham Railway, Carriage & Wagon Company, were building a batch of diesels for Commonwealth Railways. Intended mainly for the 3' 6" gauge sections, four standard gauge bogies were included in the contract so they could be used in other places on the system.
These bogies were fitted in the UK and at least one of the locos underwent trial runs on BR, in full Commonwealth livery, between Birmingham and Banbury hauling rakes of BR carriages.
I have two photos, one with a BR Mk1 in crimson and cream, a Gresley quad art coach set, plus more unidentified. About 14 or15 in all. (A picture of this is in the Locomotives of the Commonwealth Railways book - Trevor). The other shows a long rake of crimson/cream corridor stock, ex LMS or GWR. Quite an impressive sight. I use one of these pics to 'justify' running an F7 diesel and BR coaches on my Lone Star layout!


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I remember smiling when I saw a baggage trolley at Edinburgh Waverley clearly marked "Do Not Remove from Kings X" .....................

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20. Foreign Locos hauling your trains Pt 2From Bob Fleming (UK)

In 1951 a Hunslet 0-8-0 diesel for Peru spent a month on the London Midland near Leeds. This time it was in HUNSLET livery, but still quite an amazing sight.
Can you imagine anything like this happening on our regulated railways of today, though I do recall that a Siemens? emu for the UK did run trials on a European railway?


Last edited on Tue Jan 30th, 2018 11:35 am by xdford

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21. Foreign Locos hauling your trains


From Trevor Gibbs


French Electric locos have been photographed on the South Coast of England after the Chunnel opened... sorry I don't know the classes.
There were pictures in Trains Magazine circa 1960/61 of Southern Pacific Krauss Maffei Diesel Hydraulics being test run in (then) West Germany on trains.


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22. Foreign Locos hauling your trains
From Trevor Gibbs


Foreign locos were quite a common sight in Sydney when the two major builders Clyde (GM Licensee and Goodwin (Alco licensee) when locos for the Hong Kong and Pakistan North West Railway were built as well as those for the various state systems which were all tested around the Sydney area. Standard and Broad Gauge locos for Interstate systems also worked their way to their new homes via Melbourne first then for South Australia and Western Australia. T[highlight= transparent; font-size: 11pt; white-space: pre-wrap;]he exception was of the Iron Ore locos for Western Australia which were built to US loading gauges and too heavy to travel on Australian rails .but built in Sydney.
Trams for Hong Kong were also built in Melbourne and tried on the local system being variations of the locally designed Z class tram cars. The Destination boards were bilingual and very hard to read. A few commuters were also wondering where they were going to!
Now in Australia, there are locomotives ex Danish Railways in New South Wales as well as ex Hong Kong Railways with various operators.


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23 WHEN LOCOS ARE ON “FOREIGN TURF”
From Brian Macdermott (UK)
Early crest 72005 Clan McGregor was noted at Gloucester Eastgate heading the 7.45am Paignton-Newcastle on 9 July 1960. (Thanks to Ian Taylor for this.) The Carriage Working book for the period gives this train as 10 LMR coaches.
Between 10 September and 21 October 1958, early crest 72009 Clan Stewart was trialled on the GE main line (source: The Eastern Around London, by Kevin McCormack).

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24 WHEN LOCOS ARE ON “FOREIGN TURF”

From John Cherry
On 12 June 1965, 9F 2-10-0 No.92238 (82F) was noted at Bournemouth Central with an inter-regional working. Just right for those who model the SW area of the Southern Region.
Class J39s were regularly seen in the north east before the whole class disappeared by 1962. However, in August 1964 a photographer at the site of the former Forest Hall station, between Morpeth and Jesmond, had to look twice as he thought he saw a J39 approaching!
To his great surprise it was J38 No.65912 of 64B St Margarets, working a southbound freight to Heaton. J38s were virtually unknown on Tyneside.



Last edited on Sun Feb 4th, 2018 07:06 am by xdford

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25 WHEN LOCOS ARE ON “FOREIGN TURF”

From Anthony Hinxman
In the late 1950s, there were A5s shedded at Lincoln. Their duties included an early evening express parcels service to Nottingham. In the early 1960s L1s replaced C12 4-4-2Ts on Grantham-Nottingham passenger services.



Last edited on Mon Feb 5th, 2018 12:59 am by xdford

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26 WHEN LOCOS ARE ON “FOREIGN TURF”
From Anthony Hinxman
In the late 1950s, there were A5s shedded at Lincoln. Their duties included an early evening express parcels service to Nottingham. In the early 1960s L1s replaced C12 4-4-2Ts on Grantham-Nottingham passenger services.



Last edited on Tue Feb 6th, 2018 12:31 am by xdford

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27 WHEN LOCOS ARE ON “FOREIGN TURF”
From David Fairgrieve
Some unusual allocations or workings from a Scottish perspective include the following:
Long-term allocations include the use Pannier tanks '1646' and '1649' at 60A Inverness for the Dornoch Branch. There were also ex-CR 0-4-0STs at Crewe Works and Derby (and one used at times at Cromford)
Regular workings that few appear to know about include B16s to Edinburgh in the 1950s on freight. There is at least one photograph I know of with a B16 at Harmarket.
As an example of short-term use in wartime, I have heard of 'King Arthurs' at Newcastle working into Scotland around 1942. Has anyone any photographic evidence?
Short-term use for special occasions included City of Truro running special trains all over Scotland in 1959 with 123 Glen Douglas, etc.
Short-term use for failures includes V2s and B1s on the Southern in 1953 (including St. Margarets' 61354)
Other assorted short-term reallocations that people mostly have forgotten about include a Lancashire and Yorkshire tank (51235) tried out at Dalry Road, LTS 4-4-2Ts sent to Dundee where they were rejected and moved to Durran Hill (Carlisle) where they spent years out of use and Polmadie 'Clans' spending some time at St. Margarets and Haymarket around 1958, which made them (briefly) East Coast Pacifics.
As for those visiting works, everyone rightly points out that the BR 75000s were never Scottish locomotives (until 75014 came to the West Highland!) but in 1965 they were being serviced at Cowlairs Works, where I saw 75010 in December of that year, and green 75012 even made the newspapers earlier on in the year as it was found in use on the Gourock line while running-in.
Many of the above are available as ready-to-run models, so, the point for modellers is - don't completely rule out using a particular model for your area - do some research first!



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28. LOCOS ON "FOREIGN TURF"
From Mike Romans
Oxford was a place where locos from all of the Big Four could be seen, including types available in the r-t-r market. However, I always think that one of the ultimate regular 'intruder' workings was the B1 arriving at Swindon, every weekend, and sitting in shed for a few hours amidst most types of GWR loco, thanks to the nearby works.


Last edited on Wed Feb 7th, 2018 02:38 am by xdford

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29 LOCOS ON "FOREIGN TURF"
From Peter Mayne
I saw the 72006 Clan MacKenzie at Leicester in April 1962. It appeared at Leicester on April 27 1962 on the regular freight turn emanating from Carlisle which I recall usually had a Black 5 or occasionally a Jubilee as motive power.



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30,
Between the wars, there is record of a Great Eastern Locomotive arriving at Ludgershall, in Wiltshire (MWSJR) complete with it's troop train.
Foreign carriages, normally old ones, arrived every summer from all parts of the UK with troops for the annual military excercises. Up to 30,000 troops arriving over a weekend. Many of the carriages would be stabled there for the week, and then return home with the troops at then end of the week.

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31   LOCOS ON "FOREIGN TURF"

From Trevor Gibbs
Foster Yeoman imported a stock standard EMD switcher for its quarry operations in the UK. This ultimately led to the class 59's and 66's which are so abundant in the UK today as the locomotive proved its reliability. This loco could be represented by a stock Athearn SW7 or Proto SW9 switcher locomotive.
Southern Railway had a number of US built Vulcan 0-6-0 tanks ( known as the USA class) which could be modelled by the Mantua/ Tyco 0-6-0T of many years ago albeit in HO size.



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xdford wrote: 31   LOCOS ON "FOREIGN TURF"












From Trevor Gibbs




Foster Yeoman imported a stock standard EMD switcher for its quarry operations in the UK. This ultimately led to the class 59's and 66's which are so abundant in the UK today as the locomotive proved its reliability. This loco could be represented by a stock Athearn SW7 or Proto SW9 switcher locomotive.




Southern Railway had a number of US built Vulcan 0-6-0 tanks ( known as the USA class) which could be modelled by the Mantua/ Tyco 0-6-0T of many years ago albeit in HO size.

























or if you Model in 4mm you could buy the, model rail USA tank,  http://www.modelrailoffers.co.uk/pg/137/Project-USA-Tank
a very nice model it is too...


Last edited on Fri Feb 9th, 2018 12:08 pm by The Q

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Thanks for that Q and you are quite correct... this was written quite a few years ago before that model became available and I should have thought to update it.
Never having seen the prototype, did it look "big" compared to the four wheelers and coaches it would normally have shunted etc?  A US Boxcar in HO will not fit under a loading gauge in OO despite of the bigger scale and the tank would have been a similar size.  

Cheers 

Trevor

Last edited on Fri Feb 9th, 2018 01:57 pm by xdford

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The USA Tanks (officially the S100) along with the S160 2-8-0 Tender locomotives were specially built for the invasion of Europe. Shipped here from 1943 (S100), 1942 (S160) or  later.. As such they were built to the UK Loading gauge, the S100's were stored, but the S160s were used  in the UK, prior to being shipped to Europe. So they don't look huge although the American design is obvious.




