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Welcome readers




This is the start of my first "proper" layout, The Faversham Creek, based on the Kent market town of Faversham. Originally, the Faversham line ran on the Chatham line to London, but was later extended to Whitstable and then Herne Bay.  The plan was to extend it to Ramsgate and then join up with the Southern Railway and return to Faversham via Canterbury, creating a lovely loop.  I would love to have the space to model that, but sadly I do not!! Nor did the loop ever happen!

However, Faversham also had a branch line that ran to the creek, a busy little harbour famous for its exports of bricks, cement, fruit, cattle, gunpowder and beer.  The Shepherd Neame Brewery is the oldest exporter of beer in the country - at least as old as 1669 - still producing on its original site.  I can personally recommend both its 1669 ale and its famous "Spitfire" bitter!! I now live in Faversham, but there is a long family history here, on my mother's side. 

My grandfather was the last horse  drawn drayman at the brewery, taking over from his father who was tragically killed by one of the horses.  My mother lived here during the war and was regularly bombed and on one occasion, machine gunned by a Messerschmitt! She gained a little fame by identifying the last two unknown airmen of the second world war, and their crash sites, after a number of archaeological digs, and became an honorary member of 603 squadron.

So "Spitfire" beer has a special place in my family's hearts! In fact the Shepherd Neame T-shirt, emblazoned with "No Focke Comes Close” has almost become the unofficial garment of the surviving pilots!!


My father was a Cornish blacksmith who moved from the South West to work on the Kentish railway after his national service (in Paris) and although he was based at Ashford, he regularly worked at the simple coach  repair works at Faversham.  Obviously he would prefer that I modelled “down home”, but Faversham is an agreed compromise and an area I at least know!


Anyway, the line from Faversham to Whitstable was built before the branchline to the creek.  However, ideally, the line would have run from Faversham Town, to the Creek and then on to the coastal towns.  Google Earth shows that this track was a near perfect oval - perfect for my needs.

 So, I imagine that the track did indeed run in an oval to the creek before running on to the mainline to the coast, while at the other end it travelled to London.  My intention is to build this proposed line -  a busy mainline station (somewhat truncated) with a branchline to the busy creek.  Most of the industries, except for farming and beer were closed before the 60s, but I might imagine that they had  continued to prosper, thus giving me plenty of freight opportunities too. And some shunting! It will not be a prototypical model of the area, but an imaginary "what if..."  And in the 60s it was experimenting with electrics and diesel as well as the end of steam and the southern ports meant that there were all sorts of locomotives in operation, so I can pretty much run whatever I fancy!!  Perfect!

I will keep you posted on my progress, but it will be a marathon, not a sprint as SWMBO seems to have plenty of other plans for me.  

And then there is the granddaughter!!

Warm regards

Last edited on Fri Jul 13th, 2018 01:06 am by Headmaster

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Looking forward to progress reports Michael.It sounds like you've finally found your mojo.

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Spitfire - "The bottle of Britain", now your talking :thumbs

Great intro. Michael



Ed

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Hi Michael,

Great story board. Looking forward to more.

Nigel

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Well, It's been a while since I gave the outline of my proposed layout, but real life seems to get in the way, doesn't it?  However, I have made some progress, so thought I ought give a bit of an update.  Baseboards and storage have all been completed and the track plan drawn a thousand times, but I think I have what I want now.  The real life Faversham Creek proved to be too much for my scale and room available..... but then I was always re-imagining it anyway.  So I have simplified the history, reduced the number of sidings and flipped the real railway 180 degrees and imagined it continuing on to the coastal route.

It is still strongly based on the historical route though....









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I have laid out the mainline and a couple of sidings, but the way I have designed it means I have a very tricky corner which I won't be able to access easily once everything else is built.  I have designed a lift out scenic unit so I can always get to track and locos if needed, but I have been testing and testing in the hope that it will not be a problem!  Famous last words!

So, although pretty much everything is in a temporary state, I have had to start the scenic in my tricky corner.  I wanted to have some sort of theme hidden throughout the layout, and have decided on literature.  Each scene will, I hope, reflect, hint at or downright copy something from novels I have read.  Although one or two movies might sneak in too!

For my A levels (many moons ago!) we studied DH Lawrence. For my first scene I have chosen The Virgin and The Gypsy as my inspiration.  A white metal kit, a bit of scenery and a backscene I created.... I'm quite pleased with the outcome.....

Last edited on Fri Jul 13th, 2018 12:58 am by Headmaster

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It works in black and white too.  I once read that if black and white looks better than colour, then you probably have your colours wrong.  Hopefully you will agree that both photographs look ok!  Please excuse the beam at the top of the picture, I didn't bother to crop it...… I'm a loft dweller!


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I have just re-read my opening post properly, so ought give a bit of an update.  The mainline station of Faversham is now "off scene".  The plan is to show the beginning of the town, it's church and some housing, but the actual station will not appear (trains will disappear to the fiddle yard which will effectively be the "station", but not a feature).  The track will therefore follow the route of the cutting, past the brick works and some open countryside where the Abbey buildings were (although, miraculously, the Abbot's House has survived in my plans and is now an hotel!) and down to the creek for some nice scenes of Standard Quay.  It will then progress, off scene once more, towards Whitstable.

So, in effect, while the real route turns to the left at the creek, mine will turn to the right and so can go off to the existing mainline, all of which is off scene, but allows me to have a large oval track.

The length of the run is about 5 metres, with a 2 metre turn at each end into the fiddle yard.

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Hi Michael,

The virgin and the gypsy scene looks fantastic and blends in very well with the backscene.

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Thanks Dave

it's amazing how a photo can show things the actual scene doesn't! The tree is a bit wonky and some of the grass needs tidying. But I am pleased with the overall effect. I have some figures to add and might throw in a fire pit or something to give it a bit of life.....

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I love static grass and the realism it can bring, but I've learned from small modules I have made previously (as I tried to learn some skills) that it can easily look like a lawn everywhere.  Now, I do a base layer of 2mm grass in any colour.  I give it a good coating of glue and fibre, then "scrunch" it up, creating an uneven base.  I let it dry then add 4mm and 6mm grass of mixed colours to go over the top of the base.  I think it gives quite a natural look.

The "flowers" in the scene are home made flock from kitchen sponge.  Again, I think the general meadow feel works quite well.  I chop the sponge up and put it through a blender with some water, then take it out and let it dry (a squeeze and microwave speeds up this process).  Then I create little pots of the sponge and add some colours to dye it.  For this scene it is yellow, red and purple - chosen from a photograph of a meadow scene.  I scrape the sponge through a sieve to get the pieces as small as possible and just let them fall on the grass.  Then I give it all a good coating of cheap hairspray.  The scene looks quite soft but is actually as stiff as a board!  The hairspray even holds the caravan in place.

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The trees are from previous modules and I don't know if they will remain or if I will make new ones.  The one to the left is made from real twigs from a huge fuschia bush in my garden which are glued together with a hot glue gun to create the shape.  In this instance I have added some seafoam to the branches and then added dried herbs (sorry, cannot remember what exactly) for the leaves.  Looking at the photo it needs a bit of tidying in places.  The other is a seafoam tree with flock leaves added.  I am not sure this one will stay in this scene when it is finally fitted in the correct place.

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A very well put together and believable scene Michael. Your colours are well matched with the backscene too. Your practice dioramas have paid dividends.following along.
Cheers

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Thank you Marty, that is high praise coming from you. Your work almost persuaded me to go N scale - until I actually tried to make models! I don't know how you do it. I'm happy with the first bit of scenery and will hopefully keep the thread updated regularly now that it is underway

Michael

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Marty mentioned that I had spent some time making small dioramas for practice.  I didn't really chronicle those, but I do have a couple of photos from the last one I did, which was a brewery scene with a country pub....

I certainly learned a lot from the process and experimented with a few techniques - some which worked and some which didn't.  Also took my first steps in card modelling from kits.....


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I tried all sorts of things for the stream.  Modelling water proved a challenge.  I tried, PVA, varnish (which is what is in the scenes above).  Eventually settled on a shop product - E Z water, I think it was called.




The backscene is just propped up in this photo and was my first prototype for creating a photo backscene by stitching photos together from the internet.  That's something I am still trying to do better!


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For the Faversham Creek layout, I mentioned earlier that there is an awkward corner for access, so really needed to start on that with the scenic - which is the gypsy scene.  This is how I got there.....

A piece of foamboard, cut to size and shape so it can be removed to work on.....




Polystyrene added and roughly cut.  Thankfully the hot weather means the glue dries quickly!



Modroc over the top, to which I add some texture and then paint in a variety of tones



Then add some 2mm static grass as a foundation, which is then scrunched up to give it a bit of shape, so it doesn't look too much like a lawn!  The colour doesn't really matter at this point.  This is some horrible "spring grass" which I won't be buying again....



A variety of shades and lengths are added in layers over the top.  I experimented with some flowers on this - they got replaced!




I worked in small sections, rather than trying to do the whole thing in one go.  I find this stops everything having a uniform look.  Some areas were left bare which allows the texturing of the ground to show through.  I've added a the dirt track  and some wheel marks for where the caravan will eventually be placed





The final scene is almost finished - just a few things to add and it will be done!  Then back on with the track....





Michael













Last edited on Sun Jul 22nd, 2018 11:57 am by Headmaster

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Just trying to get everything up to date before I go on holiday!

Baseboards for the main scenic areas are built, with the backboards in place and overheard lighting fitted.




The sky back drop is in place.  I will be creating my own scenes for the land, and adding terrain, hence the gap!



And looking at the opposite end.....




The track plan was printed out and pieced together and transferred to the boards.  All the cork bed has now been laid and I have tested the track.... so now it is a case of painting track ready for final laying.  I much prefer to paint before laying, even if I have to touch it up again later.... it is so much easier working at my bench rather than on the baseboards.








Michael



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I am having a bit of trouble with my ballast (!)  In the dioramas I made, I used grey ballast, but from my youth I remember ballast being a light brown and cream stone in our neck of the woods - although it is all grey nowadays.  I have tried a variety of greys with mixed effects;  Some turned green when PVA was applied.... "OO gauge" ballast looked more like boulders and didn't really sit well, so I ended up using a much finer variety which I think worked better.....
So, I bought some fine brown ballast, trying to get a light brown, rather than dark, but it has a sparkle to it which will need to be toned down a lot if I am to use it.  I did a test piece, but I ended up making it look....grey!

