Video Archive         Recent Topics      
YMR logo

You are here:  Your Model Railway Club > More Practical Help > Scratchbuilding. > A Village General Shop after John Ahern. To bottom of page
                 

 Moderated by: Spurno Page:    1  2  3  4  Next Page Last Page  
Start New Topic Reply Printer Friendly

A Village General Shop after John Ahern. - Scratchbuilding. - More Practical Help - Your Model Railway Club
AuthorPost
 Posted: Sat Nov 11th, 2017 12:33 am
PMQuoteReply
link to this 1st post
col.stephens
Full Member
 

Joined: Tue Feb 7th, 2012
Location: Kent, United Kingdom
Posts: 2046
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

 Here we go again... another John Ahern building on the way.  This time I have decided to make the charming Village General Shop.  There is a drawing of the building in the appendix to Miniature Building Construction.  I have JA's 4mm scale drawing of the structure and will be working from this.  Construction is much the same as my previous builds of John Ahern buildings so I doubt there will be any ground breaking surprises coming up.  This is a small building and I anticipate that it will be completed a darn sight sooner than the Small Country Station (one year!)


Today, I awoke early, descended the stairs, fed the cats, made a cup of tea and decided to dig out the 1.5mm mounting board.  I began by drawing the ends.  Contrary to what you see in the following photos, all pencil lines and cut edges are straight and have been drawn using a set square.



The front and rear of the building were drawn and cut out also.  All corners of the windows and doors were pricked with a scriber before being cut out.



 



So, all of the cutting out was achieved by breakfast.  Off to a good start.  This is where we are at present...



As usual, I will be using Scalescenes papers to cover the model.  The rear will be covered with red brick whilst the front and sides will be covered in stucco.  The Scalescenes papers are sprayed over with Testors Dullcote, a matt varnish, to protect the inkjet surface.


More soon.


Terry

Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Sat Nov 11th, 2017 12:49 am
PMQuoteReply
link to this 2nd post
Mr.Tin
Full Member
 

Joined: Mon Nov 6th, 2017
Location: Emneth,Cambridgeshire, United Kingdom
Posts: 58
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

I love to see these made, Terry, but I meant to ask. As you cover each wall separately with brick paper, how do you cover the filling of the inevitable gap at the corners?
Martin

Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Sat Nov 11th, 2017 03:46 am
PMQuoteReply
link to this 3rd post
Chubber
Casseroled Badger


Joined: Thu Oct 2nd, 2008
Location: Ivybridge, Devon, Gateway To Dartmoor.. , United Kingdom
Posts: 4467
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

If I may leap in here (notwithstanding any reply Terry makes to explain his excellent results ) I tend to cover (say) the ends and cut the texture paper flush with the edges, then allow the front and back papers to overlap a little and after joining the four sides, cut off the appropriate overhang with a razor blade using the flush cut side as a guide.

If I were able to call up the thread I did on a GWR engine shed from my tablet there is a sketch to explain same.

Doug



____________________
'You may share the labours of the great, but you will not share the spoil...' Aesop's Fables

"Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy" - Benjamin Franklin

Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Sat Nov 11th, 2017 02:24 pm
PMQuoteReply
link to this 4th post
Mr.Tin
Full Member
 

Joined: Mon Nov 6th, 2017
Location: Emneth,Cambridgeshire, United Kingdom
Posts: 58
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Thanks, Doug.  That would be a neat way of doing it, certainly.
But a razor blade?  There are those who would have the H&E police banging on your door!<G>

Martin

Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Sat Nov 11th, 2017 10:55 pm
PMQuoteReply
link to this 5th post
col.stephens
Full Member
 

Joined: Tue Feb 7th, 2012
Location: Kent, United Kingdom
Posts: 2046
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

 Martin, I simply wrap the brickpaper over the ends of each side and glue behind.  Like this...



The corners are simply butted together.  The join can often be covered with a downpipe.  In any event, I always make sure that the brick courses line up.  On the building below, the two outer joins are covered by the downpipes.  The join in the centre of the photo is visible.  I don't think the joins are too noticeable in 4mm scale from normal viewing distances.



Terry

Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Sat Nov 11th, 2017 10:59 pm
PMQuoteReply
link to this 6th post
col.stephens
Full Member
 

Joined: Tue Feb 7th, 2012
Location: Kent, United Kingdom
Posts: 2046
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Doug, I shall have to try your method.  Thanks for explaining.


Terry

Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Sat Nov 11th, 2017 11:03 pm
PMQuoteReply
link to this 7th post
Mr.Tin
Full Member
 

Joined: Mon Nov 6th, 2017
Location: Emneth,Cambridgeshire, United Kingdom
Posts: 58
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

It's fine where there are plausibly downpipes to cover the join.  Very nice work anyway. Lovely to see JA's book still used. I have George Stoke's book too, but it's surprisingly difficult to read and seems to gloss over a lot of stuff.
Cheers,
Martin

Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Sun Nov 12th, 2017 02:33 pm
PMQuoteReply
link to this 8th post
col.stephens
Full Member
 

Joined: Tue Feb 7th, 2012
Location: Kent, United Kingdom
Posts: 2046
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

I too have the book by George Iliffe Stokes, 'Buildings in Miniature', published by Peco for five shillings.  I agree it is not an easy read.  I also have 'The Peco Book of Model Buildings' by Mike Gill.  I picked up a copy for £1 not long ago at a model railway show. I also have 'Modelling Buildings' by Malcolm J. Smith, a Pendon publication. 