The Model Rail Model S100 is a delight,  well detailed, very quiet and smooth runner.





I have a book with a photo of a S160 on the line I'm modelling (MSWJR /GWR  Wiltshire), my elastic history will allow a S100, But I would dearly love an S160, sadly as far As I know no one makes an S160 on 4mm although they do in 3.5mm scale.









Last edited on Fri Feb 9th, 2018 06:23 pm by The Q

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32 LOCOS ON "FOREIGN TURF"
The mainline British locos such as 4472 and King George V which have visited the USA have been well documented but did you know that a British 0-6-0T and a few British coaches operated at a park I believe in Michigan.
Pendennis Castle also operated in Western Australia for many years in the Pilbara Iron Ore region and also in Perth where it met Flying Scotsman in 1988/89.
A GWR Tank has operated through Germany to Poland.
The moral of this story is that you can have foreign locos on your trains and there is a theme from the prototype!



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33  CARRIAGES ARE ON “FOREIGN TURF”
From Brian Macdermott (UK)
A rare sight at Newcastle on 18 April 1962 was WR brake van No.W17398, branded ‘Marazion RU, for use on perishables traffic only’. It arrived on the afternoon 'Parcels' from York and was hastily dispatched homeward the same day on the 11.46pm King’s Cross 'Parcels'.


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34   CARRIAGES ON "FOREIGN TURF"

From Trevor Gibbs (Melbourne)
Back in 1975, I was a travelling electrician/technician on the Indian Pacific between Pt Pirie in South Australia and Sydney. On one trip out of Sydney, our Baggage car developed a Bogie problem so a Southern Aurora Baggage Car was substituted which went to my knowledge right through to Perth. Another trip had our diner replaced with an Aurora dining car. This car was very good but only had enough provisioning for a night and a breakfast and had a totally different key system to other “Indian Cars” and would not have lasted 4 meal sittings anyway. It was changed out to my knowledge at Pt Pirie and returned dead in consist during the week.

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35. Odd Workings
From Paul Reilly
I recall reading in magazines of the time that 'Coronation' pacific 46248 (City of Leeds) worked a Callander-Glasgow turn from Callander….It apparently came to Stirling on the legendary Sutton Coldfield car carrier train and was used by Stirling during its layover. The same entry refers to earlier use of both 'Coronations' and 'Royal Scots' on this turn but, when I finally managed to obtain the relevant copy, it mentioned only their having been seen at Buchanan St. on arrival from Callander, so it's always possible they were substituted at Stirling for another engine that brought the train in from Callander - that's pretty unlikely though.
The City of Leeds report specified that it was seen at Callander, though. In addition, the recent DVD of Caledonian Routes (volume 4 I think) has footage of Brush Type 4 D1856 (subsequently Class 47 number 47206) running round a local train at Callander… Interesting (and illegal) workings.

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36  ODD  WORKINGS
From Bill Dodd

Rose Grove (24B) had a large allocation of LMS and Lancashire & Yorkshire Railway classes amongst which was a single London, Tilsbury and Southend 0-6-2T (41987) formally of Plaistow. It was used as a stand-in to the more usual 0-6-0T 'Jinty's' for shunting heavy coal trains over the 'hump' in the loop to the sidings!

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37  Truro Delights
by John Cherry
On 22 July 1960, WR 2-6-2T No.4549 was photographed taking water at the country end of Truro station. Whilst initially nothing unusual, the loco still sported an 83G shed code plate, but had lost its smokebox door number plate. An enthusiastic fireman at Launceston had very neatly painted 4549 on the front buffer beam in true GW style. A nice modelling moment for the Bachmann 45xx.


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38. Details that Bend or are in the wrong place
From Brian Macdermott (UK)
I’m sure I’m not alone in accidentally knocking fragile parts that abound on today’s highly-detailed model steam locos. But, as with many things, there is a prototype!

In his article in the December 2009 issue of BRILL, David Percival recounts a photograph he took of A4 4-6-2 No.60021 ‘Wild Swan’ in the spring of 1960. Her whistle was leaning forward at an angle of 45 degrees.


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39. Details that are not quite correct


From Trevor Gibbs
An operating Queensland Railway PB15 class no 454 is on the Bellarine Peninsula Railway here in Victoria. Its stove pipe funnel last I looked is not quite 90 degrees to the perpendicular


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40. Parallel Standard and Narrow Gauges operating
From Trevor Gibbs
When the Australian National standard gauging took place between Port Pirie in South Australia and Broken Hill in New South Wales, the Standard Gauge track did not follow the alignment of the narrow gauge apart from a few areas where there was dual gauge. The full sized narrow gauge ore trains and goods trains still operated the length of the line hauled by Garratts and venerable 4-8-0's particularly while diesels were being converted to Standard Gauge.
In the mean time, test trains consisting of SG locos, wheat cars and ore cars and anything that was available were run to familiarise the crews with the new track and for all the world looked like regular trains save that some were hauled by shunter locos. This was to bed and settle track into place and get the crews used to the new track. I saw a few of these go past from the cab of a 400  class Garratt on one of my two experiences riding them.


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41. Tandem 20 class...

From John Cherry
We have all become accustomed to Class 20s working in pairs with the cabs at the outer ends - which still occurs even today. However, in the early days of these locomotives, this was not the case. Nose-end (chimney first) working on passenger trains was commonplace.


On 28 July 1962, D8112 and D8078 were at the head of the 4.35pm Glasgow Queen Street to Mallaig service, both working nose-end first. A nice modelling moment.


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42 Train Races or Parallel Running
From John Davison
'Train Racing' has been done several times within Australia most famously with the Flying Scotsman visit to Australia in 1988-89. The book A Vintage Year for Steam by the Australian Railway Historical Society, now at a special clearance price, documents some of what took place :
http://www.arhsvic.org.au/catalogue/books/vintage-year-steam
While the term 'train racing' evokes more interest, what is correctly taking place is parallel running. If I recall rightly, there was one memorable fortnight in October 1988, when, for just about each day, there was parallel running of steam specials on the triple tracks from Melbourne to Seymour and back. This was over a distance of about 100 km each way. As per the cover of this book, this culminated in specially arranged triple track parallel running as the Melbourne farewell to 4472.
This can be reproduced in model form with the Victorian Railways R Class Hudsons of the Model Dockyard-Kumata, PSM-Samhongsa or Steam Era Models-DJH or a Eureka R Class to the options list. There are lots of 4472 options including the HO scale PSM-Samhongsa version.
Searching YouTube provides amongst others :
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8PP01Ci2E5Y
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uZaeT7wtzVY

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43.   Parallel Train Running or Train Races
From Bill Dodd
Back in steam days, especially during the summer excursions season, it was far from unusual to see trains racing each other along the straight lines between Preston and Kirkham on their way to Blackpool. Numerous reasons abound, not least of which were trains from Lancashire and Yorkshire making up lost time after negotiating the bottleneck of Preston together with inter-region rivalry. Highlights included the rare opportunity of seeing rival Stanier Black 5's and Thompson B1's 'duking' it out for supremacy. There was of course, the added bonus that the first crew to hit the water troughs got to give their opponents a thorough shower-bath, something which occasionally came close to 'fisty-cuffs' on arrival at Blackpool Central shed!



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44.   Parallel Train Running or Train Races
From Trevor Gibbs

I have been on several excursions where Parallel running has taken place, notably in South Australia in late 1970 when Rx class 207 and 224 paced each other between Goodwood and Adelaide, although that could have taken place many times in steams heydey.
 In 1973, 3801/3820 and R707 paralleled from Benalla to Melbourne and also ran a special trip. 3820 and R707 did a parallel run from Albury to Wodonga later that year or in 74. In 1981 Garratt 6029 came down from Canberra and ran parallel to a K class from Victoria from Albury also to Wangaratta and gave me a chance to study the motion of the Garratt as the two trains swapped places. 

While I was not there, 621 and 4472 and 621 and 3801 have had “races” ( the fans of 3801 would have said “rigged” in the event of a real race) along where the Broad Gauge and Standard Gauge run from North Adelaide but not sure as to how far down the line they “raced”.
The most famous of these events was as John outlined in late 1988 and early 1989 and I felt privileged to be trackside for these runs.



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45.   Parallel Train Running or Train RacesFrom Trevor Gibbs

Norfolk Southern also “ran a race” between their J class No 611 and their A class loco 1218 in the late 80's I believe.
Also I was once arriving from Adelaide in late 1973 on the Overland when we paralleled the Southern Aurora also arriving on a parallel (different gauge) track from North Melbourne into Spencer St. Purely a coincidence as it did not occur that often that I am aware of.



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46  Cycling lion? No...cycling Signalman!

By Brian Macdermott

Most of these ‘snippets’ deal with unusual train workings. I thought you might like the following as an ‘unusual scenic item’.
In a Norman Lockett photo taken on 29 August 1945 near Whiteball Siding signal box, the fireman of a westbound freight is giving a broad, wry smile to the photographer.
The reason? In the 6ft way between the Down Main and Relief, a man is cycling eastwards towards the box! From the angle of the bike, he looks none too steady! Was it a signalman on his way to the box? Or was it someone a little worse for wear after a liquid lunch?
Another one of those ‘we modelled it because it actually happened’ moments!
(Source: The Norman Lockett Collection. Great Western Steam, 1934-1949. By Mike Arlett and David Lockett. Pub: Lightmoor Press)


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47  Cycling Signalmen
By Trevor Gibbs
Back in the days of the old broad gauge line to Port Pirie from Adelaide, the station at Nantawarra which was at the top of the bank from Bowmans was an attended siding for most of the day. The station master /signalman was issued with a bicycle from which to greet any crossing trains and set the points at either end of the yard. The trains were, by the standards of the day, long being up to 140 four wheelers equivalent which the siding could handle.