Does anyone have any suggestions?

Regards
Michael

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Headmaster wrote: I am having a bit of trouble with my ballast (!)  In the dioramas I made, I used grey ballast, but from my youth I remember ballast being a light brown and cream stone in our neck of the woods - although it is all grey nowadays.  I have tried a variety of greys with mixed effects;  Some turned green when PVA was applied.... "OO gauge" ballast looked more like boulders and didn't really sit well, so I ended up using a much finer variety which I think worked better.....
So, I bought some fine brown ballast, trying to get a light brown, rather than dark, but it has a sparkle to it which will need to be toned down a lot if I am to use it.  I did a test piece, but I ended up making it look....grey!

Does anyone have any suggestions?

Regards
Michael
Hi Michael.


Use N gauge ballast.
Woodland Scenics ballast doesn't turn green when in contact with pva.
Spraying the ballast with Acrylic Matt Varnish should kill the sparkle.


Tony.

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Thanks Tony - Do you happen to know if they do a light brown ballast? Computers don't always give an accurate representation of colours.
Cheers
Michael

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Headmaster wrote: Thanks Tony - Do you happen to know if they do a light brown ballast? Computers don't always give an accurate representation of colours.
Cheers
Michael


Hi Michael.


Try this video.
https://woodlandscenics.woodlandscenics.com/show/video/Ballast


Here's a link to the colours available.
https://woodlandscenics.woodlandscenics.com/show/category/BallastAndCoal



Tony.

Last edited on Sun Jul 22nd, 2018 05:01 pm by amdaley

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Thanks Tony

Maybe a mix of the browns and buff will hit the mark. I'll give it a try

Michael

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Started painting track....


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While England enjoys some unusually hot weather, it has been a bit too warm to work in the loft, even with cooling fans, so I have been busy painting track downstairs and working on a prototype for The Abbot's Hotel.  I have been experimenting with different materials to make guttering, and after quite a bit of trial and error, have come up with this...…


 

It started life as a bamboo skewer, but with a bit of work is now quite a passable length of guttering! It's pretty good for scale too, being about 2mm across.

Regards

Michael

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That is a novel idea. Looks very good too.

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I found fine granite chippings went green after applying watered down pva  I changed to green scene (ithink crushed coconut shell) and found that to be OK

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How on earth did you rebate the channel in the bamboo skewer!? Dremel cutting disc? It looks a very good gutter.

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Yes Marty.... I started with a Dremel cutter and finished it with a small round file.  I'm pleased with the finished guttering, although there are few that didn't work so well!

Michael

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Nice work!

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Well it has been a while since I updated, but work has been progressing steadily.  Quite a bit of track is laid and I've done some temporary wiring to make sure that everything is OK before I start ballasting.  I've fitted 7 cobalt ip digital point motors and got them all working.  They really are a breeze and work wonderfully.  I've also been working on the scenic area at the rear of the layout which is tricky to reach...… all necessary jobs but not particularly exciting to show people!

Maybe some pictures to follow though

Michael

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I've used a tracksetta for the first time that is great for straights. 

Last edited on Sun Sep 23rd, 2018 07:44 am by Headmaster

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And I've also used a gauge for track spacing for the first time.   Again, so useful and great for consistency

Last edited on Sun Sep 23rd, 2018 07:44 am by Headmaster

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The next section of the backscene completed.  The sky doesn't change colour like that.... just my photography skills!

Last edited on Wed Sep 26th, 2018 10:29 pm by Headmaster

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I've also decided to go with DCC Concepts levers for my points control.  They work just fine as momentary switches, but will probably link them through the required encoder to make everything digital and reduce the wiring.   They are lovely!!

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The final corner at the rear of the unit is prepared and drying, ready for a coloured basecoat and some scenic.  I hope some animated rabbits might appear here!!   (See my question about using old solenoid points motors!!).  I intend to have some of the abbey ruins on this section and a matching backscene.  In keeping with my theme, this section is inspired by the novel, Love Among the Ruins..... 

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So I am still working on the end of the layout and the scenic while I await the arrival of some track to finish off this part the goods yard.

I thought I might put some Abbey ruins in this corner, so have taken some old linka bits I have lying around

And I've added some clay which I used to fashion some of the stone filler

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Then added a bit of colour.....

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I've started to prepare the final scenic section at the rear of the layout, and the first of the ruins is planted.  Some more to be added, some footpaths, trees, bushes and the odd climbing plant to break things up.  Maybe some figures...… and some rabbits!  This fits into the corner and the colour match with the back scene is quite good.

Last edited on Wed Sep 26th, 2018 10:28 pm by Headmaster

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Have you tried the scale ballast from Green Scenes? I used their light brown - see pic below.

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Thank you Ian, definitely worth checking out.  You have a lovely layout - I was going to point out some individual bits, but ended up listing it all!  Great work!

Michael

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Thanks Michael - yours is coming along nicely as well. Looking forward to seeing more of the layout as you progress.
ian

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The Abbey ruins scene is coming along - here are the remains.....  They are made from Linka stone castings, painted and then a little white weathering powder to give that decaying appearance

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I am working on a backscene of some more Abbey ruins to set this off..... It's coming along but slow work.  I think I have sourced an image, but I am no artist when it comes to manipulating photos

Regards

Michael

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Time to make some flowers for the ruins..... here are some ox-eye daisies..... Very fiddly to make from a kit, but I like the look.


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And here are some others made from grass tufts and homemade flock

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And here they are planted and growing!  Putting the scene on a board makes it much easier to work on. It means I can work at my bench, build up the scene and check it without breaking my back leaning over everything.  This is especially true for this part of the layout which is quite hard to reach in situ.  Once it is put in place there will only need to be minimal work to get it to blend in with the other scenes.  

Last edited on Fri Oct 5th, 2018 09:11 pm by Headmaster

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I like the daisies in place..... they don't look as "plasticky" as I thought they might, once the base is covered with a bit of grass.

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I have a lot of solenoid point motors from previous dioramas and practice modules which, now that I have gone digital, I no longer need.  I asked in another thread for any ideas of how I could use them for animations, and one bright suggestion was to have a rabbit appearing out of its burrow.  I managed to source a rabbit or two and tried it out on the ruins corner.  It sort of worked, in as much as the rabbit appeared and disappeared.  However, the speed of the motor and the noise created resulted in a rabbit appearing to have been shot in the bottom and projected out of its home!!  If I could animate its eyes widening it might work (!) So I shall put that one down to experience.  Nothing wrong with the idea and I'm glad I gave it a go.  Maybe if I add a spring to the unit so it doesn't click all the way across with such a clunk/gunshot effect that will help   So long as the rabbit actually moves.  I might give it a go! In the mean time, if anyone has any bright ideas for things to do with a solenoid motor other than sell it, let me know!

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A quick update.  The back scenes for the end of the layout are now complete and just drying.  I have also completed the small scenic banking that sits between the backscene and the track at that far end. There might still be little bits of detailing to do - it's knowing when to stop!
The track has all been tested and weathered, so now for the ballasting and blending the track into the rear scenic boards.  Photographs will follow when everything is dry and I've had a tidy up and vacuumed everything.

Making my own backscenes from photographs which I edited and blended together proved to be an interesting road of trial and error.  Combinations of different types of paper and glue brought about very different results. Plain paper and wet glue was fine until it dried.  Then the inkjet colours had changed, probably because the glue seeped through the paper a little.  Matt photo paper resolved this, but the coating on this paper made it harder to disguise the joins.  I tried going down the edges with a matching colour, but that just led to  seeing slightly coloured joins rather than very thin white lines.  Better, but not perfect.  Spray adhesive worked with all papers, and with a tiny overlap tended to disguise lines the best - but there isn't much chance of correcting things once the paper hits the back board!  But this is the way I will probably go in the future.  The final backscene of ruins on a bank, printed on plain paper with inkjet printing and fixed with spray glue is as good as I think it needs to be.  I keep telling myself that there will be lots of buildings and things in front of all of this, so it really will just fade into the distance, but at the moment it is all I can see so I tend to notice every little thing.

As I said, photos will follow and you can make your own judgements.

Regards

Michael

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I owe a great debt to Gormo in creating the backscenes.  He does an excellent tutorial in his thread somewhere - or maybe it was on his YouTube channel - and it certainly gave me the confidence to have a go.  Otherwise I would have been a buy it off the shelf modeller.

I am no photographer and even worse with all of the software for editing.  I am sure if I put the time in I could make the scenes better, using layers and combining different elements together, but that isn't where my interest is at the moment.   One tool I have used constantly is the clone tool, which allows you cover things you don't want in the picture or add things which are missing.  Very useful for adding some trees on the skyline for a sense of depth.

The piece of software for turning it into the actual back scene which Gormo recommended is called PosteRazor, which is free.  I have also used a similar piece of free software called Posteriza which is incredibly easy to use.  You just load your image and it sets how many A4 pages it needs to reproduce it.  You can play around with those if you need to.  I tend to edit my images so that they fit one A4 piece of paper in height (landscape) and then use the posteriza to set the number of pages in length.  This has seemed to work quite well for me.

Michael

Last edited on Sat Oct 13th, 2018 11:45 am by Headmaster

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So, looking down the layout to the right hand end. this is the corner scene with the new back scene fitted



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And the opposite corner, with other new back scene finished!

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On days when I haven't been able to get in the loft, I've been practising with Linka moulds.  I had a set of these when I was a boy in the 70s, but never really got to grips with it.  However I have purchased a few brick and stone moulds and thought I would give it another go.  Casting with plaster was exactly as I remember - not very successful.  But I have been experimenting with using resin recently, and have been much happier with the results.  However, there are still problems, just different problems!  The biggest challenge is still to make sure that the castings are square and even, followed by hiding the joint between the castings.  I still have not perfected it, but I am making some progress.  The ruins posted above are from early attempts at making buildings, which I then broke up to form said ruins. So nothing lost!

I plan to have The Abbot's Hotel somewhere.  We don't know what the Abbot's house looked like in Faversham (or where it was) so I have some licence.  I made a plan from some online photos of possible buildings and set about trying to create it with Linka. Here is my first attempt so far....