Terry 

Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Sun Nov 12th, 2017 02:42 pm
PMQuoteReply
link to this 9th post
Mr.Tin
Full Member
 

Joined: Mon Nov 6th, 2017
Location: Emneth,Cambridgeshire, United Kingdom
Posts: 58
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

You can never have too many books, Terry. Especially by the acknowledged experts. I have Gordon Gravett's book on grasslands and muddy tracks, but I haven't got round to laying out for static fluff. I made a bug bat dispenser, but I still do alright with my medical lint and Scotch brite. However I will shortly need some sticky up stuff.
I used to have the Pendon book on cottage building, but it disappeared in a move. Looking at some recent additions to Pendon in MRJ, I am inclined to stick with the George and John show! I wonder what George would have made of Foamex. He's bound to have used it if it were around back then.
I believe my dear bride has got me a book on using brick papers, for Christmas, ut I'm not allowed near it. It will go with another by Gordon Gravett that also turned up and was also hidden away till the 25th. She buys me books and music for Christmas. It stops me screaming abuse at the crap on the telly that she might be watching on the big day

Martin

Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Sun Nov 12th, 2017 03:39 pm
PMQuoteReply
link to this 10th post
Chubber
Casseroled Badger


Joined: Thu Oct 2nd, 2008
Location: Ivybridge, Devon, Gateway To Dartmoor.. , United Kingdom
Posts: 4467
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Mr.Tin wrote: Thanks, Doug.  That would be a neat way of doing it, certainly.
But a razor blade?  There are those who would have the H&E police banging on your door!<G>

Martin

Tee-hee!

If it was good enough for Mr Ahearn, s'good enough for me....



Copyright CV Russell and E Fells. Reproduced with their kind permissions.

and here, appropos the razor blade corner method, see lower right corner...





With apologies for semi-hi-jack, Terry,

Doug



____________________
'You may share the labours of the great, but you will not share the spoil...' Aesop's Fables

"Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy" - Benjamin Franklin

Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Sun Nov 12th, 2017 05:43 pm
PMQuoteReply
link to this 11th post
albert weatherspoon
Full Member
 

Joined: Wed Jun 10th, 2015
Location:  Ipswich, Suffolk, United Kingdom
Posts: 29
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Just another quick question, if I may, which adhesive do you use, and is it applied to paper or wall? I'm having trouble with wrinkles at the moment, and happy to listen to the experts.

Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Sun Nov 12th, 2017 05:50 pm
PMQuoteReply
link to this 12th post
Mr.Tin
Full Member
 

Joined: Mon Nov 6th, 2017
Location: Emneth,Cambridgeshire, United Kingdom
Posts: 58
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Spraymount if you can afford it or Evo-Stik for me, always.

Martin

Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Sun Nov 12th, 2017 06:04 pm
PMQuoteReply
link to this 13th post
Chubber
Casseroled Badger


Joined: Thu Oct 2nd, 2008
Location: Ivybridge, Devon, Gateway To Dartmoor.. , United Kingdom
Posts: 4467
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

For me, for large areas, PritStick, applied to the walls. Paper damp with glue stretches and tears easily. This way you can stick one surface/face, then have dry paper to score along at the edge to make a sharp fold. For 'beasting' a wrap around, say, a chimney, then apply it to the paper and fit carefully. If you have ever done any wall papering you'll know that the paper should 'soak' a bit if you want to stretch it.



____________________
'You may share the labours of the great, but you will not share the spoil...' Aesop's Fables

"Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy" - Benjamin Franklin

Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Sun Nov 12th, 2017 07:38 pm
PMQuoteReply
link to this 14th post
BCDR
Moderator


Joined: Sat Oct 19th, 2013
Location: Reston, Virginia USA
Posts: 2587
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Hi Terry,
I like the razor blade holder design. I have similar in plastic. I use the blunt end for curving strips of paper (without the blade :lol:). Pretty obvious which way the sharp end goes. Just have to remember which end is used for cutting. Is there a left-handed version?
Nigel



____________________
©Nigel C. Phillips
Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Sun Nov 12th, 2017 09:30 pm
PMQuoteReply
link to this 15th post
col.stephens
Full Member
 

Joined: Tue Feb 7th, 2012
Location: Kent, United Kingdom
Posts: 2046
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Doug, thanks for the drawings.  I'm going to give it a try on this current project.


Nigel, personally I always use a scalpel with a 10A blade for all my modelling projects.


Albert, I always use a glue stick.  I reproduce here what John Wiffen who produces Scalescenes kits, says on his website on this subject:


Can I use spray glue to mount the prints?