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48 Disguising whats under the “layout”
By Trevor Gibbs
There really is a prototype for everything. During The Second World War, Lockheed in Burbank and Boeing in Seattle used Disney artists to lay chicken wire over their factories and the tops were covered in plywood buildings, painted like rural orchards and plywood cars moved in various sequences so that an aerial reconnaissance plane from Japan would not pick the activity of building aircraft going on underneath!


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50  Restriction lifted
By Brian Macdermott

Modified 'West Country' and 'Battle of Britain' Pacifics were permitted to run between Okehampton and Plymouth from the summer of 1959. No.34062 17 Squadron is believed to have been the first across – on 28 July – working the 8.41am Exeter Central-Plymouth.
(Source: Railway Observer.)


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51  Restriction Lifted
By Trevor Gibbs
For years the Cambrai and Loxton lines in South Australia was captive to the lightest motive power, Rx class in steam days and 830 class (900 HP 6 cylinder Alcos) in diesel days. The Cambrai line was “shrunk” to Apamurra (wheat silo location) but laid with slightly heavier rail which enabled bigger power in the forms of 600 class Alco diesels when they were still in South Australia as well as 422/22 class diesels after 1996. The Loxton line was also relaid and truncated to Tookyerta and took the biggest power available in the form of 3000 HP CL type locos.





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52  Pacifics on Bolster Trains
By Brian Macdermott

In late 1959 and early 1960, 'pacifics' were noted on empty bolster trains from Healey Mills to the north east. On 30 December 1959, it was A2 No.60522 Straight Deal; on 1 January 1960 it was A4 No.60008 Dwight D Eisenhower; and on 2 January it was A1 No.60158 Aberdonian.



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53 Mixing Liveries

By Brian Macdermott


Ivatt 2-6-2Ts Nos.41223/4 were taken out of store during the week ending 24 October 1959, and transferred to Bedford, after having been at Watford for over a year. 41224 was probably (on the LMR at any rate) the last engine in service still lettered ‘British Railways’.


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54 Mixing Liveries
By Trevor Gibbs
Here in Australia there have been a few corporate changes in paint schemes on different locos particularly on interstate runs. 4 or 5 liveries on as many locos is not uncommon and makes for a colourful sight.
In the USA and Canada,  diesel locos commonly through so I have seen  Missouri Pacific locos mixed with Conrail units, Conrail and Santa Fe locos, and Southern Pacific and Burlington Northern units together. I have also seen pictures of Union Pacific, Seaboard and Santa Fe units  working in Canada so you can mix and match North American locos almost with impunity.



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55. No Codes
By Brian Macdermott
If you run your trains without headlamp codes, there is a prototype! Michael Mensing photographed 2-6-2T No.4571 starting away from Widney Manor station at the head of the 7.53pm Knowle & Dorridge-Birmingham (Snow Hill) local on 16 May 1957. The loco was not displaying a headlamp code. (Source: Railway Observer)


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56. Long Train Names?
By Brian Macdermott
Early on Sunday 4 October 1959, B1 4-6-0 No.61379 Mayflower (in a very clean condition) was noted travelling to King’s Cross at the head of a special train, which included two kitchen cars. The train carried roof-boards saying ‘The Ancient and Honourable Artillery Company of Massachusetts Express’.
Is this the longest UK train name ever? (Source: Railway Observer)


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57. Wandering Coaches?
By Brian Macdermott
The first Western branding of a standard BG (gangwayed brake) for parcels traffic appeared on 81240 (Aberystwyth and Manchester Victoria). However, it was observed during the summer of 1959 travelling between Manchester and Penzance. (Source: Railway Observer)


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58. Summer Saturdays in the West
by Brian Macdermott
The Saturday 1.40pm Kingswear-Paddington (first part of the ‘Royal Duchy’) was reported as being regularly hauled by a 9F.
9F 2-10-0 No.92207 worked the 12.05pm Paddington-Plymouth on 15 August, and, on the same date, the 3.45pm to Fishguard was taken by 92229.
The 47xxs had, apparently, not been seen very often that summer. However, there was a fine sight at Exeter on 1 August, when 4706 was on the 1.25pm Paddington-Kingswear, passing 4704 on the 3.20pm Kingswear-Cardiff. Both locos were green.
On 27 July, the up ‘Torbay Express’ was hauled by D807 Caradoc and the down by D808 Centaur.


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59. 4F to the Rescue
by Brian Macdermott

On Monday 3 July 1961, the 12.52pm York-Bristol failed at Mangotsfield North Junction, with D28 at the head. The train eventually arrived at Mangotsfield 45 minutes late with Bristol 4F 0-6-0 No.44523 acting as the rescue loco, tender-first. (Source: Mangotsfield Railway Circle newsletter, The Mail.)


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60. Variety of Locomotives at one location
by John Cherry
A. Being on the principal Great Central route between Nottingham and London, and on the cross-country link to Banbury, Woodford Shed could often offer a mixed bag of locomotives. On 23 June 1963 the photographer recorded the following which, when related to today’s models (and some forthcoming items), is a railway modeller’s delight.
WR 2-8-0 No.2893 from Didcot was one of the last of the class and was seen on shed with classmate No.3806. These are the type fitted with the cab window – soon to be available from Hornby. In addition, the earlier type of 28XX was also present with Banbury’s 2845 – again, a brand new model to come from Hornby.
However, that was not all. J39 No.64727 (Bachmann) was stored on shed. Also present were WD 2-8-0 No.90218 (Bachmann), 'Royal Scot' 4-6-0 No.46169 The Boy Scout (Hornby), 9F 2-10-0 No.92104 (Bachmann) and, finally, B1 4-6-0 No.61018 Gnu (Bachmann) of York.
A lovely cross-section of locomotives of all types currently available to the modeller gathered in one location.


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Keep your eyes open on the GWR between Exeter and Penzance. The GWR are doing trials on a mini-hst (2 + 4).
The carriages are not the usual HST stock but MK3 coaches with the doors altered to sliding doors. At the moment it is running in GWR green livery  with one engine being Old Oak Common. A.t the moment it is stuck at Longrock for repairs to one of the carriage doors. This means you can run a 4 car HST on your layout. If I can grab a pic of it I'll post it up.

 Video of it here      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L27FvwbGhXY

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Thanks Mick, 
That is exactly the type of thing I would like to see more of in this column,especially as I only have a finite number of them! As it is, you have reminded me of the following! Regards  Trevor

...

62  Short HST consists

A couple of New South Wales Countrylink XPT's ( the Australian HST equivalent.) have also run with reduced consists and only one loco/powered end. 

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63 Variety of Locomotives at one location Pt 2

by John Cherry


On a very sunny day in June 1959, a photographic session by the lineside at Putney produced the following array of locomotives working freight traffic: 43019; 44297; 33009; 33015; 30449 ‘Sir Torre’; 48306 and 30699.
All perfectly feasible, but, more importantly, all these locomotives are available to us as ready-to-run models. The 700 Class 0-6-0 No.30699 could be obtained from OO Works.
Putney is a suitable location for modelling (even in a fictitious way) whereby such locomotives could be correctly run together.


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64 Variety of Locomotives at one location Pt 3

by John Cherry


As many will know, the batch of BR 9Fs fitted with compressed air pumps was allocated, for most of their life, to Tyne Dock shed for the workings to and from Consett. As diesels began to erode these wrkings, they were reported as being seen on more conventional freight services, but photographic evidence is very sparse.


A new photo to me, personally, is of No.92063 being turned on the turntable at Carlisle (Kingmoor) in 1965. This is the first positive evidence of a Tyne Dock 9F working into Carlisle and yet another opportunity for those who model the north west area.



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65 Extreme Curves on a Viaduct Pt 1
By Bill Dodd
There was a viaduct that once carried the Midland Railway's Colne - Skipton line still in existence that has an arc (in the plan or overhead view) of approximately 35 degrees. As this column says, there's a prototype for everything, although I do recall one leading figure back in the 1960's pontificating in the model press, bemoaning the errors being perpetuated by modellers who built such curved viaducts and bridges on their layouts because, "such things do not exist on the real thing!". It lies just NNE of Great Harwood in Lancashire and carried the line, known locally as the Harwood Loop, over Martholme Lane and the River Calder


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66 Extreme Curves on a Viaduct
By Trevor Gibbs
A viaduct built circa 1915 over Commercial Road Port Adelaide was built on a very elongated S curve turning nearly 75 degrees with a station at the top then converting to a long embankment and a 80-90 degree corner at the other end. It was an operational headache for the South Australian Railways and was up till the 1950's anyway with helpers needed for relatively light loads.


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67 Lack of Ballast on a railway
By Trevor Gibbs
The Commonwealth Railways in Australia  was completed in 1917 between Port Augusta in South Australia and Kalgoorlie in Western Australia. Because of the terrain being desert, and lighter loads crossing the country, it was laid without ballast for the entire 1100 miles and stayed so for 20 years before it was ballasted and then gradually. So if your layout has a few yards of unballasted track on a mainline, there is a prototype...


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68    Shunting Locos on Passenger Trains
By Trevor Gibbs

Long Island Rail Road specifically bought SW1500 locos for their longer distance non electrified lines. These all hauled or pushed commuter trains with very little freight on Long Island.  

