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Marshalling of a Goods train - General Model Railway Discussion. - Other Areas. - Your Model Railway Club
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 Posted: Fri Nov 24th, 2017 03:40 am
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Sol
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Not sure if this is written down as a real process but I am after some guidance.

Let us assume this local branch line railway:_
Terminal station A – through station B to main through Station C  and then back to B & A.
At C, there are lines coming from & going to further stations D, E  , F etc

So would station A marshal/block the goods wagons so that all wagons for each station are next to each other and would B also add any pickups into the same blocking format to assist C in sorting out when the train arrives at C for shunting not only at C but for stations D, E  , F etc?

Or would there be no attempt made at all on any blocking of wagons? 


The reason for these questions in the model rail scene and having timetables;
having no blocking requirements make operating simpler at Stations A & B but can really make it harder at C    or
Having blocking means more time required at A & B but helps C in shunting



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 Posted: Fri Nov 24th, 2017 09:36 am
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pnwood
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Sol

I'm no expert on these matters but I am fairly sure that Station A would marshal the train to minimise the amount of shunting at each station along the route so would therefore put the wagons in blocks as far as possible. It would be up to the crew en-route to add any returning wagons appropriately to a) where they are going and b) keep shunting work further on the journey to a minimum. Crews would always try to do the shunting in as few of moves as possible.

Putting wagons in blocks can only go so far as some wagons (or at least there contents) were restricted in where they were positioned in the train. Gunpowder for instance should be as far as possible from both the Loco and the Brake Van. Wagons with livestock would normally be marshalled directly behind the engine to give a smoother ride and minimise injury, Fitted wagons would again be marshalled behind the engine. 

All of which means on a branch pick up goods it starts of organised and gradually descends into organised chaos.

 



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 Posted: Fri Nov 24th, 2017 12:23 pm
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Sol
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Thanks Nick.
I asked what happens here in South Australia especially re stock wagon placement - they went anywhere as couplers were Knuckles and so no problems with jerking wagons as compared to 3 link &hook.



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 Posted: Fri Nov 24th, 2017 02:56 pm
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Hi Ron,

Pretty organized I suspect, most stations had only 15-30 minutes for dropping off and picking up wagons. That's why they had one of the best telegraph systems around. I think livestock would normally have been scheduled well in advance (usually with the local market day), same for coal. It depends on what time period as well. From my reading pick-up goods trains were a late development after most scheduled goods went onto the roads. Many BR WR goods trains went out with an engine and Toad, and came back with the same. At most 2-3 vans and a couple of coal wagons, and no livestock. Branch lines would pick-up and drop-off in either direction, which could see a wagon passing through its destination, only being dropped on the return. Same for the pick-up. A real skill.

Unfitted stock was normally manually braked on descending inclines of around 1:100 (locked down), and then unlocked at the bottom. Even with fitted stock at the front. We used to watch this with the pick-up to Banbury on the 1:100 just outside Hook Norton station.

Nigel



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 Posted: Fri Nov 24th, 2017 04:25 pm
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Barry Miltenburg
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Hi Ron

As far as the UK steam era is concerned, I agree with Nick regarding the sorting and marshalling of wagons throughout the train.  The train would be classed as a "stopping freight", Class K (early 1960's).  If stations D, E etc were some distance away and served by a different stopping freight train, then the wagons might be rough sorted so that the comprise was A, B, C, the rest.  That way, the local crew would gain the benefits of sorted wagons for their section and then leave the roughly sorted wagons for whatever was added at D.

Here, of course, by the end of the 1960's, we had moved to, predeominantly, block freight trains and the branch/local freight was dead so I guess we have little experience with modern coupling and how this might have affected the traditional local freight trains.  Interesting to speculate perhaps.

B

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 Posted: Sat Nov 25th, 2017 04:40 am
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Sol
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Thanks for all the various replies… plenty to think about.

Perhaps I better give some explanation about my layout.

 All locos are diesel but still use brake vans (as a train doesn’t look complete without one..) The D&S railway has modernised in all rolling stock has been fitted with modern braking and knuckle couplers.

Station A – terminal has  a yard loco with a 2 car DMU stabled and has traditional Good Shed & cattle dock but a large printing works, memorial firm for cemetery head stones, etc & a Farm & Fuel depot.

 Station B – the smaller of the two through stations has a yard loco with traditional Good Shed & cattle dock combined with a larger Farm & Fuel depot of 2 tracks, Gravel/Stone loading plant that handles 14 open/hopper wagons; container loading track; railway stores building: a large electronics factory & a depot for Leather Supplies factory.
 
Station C – the large through station has tracks for marshalling of trains back to stations A & B but for other stations D,E & F which in reality are “hidden” storage tracks for upto 60 plus working wagons and 3 through running goods trains from storage to storage via Station C. Plus trains from storage that stops at C to set down & pick up wagons before going to other storage tracks.

 So C has a large Goods shed of 2 tracks, container loading track, railway stores building, 3 track Brewery; 3 track Flour mill, 2 track Farm & Fuel; Carpet Co Depot plus a large MPD.   In an average operate session of 2 hours, Station C can move around 60 wagons.

Stations A & B are one person operator while C has 2 people.

During these goods movements, passenger services are also run.



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 Posted: Sat Nov 25th, 2017 08:35 pm
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col.stephens
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Each station down the line might not get served in turn.  For instance, if a goods yard or siding could only be entered loco first because the siding(s) were in the direction of travel, obviously the loco would not be able to get out because the wagons being dropped off would be in the way.  So, the train would only stop at those stations where the loco could reverse the wagons into the sidings.  It would run past those stations with facing sidings as detailed above, and on reaching the end of the line, the loco would run round the remaining wagons.  On the way back along the line, the loco would now be able to reverse into those goods yards or sidings which it had missed on the way down the branch, and drop off the wagons intended for that station.  Obviously, the train would also be picking up wagons, if necessary, at each station.


The series of books on railway operation by Bob Essery are a mine of information on this subject.


Terry


 

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 Posted: Sat Nov 25th, 2017 10:25 pm
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Sol
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I am aware of the books by Bob Essery but I think he would had a fit if he saw my station plan


Passing loops, sidings pointing both ways...

and attached is a typical sequence list of trains and Train Orders for that station showing all trains & times

Attachment: Sequence test .xlsx (Downloaded 0 times)



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 Posted: Sat Nov 25th, 2017 10:27 pm
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Sol
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The times on the sequence list are based on a fast clock of 5:1 that is displayed on two monitors for the crew to see.



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