Video Archive         Recent Topics      
YMR logo

You are here:  Your Model Railway Club > Getting You Started. > Layout Design, Trackwork & Operation. > Stub points To bottom of page
                 

 Moderated by: Spurno  
AuthorPost
Dorsetmike
Save oil - bring back steam


Joined: Mon Feb 18th, 2013
Location: BOURNEMOUTH, United Kingdom
Posts: 1482
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Has anybody built/used stub points





Can be from 2 to 5 way, AFAIK prototypes were used on narrow gauge industial lines, for example, a few were used on the clay workings on the Purbecks; no filing down of the blades just multiple frogs!

Could see that 5 way would be handy on a limited space fiddle yard

MaxSouthOz
Admin


Joined: Sat Aug 23rd, 2008
Location: Adelaide , Australia
Posts: 12343
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

OMG!  :shock:

BCDR
Moderator


Joined: Sat Oct 19th, 2013
Location: Reston, Virginia USA
Posts: 2958
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Yup. No point blades to grind/file :doublethumb :doublethumb :doublethumbHeavy duty bars though, and the other ends need hinges. Easy 3 way turnout, that as you say saves space.

Nigel

Passed Driver
Full Member


Joined: Thu Feb 19th, 2015
Location: Peckham, United Kingdom
Posts: 3299
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Hi Mike.   Having had no experience of Narrow Gauge, either prototype or model this set up looks less than graceful. We’re these points restricted to freight use? Mind you they are space saving.  Best wishes. Kevin

Dorsetmike
Save oil - bring back steam


Joined: Mon Feb 18th, 2013
Location: BOURNEMOUTH, United Kingdom
Posts: 1482
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

The narrow gauge lines on the Purbeck clay workings were basically freight but did carry a few passengers, the first and last trains of the day would carry workers to/from the workings in the open clay wagons, but during the 1930s there was actually a "school train" one covered wagon adapted to take workers' children to the nearest school, there is a picture of it in a paperback of railways in the Purbecks.

Passed Driver
Full Member


Joined: Thu Feb 19th, 2015
Location: Peckham, United Kingdom
Posts: 3299
Status: 
Offline

My photos:
view photos in Gallery
view photos as slides

Thank you Mike, It is good to see variations in Railways both prototype and model.    Kevin


                 

Recent Topics Back to top of page

Powered by UltraBB 1.15 Copyright © 2007-2011 by Jim Hale and Data 1 Systems. Page design copyright © 2008-2013 Martin Wynne. Photo gallery copyright © 2009 David Williams.