South Australian Railways ran a number of local passenger trains including Works trains often with 500 (500 Horse Power  and 800 class (750 horsepower similar to BR class 20’s) English Electric locos or anything else that was available.


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69    Shunting Locos on Passenger TrainsBy Trevor Gibbs

When the only mainline loco available at Pt Pirie for an up passenger train was declared a failure, a 500 class (500 HP shunting loco) was seconded to haul it until a loco could meet it coming from Adelaide... it would have been a slow trip being limited to 40 mph.
In the early 1970’s there was a special workers train of 1 car and a loco from Broadmeadow loco depot/yard to Newcastle in New South Wales every workday evening about 5 pm which was often hauled by an X200 class 0-4-0 rail tractor .. not very speedily with a rated top speed of 32 mph and seldom looked faster than 20!



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70   Dummy Locos Leading Trains
By Trevor Gibbs

In the US and Canada, old cab locomotives such as F7’s or FA2’s have been used as “driving ctabins” on GO transit in Toronto and Long Island Railroad in New York while the actual road locomotive was pushing the consist at the other end of the train.


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71. Dummy Locos Leading Trains


In Tasmania circa 1992, an old TGR Y class (similar in appearance to a class 20) was converted by Australian National to a Driving trailer and used in a Bulk Cement unit train that only ran a relatively short distance of about 28-30 rail kilometres to Devonport in push/pull mode.


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72 Dummy Locos Leading Trains
By Trevor Gibbs


In the 1990’s, Canadian Pacific (CP Rail) refurbished and converted several old Alco locomotives to control cabs and used them with branch line trains where only one loco was actually needed for the train and the use of a turntable or triangle was reduced or removed. For all appearances such a train looks like a couple of locos double heading.



Last edited on Thu May 3rd, 2018 07:55 am by xdford

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73. Dummy Locos Leading Trains
By Trevor Gibbs

n the mid 2000’s Amtrak began using their old F40PH locos and making them into Baggage cars while keeping their driving cabins in push pull mode with newer locos obviating the need to turn the train, build special driving carriages or disconnect Head End Power. From the railfan point of view, the converted locos were given the moniker of “Cabbages” (Cabin /Baggage).


Last edited on Sun May 6th, 2018 10:26 am by xdford

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74 LIMITED ROOM FOR AN ENGINE SERVICE FACILITY?


by Trevor Gibbs
I have a model coaling tower that one of my longer locos has trouble stopping at without blocking the Turntable or an exit road. There is a picture in the Bytown Branchline files that clearly shows a 4-6-2 in Canada being coaled with a clamshell bucket loader while the engine is resting on the turntable.


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PINK (UNDERCOATED NOT UNDECORATED) COLOURED LOCOS
Circa 1977, Western Australian Government Railways started repainting their locos in the corporate "Westrail" scheme but a bumper wheat harvest meant that there was a loco shortage so a number of locos were running around in a pinkish undercoat colour for a month or so until the locos could be released for the final repaint.

I don't know how the natural weathering would have affected the paint between coats as such!


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PASSENGER LOCOMOTIVES ON FREIGHTS
Victorian Railways in part of the rebuilding after World War II ordered 70  4-6-4 locomotives as their passenger R class among other locomotives. They did not last long as prime passenger power as dieselisation was concurrently taking place so these locos spent much of their lives hauling freight round Victoria despite being highly unsuited with large driver wheels for general goods work.


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LOCOS IN UNDERCOAT WITHOUT VISIBLE NUMBERS RUNNING TRAINS
In April 2018, an LDP class loco was photographed in grey undercoat, many miles from a painting point in Parkeston Western Australia as the second unit being refuelled on a trip west on the last leg to Perth. The Picture can be seen on https://www.pilbararailways.com.au/WestAustralianRails/

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PASSENGER LOCOMOTIVES ON FREIGHTS
Victorian Railways in part of the rebuilding after World War II ordered 70  4-6-4 locomotives as their passenger R class. They did not last long as prime passenger power as dieselisation was concurrently taking place so these locos spent much of their lives hauling freight round Victoria despite being highly unsuited with large driver wheels for general goods work.


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PASSENGER LOCOMOTIVES ON FREIGHTS
Bradley Nixon
Maine Central regeared some E-7s and used them in freight service after the cessation of passenger service.  The New Haven's PA-1s ran out their final years in freight service. They were regular power on a job known as the "Drop" which worked the non-electrified yards and sidings between the New York City area and New Haven.  They also appeared on piggyback trains between New York and Boston on a regular basis. New Haven was one of the pioneers in the dual-service diesel concept when they used their DL-109s on passenger trains in the daytime and freights at night.


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Here's one you haven't covered yet. 2 x HST Power Units recovering failed Loco and train.
Last night the sleeper from Paddington failed at Newton Abbot. (The class 57 'Totnes Castle developed a bad fault). This morning 2 x HST Power cars were sent out back to back from Laira Depot and hauled the whole lot back to Laira to get the fault sorted. Seemed strange as it passed the South Devon Railway at Totnes.

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PASSENGER LOCOMOTIVES ON FREIGHTS
Steven Jones
PRR very famously tried E units on some of the TrucTrain consists, as the need for passenger power began to fall off. This led to comedy fairly quickly as freight engineers, used to automatic backward transition on F units, created Flashover City when trying to operate E units a little forgetfully.



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PASSENGER LOCOMOTIVES ON FREIGHTS
Byron Eadie
The Erie Railroad used Pacifics on branchlines for freight service on weekends when they were not needed for commuter service. On the New York Central, the K-11 Class Pacifics with 70" Drivers were almost exclusively used in Freight Service. Also the Atlantic Coast Line Pacifics were used in Fast Freight (read perishable fruit) service from Florida to the Northeast.


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PASSENGER LOCOMOTIVES ON FREIGHTS

Trevor Gibbs
The South Australian Railways 600 class Pacifics were nearly all based in Tailem Bend in the last days of steam but right through their lives, they were allocated freight and passenger trains with impugnity. Similarly for the SAR 620 class although there were many more passenger trains that the Adelaide based units could be allocated to so the freight haulage did not occur till later in those locomotives careers.



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ELECTRICS AND DIESELS WORKING TOGETHER
It was common for Electric Locos in New South Wales double head with mainline and branchline diesels particularly on the steeply graded section from Gosford to Enfield in Sydney up till the late 1970’s when electrification was extended to Newcastle and the need for loco changes lapsed.  I witnessed a 46 class (3600 HP electric) and a 48 class (900 HP branchline unit) leaving Gosford in September 1970.


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ELECTRICS AND DIESELS WORKING TOGETHER

The Milwaukee Road in the US had a very long electrified section over the Rockies and Cascade Mountains and their electrics and diesels were intermingled usually with Electrics at the front of trains and Diesels trailing but there are pictures of mixes up to the cessation of electric traction circa 1974. They were fully in Multiple unit unlike the New South Wales electric and Diesel mixes which were true double headers with two crews and nothing but an air brake connection



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VERY OLD STEAM LOCOS AND DIESELS RUNNING TOGETHER
Louisville and Nashville Railroad rejuvenated the General in 1961 to mark the centenary of the famous train chase of the American Civil War. SIerra Railroad also still has No 3 which was the engine in Casey Jones, Petticoat Junction and Green Acres TV series which would be running alongside diesels as well.


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VERY OLD STEAM LOCOS AND DIESELS RUNNING TOGETHER
Prairie Dog Central in Winnipeg has run summer excursions behind a 135 year old 4-4-0.  So if you want to run the Triang Davy Crockett loco and old train with your up to date North American  type stock...

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OLD PAINT SCHEMES ON NEW LOCOS

A number of the “Mega Railroads” in the USA have painted different diesel locomotives in Heritage Schemes so it has occurred that modern units so 21st Century locomotives have appeared in Susquehanna, Missouri Pacific, Reading, Pennsylvania, New York Central, Southern Pacific Daylight Colours, Southern Railway, Nickel Plate and Rio Grande to name a few well after the demise of those railroads,  Recently a class 66 has been painted in British Rail blue!

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DIESEL LOCOMOTIVES RUNNING BACKWARDS FOR LONG DISTANCES

I personally witnessed a CN Wide nosed (Safety Cab GP40)  running long end forward through Toronto Union Station on either a transfer freight or a local. Victorian Railways 3rd series X class and C class were designed as effectively single ended locomotives but have often run long hood forward when turning facilities were not available for considerable distances.

Last edited on Fri Jun 15th, 2018 08:08 pm by xdford

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DIESEL LOCOMOTIVES RUNNING BACKWARDS FOR LONG DISTANCES

There were 16 single ended cab locomotives in the South Australian Railways and I witnessed a couple of these hauling small trains or travelling with a brake van for at least 7 miles, the distance between one major yard and another. The Wellsville, Addison and Galeton shortline in Pennsylvania and New York operated single F7 units on light trains and consequently ran the length of the line backwards, admittedly on rare occasions.

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COLOURED BOGIES ON LOCOS AND WAGONS

Many locos over the years have been built with either Silver or Black underframes and bogies. Union Pacific went on a bit of an economy binge to see if they could  keep up their corporate image with less cleaning. Subsequently they painted the bogies of their diesel locos in a gray/grey colour instead of silver.