Last edited on Sat Oct 13th, 2018 05:18 pm by Headmaster

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The end of the layout is starting to take shape now.  I have started to ballast and added a little more greenery to pull everything together.  A bit more work to do with that, but the right hand side is pretty much how I want it.  A few tweaks needed on the left hand side.  Annoying things like gaps where backscenes joined are now resolved. Just waiting for it all to dry!





Regards

Michael

Last edited on Sun Oct 14th, 2018 05:03 pm by Headmaster

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Your backscenes look extremely good Michael a credit to you there i note they have blended well with the angled roof something i will have to tackle myself at some time.

Brian

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Thank you Brian, I'm pleased I have finally got them sorted.  I was quite lucky with the final image I  chose as it looks as though it recedes into the background, even though it actually protrudes forward and over the track.  I tried a number of images but they didn't look right - I think it was a scale thing.  The main length of the layout has upright back scenes so they will be much easier.  But then I will have to contend with the other end!

Michael

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Well done Michael. ;-)

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Your whole scenery is looking very convincing, Michael.  :thumbs

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Thank  you Reg, Thank you Max.

It has been quite a learning curve and, ironically, much of it won't really be noticed when the quayside buildings and tracks are in place.  Hopefully it will be something people spot after they have seen the action!  But at least I will know it is there.  I cannot wait to get this bit finished off because then I can get on with the final track laying at this end.  And maybe run some trains again!

Regards

Michael

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The ballasting begins.   First some PVA with the ballast poured on top to give a good solid base....



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Then plenty of diluted PVA (about 3 water to 1 PVA).  A good spray of water and washing up liquid first to help it spread properly.  And a light dowsing afterwards to help it get into all of the gaps





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This is what it looks like shortly afterwards - still very wet, but the glue has almost disappeared

Last edited on Tue Oct 16th, 2018 09:57 pm by Headmaster

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Then it just a case of a bit of weathering and I've added a  few weeds - not sure they will stay though.....

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And looking down the line you can see the difference quite clearly...…






I do have to pick off the rogue bits of ballast from the rails and track and touch up the rails in places, but pretty easy, if a little time consuming.  Once it is all finished I will add some weathering powders to pull everything together

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The wonders of a simple bit of editing gives some nice evocative black and white photographs of the scenery so far....














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I also started on the last "scenic board" for this end of the layout.  My usual method described previously.  I do the static grass in small areas trying to link the colours to the backscene.  Here the top of the bank has been done and I think it ties in quite nicely.  I will let this dry properly before I do the face of the bank.  I don't think it is too obvious where the two things join, which is the main thing.....


Last edited on Tue Oct 16th, 2018 11:45 pm by Headmaster

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Thinking ahead, I've been wondering what sort of surface to give to the quayside scene.  Old photographs of the area show a mixture of different things, including lots of stone - a bit like cobbles only slightly larger.  I thought originally about using plastic sheets, but I really don't like the joins which will inevitably show up.  So I have been experimenting with modelling clay and a little tool I made.  This is a sample.  What do people think, is it convincing?


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Looks good from here Michael  :thumbs





Ed

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Those monochrome cameos are excellent Michael:thumbs
The cobblestone sample looks good to me......you will need lots of patience to hand stamp them all.....how big is the quay area?

Regards

John

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Thanks Ed

I thought they looked ok.... but it's always good to have a second opinion before I waste time planning how I might actually do it!  Thanks for the reply
Michael

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Thank you John - high praise from you!  And thanks for the comment on the cobbles.  It is quite a large area, but I don't think it will all be the stones, the prototype had a real mixture of surfaces - stones, bricks, cement..... so I might replicate that.  I actually find it quite therapeutic stamping the stones.....  I might not be saying that at the end!!

Michael

Last edited on Wed Oct 17th, 2018 07:54 pm by Headmaster

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This was my final scenic board for the end of the layout.  When I finished the static grass it didn't look right.  The bank was too steep and uniform and looked like I had just plonked some lump of green on the edge of the layout.  So I thought I ought to remake it...… But then I had an idea.....





Using precision engineering techniques I decided to try a bit of terra forming:  I hit it with a hammer.  A lot.  The second photo is the result!  Much better.  I may have invented a new technique!!







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The ballasting and scenic at the end of the layout are almost finished.... And final wiring and soldering is done











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I will be able to put in the lift out section and crack on with a bit more track laying, and start to plan the quayside buildings.

Michael





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A good bit of impact engineering gave the exact desired result Michael


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Impact engineering!  I like it Brian!!

Michael

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Not much done today except an experiment in making a rickety fence which I think will go at the rear of some warehouses that will feature at the quay.   These were made from chopped up coffee stirrers and lolly sticks, soaked in wood dye.



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I think those coffee stirrers/lolly sticks get used more than what they were designed for.... a nice fence Michael.

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Very true Sol, although I did pay £! for a hundred lolly sticks!  The stirrers came free with an overpriced coffee....
I think the test shows the fence will work in principle although I will make the final one a little more even at the top and a few gaps and broken bits at the bottom.  I will also have to improve the rear side for connecting short sections together and think of a way of firmly attaching it to the scene.  But as a first attempt I'm quite happy. A bit of weathering at it should fit in just fine.

Michael

Last edited on Wed Oct 24th, 2018 08:19 am by Headmaster

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Hi Michael
I do admire the sweeping curve with the Abbey ruins......great example of the effective application of “less is more”. What is planned for the space in front of the track? I re read the thread but couldnt find a track plan.

Forgive me I am invariably slow with my responses so this is out of sequence......although I do like the fence:thumbs

Best wishes

John

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Thank you John.   I played around with plans for so long, I was in danger of being a permanent armchair modeller.  I really want the railway to sit in the landscape, but also feel like, but not replicate, the prototype.  I have taken a few liberties with history.....

The "sweeping curve" is the mainline that goes off to the coast.....  In front of that is Standard Quay, from Faversham Creek, with a number of sidings, warehouses, small industries and fishing.  The Creek exported beer, coal, cement, gunpowder (even in the 60s.... in fact it still produces specialist gunpowders) fish - especially oysters, bricks (there were 13 brick works making London Bricks up until the 70s) fruit, hops and fertilisers. There was a large cattle dock for transporting a variety of animals. There was, until recently, a dairy and also furniture manufacturers.  There was also a processed food factory.  All of these products were moved to the creek and it's goods yards before being sent out, either by boat or by train. There were six quays in total - I'm only modelling one!  While exports and deliveries were the main focus of the Creek, it also imported things, especially  steel and wood from Scandinavia.  It also experimented quite early on with shipping containers, and some of those are still in existence at the modern quay.  There was a customs house, a harbour master's house (Quay master's house?) both of which I hope to model.  In fact, the quay has England's oldest surviving, working warehouse, although it is a series of shops these days..... the building is quite magnificent, but sadly beyond my modelling skills!

In truth, the heyday of the creek was from 1650-1930.  (I know that is quite a long time frame, but the importance of Faversham developed over this period) After that, other local harbours had taken over imports and exports and trains actually took services away.  Once important industries died out.  But I am imagining that the creek continued to flourish and that sea and rail are working together.

In the prototype, goods wagons were deposited in a holding section, but the locomotives were not allowed to take them to the various sidings.  Instead small shunters were used, which I plan to replicate.   There will be lots of opportunities for shunting and puzzles, while both stopping and non-stopping passenger services run around the loop. We get express passenger services to Dover and Ramsgate, local stopping services, some freight running through to other ports and, of course, the Orient Express! The era allows late steam, diesel and, with the advent of electrification, some early electrics.  I had thought about adding the third rail, but decided that was probably pushing my limited skills!  I'm not one for making sure that all of the trains are spot on for the time and location, although I try to be broadly in line.  Definitely a case of "It's my railway...."

A long answer to your question about a layout plan!!  Basically it is sidings with warehouses and industries in front of the countryside backscene, which is how it is in reality.  It is still an area that is thankfully protected and undeveloped.

I originally intended a small turntable (which was once present at the quay), but the electrics, power and DCC scare me.... And having read about your travails, I know that may be a step too far for me at this point.  Maybe in the future! 

I have learned so much from reading your thread and looking at your photos, if I get to 50% of your eye for detail I will be delighted!!

Regards

Michael

Last edited on Wed Oct 24th, 2018 11:42 pm by Headmaster

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For anyone interested, this is the old warehouse in Faversham...…




Last edited on Wed Oct 24th, 2018 11:55 pm by Headmaster

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And this is the old Provender Warehouse, used by merchants who did not have their own warehouse.  It is now the home of the Sea Cadets!

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In fact, Faversham is well worth a visit.... Regular markets, boutique shops and pleasant restaurants and tearooms - SWMBO is bound to be entertained!  Then there is the brewery tour of England's oldest, still existent brewer - Shepherd Neame….  I may have mentioned them earlier!!

Here is the visitor centre...


And part of the main brewery and hireable venue!




But that is not all.....















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Just one of the old pubs in the town, which also does some excellent food....



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A bit our nation's history.... this is the Faversham Workhouse...



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We have a beautiful conversion of the original water tower.....






The station is a listed building...








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Longbridge, so named because it is (was?) the longest footbridge spanning a railway track.  I believe it still is, but I may be wrong....






We even have a Michelin starred restaurant, and two more just a few miles away!

Last edited on Thu Oct 25th, 2018 12:26 am by Headmaster

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King Stephen is buried here, we have our own copy of the Magna Carta, we are one of the oldest market towns in England and.... we have a model railway shop!!!



And I don't even work for the Faversham tourist board!!!

Warm regards 

Michael

Last edited on Thu Oct 25th, 2018 12:29 am by Headmaster

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What splendid photos. Will you be modelling any o the buildings?

Cheers


John

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There are lots of buildings to choose from!  I will definitely have a go at the Provender Store, I do not know if it was common to have a community warehouse, but I like the idea.  The old warehouse is beyond me, but I may try to do something with photography to perhaps create something at the rear, to give a bit of depth.  The brick patterns change every 6 feet, which is what gives the character.  Maybe  in a few years and after a lot of practise!

I will definitely have a go at the Guildhall when I get to the town end of the layout...