"Having spent over twenty years working as a graphic designer, I really can't say I trust the longevity of spray glue, it does have a tendency to dry out and separate over time. After much experimentation, as unlikely as it seems I have found the best option by far for mounting the sheets on to card is the humble glue stick (I use UHU). 


As long the back of the sheet is given a generous but even coat of glue, not only do glue sticks not wrinkle or bubble, but they also have the ability to be repositioned and smoothed for several minutes after application. After running a roller over the sheet, I have found gluestick adhesive to have excellent longevity."


Personally, I always run a small roller over the sheet once it has been applied with the glue stick.  The rollers are available from craft shops.  I also always construct the model on plate glass to ensure the building sits flat.


Hope this helps.


Terry 


 


 

Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Sun Nov 12th, 2017 10:09 pm
PMQuoteReply
link to this 16th post
albert weatherspoon
Full Member
 

Joined: Wed Jun 10th, 2015
Location:  Ipswich, Suffolk, United Kingdom
Posts: 29
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

I've tried glue stiks, but after a while they seem to give a 'lumpy' coating. Perhaps I keep them in operation for too long? I'll be trying some of the other suggestions, though.

Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Sun Nov 12th, 2017 11:57 pm
PMQuoteReply
link to this 17th post
gastwo
Member


Joined: Sat Jul 30th, 2011
Location: Llechryd, Ceredigion, United Kingdom
Posts: 578
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

You are right A-W, they seem to have a limited life once you start to use one. I generally ditch a glue stick after I have used it for a couple of weeks - it begins to dry out and start to solidify.
Cheap enough anyway, so it's false economy to try and make one last.

HTH
Shaun.

Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Mon Nov 13th, 2017 02:41 am
PMQuoteReply
link to this 18th post
Mr.Tin
Full Member
 

Joined: Mon Nov 6th, 2017
Location: Emneth,Cambridgeshire, United Kingdom
Posts: 58
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Cannot get Prit sticks to work. Even helping the kids with school projects where they're given the stuff to use, I couldn't get it to stick. Good quality Spraymount if used on both surfaces is OK. I have had it let go when the card substrate got very damp. In that case I just reglued with Evo-Stik. That does NOT let go! But you have to be accurate positioning it. If that is a potential problem, use Dunlop Thixofix. It allows a bit of shifting. As long as it isn't a liquid style glue.

Cheers,
Martin

Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Wed Nov 15th, 2017 05:50 pm
PMQuoteReply
link to this 19th post
col.stephens
Full Member
 

Joined: Tue Feb 7th, 2012
Location: Kent, United Kingdom
Posts: 2046
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

The two chimney stacks were made next by gluing four more pieces of mounting board to each chimney on the ends of the building.  This gave the required thickness...



 



The brick was applied to the rear of the building and the stucco to the front and sides, using a glue stick.  Note the 'wings' protruding from the ends, to cover the edges of the front and rear walls, as suggested by Chubber...



 



The windows will be added next.


More soon.


Terry

Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Thu Nov 16th, 2017 05:55 pm
PMQuoteReply
link to this 20th post
Marty
Enjoying the Journey


Joined: Sun Oct 14th, 2007
Location: Perth, Western Australia, Australia
Posts: 5885
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

I use the cheap glue sticks that you get in the stationary section of the supermarket. Very effective. 
Following along Terry, keep it coming.

cheers

Marty



____________________
Marty
N Gauge, GWR West Wales
Newcastle Emlyn Layout.
Newcastle Emlyn Station is "Under construction"
Back To Top PMQuoteReply

This is topic ID = 15266     Current time is 04:35 am Page:    1  2  3  4  Next Page Last Page    
You are here:  Your Model Railway Club > More Practical Help > Scratchbuilding. > A Village General Shop after John Ahern.
You can type a quick reply to this topic here. Click in the box below to begin.

Or to reply to an individual post, or to include images, attachments and formatted text,
click the Quote or Reply buttons on each post above.

To start a new topic in this forum, click the Start New Topic button below.
To start a new topic in a different forum, click the Forum Jump drop-down list below.
Start New Topic


Back to top of page

           
15 Most Recent Topics

Problems with this web site? Please contact the Webmaster.

All material submitted to this web site is the responsibility of the respective contributor. By submitting material to this web site you acknowledge that you accept full responsibility for the material submitted.
Unless stated otherwise, all the material displayed on this web site, including all text, photographs, drawings and other images, is copyright and the property of the respective contributor. Registered members are welcome to use it for their own personal non-commercial modelmaking purposes. It must not be reproduced or re-published elsewhere in any form, or used commercially, without first obtaining the owner's express permission.
The owner of this web site may edit, modify or remove any content at any time without giving notice or reason.    © 2008

                 

Recent Topics Back to top of page

Powered by UltraBB 1.15 Copyright © 2007-2011 by Jim Hale and Data 1 Systems. Page design copyright © 2008-2013 Martin Wynne. Photo gallery copyright © 2009 David Williams.