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COLOURED BOGIES ON LOCOS AND WAGONS

South Australian Railways were taken over by the Commonwealth Government in the late 70’s and part of the corporate change was the painting of bogies yellow. You can see an example at https://i.pinimg.com/736x/6f/d8/5a/6fd85a1389851825ec1b83d31f4504d3.jpg on a GM class loco and various items of rollingstock was similarly treated before common sense prevailed and loco bogies on new locos or repainted older locos were painted in black.



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ROUNDY ROUNDY PROTOTYPES
The US Department of Transportation ran a huge 10 miles of track in a Loop. This was used for train and loco testing purposes.
The concept of Merry Go Round Trains for Coal and Wheat is used often around the world to avoid runarounds and shunting but there are a couple of examples where there are actual loops built into the balloon with fairly sharp radii by railway standards.


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ROUNDY ROUNDY PROTOTYPES
Illinois Central ran a train for about 180 miles  or so in a circuitous up to the 1950’s where the destination was only about 18 miles from the starting point! Virtually a Circle Trip


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LARGE ENGINES AS SHUNTERS
Norfolk and Western were among other roads with large articulated engines intended for a mainline, but used their engines as shunters/switchers as well as evidenced by the following You Tube video  https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=155&v=tEN_wUwzIIE

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LARGE ENGINES AS SHUNTERS
Pacific National in Australia has relegated 3000HP ex mainline units to shunting and transfer duties in Melbourne, Adelaide and Perth and most likely Sydney and Brisbane as well. There were two ex Victorian Railways C class ( mechanically the same as an SD40-2) hood units and a couple of 81 class (or a big 66 class)



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LEAVING FREIGHT CARS ON THE MAINLINE AT LOADING POINTS  
by  Bill Beech
A book about the Yancey Railroad describes some of the day-to-day operations in the WWI and 1920's time period, where they would indeed leave a freight car on the main for unloading by a nearby business, with the understanding that the business was to have the car unloaded or loaded and ready to go by train time tomorrow.  The car to be spotted would be put at the end of the train and just dropped in place and blocked there, then the train the next day would come along and push it back up the line. Clearly, problems were presented if the business did not complete those tasks in time and this did involve the pushing or pulling of the "drop" in front of the locomotive to get it to a place to form the train into a more conventional manner.   


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A SMALLER LOCO HAULING A BIGGER LOAD THAN A LARGE LOCO
South Australian Railways had two loco classes, the 800 class of 1956 and the 500 class (1964) both of which did shunting and transfer duties and some mainline duties in South Australia. The 800’s were mechanically similar to the English Electric Class 20’s while the 500’s were a home grown 500HP shunter using EE components, lighter and of 500HP but they could pull more tonnage in some areas than their older cousins and were rated by working timetable to do so.
So if one of your smaller locos can handle more than your mainline power, there is at least one prototype I know of!


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DIFFERENT BOGIES ON FREIGHT VEHICLES
In Australia, there were three bogie exchange centres where vehicles were left intact but gauge changed at those Break of Gauge stations so it was not unknown for a freight car to be for example South Australian with one Yellow Western Australian Railways bogie and a Blue New South Wales Railways bogie. Although the bogies were usually matched pairs. it was also possible for them to be of different types entirely.


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DIFFERENT BOGIES ON PASSENGER VEHICLES
South Australian Railways had a fleet of Railcars known as “Red Hens” on the suburban network which had two distinctive bogie types. After overhauls, it was common for these cars to have one bogie of each type as they were fully interchangeable.


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DIFFERENT BOGIES ON PASSENGER VEHICLES

Canadian National had one Budd Car that had outside Disc brakes but it has been photographed with a mix of its regular truck and a standard inside brake truck presumably when maintenance was required.

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DIFFERENT BOGIES ON PASSENGER VEHICLES
The Southern Aurora was a train jointly owned by the Victorian and New South Wales Railways and two thirds of the cars were fitted with NSW "preferred style" bogies while the VR owned ones had Commonwealth Bogies, the proportion being approximately the proportion of distance covered in either state between Sydney and Melbourne.


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WANT TO NAME YOUR RAILWAY AFTER YOURSELF?
There is nothing stopping you of course... many railways are named after the area they serve such as Buffalo Creek and Gauley in Virginia, Central of Georgia, Southern etc but there are rail providers in the world such as CRT (Colin Rees Transport) in Australia and RJ Corman Rail Services in Kentucky.  RJ Corman even have a steam loco which they run a dinner train with, a Chinese built 2-8-2 built circa 1990. Check out https://www.rjcorman.com/


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HEADLIGHTS ON ALL THE TIME
After a number of vehicle train collisions circa 1965, it was mandated that all trains on the  South Australian Railways would only be moved with headlights burning so consequently the only time a loco was less its headlights being on was in a maintenance depot, facing another loco when crossing at a passing siding or entering a terminus. It was adopted fairly much Country wide apart from the inner suburbs of Sydney.  North American locos also did this as well as using “Mars LIghts”, sort of an ambulance gyra light of red and yellow.


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ONE SIGNAL PROTECTING A NUMBER OF TRACKS IN A YARD
At Tailem Bend in South Australia, trains would be re-marshalled after having gone through the Adelaide Hills with relatively lighter loads. Eastbound trains for Melbourne and Mt Gambier of an evening would line up in one of 4 possible departure roads governed by one lower quadrant signal before the ladder of points joined the main line. So if you are short of cash for a working array of signals for a similar area of your layout...

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CUT DOWN LOCOMOTIVES
Penn Central took one of their magnificent GG1 locos ( a 2-C-C-2 electric) and cut it into a half unit for shop work at their Wilmington shops for snow clearing circa 1969.  I saw this unit in the flesh while passing by (incidentally riding in another GG1 on the Washington Bound “Montrealer”).


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BRANCHLINE LOCOMOTIVES ON MAIN LINE PASSENGER TRAINS
I was a travelling Technician on the Indian Pacific in 1975 between Port Pirie in South Australia and Sydney.  It was quite common for NSW 47 and 49 class locos to be attached as trailing units behind Mainline units on this train. On one occasion the 47 class (Caterpillar powered 1000HP units of the time) led the train, more than likely as they were a very smooth riding unit on rough track!


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BRANCHLINE LOCOMOTIVES ON MAIN LINE PASSENGER TRAINS
Up to about 1972, the Indian Pacific was hauled by 600 and 830 class units (1800 and 950 HP Alco locos) working in tandem together and did so until the arrival of the 700 class diesels in late 1971 where the doubleheading was no longer considered necessary.


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BRANCHLINE LOCOMOTIVES ON MAIN LINE PASSENGER TRAINS

A friend of mine in New South Wales recorded unit 48165 ( a  950 HP Alco loco similar to the SAR 830 class ) on the front of the Sydney Melbourne Southern Aurora circa mid 1973. I also rode back in my technician days on the Indian Pacific behind a 44 and a 49 class while on one of my weekends off, a 44 and an 830 class on hire to New South Wales worked the Indian Pacific between Parkes and Broken Hill reuniting it with some of its sisters in Broken Hill Loco Depot.



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OVER POWERED TRAINS
Union Pacific did not often double head its’ bigger power, especially Big Boys in the steam era but double heading was not unknown due to power balancing purposes.  A friend from long ago witnessed 12 Union Pacific Diesel Locos including a number of their high horsepower unit hauling a Solitary Caboose in the 1960’s, no doubt for similar balancing purposes from one end of the Wasatch Range to the other.


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OVER POWERED TRAINS


South Australian Railways often had to shift power from Pt Pirie to Peterborough 75 miles east as there was more traffic on the Transcontinental line from Sydney to Perth rather than the other way around. One driver in particular hated having dead locos on his trains so it was not unusual for him to have 5 or 6 locos running on his relatively light trains with empties returning to Sydney, 3 or 4 of which were supposed to be dead hauled back to Peterborough.

Last edited on Sun Aug 19th, 2018 07:48 am by xdford

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OVER POWERED TRAINS

I took a photo of a Victorian Railways triple B class  on an up Dimboola passenger in 1981, no doubt a power balancing issue as it was only 4 or 5 passenger cars behind them.



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A Victorian Enthusiasts Special in the early 1980's triple headed 2 R Class and a D3 class between Bacchus Marsh and Ballan.  Really speaking, it seemed only the second loco was powering the whole train! Since that time there have been a number of double, triple and even a quad header train!


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DISPARATE COLLECTIONS OF ROLLING STOCK
Where I now live, there is a tourist railway called the Bellarine Peninsula Railway that has locomotives and rolling stock from Tasmania, Western Australia, South Australia and Queensland Railways that would not have met in real life. The main train consists of Tasmanian passenger stock and I have seen it hauled by their ex SAR  T class, ex QR PB class and an ex WAGR V class as well as their Tasmanian engines, 3 diesels, 1 steam engine and a couple of railcars.
Tasmania did buy a couple of SAR T class in the 1940’s but the others are quite atypical but prototypical!  And who said their trains shall not meet?
 


Last edited on Fri Aug 31st, 2018 08:31 am by xdford

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In the 1950’s the South Australian Railways bought 10 ex Victorian Railways N class 2-8-2’s and numbered them as 750 class. For a while they kept their VR numbers and there is also a pic of a 750 with the N class cast plate still on the pilot (in the 450-490 series) but with 753 painted on the other side of the headstock taken at the Islington Workshops Steaming Up shed.


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When Queensland Rail electrified their Brisbane services, several stainless steel train sets were loaned/leased  to Western Australia - complete with QR markings for a number of years.


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When  Western Australia electrified their Perth metropolitan services, their diesel railcar fleet was sold to New Zealand and spent their last years in Auckland commuter services prior to their lines being electrified. I photographed many of these in Westfield yard south of Auckland when the lines were being electrified in 2013.