Michael 

Last edited on Thu Oct 25th, 2018 08:10 am by Headmaster

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That's very exciting, Michael.  :cool:

Did I see that water tower conversion on Grand Designs?

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And maybe something like these - The Royal Cinema is just tucked in there too.  It's a delightful "Tudorbethan" building, designed in 1936 to fit in with the surrounding buildings.  Originally Faversham had four cinemas, only The Royal survives 



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Hi Max
There have been a couple of water tower conversions on the show, but I don't think it was the Faversham one... but I may be wrong.

Michael

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This is typical of the warehouses at the creek I shall be attempting to model - with its rickety fence!


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Headmaster wrote:

This is typical of the warehouses at the creek I shall be attempting to model - with its rickety fence!


And this photo very effectively answers my question earlier about vackground and fore ground. What a super building to model
Regards

John

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I am starting to think about the sidings which actually run and the make up and location of buildings.  Usually I just use cardboard boxes made to a rough scale of finished buildings, but this time I thought I might make it all a little more picturesque!



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Some great photos, make me almost wish I was back in the UK so I could go and have a look myself. What a great idea of printing out the buildings (or something similar) to what you eventual intend to model. A while off that stage for me at the moment but I am keeping boxes ready for mock ups. Will have to look for pics to face them off with.

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Thank you Dave.  I am not very good at visualising 3D space, nor the scale size of things, so this helps me a lot!  And the pictures of the final buildings also give me a reference point for what it will look like, so I can play around until I get the scene right.

It's cold and wet here.... you are probably better off in Spain!

Regards

Michael

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No work on the layout as we had the granddaughter for the day.  Delightful, but I'm on half term and have a schedule!!!  I did however, manage to experiment this evening with making a small step ladder, shovel and what will become a broom.... Just to see if I could make them!  Might end up near the fence and a warehouse. The penny gives an idea of scale.

The holes for the steps were drilled with an Archimedes drill - a delightful little tool.







Last edited on Sat Oct 27th, 2018 08:34 am by Headmaster

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That looks brilliant. I might have a go!

Headmaster wrote: Not much done today except an experiment in making a rickety fence which I think will go at the rear of some warehouses that will feature at the quay.   These were made from chopped up coffee stirrers and lolly sticks, soaked in wood dye.




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Thanks Chris!  Rickety is easy to do.  I haven't managed to make a nice neat one yet!  

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The first warehouse is under construction - but typically, no builders to be seen!!  The ladder is another homemade effort while watching television.... and the broom has some bristles now.



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This warehouse is being constructed using Linka moulds and resin, but that won't be any good for when I come to model actual buildings.  I've made card kits, but can never get them to look like anything other than.... cardboard with paper stuck on.  They work well for buildings in the distance or hidden by a bit by scenery but always look a bit flat to me.  I've seen the card work of others and they look great, so I'm not sure what I am doing wrong.  Has anyone had any success with a card frame covered in Slater's embossed plastic sheets in OO gauge?

Michael

Last edited on Tue Oct 30th, 2018 09:06 pm by Headmaster

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Headmaster wrote: This warehouse is being constructed using Linka moulds and resin, but that won't be any good for when I come to model actual buildings.  I've made card kits, but can never get them to look like anything other than.... cardboard with paper stuck on.  They work well for buildings in the distance or hidden by a bit by scenery but always look a bit flat to me.  I've seen the card work of others and they look great, so I'm not sure what I am doing wrong.  Has anyone had any success with a card frame covered in Slater's embossed plastic sheets in OO gauge?

Michael

Hi Michael

I was just about to respond to your earlier post and ask how you made the ladder? It looks so much more realistic than the cast off Ratio signal ladders that I use.

As you know I am a big Scalescene fan........he has progressively made his kits more three dimensional, and consequently more complicated, but the end result does overcome the flat look you refer to. Chubber, of this parish, taught me the key to acceptable card modelling.......sharp blades, multiple cuts and careful scoring of corners.
I know you are not supposed to mix media but I always add plastic guttering, drain pipes and often doors to my models.....I dont think the supplied card versions work.

To answer your question above.....yes I have. Both the dairy and the stables on Granby are made from Slater sheets on card. I can dig out a photo if you wish or point you to the post#s on Granby

Best wishes

John

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Thank you John - I will go back through Granby to find the dairy.  I do like the scalescenes models - by far the best for me. I think in the past I may have been too quick to get them finished.  As I have some downloaded I may give them another go, but more patiently.  Then I can have a go at a bit of scratchbuilding/kit bashing.  Small steps at a time.

The ladder is coffee stirrer sticks cut down.  Holes drilled with an Archimedes drill and wire threaded through and glued into place, then all filed down smooth.  That way you see where the rungs are from the side. as in good old wooden ladders.  In truth the wood is a bit over scale for an OO ladder, but I don't think it shows up too much. But it might be if I add figures.  It's not too fiddly, but it does take a while and very satisfying to finish.

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Hi Michael i assume you are using a fastcure resing mix in your Linka moulds?
I have a couple of kilo tins of that that i have never used at one time i was going to make a mould for retaining walls but i didnt get that far before having to dismantle the layout.

Brian

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Hi Brian

Yes, it is a fast cure compound.  Out of the mould within 15 minutes, so I can get a production line going quite easily.  I have also made some of my own moulds from silicon which work quite well - so long as the gaps are all filled.  I can mould a whole wall or side of a building which makes production of repeat buildings very quick and easy.  It's great for things like retaining walls.

Michael

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Hi Michael.   Terrific work, I do like the way that the baseboard blends with the backscene , it looks so natural. Best wishes Kevin 

Last edited on Fri Nov 2nd, 2018 07:28 am by Passed Driver

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Thank you Kevin.  I will be honest: when I started it wasn't a deliberate plan.  But with the colour of the static grass I used (which was actually a mixture of several colours) I noticed how similar it was to the backscene and so added dry grass and foliage which matched the scene and the two blended very nicely indeed. That's the way I will go now.

Michael

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The ground floor has been added to the warehouse.  This is simply cut coffee stirrers glued to a cardboard base.  The sticks are then coloured with wood stain and given a beeswax polish


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Hi Michael. I have been trying to buy coffee stirrers, but I cannot purchase them anywhere. If I was the wrong “ type “ ? I could pop into McDonald’s and grab a handful. In the meantime I have lots to be getting on with.Best wishes Kevin 

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I thought that I ought make something in storage.  I've decided this will be a general provender store - here are some barley sacks.  They are made from synthetic clay, which hardens in the oven.  I find this a very useful medium to work with for small items like this, and easily done while watching TV with SWMBO!!







Then just a coat of paint and a bit of a dark wash and here they are in situ...




And then I thought I might have a go at some crates of fruit....





I think these will look fine inside the warehouse.  I might have to go for a little more accuracy and detail for products outside, being loaded, but quite good enough for inside.  And cheap! I love cheap....

Michael

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Hi Kevin


I must confess I grab a few stirrers when I buy a drink in one of those over priced chains of coffee shops!  I can buy lollipop sticks - £1 for a hundred.  I used these for the large crate in the photo above.
Regards
Michael

Last edited on Mon Nov 12th, 2018 10:15 pm by Headmaster

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Hi Michael.  Thank you very much. I don’t frequent “ over priced coffee chains “, I do however visit the occasional £1.00 shop and I keep looking for them.  Best wishes Kevin 

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Hi Michael

I do like the way the warehouse is developing.......genuine wood floors polished with beeswax...whats not to like? So much better than Wills plastic.

I also like the stock you are creating for it. I always think its good for buildings to br dtailed so they look as though they are in use (your ruined Abbey excepted of course) :lol:.

You mentioned your need for a simple DCC turntable on Brian's thread. Could I ask how you want to control the TT?  Do you want to switch it through your DCC throttle (cant remember if you have mentioned how turnouts will be operated)

Best wishes

John

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Hi John, thank you for the kind comments.  I am always wary of posting pictures as things develop, without having the finished article to go, "And here it is finished!!"  I thought it might be useful to some to see that you can still make things when away from the layout.  People may end up seeing little of the inside, but I will know it is there!  It also helps me feel like the scene has purpose - which is what I love about your detailing.

All of the turnouts are controlled by DCC concepts digital motors and can be controlled from the digital controller.  But they are also wired into levers, so can also be controlled manually.  A bit daft, I should have gone down an analogue route..... but the layout has grown in terms of the number of points and I decided I would like some manual control.  There are other advantages to using their digital motors though, (like less wiring and control of LEDs and ground signals,) so I have decided the small extra cost is probably worth it. 

As to the turntable, I don't necessarily want a DCC one, although I guess there are advantages to that.  As the turntable at the real Faversham was only used to turn locomotives 180 degrees, that is all I will need it to do, so cost is a consideration.  I have never modelled a TT and don't really understand all the different ways to power and control them, or how you get tracks to line up - other than on the more expensive DCC versions, which I don't think I can justify.  So if you have any tips or advice, I am all ears!!

Regards

Michael

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Hi Michael

As you are not planning to run Faversham automatically you really dont need a turntabe with all the bells and whistles.

You will need to address Polarity. When a loco is driven on to the turntable, the bridge wiring matches that of entry track. When the 180o turn is completed this will not be the case unless the polarity is switched during the turn. This can be done manually or you can fit devices like those used for reverse loops.

You also need to think about indexing........how does the bridge when it has completed its turn stop so that the track lines up precisely with the exit track. This can be done manualy ie by eye or you can buy/make some form of stepping motor.......I know very little about this but BCDR can help........ check his Sugar Cane shed.

The fact you only need a single entry/exit track does simplify matters. I would think about initially installing something inexpensive like Peco/Hornby/ Dapol and operate it manually for a while.If you are so inclined you may well be able to hook up a motor......many people have done so and there are plenty of videos.

If you are like me, a useless engineer but moderately competent electrically,  I would keep an eye out for a used Fleischmann non DCC  turntable* which comes with a simple switch. It would probably do everything you need and might cost about the same as a Peco TT, Motor,Polarity reverser switches etc.

One thing to bear in mind is the aperture you need to cut in the baseboard. The dimensions vary. I would cut the biggest aperture which will accommodate the smallest TT you might consider in the future.

