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The Lincolnshire Loop. - Members Personal Layouts. - Model Railway Layouts. - Your Model Railway Club
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 Posted: Sun Apr 29th, 2018 04:21 pm
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Bunkerbarge
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Hi Barry many thanks for the input.  I did toy with the idea of soldering the drops to the fishplates as it does seem to be an infinately easier way of achieving the goal but everyone I spoke to suggested, as you mention, the dangers of a bad contact, particularly as I will be spray painting the track as the first stage of weathering before ballasting.  The more I thought about it afterwards though the more I suspect that the chances of a bad connection are unlikely plus, if I use a drop at every joint even in the worst case scenario of a bad contact the track section is still being fed from only 900 mm away.  I think when I go to the lower levels I will have a go at soldering the drops to the fishplates.  I did find that the slightest misalignement of the wire with the hole would put the track out and I did struggle with a couple of sections.  I also tried the curve templates but my track does not conform to 'standard' curves so they ended up being more trouble than they were worth.  I also tried the adjustable curve holders but found I needed yet another hand to hold them in place!

I think I should have had a go with the straight one but the long straights are all down now and regular use doesn't seem to highlight any major problems.

To be honest the curves proved to be easier to deal with than the straights, which are not as perfect as I would have liked.  I have to say though that I do feel fairly reassured when I look at magazine and show layouts and see that perfect straights seem to be a challenge for everyone.

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 Posted: Mon Apr 30th, 2018 07:05 am
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Bunkerbarge
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Well just a bit of an update for now.  Since I last wrote I finished the backscene on the north wall but had a problem yet again with the same piece.  The challenge stems from the fact that I have to make a deep cut out to go around a piece of wood on the wall so the backscene ends up very weak and flexible at that point.  I ended up again with a bad joint but decided this time to hide the joint with cunningly placed scenery later.  This piece also of course then threw the last piece out as well so I have two bad joints to hide.


After that I completed the two upper level loops of track and have been frequently testing it since.  The straights could be better but being fitted at arms length were never going to be easy.  The rolling stock all seems to work fine apart from the Hornby L1, which seems to have a reputation anyway.  From what I can see on line the front pony truck is a well known challenge and quite why Hornby are still selling it is completely beyond me.  They are well aware that this locomotive has challenges rendering it almost useless yet they still continue to take people's money for them. 



Anyway the track incorporates two crossovers between the loops on the north side with the pairs of points being operated from a single channel.  I also have the two points fitted to connect to the lower levels at a later date and a point to a loco shed siding line and a goods shed siding line.  The goods shed will fill up a corner but I thought it simply looked odd with a buffer behind it as I am sure that trains will be filled as they file through the shed for its full length.  I decided to cheat by using a tunnel entrance to give the impression of a much longer siding and the best way of achieving this seemed to be by knocking around some Will's kits.  Fitting it into a curved backscene took a bit of doing.  It remains a separate piece for now until the painting and scenery pieces are added.


Another thing that has absorbed a lot of time is the playing around with the building of the loco shed.  I liked the LCC kits so put one of those together and added some detail in the form of quoins to cover the corners, fans in the gable ends a piece of platform inside along one side and some signage.  I have played around with this on a test board and added a platform, also from LCC with some additional stiffening, and a coal office.  For that I didn't like the wooden staithes so I made my own from wood stock.  The derrick is a ratio kit and the water tower is a Backmann ready made item, both to be finished painting, detailing and weathering.  The stores/office/canteen is a cheap Hornby coach removed from its wheels, mounted on a wooden frame and weathered up.When I am happy with everything they will be transferred to the layout after the goods yard in the corner has been done.


A big challenge has been the operation of the crossovers, which regularly fail and then throw the pair into an uncoordinated mess, which takes a long time to reset.  I can only think the challenge comes from the 1 mm brass rod I have used to operate them, which maybe causes them to stick occasionally.  I must admit I am not as happy with the look of them as I had hoped so I might try for a less obtrusive and more reliable connection to the point or I might try some plastic sleeving and piano wire arrangements instead and then use plastic points rodding kits to hide them.  I have some 1mm OD x 0.5 mm ID plastic tubing and some 0.46 mm piano wire, which fits perfectly.


When everything is eventually working reliably the electronics will be boxed in and a hinged cover fitted which will have scenic items on top of them to hide them.









































































































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 Posted: Mon Apr 30th, 2018 06:21 pm
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Barchester
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Hi Richard, just a thought with the backscene how about instead of cutting round the wood block actually bend the backscene completely round it ? The same as you did in the corner, but bend the backscene board so it comes out, round and back in. Then your scenic paper would flow round rather than needing cut. Might be worth considering if you re do it anytime.   looking good  though !

Cheers

 Matt

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 Posted: Mon Apr 30th, 2018 07:28 pm
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Bunkerbarge
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I did think of a number of possible ways of accomodating the post, including going around it as you suggest, but decided the cut out option was going to be the easiest way of doing it!!  I'm stuck with it now as removing the backing will probably remove most of the plaster with it.  Consequently it is staying put.

Hindsight is a wonderful thing.

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 Posted: Thu May 3rd, 2018 06:38 pm
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Barry Miltenburg
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Hi Richard - coming on a treat!!

I confess that, having looked through the pictures, I cannot see a bad backscene join.  Did you manage to keep it out of shot?  The loco shed and facilities are very nice - its this sort of eye candy in the foreground that always let you get away with the odd blemish in the background I believe so the backscene issue may simply vanish.

Barry

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 Posted: Thu May 3rd, 2018 07:55 pm
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Bunkerbarge
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Hi Barry,  If you look at the wooden post on the wall the first bad join is around six inches to the left of it.  The worst one is around the corner about two inches to the right of the building sat on the right side of the group.  I have intentions of elevating the level around the corner anyway so I think a strategically placed tree and a bit of careful airbrushing should render it almost invisible.

I do agree with the thinking of the foreground taking the eye away and, as I mentioned earlier in this thread, the research I have done on backscenes all suggests that the detail and clarity should be reduced towards the distance to give the impression of depth.  I think blowing mine up as much as we have has had the desirable effect of doing just that and, from what I have played around with so far with low relief buildings etc. I think the overall effect will work well. 

Its just a shame when all the other joins are almost invisible and i was really pleased with the whole scene.

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 Posted: Tue May 8th, 2018 08:30 pm
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Barry Miltenburg
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Blimey Richard - if you have to point out the bad joints they can't be that bad!!

I would plant some trees and forget about them!!

Barry

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 Posted: Wed May 9th, 2018 07:42 am
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Bunkerbarge
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I think we are all more critical of our own work.  I agree though, they will be hidden with something appropriate.

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