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At one stage, the Railways of New Zealand and Tasmania were run by the Wisconsin Central who bought up a number of locomotives from Queensland and Western Australia. So in Wellington, it was possible to see ex WAGR A, AA and AB classes, as well as QR 1460 and 1502 classes. Later an ex QR 1502 class and a NZR DC class found their way to Tasmania.

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Back in the 1980’s when the Queensland Railways electrified many of their coal lines and the Mainline to Rockhampton, Tasmania’s railways were operated by Australian National Railways and bought the entire class of QR’s 1300 and 2350 classes for about 45 locos.  ANR also transferred a number or ex South Australian Railways 830 classes, although many were transferred back after a few years. They ran with their QR and SAR schemes for quite some time although the Queensland Locos were renumbered into the Tasmanian Z series.

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The ex BHP “tramway” line between Whyalla and the Iron mountains to the west on South Australia’s Eyre Peninsula has been recently taken over by Australia Southern Railway and has had ex WAGR DB class, SAR 830 class, ex Victorian Railways T class as well as the ex BHP locos freely mixed and matched on their ore trains.


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This caught my eye whilst waiting at the local station. 
A derailer to stop runaway trains entering the mainline is common but look what any  derailed train would collide into - its a newly erected  stanchion !  Maybe something to model where space is limited ?

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During WW2, Commonwealth Railways commandeered a number of locomotives from the South Australian Railways T class 4-8-0’s and Y class 2-6-0 as well as their own NM class which were copies of the Queensland Railways C16 class.  Plus there were two US built 0-6-0’s Saddle Tanks built by Vulcan Foundry so there were influences from a few scenes as well Beyer Peacocks Colonial type 2-6-0 which were replicated with WA G class and Tasmanian CC class. Rollingstock was a mixture of SAR and CR stock.


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spotted at Toronto Station in Canada. . . So now I have an excuse for all those marker pen or Chalk lines   on the baseboard !




Cheers

Matt

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LOCOMOTIVES IN ATYPICAL SCHEMES
In the Former Yugoslavia, a couple of NOHAB double ended General Motors units were repainted to represent Great Northern and Santa Fe units.  To wit http://model-railroad-hobbyist.com/node/26186

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The Chicago Burlington and Quincy never owned an Alco powered diesel in their classic Chinese Red and Grey scheme with the big word “Burlington” emblazoned on the side but that did not stop Australian Alco licensee Goodwin from painting 3 DL 531’s ( similar to the SAR 830 and NSW 48 classes) similarly albeit with smaller lettering for  “Silverton” for the Silverton Tramway Co in 1961. Silverton kept much the same scheme but changed their colours to Blue and Yellow/Gold in the 1980’s
See an early pic http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-10-31/silverton-tramway-company-locomotive/7979588

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SMALL LOCOMOTIVES - BIG TRAINS

The Overland between Melbourne and Adelaide grew in the early 1970’s to about 20 cars length and I remember seeing a Victorian F Class engine which was very close except for minor details to a British 08 class 0-6-0 loco bring the set in single handedly from the car sheds to the platform in Spencer Street, and at not a bad clip either!


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Queensland has a number of 2 ft gauge railways which are used in the sugar fields for gathering cane even to this day although their numbers have diminished gradually shrinking further north. I have only had limited experience watching them only once having been there for the sugar season but I have seen a single 0-6-0 hauling about 70 cane wagons snaking around the fields near Mossman north of Cairns and  in their own right, these railways are a fascinating model subject.


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xdford wrote: 6. EXPRESS LOCOS RUNNING TENDER FIRST
Brian Macdermott (UK)

On 4 October 1956, the loco of the Up ‘Royal Scot’ failed north of Carlisle. The train eventually arrived 62 minutes late behind Crab 2-6-0 No.42876 – tender first.


Hi Trevor.  It would be nice to have a photo of this event. As I know a lot of retired Drivers that would swear that Mainline Locos never ran Tender first.  Best wishes. Kevin

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Hi Kevin,
It would be but I was born in Australia in 1954 and lived here most of my nearly 64 years.  The only experience I have is seeing 4-6-0's on the South Devon and Paignton and Dartmouth Railways as well as a 4-6-2 West Country and a S&D 2-8-0 on the West Somerset running backwards as well as a movie showing Tornado hauling a train tender first. 

I have also seen video of Union Pacifics 4-8-4 no 844 hauling a train tender first so in short it has been known to happen in the preservation era but Brian would have been very accurate with his recording.

Regards

Trevor

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Hi Trevor.  Thank you.  I was not disputing you, but as I said, I know retired drivers that would deny that it ever happened.     Best wishes. Kevin

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Kevin.... Google
locomotive running tender first

select Images & you will find many photos of tender locos running tender first

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Hi Ron,
I actually tried  that but did not find much apart from the Heritage Railways pictures... any particular links that you found through the images please?  I also tried 844 tender first as I saw a pic in Trains a long time ago but again to no avail...

Update
Sorry Ron I tried again using "British Railways locomotives running tender first" nd came up with quite a few old photos
To Wit

https://www.google.com.au/search?q=British+Railways+locomotives+running+tender+first&rlz=1C1AWFC_enAU758AU759&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjIj8eAx-fdAhXCdN4KHWTTBzsQ_AUIDygC&biw=1163&bih=488#imgrc=THMg-FYwyzPwiM:



Regards

Trevor

Last edited on Tue Oct 2nd, 2018 10:46 am by xdford

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Hi Ron   Thank you I will google that now.   Best wishes. Kevin

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Here is a couple Trevor
http://www.warwickshirerailways.com/gwr/shipstoneonstour/gwrss566.jpg
https://c8.alamy.com/comp/MTA3FW/a-train-leaving-goodrington-on-the-dartmouth-steam-railway-hauled-by-br-standard-class-4mt-no-75014-braveheart-running-tender-first-MTA3FW.jpg

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During the Second World War, a number of Norfolk and Western 2-8-8-2’s were sold to Rio Grande as well as Union Pacific Challengers being diverted to the Delaware and Hudson, albeit with detail changes.  Western Pacific also owned some 4-8-4’s which were deliberate copies of the famous Southern Pacific 4-8-4’s of the GS class.


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PASSENGER LOCOS HAULING FREIGHTS
GO transit in Toronto have often hired their locomotives to other Canadian Roads particularly on weekends when service is sparse as has Chicago Metra. The locomotives were specifically built as passenger units but double as freight units, I assume with different excitation units as explained in the next  TAPFE


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Queensland Railways had a 1000HP locomotive known as a 1720 class loco. They were often used on the shorter commuter trains in the Brisbane area but were also used on various goods trains as well as being second units on the longer distance passenger trains including the “Lander” trains (Westlander, Midlander, Inlander and Sunlander).


For Commuter services, they had a switch to change the excitation levels of their generators which improved their timekeeping abilities but drivers on other trains often just left it on. As these locos I assume this is a similar system to North American passenger locos for commuter trains


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HOUSES TOO CLOSE TO THE TRACKS
In Oshawa Ontario, a Canadian National line ran down a street where it did a sharp left hand turn across the face of a domestic home coming within a few feet of the corner of the house. In fact the railway line actually appears to cross the pathway to the front of the house
To Wit
https://preview.ibb.co/iw8KvU/CN1.jpg
And
https://image.ibb.co/kFFXFU/CN2.jpg

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Hi.  Have you seen the trains in Bangkok, on the maeklong Railway that runs through the street market, everyone knows that the train is due, and moves the goods away from the track just in time. Best wishes Kevin 

Last edited on Sun Oct 14th, 2018 11:08 am by Passed Driver

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THREE GAUGES IN THE SAME RAILWAY YARD
Port Pirie in South Australia  was unique in the world until January 1970 when there were three railway gauges meeting of the South Australian Railways Broad Gauge from Adelaide, the SAR Narrow Gauge from Broken Hill and the Commonwealth Railways Standard Gauge from Pt Augusta. When the SAR Broken Hill was standard gauged, South Australia became twice as unique by having Gladstone and Peterborough having triple gauge yards including the worlds only fully triple gauge points/turnouts in Gladstone yards.  


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PASSING SIDINGS AS GOODS SIDINGS
When the South Australian Railways was modernised in the 1920’s by Commissioner W A Webb, many stations on branchlines were converted to passing sidings so that shunting was quicker and easier in both directions.
At stations with very little traffic, the passing siding was the goods siding and any shed on the platform was used to receive less than carload loads but could double as a passing siding in the very rare event that two trains would cross.


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ENGINES PREFERABLY RUNNING TENDER FIRST
South Australian Railways had a smallish (by their later standards) 0-4-4T engine known as the K class which in their early days rode roughly going forward and had an undue number of derailments. However they apparently rode much better in “reverse” and due to the 4 wheel trailing bogie tracked much better at speed so the edict came from the top that they always be driven with the boiler trailing. The presence of turntables or triangles/wyes at nearly all terminal stations enabled this to be enacted without a problem.


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IMPERFECTIONS IN ROOF OUTLINES

During the late 1940’s there was a series of coal miners strikes that affected running steam trains so a number of SAR F class tank engines which were the mainstay of the Adelaide suburban system were converted to oil burning. The oil tank got in the way of the cab roof so a notch was taken out to accommodate the fillers. When the engines were reconverted to coal, the notch was left in situ so it was easy to tell which engines had been converted!