Turntables are a wonderful feature on a layout and if you get it set up right provide loads of enjoyment

HTH

Cheers

John

* My Granby thread is about a Fleischmann with bells and whistles but I have a second Fleischmann like the one above which I bought used for ninety bucks 15 years ago. Its a bit clunky but it wheezes happily around its 2 exits.......and it does that automatically!

Last edited on Mon Nov 19th, 2018 11:13 pm by John Dew

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Hi John

Thank you for the advice, very helpful.  A bit of planning required I think, but the idea is growing on me!

Thanks

Michael

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I have had a bit of a rethink about the track plan for the quayside following all the talk  of turntables.  I've looked at buying a small turntable, but they seem few and far between and a little pricey for my needs, so will go with a fairly  standard one.  My original idea was to dispense with the TT and have extra sidings, but now I am going back to something more like the prototype of Faversham Creek.  As a result, track laying is on hold while I sort out the TT.  Which means a lot of research because I have never done one and don't understand all the necessary electrics.  

I have, however, continued with some modelling.   The first Linka warehouse is coming along …. this is an internal view of proceedings so far...




My plan is to model all three floors and to add some lighting - something I haven't done before so that will be another learning curve!  I don't think that any of this will be visible to anyone, so it might appear to be a bit of a waste of time, but knowing it is all there and that there is a life beyond the exterior walls is quite important to my sense of modelling.  And I have thoroughly enjoyed making the various things, which I think is what it is all about, isn't it?

Michael

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If there is anyone out there thinking of having a go with Linka for modelling buildings, my general advice would be don't bother!.  Plastic or card is probably quicker, easier and better for scratchbuilding.  But I have sets of moulds and wanted to see how far I could go with them.   The linkaworld website has lots of moulds for things like walls, paving and accessories which I think would work really well, as well as moulds for specific buildings which are also probably good, although I'm not sure how cost effective they are for most layouts.   I think I might experiment with linka and plastic at some point to see how I can combine the two.

For novices like me, Linka does help with scaling and proportions, which is a real bonus!

Michael

Last edited on Fri Jan 25th, 2019 12:20 am by Headmaster

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Hi Michael.  Have you ever thought about “ Scalescenes Kits “ ? You pay for the building that you want, print it out, and then you either begin eating lots of Cereals and saving the packages or purchase a suitable cardboard and away you go. Depending on the building you can print as many as you may require. Best wishes Kevin 

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Another medium for model buildings which now has advanced greatly is laser cut model kits in wood and card Michael.
Do a search for Model railway laser cut kits there are a number of suppliers who do kits at very reasonable prices.

Brian

Last edited on Mon Nov 19th, 2018 02:53 pm by Briperran

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Hi Kevin

Yes, I have made some scalescenes kits, and as far as card kits are concerned, certainly my favourites.  I am pretty sure a few of them will appear on the layout.  But it's a limited range and I am thinking more about my scratchbuilt buildings.  I know you can download brick sheets etc. and make your own card models and I will probably have a go at that, or kitbashing.  But I quite like the process of painting models myself, even if I am not that good at it yet.  But practice is starting to pay off.  Maybe the card shells with plasticard coverings will be a way forward.

Thanks for taking the time to reply - there don't seem to be quite so many active members these days - I really appreciate it.
Regards
Michael

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Thanks for the reply Brian - again really appreciated.  I have not looked at laser cut kits at all, so will give it a search.

Regards

Michael

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This is one outer wall of the warehouse painted.  I need to go over it with a couple of very light washes of dirty brick red and brown to tone the colours down and pull it together and then add some weathering powders.

The windows were white ones I found on the internet.  I changed them to negatives in a photo programme and then printed directly to OHP film made for inkjet printers after I had got them to the right size.  I assume the small, slightly heavier block of four panes of glass at the bottom of  each window opened.  Does anyone know which way they opened?  I thought I might try to model that.




Last edited on Mon Nov 19th, 2018 05:38 pm by Headmaster

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Looking good Michael :thumbs

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Thank you.  It looks a bit harsh so close up, but I'm sure I can get it to blend in a little more, with a bit of luck!

Michael

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Hi Michael
Thats impressive.....you certainly get more texture than with Scalescenes Ashlar.

Good question about the windows......I have a few like that on Granby but never thought about it until you asked. My guess would be outwards.....not so much for health and safety,considering the period, but becauseit would restrict the internal space.

Cheers

John


PS 
I re read my TT advice and to my embarrassment I see I omitted a rather important “ to” :oops:

“You will need address polarity “ is rather confusing........it should have read “ You will need to address polarity “ ie you will need to think about how you will change the bridge polarity........my apologies and I hope I didnt confuse you

Bearing in mind your nom de plume I will start writing 100 times......USE THE PREVIEW :lol:

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Hi Michael.  Very good. Collect two gold stars ⭐️, and go to the top of the class.  Best wishes Kevin 

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Thank you John.  Don't worry, years of experience has taught me to add the missing words!!  It didn't confuse me, just thinking about how I will do it.

As to the windows, where do you think they were hinged?  I was wondering if they were hinged at the bottom, rather than to the side.  Do you know?

Regards

Michael

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Thank you Kevin, It's getting there.....



Last edited on Tue Nov 20th, 2018 05:00 pm by Headmaster

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Hi Michael,

These metal windows were often horizontally centrally pivoted, with the top edge pulled down internally. This kept the rain out while ventilating the internal space.

Bill

Last edited on Tue Nov 20th, 2018 06:45 pm by Longchap

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Ah!  Thank you Bill.  I will see if I can model that and if it looks ok....and worth it.

Michael

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 Bill got there before me.......but I agree centre hinged. If you google Quarry Bank Mill you will see some photos with the windows open although they are at the top rather than the bottom
John

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Ok, I tried.... and failed.  Closed windows for me then.  Thankfully the doors are open for a bit of ventilation for the workforce!!  And thank you John for your reply and the link.  Very helpful

Michael

Last edited on Tue Nov 20th, 2018 09:10 pm by Headmaster

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Just a quick update and some questions.

The warehouse is progressing slowly while I work out how I will illuminate it and finish of the necessary castings for the two remaining walls.  I have some figures to paint and fix, but probably need to source some for the scene, preferably characters doing some work, loading and unloading and checking stock.... that sort of thing.  

I decided to go for the peco turntable as an entry to the world of turning trains, mainly because I discovered I had the kit!  Don't know when I bought that, but at least it will get some use now!  I've bought a motorising kit and found a useful website for fitting it and reducing the noise, with some tips for getting it to run smoothly, so I shall work on that. I've built the kit - no need for photos, I'm pretty sure everyone knows the model.  I just need to paint and weather it, which I will document as I progress.

So to the questions:

The kit supplies two wires which are to be soldered to copper rings which attach, via springed contacts, to the track on the turntable.  As my track is DCC, do I just attach those wires to the main bus?  I probably know the answer, given my next question.....

Now, as I intend to use the TT to turn trains 180 degrees, there will be a problem with track polarity.  I have read that you can control this with switches or with a reverse loop gizmo.  Which is best?  And how do I do either of them?  I've tried to find answers via web but either: explanations dodge those questions; Or I don't understand what is being said!  

And as it is basically just a simple geared motor, does anyone have any bright ideas to help get the tracks to line up correctly, between the TT and the entry and exit tracks?  I'm planning on doing it visually, but if there is any help or a better (and simple) way, I would love to know.  I've seen websites using stepper motors and microprocessors, but I only want to turn a train round! When I am in the classroom I teach philosophy, not engineering!! 

I had my first train set when I was about 9, and played with it on the dining table..... 43 years later I decided it was time to play again.... but things had moved on a lot in that time!  I've practised and developed my skills in scenery and to a lesser extent model making, but electrical wizardry has rather passed me by - I just had small end to end planks with a couple of points on my practise modules!!  I've just about managed the leap into DCC, but any help, wisdom or a nudge in the right direction would be most helpful!

Regards

Michael

Last edited on Sat Nov 24th, 2018 12:14 am by Headmaster

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I ought to add, I don't intend to drive the TT by DCC - I will use an analogue controller to power and control the motor.  I have read the Brian Lambert website and he suggests that I don't need to worry about polarity with the peco TT, but in my head, as I imagine the TT working, at 180 degrees I have a polarity issue.  Or maybe I just have this wrong!

Michael

Last edited on Sat Nov 24th, 2018 12:28 am by Headmaster

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Not much time in the loft, working on the layout, but a little progress on my workbench.  Firstly, I've been working on the turntable.....
A little weathering



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And work on the top, in progress.  I know, it's shocking..... an empty wine glass!
I thought the kit looked a bit too perfect, so I've done a bit of work to bend a few things and give it a bit of history!



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And I made some planking for the warehouse.  This is just a lolly stick.  I scribed the lines for the individual planks, then with a pin added the nail holes.  Then gave a coat of woodstain.  This is light oak





Last edited on Sun Nov 25th, 2018 10:17 pm by Headmaster

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This is where it will go on the warehouse.....


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I've fitted the first guttering.  This is half a bamboo skewer with a channel carved, which I have described earlier in this thread.  I glued on a piece of paper to create the end, which I cut to size and shape once the glue had set.  


Last edited on Sun Nov 25th, 2018 10:23 pm by Headmaster

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There is a website I use which produces "textures"  These are basically photographs of things like walls and doors and floors etc. which you can manipulate, or stitch together.  I made the walling for the well of the turntable in this way.  I am pleased with the result and it's free!.  I am pretty certain the website is listed in the resources on this forum.  
There may be a better way to create printable brickwork, but all I do is copy the image to word and then size it correctly (checking that the image on my screen is at 100%).  I then copy and paste the image as often as I need to.  I might invert images sometimes to get them to match up, or for a bit of variation.  





Last edited on Sun Nov 25th, 2018 10:52 pm by Headmaster

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Hi Michael. Very good, work on the turntable weathering . It doesn’t  look like a Peco product , you have made a toy into a model.  Best wishes Kevin 

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Michael re the turntable there is no reason why you cant attach power from the dcc bus as long as its the same as the required voltage to your motor kit i dont know what dcc system you use but a lot of the better units you can actually adjust the voltage to give the correct voltage on the track for locos so in some cases the voltage could be as high as 14-15 volts which could be to much for your TT motor.
Many of us actually have a separate bus that supplies all accessories like point motors etc so not to interfere in any way with track power these are supplied by a separate transformer usually.

