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Scratch buildings - Scratchbuilding. - More Practical Help - Your Model Railway Club
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 Posted: Tue Aug 1st, 2017 04:33 pm
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Dorsetmike
Save oil - bring back steam


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Rather than hijack Allan Downes thread on Tools and materials; I thought it best to post my puny efforts separately; rather than larger  beautifully produced edifices my efforts are mostly aimed at  mainly older residential scenes needing fewer skills; an added advantage of N gauge is that most buildings can be cut from an A4 sheet.
I use a plotter cutter for all except the roof, saves hours of cutting, snapping blades, chunks out of fingers etc
It can produce identical copies, a pair of 4 house terraces take about 5 minutes to cut in card, a little longer for embossed plasticard. Positioning and/or size of doors and widows is easily altered with a few clicks of a mouse.



This is a mix of  Metcalfe card (factory bottom left and corner shop/pub upper centre right) and Peedie models cast resin kits (lighter grey low relief top centre) and one Scalescenes garage (bottom right of centre) with a number of my scratch built terraces in various brick or stone finishes. My aim is to get buildings which blend in with Metcalfe, Sclescenes or Peedie yet are sufficiently different. Bay windows and dormers are Scalelink csst white metal. Greenhouse, cold frames and garden sheds Peedie; vehicles and other bits from P D Marsh, plants Ebay Chinese sellers, enhanced with scatter.


Basic shape is produced in the cutter software, just a rectangle with a triangle perched on one end, then exported to an image editor, window and door openings sneakily produced by scanning the etches to get an exact sized rectangle, which I then copy/paste onto the basic shape as required to give the following images which are then exported back to the cutter software. (to position doors and windows draw a line along where you want the top, erase it before export, you could also copy the 3 windows and door of the first house and copy/paste to the others flipping if necessary)

Image sent to cutter software, my window and door openings are sized to accept Peedie models etches; this would be used for the back of a terrace with rear extensions but could also be used for front


Alternative door/window arrangement, this can  be used for a front, but only for a back if no rear extension.


Alternative rear extensions


For N gauge the above will fit onto an A4 sheet, alternatively leaving out the rear extensions you can extend the terrace to 6 houses and include a ginnel


Some cut parts plus 3 frets of etched windows and doors (grey primer, paint any colour) the Window cills and lintels are thin plastic strip, could also be paper , Scalescenes do some sheets of cills and lintels which could also be used. The darker pieces of card on the piece centre right are for positioning the rear extensions and also serve as roof supports for the extension, the four pieces on the left also show where to make folds.  The smaller grey pieces top centre are for porches, the longer single storey piece can be used to extend the ground floor front, could also be used with larger windows for shop fronts .


 A very simple "porch" as above can be made from plastruct styrene angle 3/16", cut a piece the wiidth of the door opening, glue the vertical inside the door opening with the horizontal through the opening. Chimney stacks made from plastic square or rectangular tube covered in brick (or stone) paper, chimney pots either cast white metal or plastic, or DIY from plastic tube.  (as usual the camera sees bits that we miss with the Mk I eyeball)

Assembly much the same as for any card kit, fit doors and windows first; I usually cut a floor and/or ceiling from heavier card or foam board, helps keep things square, I also often use a piece of plastic angle at inside corners especially at joins to give a greater area for glue, while glue sets I use York Models magnetic pieces to hold things together.

Roof preferably from tile embossed plasticard, the roof is probably the most visible part so the embossed looks better than printed card, York Models do self adhesive laser cut strips which look effective, various shapes and colours.

https://www.yorkmodelrail.com/n-scale/tiles




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Cheers MIKE
How many roads must a man walk down ... ... ... ... before he knows he's lost

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 Posted: Thu Aug 3rd, 2017 12:41 pm
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Marty
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Joined: Sun Oct 14th, 2007
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That has come out very well Mike, how long is the building? about 100mm?
cheers

Marty



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Marty
N Gauge, GWR West Wales
Newcastle Emlyn Layout.
Newcastle Emlyn Station is "Under construction"
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 Posted: Thu Aug 3rd, 2017 01:48 pm
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Dorsetmike
Save oil - bring back steam


Joined: Mon Feb 18th, 2013
Location: BOURNEMOUTH, United Kingdom
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My photos:
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Just over 150mm/6" Marty, slightly longer than a pair of Metcalfe 2 terrace houses (2x70mm). I suspect part of th ereason for the extra few mm is that I make my window and door openings slightly larger to suit Peedie models etched doors and windows,so each house is about 2.5-3 mm wider, which in N guage scales to roughly between 12" and 18".

One big advantage of scratch building is that you can easily make a building to fit the space you have; also for me a further plus is that viewers are less likely to say or think "more of the same old kits that we see on every layout"

"Same old, same old houses"  often makes me think back to some shows I attended back in the 1980s where a chap was wandering round the layouts marking loco numbers off in an Ian Allan ABC; used to wonder what he thought of the same loco turning up on a number of different layouts.



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Cheers MIKE
How many roads must a man walk down ... ... ... ... before he knows he's lost

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