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THE OLDEST AND NEWEST LOCOS WORKING TOGETHER
In 1972, Southern Pacific ordered and were delivered and number of their SD45 Dash 2 locos. They also had 5 early F series units left on roster and there was a picture in a 1972 trains magazine showing one of each coupled together ready to work a train.


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THE OLDEST AND NEWEST LOCOS WORKING TOGETHER
Bangor and Aroostook Railway in Maine had a penchant for keeping their old locos running so it was not unusual to see relatively new GP38 locos running with F3 series and BL2 locos, especially when the potato harvest was on.


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THE OLDEST AND NEWEST LOCOS WORKING TOGETHER’
New South Wales had 4 General  Electric 44 tonners as part of a lend lease during WW2, 2 of  which were still extant on that system when their latest (at that time) were the 442 class Alco locos. The other 2 went to the Commonwealth Railways and could be seen working with their latest (at that time) CL class locos as recently as the mid 1970’s.  The two NSW units were sold to British Phosphate on Christmas Island in the Indian Ocean in early 1975 and were shipped through Adelaide


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NATURAL FEATURES AS TUNNELS or MIS_SHAPEN TUNNELS
There is a tunnel on a Southern Railway known as Natural Tunnel which the railway used ( and still does as Norfolk Southern) as a mainline tunnel. It is near Duffield West Virginia...
https://thetunneldiaries.com/tag/natural-tunnel-state-park/

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TUNNELS, BRIDGES AND STATIONS IN  VERY CLOSE PROXIMITY
There are several examples of having the above general model railway features close by around the world but the one I am most familiar with is the West Richmond Station in metropolitan Melbourne
Here it is!  https://railgallery.wongm.com/melbourne-stations/F115_2634.jpg.html

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RAILCARS HAULED BY LOCOMOTIVES
Many modellers of North American outline have taken old Athearn rubber band drive Budd RDC cars and hauled them with locomotives if they have not been inclined to regear them ( funnily enough, I have converted mine to gear drive)
Commonwealth Railways circa 1973/1974 took to hauling their Budd Cars for many services with a GM class locomotive.  Boston and Maine also changed their Budd Cars to locomotive hauled cars for commuter service with the Metropolitan Boston Transit Authority.  GO transit in Toronto had a fleet of 9 Self propelled single level cars which also became locomotive hauled cars both in Toronto and Boston.


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USE OF CABOOSES AND GUARDS VANS  IN THE MODERN ERA
Here in Australia, the use of a Guards Van or Cabooses started to become rare occurred circa 1986 a few years after North America. However a number of local trains in the US still use Cabin Cars ( a strange plural of Caboose but there you go) when backing moves are required as well as for work trains.  


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LONG TRAINS BACKING INTO DEAD END YARDS
One of the Private operators in Australia has a huge dead end yard that trains in both directions basically back into from a Triangle or Wye track, day in day out.  
Also trains on the Indiana Harbor Belt Railroad also had a couple of yards which required backing into with long trains and all Long Distance Passenger trains into Chicago’s Union Station back in so that the Locomotives are not under the train shed there.


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TRAINS COMING OUT OF A STATION THEN BACKING UP TO PROCEED.


The South Australian Railways had a timetabled run from the Port Dock Station which proceeded a short distance onto the Dry Creek Loop Line beyond the “Red Hill Junction” before reversing to travel over the Port Adelaide Viaduct, to Outer Harbour and back via the Loop Line to Dry Creek. A single double ended railcar was used for this service.  A Similar operating scenario was used for trains on the Liskeard to Looee line in Cornwall.


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WHEN MEMBERS OF THE SAME CLASS HAVE DISTINGUISING DIFFERENCES
Canadian National gradually built on their fleet of Budd Railcars which all but one had plain rather than fluted front and rear ends.  The one exception had fluted ends because it was bought by CN from the Chesapeake and Ohio Railroad and never modified. The ends were painted in CN red but the CN squiggle was placed above the flutes on the left hand side panel (looking at it face on) below the motormans position.


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South Australian Railways 930 class Alco locos came in 4 separate phases over a 12 year period with some  remarkable external differences although they shared the same outline
South Australian Railways 400 class railcar number 432 had air vents on either end of the roof. It was undecided during construction whether it would be a suburban railcar or a 100 class Bluebird Trailer or possibly even a 250 class Bluebird power car and as all these shared common end tooling and frames, that car could have been any one of those three when it was started.



Last edited on Wed Nov 28th, 2018 06:13 am by xdford

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Victorian Railways T class were  a disparately built class of locos over a 14 year period where they were similar mechanically but 3 totally different body styles with a high nose. A high cab and a stub nose cab, Furthermore when one had to be rebuilt from what was known as  a 2nd series after an accident, it was rebuilt to outwardly resemble a 3rd series loco with the stub nose.


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ELECTRIC LOCOS LEADING TRAINS WITHOUT CATENARY
Many of us have models of Electric locos and no catenary.  Penn Central had to deviate a few trains around a derailment site using the Baltimore and Ohio. The E44 electrics had to lead because of cab signals which would only work for the Penn Central yards and mileage but as they could MU with Diesels, the crews drove the diesels from the Electrics cab.  This was for an emergency obviously and the venerable GG1’s were sidelined in that area... and yes there were a few photos!


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When I was the stores clerk in Cambridge S&T stores we had our own siding which was a back shunt off the oil siding at Coldhams Lane Diesel Depot. When our stores wagons (normally a pair of Vanfits) were being delivered and nothing was to go out the DSL (Diesel Shunting Loco) normally an 08 would fly shunt our wagons - the first we knew of their arrival was a toot toot from the DSL as it trundled back to Cambridge Yard and the wagons rolled past the window, we had to leap out to put the brakes on - if we missed they ended up in a former private siding belonging to Ridgeons the builders. 

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The old BC&DR GWR/WR branch lines had some interesting movements. Shunting the goods shed and the coal wagon siding (as well as the cattle dock) at Hook Norton involved using the first viaduct located at the goods end of the station as a head shunt, repeatedly running on and off, with the guards van usually left in the middle of the viaduct. Running around passenger carriages at Chipping Norton to go back to Kingman in the late 1950's and early 1960's required the locomotive to use the tunnel immediately after the passing loop points as the head shunt. All of the stations on the two  lines of the branch line (Banbury to Kingham and Kingham to Cheltenham) originally had station passing loops. The collapse of a cutting at Hook Norton meant passenger service from Kingham ended at Chipping Norton. No turntable at either Chipping North or Kingham at this time so the out or return was usually  cold and drafty.

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British Rail had an Electro Diesel (Class 73?) which had an Auxiliary diesel motor of relatively low power for use in non electrified areas.  I believe there are a couple of Italian examples of this type of loco with Pantographs. New Haven (The NYNH&H RR) which merged into Penn Central had a fleet of 60 FL9 locos but these locos were powered by outside third rail. A number of these survived into the 2000’s.


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TOY TRAIN TUNNELS - ON THE PROTOTYPE
There are some real examples of tunnels that look just like train set ones
While it looks toyish, I believe the following one is for protection against snow slides/avalanches etc


http://photorator.com/photos/images/a-cave-in-has-been-cleared-leaving-the-stand-alone-portal-and-a-gap-to-the-rest-of-the-rail-road-tu--20320.jpg
The following “toy train tunnel” is in Costa Rica which the photographer thinks may have been bounded by a river


http://i1112.photobucket.com/albums/k490/jimmol/IMG_zpsgmqi7zhd.png

Last edited on Mon Dec 10th, 2018 04:38 am by xdford

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HOLDING LOOPS FOR TRAINS STACKING
The NYC subway has a multi track loop at the foot of Manhattan where they turn the trains to run north again.  It is within a few feet of the upper bay. There are also holding tracks alongside the loops.


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CURVED PLATE GIRDER BRIDGES
The Western Maryland Scenic RR in Cumberland MD has a curved plate girder bridge is over the Potomac south of the depot.  You can see the cross girders running between the main girders:

https://www.google.com/maps/place/The+Western+Maryland+Scenic+Railroad/@39.6476456,-78.7645239,179m/data=!3m1!1e3!4m2!3m1!1s0x0:0x443c4bb66b25e462 or more simply






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TOY TRAIN BRIDGES
The Brusio spiral viaduct near Brusio, Switzerland. Sure looks like a model railroad scene.
http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s319/centralpullman/1280px-RhB_ABe_4-4_III_Kreisviadukt_Brusio_zps48abd286.jpg


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Low frequency services

Sad, but true that the least used railway station in the UK still having a daily stopping passenger service, saw just 40 passengers last year. That is the case for the once busy station of Redcar British Steel. The station was opened in June 1978 to serve the mighty steel plant, now closed, yet the trains continue to stop daily, excepting Sundays.

Comparing these 40 passengers who have no ticket machine, waiting room or toilets, with the annual 94.4 million for the country's busiest station who have a veritable choice of facilities, provides a grand choice for the railway modeller to portray prototype workings in miniature.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s7wF2FrRkJ4

The possible light at the end of the tunnel though is that the SouthTees Development Company plans to redevelop the steel works site and improve station facilities to cater for the avalanche of passengers.

Bill

PS. Waterloo is the busiest for the 15th year running

 


Last edited on Thu Dec 20th, 2018 08:58 am by Longchap

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BUILDINGS THAT LEAN
Although the most famous is the Leaning Tower of Pisa, there are many examples of leaning buildings in Italy that my wife and I saw on our first trip there as well as a few leaners in Amsterdam on our second trip to Europe. In Melbourne there is a high rise apartment block that definitely looks offset from about halfway up the building.