Your simplest solution would be a switch to change polarity which you could manually change yourself or somehow set up a microswitch arrangement somehow.
You can buy the electronic polarity changers which work fine and the change over is seamless with one of those but of course there is a cost i have not looked but i would assume about £30 or so i have 2 of those i used before an LDT one and a Onguard dcc circuit reverser both easy to install.

I have never tried to do a peco table so i cant really say an easy way to cheaply stop it in the right place i assume you could do it using microswitches and relays.

Brian

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Hi Michael

I agree with Brian......a separate supply for accessories ie the TT motor is a good idea.

Regarding polarity....I checked the Brian Lambert site and he is very explicit that connecting the DCC bus to the split rings provides power to the bridge and the split rings resolve the polarity issue. I couldnt see the video he referred to and I confess I couldnt follow the diagram, however he is very competent........I would wire it up as he suggests.

Indexing.......I wonder if a wire in tube device could be installed as a retractable stop? It sounds as though it will be turned on and off by a manual switch and there is only one exit. Even guide marks on the perimeter might work.

One question are you planning to insert a circuit breaker on the DCC Bus to protect against shorts? Strongly recommended.....mine must have saved me hundreds of dollars.

Cheers

John.




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Thank you for your kind words Kevin.  When it is in place it is quite subtle, which I think I like.  Once it is all painted I will have a go at adding grease and grime which might bring it alive - or look like I've dropped powder everywhere!  We shall see...

Thank you Brian, but I wasn't very clear in my post.  I was wondering about wiring the track on the TT into the DCC track bus.  I think I have this answered now.  The motor will be controlled separately, or via the DCC accessory bus.

And finally, thank you too John.  I could not see the video either, perhaps that was my confusion.  Once I had it all made and set up so that I could actually see how it worked, it made sense.  I do have trouble visualising these things!  With the split ring, there are two dead spots as the TT rotates, which means there is no power to the track, but as I do not have sound, it will only effect lights briefly, which I think I can live with.  The driver just keeps leaning on that button!

I had kind of come around to the idea some sort of physical indicator or physical block myself, so long as I am alert and don't burn out the motor as it tries to progress.  But I will be following your earlier suggestion and operating it by hand to begin with while I finalise track arrangements.  I have already progressed to the idea of a small loco shed for a shunter coming from the TT, so at least one extra exit - maybe two.  In the prototype, locomotives dropped wagons off in a siding and small shunters came and took them to their various points at the quay - no other locos were permitted in the quay area, so the shunter will need a home and service area, unlike the other locomotives which were serviced at the mainline station.

My DCC system has a pretty good cut out and alarm for short circuits - do I need additional protection?  What is the potential damage and cost??  Honestly, I remember when we were told all you need is DCC and two wires!!  Well that is certainly not the case, looking under my baseboards!!

Thanks to all for your helpful comments, all much appreciated.

Regards

Michael

Last edited on Mon Nov 26th, 2018 05:18 pm by Headmaster

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Hi Michael
Sounds like the TT is sorted.....you are clearly getting into the right spirit with a second exit.


Short circuit protection......you need to be satisfied that the system will close down before there is the slightest risk of frying a decoder. When I started I was paranoid about this so I installed PSX circuit breakers between the Lenz unit and the DCC bus and they have worked perfectly.  I think there maybe a simple test to establish that your systems cut off is sufficiently sensitive.....I will see what I can find. Maybe someone more knowledgeable than I knows the answer already?


Regards


John

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Thank you John.  I have already ordered a PSX after doing a bit of research following your question!  Glad I seem to have made a good choice!  Am I right in thinking they auto restart the system once the short circuit is resolved?

Many thanks

Michael

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Good choice.
Yes they auto restart the system when the short is sorted

Try and mount the unit where it is easily visible. If a loco stops unexpectedly the first thing I do is glance at the PSX lights

Cheers

John

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Thanks - another useful tip!

Michael

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The warehouse is coming along slowly.  the front is now painted and some fruit boxes have arrived.   I've put the second floor in, and some more stock.  One more floor to go and the top floor ceiling and I can put the other sides and the roof on, all of which have been cast and made and add the lighting.






Last edited on Tue Nov 27th, 2018 09:53 pm by Headmaster

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I had some left over plastic from the TT kit.  I hate throwing things away and always look for how I might use something.  Here I have cut the right angles to form barge boards for the warehouse.  I scratched in some wood grain and will be able to fit them to disguise the thickness of the roof.  Another freebie!



Sorry about the poor focus.  Must have been my excitement!!

Last edited on Tue Nov 27th, 2018 09:54 pm by Headmaster

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Another Linka experiment, this time a platform.  A few castings which I have had to chop about to make the right size.  Then painted in various grey tones and given washes of grey and dirty brown.  Finally adding the white edging.  





Out of interest, does anyone know when platforms started to be edged in white? Was it always the case, or did H and S step in at some time?

Michael  

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Hmm, good question Michael and without looking it up, I suspect it was during the war as precautions against the Luftwaffe, but I'm prepared to be better educated!

Bill

Last edited on Tue Nov 27th, 2018 10:25 pm by Longchap

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An interesting answer Bill, and not one I had predicted.  I shall refrain from searching for a definitive answer and see what the combined minds of Your Model Railway Club can come up with.....

Michael

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I am pretty sure it was during WWII ......thats is also when the base of signal ladders were painted white I believe

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OK I have done some research.....google is my friend
Type....” When were UK platform edges first painted white” or similar

Look for the RM web thread

The conclusion I have come to is that some stations had white edges prior to WWII but, certainly as far as the GWR was concerned it was a local initiative.....no formal instructions as such.

It was introduced nationwide on all the big four during WWII

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Thank you for the confirmation John, yours and Bill's hunches were right.  Or was it knowledge you didn't know you knew!

Michael

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The final floors and walls have now been added to the warehouse, as it nears build completion.  The final ceiling to go in, with the lights and final layer of linka moulds to finish the bottom of the walls.  Then on with the roof and finish the painting, before adding exterior details like gutters and drain pipes.  








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Barge boards and ridge tiles added.  Sorry about the aspect of the photo, don't know how to change that.

The barge board is just a cut up and cleaned sprue from the turntable kit.   The ridge is a linka cast



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Did you take the photo with a tablet Michael, such as an ipad? If so, they have a tendency to store photos in the same relative orientation to the camera lens and if you have the device rotated, with the screen image the right way up, the stored image is often the wrong way round.

That may be a possibility.

Bill

Last edited on Sun Dec 2nd, 2018 06:18 am by Longchap

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I have fixed the wooden flooring in place on the exterior and fitted lights.  I think I need a bigger resistor for the top floor.




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I just have the rear wall to paint.  Then add the front loading area, a chain and housing, and the rest of the guttering and drainpipes.  Then it will be a case of planting on the layout - when it is ready - and add some figures and goods to bring it alive.

Last edited on Sat Dec 1st, 2018 11:53 pm by Headmaster

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Thanks Bill.  It seems to happen when I crop some photos, and as I use my phone, you are probably on the right lines

Michael

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Hi Michael.  All looking good. I had that problem with my iPad, and I was advised to “ rotate the iPad with the lens uppermost “. But then I have problems with everything that I touch.  Best wishes Kevin 

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Hi Michael

If you download Faststone, you can fix the rotation problem - even if you have used a tablet . . .



http://www.faststone.org/

Cheers

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Thanks for the advice. 

The warehouse is now finished apart from action features to bring it to life.  This is roughly where it will be on the layout.  I think I will have some low relief buildings behind it to give a sense of depth - like the goods shed, which is a scalescenes model, although it will need more careful placement.



Last edited on Sun Dec 2nd, 2018 10:23 pm by Headmaster

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I had some spare LED flexible strip lights, in warm white, which I thought would work for lighting in the warehouse, and other buildings.  However, when I tried them, they still looked to bright white.  The strip lights are very cool (temperature!) as they are covered by a sort of gel.  So I covered them in a few layers of masking tape, which gave a nice glow, like old fashioned lights.

The mixed covering to the external floors to the warehouse are actually prototypical.   The external boards were wooden, for the local lorries which were responsible for transferring goods, until the railway arrived.  Then, over time, the wooden boards were replaced by cement, tarmac or paving.....  but only where the platform met the railway. As a result, buildings had a mixture materials.  The same was true for the ground cover - bricks, cement, cobbles, paving and tarmac are all in evidence  at the quay.

Michael  

Last edited on Sun Dec 2nd, 2018 11:57 pm by Headmaster

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I decided to extend the white edging - just a little more easy on the eye


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So now it is on with the turntable.  I coated the well in pva and added chinchilla dust which I then dried quickly with a hairdryer - it creates these lovely cracks


Then I dug some of it out, for the drain covers and to give it a well worn look and checked the bridge still rotated easily


And then on with the painting.  I always intend to do light washes and build up the colour - but it never seems to work out like that.  I also had to remove the brick paper, as the colours ran.....



And here it is finished, with the new brick paper, some water effects and lots of broken up cement.  weathering powders help to tone colours down and pull it all together


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The TT is now ready for fitting and powering.  I have sorted out a motor for it, I just need to solve the problem of stopping it accurately at the different exit tracks.  I will work on that when it is in place.   Then I will be able to finish off laying the track at the quayside.  Maybe Father Christmas will bring me a goods shed and engine shed!  I'm sure I have been good this year!

Michael

Last edited on Tue Dec 4th, 2018 11:20 pm by Headmaster

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I also have to make a decision about coupling methods.  I want automatic delayed uncoupling and have studied a variety of solutions including kadees and modifying tension locks.  Passenger stock will all be changed off layout, so they do not need any modifications.  Thankfully I don't have much stock in terms of freight, so I won't have a lot to change in one go and can make changes as I buy items.
I am leaning towards the kadee route - if anyone has any advice, warnings or suggestions, it would be most appreciated!

Michael

Last edited on Tue Dec 4th, 2018 11:30 pm by Headmaster

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Michael, have read of this for starters
http://yourmodelrailway.net/view_topic.php?id=8591&forum_id=156


plus
http://yourmodelrailway.net/view_topic.php?id=8481&forum_id=6
then check the Forum Contents index on the Home page

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Thank you Sol - very helpful indeed!

