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Tools of the Trade ? - All Other RTR Locomotive & Rolling Stock Makers. - More Practical Help - Your Model Railway Club
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 Posted: Tue Aug 1st, 2017 09:22 am
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allan downes
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It may come as surprise to some that you don't really need that many tools to scratch build buildings out of card or styrene


From lamp huts to cathedrals, nothing changes, either in construction methods used and tools employed where the only difference is that there's a lot more of one than there is of the other. So, here's three short lists of tools, materials and glues that I've been using for over 50 years where the only things that have changed is the strength of my bi-focals and the kind of  memory that these days has me building things twice because it's a lot quicker than looking for the one I thought I'd built earlier but probably didn't ! 


TOOLS.

Stanley knife.


12inch/24inch steel ruler. 3 foot steel straight edge.


6inch/12inch steel square.


And that's it. 


MATERIALS.


1mm/2mm grey non faced cardboard. Post card quality card for making roof tiles.


Various thicknesses of black and white Slaters plasticard


And that will be all you need to build anything.


GLUES.


PVA - Superglue/thick/medium/thin. - Evostick impact adhesive.


And there you have it, but do use good quality knife blades - Draper for example - and you'll build empires for just as less as for just as more !


Hope that helps.


Allan 












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 Posted: Tue Aug 1st, 2017 11:35 am
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Dorsetmike
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Must admit I don't aspire to the quality of your models, especially with the tools and materials you list, I suspect most of us will have our own preferences for both tools and materials

I'd agree with most of the tools you list, except maybe modelling in N gauge I'd rarely need 24" rules.  As for materials my preference where possible is Slaters embossed plasticard, alternatively plain card with brick, stone or tile printed onto A4 label stock and stuck to the card.

With advancing age (now 83) I've gone over to using a plotter cutter for as much as possible, leaving knives as a last resort. I do the building walls with window and door openings on computer then convert the images in the plotter cutter software to generate the drive signals to the plotter cutter. I can cut out 2 four house terrace house walls from an A4 sheet in between 5 and 10 minutes depending on the material being cut.

I use etched brass windows and doors, I think most of those provided in plastic kits are too coarse in N gauge, the Metcalfe printed on acetate are not much better. I also use cast bay windows and dormers to add variety.

I'd beinterested to know what method you use to keep corners square, I usually add a floor or ceiling of 3mm foam board or sometimes some plastic angle, backed up by some York models magnetic aids  in various sizes while the glue sets

https://www.yorkmodelrail.com/useful-bits/yorks-magnetic-mates-small-squares-x-2




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 Posted: Tue Aug 1st, 2017 01:00 pm
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allan downes
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The thing is, Mike. All the tools and materials listed above was all that was needed to produce this. So, how would you go about producing the same on a plot cutter thingy ?

Oh, and How do I produce square corners ? With a set square of course the same way as builders have been doing for centuries.


Secretly of course I wish that I had your computer skills then it would cut out all the guess work associated with 'hack 'n' hope' !





Allan


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 Posted: Tue Aug 1st, 2017 01:35 pm
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Brossard
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Quite agree that the tools required for making buildings from scratch are not extensive.

I think the biggest challenges are finding a suitable prototype and sufficient information on it to make a reasonable model.  After that it's simply a matter of scaling and copying.

Allan, you've shown us a number of ways to create details in your articles (which are now safely in my computer).

I know I'm not going to tackle anything like your church but we can take on smaller projects.

Wills sheets are good but those available commercially tend to be too small for a large area like a wall or roof.  They're also a devil to cut.  I believe you have said elsewhere that you get Wills to supply you with large sheets.

I tend to use Slaters or Southeast Finescale embossed plastic for brick, stone and roof tiles/slate.  These come in large sheets and are very easy to cut.  They do need to be laminated to 0.040" plastic sheet though.

Scalescenes are a very good way for us bodgers to produce good looking buildings.

Lovely stuff.

John



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 Posted: Tue Aug 1st, 2017 03:16 pm
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allan downes
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Hi John.

If you want to join Wills sheets blind the join in with a low melt soldering Iron and always cut out apertures from the back with a Stanley knife


You can also use Slaters heavy embossed stone sheets to good effect as seen here.


Allan.










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 Posted: Tue Aug 1st, 2017 03:24 pm
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allan downes
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Continuing with my ego trip, here be a few more castle shots but built out of Wills stone sheets.

Allan










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 Posted: Tue Aug 1st, 2017 03:31 pm
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allan downes
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And a few church builds too...

Allan














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 Posted: Wed Aug 2nd, 2017 09:27 am
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Longchap
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allan downes wrote: Continuing with my ego trip, here be a few more castle shots but built out of Wills stone sheets.







Allan


























You have a disgraceful lack of self control Allan! Keep up the wonderful work and making us smile.



Best,



Bill



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 Posted: Thu Aug 3rd, 2017 11:10 am
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GreenBR
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Hello Allan,
Are you sure you are not a alien ?
I know me a mere mortal can not do that. But it is wonderful to see Thank You
Regards
Stephen



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 Posted: Mon Aug 7th, 2017 12:57 pm
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The Q
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Although your work is vastly better than anything I can do. I would add one more tool, a Scrawker, for adding masonry lines or timber joins in wood.

http://www.clag.org.uk/scrawker.html



although I use a commercial one

https://eileensemporium.com/index.php?option=com_hikashop&ctrl=product&task=show&name=plastic-cutter-scrawker&cid=1622&Itemid=189&category_pathway=1063



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