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A DIESEL CONTROL STAND FOR A STEAM LOCO?
The privately run West Coast Railway in Victoria, which operated between 1997 and 2004 in Australia rebuilt one of the 1951 built R class to run regular steam excursions and in the process of rebuilding it, fitted a diesel control stand for running supporting locos behind the steam engine.  Clinchfield Railroad also did the same with their No 1, small 4-6-0 used in excursion service till the mid 1970’s


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A DIESEL LOCO MOVING WITHOUT THE DIESEL ACTUALLY OPERATING
When I was working at Mile End Diesel Depot in Adelaide, a colleague was servicing a diesel electric loco when a combination of circumstances occurred that the loco started moving under its own battery power when he threw the battery switch on to check a suspect relay. He was quite shaken by the event as there was only just  enough air in the reservoir to apply the brakes and bring it to a stop as the brake isolating valve had not been closed. The loco moved about 40-50 metres or so in the process.
But there is a prototype for our model locos which are operated purely by electricity with no diesel motor!


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NON WORKING SIGNALS ON A LAYOUT
In the early 1970’s, both the South Australian and Victorian Railways installed CTC (in the Victorian case very gradually) on their Murray Bridge and Western Line respectively.  While the conversion was taking place, colour light signals were put in place but were hooded for the most part but often the hoods were not there and signals appeared to be off and trains worked with train orders and staff working. So if your railway has colour light signals similarly in place but not connected ( as mine were for a longer time than I care to admit)... you have an excuse.


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COUPLER CONVERTOR CARS
When some New York and Long Island EMU’s were built in St Louis Missouri, they had to be transported from there to theIr destination to begin their working lives. Hence Penn Central, made a gondola which had a convertor coupler at one end to enable these cars to be taken by train halfway across the country.
A semicircular anticlimber was actually fitted above this coupler to match the coupling face of the Long Island Cars in particular.


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SHARP TRACKAGE IN A CIRCULAR SHAPE
In the Bronx in New York a round Freight House was built that was worked from a circular track on the outside. The tracks around the freight house scale to 15” radius track !11

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STEAM OPERATED RAILWAYS IN RECENT TIMES
The Crab Apple and Orchard Egyptian Railway in Illinois was steam operated as a common carrier right up until the mid 1980’s. Duluth and North Eastern was operated into the early 1960s with 5 venerable steamers while the Buffalo Creek and Gauley railroad in West Virginia was also operated by steam into the mid 1960’s.
I am of the belief that an Eastern European city has had a steam operated commuter service as recently as 2010. Also the Harz system in Eastern Germany is operated by. steam locomotives
So a late model car and Steam Engines can be photographed together and there is a prototype for it!


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xdford wrote:
SHARP TRACKAGE IN A CIRCULAR SHAPE
In the Bronx in New York a round Freight House was built that was worked from a circular track on the outside. The tracks around the freight house scale to 15” radius track !11


This was a terminus, all freight cars and presumably locomotives, entered and left via a transfer bridge from railroad river barges (top right). There were a total of 7 curved 3-way points/turnouts, 6 symmetrical, 1 asymmetrical, 3 are visible to the left off the entrance. All other regular points were curved, as was the scissor/diamond crossing at the back of the building. all were operated by hand-throw levers. All this track work served 17 sidings/transfer tracks, in addition to the double track around the building and the 2 tracks from the bridge. The slip for entering and leaving the inner circle is to the left of the entrance.The depot had 29 sides, all different, and was a not quite symmetrical oval. Most of the freight cars are reefers (refrigerated cars), the ice hatches are visible on the roof. Food or beer in, anything out. The 2 gantry cranes would be for flat car loads.

Edit. Engine house over the Harlem river on piles. Accessed by a piece of portable track. Steam 0-4-0 until 1928, small box can diesel afterwards.  Locomotives appears to come over with the freight cars from the late 1940's on. 

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Duplicating the Bronx freight terminal
http://www.bronx-terminal.com/?p=5

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Even Tim admits it is a challenge. Lots of attempts to model this. There are some nice paintings of the terminus in action. Just Google!
Nigel

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Correction. There was a land connection SE to the New York, New Haven and Concord RR freight yard next door. Another web site of interest is: http://members.trainweb.com/bedt/indloco/crrnjbxt.html See also http://www.port-kelsey.com/?p=70

Not sure about the image that Trevor shows - looks like the model superimposed on an old photo. If so shows how good Tim Warris' modeling is.

Fascinating prototype that closed in 1961.

Nigel

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STEAM OPERATED RAILWAYS IN RECENT TIMES
The Crab Apple and Orchard Egyptian Railway in Illinois was steam operated as a common carrier right up until the mid 1980’s. Duluth and North Eastern an operated into the early 1960s with  5 venerable steamers while the Buffalo Creek and Gauley railroad in West Virginia was also operated by steam into the mid 1960’s.


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STEAM OPERATED RAILWAYS IN RECENT TIMES
The Mississipian and  Reader Railroads were also  steam operated into the 1960’s but Union Steel instead of scrapping some ex Grand Trunk Western 0-8-0’s operated these engines into the 1980’s
London Transport continued to use 0-6-0 tanks (of the Hornby 3F type?) until 1972 or 1973 shunting Underground stock I think through washbays etc.
I am of the belief that an Eastern European city has had a steam operated commuter service as recently as 2010. Also the Harz system in Eastern Germany is operated by. steam locomotives
So a late model car and Steam Engines can be photographed together and there is a prototype for it!


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MAINLINE RAILWAY VERY CLOSE TO ROAD TRAFFIC
There are of course many examples of street running of railways in the world but an example of a mainline railway running very close to a road less protective fencing etc exists in Guelph Ontario in Kent St. In fact Kent Street is split by the railway. GO Commuter and VIA Passenger trains also use this line.
You can see this  at http://www.railpictures.ca/?attachment_id=35815


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RAILWAYS ENDING IN A LOOP
The New York and Long Branch, now New Jersey Transit's North Jersey Coast Line, ends at a loop with a yard in the middle of it. It is a model railroader's dream! The North Jersey Rappenfieldid Transit Company (service ended 1930) was a trolley company. The line parallelled the Erie, climbed a very steep grade, swung to the right to cross the Erie tracks via a through truss bridge then a steep grade down the other side back to grade level. The grade was somewhere around 6% (a guess)


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I noticed a number of transit lines in the US that ended in Balloon Loops, notably the Philadelphia Area Transit parallel to the subway system in Philadelphia as well as the MBTA in Boston at Riverside.  Many of the cars were the single ended PCC cars so turning was essential and there were PCC cars operating in San Francisco, Toronto and Pittsburgh so there would have been many other loops needed.


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South Australian Railways had two lines at Outer Harbour and Penfield which ended in Balloons, the station at Outer Harbour being at the “apex” of the loop. They were both handy as trains were regularly sent to both to equalise flange wear or single ended locos with passenger consists could be used when there was a shortage of railcars. Eventually the loops were either truncated (Outer Harbour) or the entire branchline closed (Penfield). There were also some other little known balloons in the Port Adelaide area to access some wharves.


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Reverse loops weren't unknown in passenger terminals in the US (ATSF in Chicago), or even engine terminals (N&W in Winston Salem NC); but they were rarely used as main running tracks.

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A Number of stations in Queensland were at the end of what effectively were balloon loops at Bowen and Townsville as well as Fox Lake in Wisconsin which all received regular trains going in and out of their respective towns.  Thus trains could be also replicated turning and going in the opposite direction as is commonly seen on loop to loop model railways.


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VERY SHORT STREAMLINED  PASSENGER TRAINS
While North American Modellers in particular like long trains and among them passenger trains, there are a few examples of very short passenger trains. One I noted on a Model Railroader post consisted of an Alco PA, a streamlined baggage car and a stainless steel observation car.  You can see several examples on http://cs.trains.com/mrr/f/13/t/273933.aspx

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LOUSY DECAL JOB ON WEATHERED ROLLINGSTOCK
Look at how poor this paint and decaling job is! They did not even bother covering up the decal film. Prototype photo by T. McAdams


[espee.railfan.net/nonindex/caboose_photos/1764_sp-c-40-7-caboose-thom_mcadams.jpg


A NOTE FROM TREVOR ...


This is the last I have of the TAPFE's for now... much to my chagrin, there just have not been much happening or inputs but you are all quite welcome to add to this one. I will add more as I find them... I was able to stretch them out from where I was at a few months ago


I did do a bit more digging and there are a few more Hints and Tips to last for about 2-3 months at this stage, so again your contributions directly to me via PM would be appreciated!


Cheers


Trevor

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London Transport used ex GWR 57xx pannier tanks to replace the ex Metropolitan Railway locos. They were used to haul engineering trains when the juice was off overnight and also on the trains from the demolition of the Met power station at Neasden to Watford Tip. Models have been made by Bachmann in 00 gauge, Graham Farish in N gauge and now by Dapol in 0 Gauge.

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COAL TRAVELLING IN BOTH DIRECTIONS ON DOUBLE TRACK
In Central News South Wales, from Wollongong 50 miles south of Sydney to Newcastle about 104 rail miles north of Sydney are both double track mainlines.   Because of export of coal from the Steelworks in the Wollongong area and the need for specific coals in the refining process, as well as coal mines at intermediate points supplying different market areas, both mainlines could see loaded coal trains running in both directions.


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Hi Trevor’.   Haven’t you heard the phrase “ Coals to Newcastle “ . Nice to hear from you. Best wishes Kevin 


                 

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