Last edited on Wed Dec 5th, 2018 08:24 am by Headmaster

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Great weathering job on the Turntable.....it looks very realistic. I am looking forward to seeing how you deal with the indexing.
I imagine you use Artists fixative spray to secure weathering powder and on finished Scalescene models. I give a few quick sprays as soon as the sheets come off the printer.....rather than when the model is completed. Too late now but might help reduce/eliminate running next time you use brick paper.

Couplers......I use Kadees on all my stock......as you may know I do a lot of automatic coupling and uncoupling on Granby......they are super reliable. They are a bit obtrusive and not entirely prototypical.....but I can live with that in return for efficient operation and ease of fitting.

You might want to check the threads of Nick Wood (Much Murkle) and IanLMS for less obtrusive and I think less expensive alternatives to Kadee

Hope this helps

Regards

John

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Thank you John - I will be equally interested in how I manage the indexing!  

The problem with the paper was that initially I did the ground cover like I do ballast, with a pva/water mix, but the water rather soaked up from the bottom and behind.  A lesson learned.  In the finished version I used neat pva, which proved much better. I do usually coat the paper with a fixative before doing anything with it. 

I am pretty much decided on the kadees for the very reason you suggest - reliability.  do you use their magnets too?

Regards

Michael

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Headmaster wrote:
I am pretty much decided on the kadees for the very reason you suggest - reliability.  do you use their magnets too?

Regards

Michael

Yes.....lots!

I generally use the wider ones where you have to do the famous kadee shuffle to uncouple. If you are super confident about your track laying you only need one at the toe of a turnout ladder and the loco will push the uncoupled wagons to their siding without recoupling.........any bumps on the way of course and they recouple.......which is one reason why I use lots......typically one in each siding:oops:

Cheers

John

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Michael, re Kadee - I did use the Kadee in the track magnets but for appearances, I  went down the path of rare earth magnets as described in the thread by Perry
In my  main station platform tracks I use electromagnets
http://yourmodelrailway.net/view_topic.php?id=13783&forum_id=6

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Sol wrote: Michael, re Kadee - I did use the Kadee in the track magnets but for appearances, I  went down the path of rare earth magnets as described in the thread by Perry
In my  main station platform tracks I use electromagnets
http://yourmodelrailway.net/view_topic.php?id=13783&forum_id=6

A much more elegant solution Ron :thumbs

Mine do tend to stand out......problem is I keep moving them....can never make up my mind where the ideal location is! :roll:


Cheers

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Yes, I've read that thread - very interesting R and D.  I like the five magnet solution.  When I have looked to source them they come in a range of "powers", do you have any idea what that is on the ones you have used Ron?  I think I have seen them range from 250g to 1kg!  And I presume that is each one.  I can imagine too strong and the freight will go flying!

Michael

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Michael 3mm Cube are I think standard like these
https://www.ebay.com.au/sch/i.html?_nkw=rare+earth+magnets+3mmgshopping&msclkid=329468c65eea129d850e34cf9a7fdb5e

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Thank you Ron, although  even these vary between N35 and N55 (delighted to see their force is measured in Newtons!)  But N52/55 seems to be about average - which is quite a strong magnetic field.

Regards

Michael

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Michael, that is something I just learnt - was not aware of the differences in Newtons! Or that they are measured !
I see that N number now but took no notice.

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Actually, I have discovered I have it wrong - although the error still has some truth.  The number refers to the degree of magnetisation - the higher the number, the stronger the magnet.  The force of the magnet could be measured in Newtons, but that is not what the N stands for.  The N describes the maximum working temperature.  N is 80 degrees, which is the most common.  But, the number does still describe the "power" of the magnet.

I hope that clarifies things!!

Michael

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Learning more again. thanks Michael.
I think my magnets were N50.

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Thanks Ron - that does seem to be a common figure, I will go with those

Michael

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I am confused...I thought Newtons were all about apples.
:pedal

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:mutley 

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The next part of the buildings for the layout, while I consider how the quay side will develop, is the first platform.  This is made from a series of linka castings which have been chopped a bit to make it double sided.  At the bottom of the photo is finished paving, in the middle, paving which has been painted and the first wash added, and at the top beginning the process, colouring individual pavers in a variety of shades.



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That Linka has real potential, Michael.

It's looking good.  :thumbs

If it turns out as well as your turntable pit, you will be well pleased.

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Thank you very much Max.  It was taking a bit of time, doing the casting and then hacking them about, but I have now made my own mould to the correct width so should be a little quicker.  This photo shows that I have started to add and paint the walling and I am very pleased with how it is coming along.  



I am trying to be true to my opening story..... The creek had its heyday up to about 1920, but I am imagining that it continued to prosper into, currently, the 60s, but that everything was starting to show its age.  It's a busy little transport hub showing some wear and tear! Hopefully the buildings will reflect that.

Last edited on Sat Dec 8th, 2018 11:49 pm by Headmaster

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The problem with hacking the linka platforms about is that there is always a half paver which joins another half paver, and you can see the join, no matter how accurate the castings and cuts.  However I have discovered a great surface filler which solves the problem: Tippex.  You might just make it out in the platform photo above - the white blocks at the very top.  It doesn't need sanding but fills the gaps perfectly and is easily painted over.  I use the variety that comes in a sort of pen because it doesn't go thick and hard and it is quite easy to control.  I used it on joins for the warehouse too.

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Not too much to report so far - just encountering lots of problems!  The Peco turntable is now motorised, but it isn't very convincing.  Looks good, but might need to be hand of God, until I get something better.  It looks ok form some angles, but not from where I will be operating it.  It looks like a toy, if I am honest.  Also encountered my first problem installing a decoder in a supposedly DCC ready loco. Admittedly an early version of DCC ready, but it isn't working for me.  I tell myself that these frustrations are good for the soul, if not the bank balance!

If anyone has any recommendations for a TT, I would be grateful.  Searches on our friend google give a bunch of mixed results.  The layout is DCC, but I am quite happy for the actual TT to be DC, so long as powering track is straightforward.  Smooth and quiet operation are a must!


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I have, however, been cracking on with the platform.  It is now at 90cm, so 3/4 built, roughly.  I think it will be 130cm long when finished










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Going down the Linka route, accepting that I had already bought the moulds, I think it works out that the full platform will cost me about £3 pounds to cast.  Add in another £2 for the cost of creating a custom mould, and it will be a fiver, plus the cost of glue and paint.  It might be slow, but it is pretty cost effective.  And as I will be building a further two platforms and can use the moulds for platforms for goods sheds or warehouses, this is one situation where I think Linka has come up trumps.

I don't use plaster, all of the castings are in resin - which is much more forgiving.

Painting the castings has been a real challenge.  I had some cheap acrylics, but these really don't work.  They don't have enough pigment.  I have been researching paints and techniques, and have discovered a wealth of information and guides from war gaming sites.  While the actual subject matter has little interest for me, the modellers face the same issues that railway modellers face and paints designed for war gaming miniatures have worked very well.  They have a high pigment ratio and go on very easily.  Obscure colour names, but if you ignore those and just look at the actual colour, they work very well.  Washes and special effects, including excellent metallic  colours are available too.  There are a couple of well known brands, but I have recently discovered the "Army Painter" versions, which have a good variety of colours and are excellent for coverage.  They need a thorough shake though - I use my jig saw!!

The platform was done with Citadel paints, which are produced by Warhammer.  I also used their paints for my track too.  Excellent first time coverage.  But I've used the Army Painter brand for some test pieces and I am very impressed with the coverage and the effects, and the price.

I've discovered that diluting these types of paints with  water does not break down the pigment too much, but using isopropyl alcohol is even better and you can create your own custom washes and glazes.  You really don't need much paint and they are great for pulling things together.  A little light weathering is all that is needed to make a model sit in the scene.

Last edited on Sun Dec 16th, 2018 09:35 pm by Headmaster

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Hi Michael


Sorry to hear of your problems.

I guess we always knew that indexing would be an issue. I thought of the Peco TT as an inexpensive way of getting a TT into the layout so you could find out how much you enjoyed operating with them. It sounds as though you have caught the bug.......they really are fun to operate.


I wouldnt worry to much about the appearance..... with your model skills I am sure you will be able to get the TT to merge into the overall scene. I assume it is the well that is bothering you because I thought the weathering on the bridge looked great.


Regarding an alternative .....I can only repeat my earlier advice to look out for a second hand non DCC Fleischman.  The indexing is very crisp and accurate so it is easy to operate by eye. With only a limited number of exits it is relatively easy to convert to automatic/DCC operation using reeds and magnets.......which is how I operate the TT in the storage yard.


I hope you got your decoder problem sorted.....I will write separately

Best wishes

John

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Thank you John.  I don't get too downhearted by the challenges.  Half of what I like about the hobby is overcoming problems.  The turntable works fine by hand, which I remember saying was what I would do until I had decided where I was going with it.  But I just got bitten by the idea.  Partly your fault and your amazing scenes!  I do like the added dimension it gives and I'm pleased it replicates the prototype a little more.  I would love a large shed area, but that isn't what I am modelling - just a small part of a larger quayside operation.  However, I have been doing quite a bit of research and we may see some exciting developments in the new year!

Have not had time to solve decoder problem.  But Christmas holidays have begun so I hope to have a little time on the layout. Although SWMBO has shopping plans for me!

Regards

Michael

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So, having been hit by the turntable bug, it means that I will have to change the plan for the track at the quay.  This isn't a bad thing at all, as it will now be a little simpler - in fact it will be as the prototype.  It does mean a little space at the rear of the scene. I once made the scalescenes free warehouse model (the low relief one), so I thought I might do an interpretation of it in Linka.  This is the progress so far:  I've decided it will be the brewery warehouse, and have added a backscene to it which I think gives it a little depth.  You can see the linka joins which have to be disguised with a little filler and careful painting and weathering.  The weathered blue doors are made from my go to wooden resource: coffee stirrers.  I've added some handles from wire and I have the sliding door mechanism drying, also made from coffee stirrers.

I have included an extra line of bricks to the bottom of the model so that it can be "buried" in the scenic base so it looks like it has foundations. This particular warehouse will be served by both road and rail




A close up gives an idea of the sense of depth the photo gives.  As it will be at the rear of the scene, it probably won't really be seen, but at least I will know it is there!


Last edited on Sat Dec 22nd, 2018 09:40 pm by Headmaster

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A week back at a book fair I picked the Faversham to Dover book with photos and maps. Although I was brought up down the track at Kearsney I never knew about the 'creek' railway, mind you I did not know much about Faversham except it was the junction stop after Canerbury. Other than a traveller I was not really into railways, planes were more interesting, and my dad was a guard on the railway.

One thing about living up north is that stuff about home is often a bit cheaper in second hand sales, not the local interest!

Anyhow well done and a good subject for modelling.

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Thank you... I certainly think Faversham is a hidden gem.  I spent a long time trying to decide what to model, like many starting out I had plans to include everything I could think of, but not the room.  But the creek gives me the chance to do the quay, with industrial buildings, a small station, some countryside and the edge of the town of Faversham with a couple of centrepiece buildings, I hope.

You are now living where my wife originates and the in-laws are still up there - I will have to look out for some cheaper southern stuff when I am up there!

Happy Christmas

Michael

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I'm off to wait for Santa...…. but this is the progress on my low relief warehouse.  Happy Christmas everyone!



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Just a quick update.  Not much done to the track at the moment while I await delivery of my new turntable, so I have been working on some buildings for the quay scene.  This is the goods storage, in half relief, which will appear at the very rear of the scene and is the storage for Shepherd Neame beers.  It's based on a scalescenes building, but this one is made in Linka.





I am slowly but surely becoming a convert to the linka system.  It's not an easy modelling system but with every model I attempt to make, I learn something new which improves the next model.  I have quite a few discards, but I think I will keep this one.  I just need to add some downpipes and then some "action" but I think it will work well at the the rear of the scene




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Father Christmas, via my daughter, brought me my first plastic kit - a Wills Craftsman kit for a goods shed.  Having never made one, I followed the instructions, although they are designed for a bit of kit bashing.  Here is the basic structure...



And the interior with a bit of paint added...…  The owners really need to sort out their rising damp!



And the exterior brickwork painted.....




Overall I am very impressed with the model, and would definitely recommend them if you haven't tried them before.  I made a few mistakes in the construction, but could thankfully correct them.  I'm sure that with a bit of practice, I will be able to create bespoke buildings.

To paint the brickwork, I gave an all over coat of cream for the mortar, which I then wiped off the brickwork.  I mixed the colour myself, but basically it is a brown with white.  I have tried many approaches to painting the brickwork, especially for my linka models.  On this occasion I used a single colour from the Citadel range of paints (they are a wargaming set of paints).  There is a nice range of tones and shades, depending on how much paint is applied because the paint has a high pigment content.  I have used a range of techniques with other models, but for this one, I dipped a  piece of kitchen roll in the paint, wrapped around my finger, which I then carefully "brushed" over the bricks, which I think has worked well enough.

Last edited on Sun Jan 6th, 2019 09:28 am by Headmaster

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My plan involves the quay side, for some shunting and industrial buildings, some countryside, a focal building, which will be the Abbey Hotel, and then something of the market town of Faversham.  I decided to make the Abbey Hotel using linka castings.  I have made a couple of prototypes and have now settled on a specific design.  This is the beginning of the Abbey House.  One of the problems with linka is disguising the joins between the castings, but I have found two useful techniques.  The first is to paint the rear of the model with a fine surface primer.  This fills a lot of gaps, and appears on the front in grey.   The second is to use tipp-ex on the front of the model to fill any remaining gaps.  All of this will be disguised when the model is finally painted.  Quite of a few of the castings had to be chopped up in order to create the final building.  



The plan is to have a terrace area from the door, then steps down to a formal lawn and flower borders, before the land falls away to the railway cutting.  I plan to have vegetable gardens to one side and a conservatory and flower gardens to the other (although I have no idea how I will make the conservatory).  I've experimented with a range of approaches to the inside detail and have decided on photo realistic interiors for the bedrooms and lounge areas, but intend to create a restaurant, hopefully with lighting.  As this will be a major feature of the layout (I envisage it will take up about 100cm in length - the building will be about half of that) I will have to go overboard on the detailing


Last edited on Sun Jan 6th, 2019 09:31 am by Headmaster

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With luck, Raymond Blanc will come and run the Abbey  Hotel Kitchen!!!

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Like the Wills goodshed Michael i have that actual kit myself here to build at some point i have made a number of Wills kits in the past and i do like them myself there not like an Airfix kit they are really a scratchbuilders kit with instructions i have done buildings in the past self designed using the Wills builder sheets.

Your Linka buildings are looking great not ever ventured into using Linka i like the barrel stack picture inside which will give the model depth on the layout

Brian

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You have been busy Michael. I do like the sound of the Abbey Hotel, particularly if you can hire Raymond Blanc!

Dont keep me in suspense about the turntable.........what is on its way? :lol:

Best wishes

John

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Thank you Brian.  As with everything with this hobby, there is a lot to learn, but practice and trial and error are great teachers.  The shed was my first go at modelling with plastic, but I have another couple of kits to make, so hopefully I will learn some tricks so that I can do a bit of scratchbuilding with it.

Michael

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Hi John

The Christmas holidays gave me the chance to slowly crack on with the buildings.  I have 3 on the go, none of them finished yet!

I found a small producer of a turntable, based on the Peco model I made.... ADM Turntables.  They have a demonstration video on youtube.  Solves all my problems!!

Michael

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I believe I have heard of them......I think you will be quite pleased:thumbs
Regards

John

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Hi Michael,

I'd never heard of ADM Turntables before, but had a quick look at their website. Quite interesting and with options from very expensive to mouth-wateringly so, but you appear to get a fully built and tested unit.

In the interests of completeness however, have you considered the drive and indexting units by Locomotech which are also tailor made to work Peco turntables?

http://www.locomotech.com/

Their deluxe (2 rpm) unit with auto indexing at £65 seems an attractive proposition compared to £425 plus.

Bill


Last edited on Mon Jan 7th, 2019 12:37 pm by Longchap

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Emulsion paint can also be used as a filler for small gaps the same as tipp-ex, works out a lot cheaper too.

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Hi Bill

Thanks for the suggestion.
I had looked at the locomotech device and did quite a bit of trawling through forums for some feedback on it.  It certainly has its fans.  The ADM turntable is certainly a little pricey, but I think it is cleverly designed.  The base gives added stability to the peco turntable which is notoriously flimsy, the stepper motor is fully programmable, so I won't have to hold buttons down to get to the exit I want, I like the fact that it is fully tested before dispatch and Alistair, the designer and engineer could not be more helpful.  I decided that if I was going to have one, I would want it to hit all of my requirements.  Pricey I know, but I only want to fit it once and don't want any regrets!

Michael

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Andy

Great suggestion, I will give it a go!

Michael

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The goods shed is almost complete - I just need to do a bit of work on the roof tiles and add a little more weathering.  I am pleased with my first attempt at a plastic kit - it's from the Wills Craftsman range.  I think it will fit nicely at the quay.




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So, the three buildings completed so far for the quay scene are here.... The linka buildings and plastic kit seem to work well together







Last edited on Thu Jan 10th, 2019 11:56 pm by Headmaster

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Looking good to me Micheal. 
Marty

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You have made a really good job of the Wills kit Michael and its fits in well with your Linka building


Brian

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Thank you very much gentlemen!  I enjoyed making it.... in time I might try a bit of kit bashing, but following the instructions for now while I learn

Michael

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While I await delivery of the turntable (it's delay is because of me, not ADM) I have been thinking about the layout of the quayside, the station area and the next feature, the Abbot's hotel, which will be placed on an area of raised ground which drops down to the railway cutting.

My original plan for the quay probably  had too much track, but now there is to be a turntable, there is less room so I have had to simplify it.  I will probably work it out once I have the TT installed - at least I know where that is going!

The first platform for the station is almost complete, so I need to think about the backdrop and any buildings which may appear nearby, as well as what the station will look like.  In my re-imagined world, the station is a little bigger than the original halt, even though it transported hundreds of workers at the time, as well as all the freight.

So I have continued with the build of the hotel.  The front is now complete.....




Last edited on Fri Jan 25th, 2019 12:44 am by Headmaster

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I've added some "glass" to the windows...





And some interior detail to the "drawing room".




Michael

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“Windows” printed on overhead transparency Michael? Something I’ve Always wanted to do but have not, as yet, tried. 
That building is quite imposing!

Marty

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Yes Marty, exactly that.  I've added a couple of stained glass windows in  exactly the same way.  Just can't print white windows!



This is probably my fourth go at the building - the others were either too small when put in position, or just not quite right.  I used them for lots of practice of different techniques though, so not wasted.  

You know how it is when you sit and plan your dream railway, you put everything in... only to discover space is not as great as you imagined (maybe it is less of an issue in N gauge!) Well, that was my exact experience, so I had to take things out.  The Creek was a given.... and I decided to cut out most things and just sort of hint at their existence in the layout. But one thing which stayed was to have a feature building - the hotel - sitting in the countryside.  So it has rather grown to take up a substantial part of the plan!

Michael

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Mother's Christmas present was a brand new Epson inkjet printer... might be a time for a visit and some testing!  :lol:
I well know about the compromises we need to make in this hobby, even in N gauge there is never enough room and I too have had to hint at scenes that would otherwise take up more floor space than I have available. 

I think that I may have talked T into assisting with an exhibition layout sometime in the future... modular, transportable and .... uh... expandable... little does she know.  :mutley

Marty

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That would be great to hear about Marty - and lucky you!  My wife, D, definitely only tolerates my hobby! I asked her once if she would prefer if I was in the loft or in a casino..... she had to think about it!!!

  I am always so amazed by how you model so beautifully in N gauge, but your work was one of three or four that I read that finally got me out my armchair modelling and dreaming and to get started on making something.

 Would you still model in N gauge? Would it be a different area? Or time?  I keep thinking of different things I would like to have a go at modelling.  I really need to win the lottery!!  I would buy modelling space....

Michael

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The restaurant at The Abbot's Hotel is open and ready for business!




Last edited on Tue Jan 15th, 2019 09:38 pm by Headmaster

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Orange Pekoe please.... and maybe a scone! What’s the local specialty cake?

As for the Exhibition layout... it’s early days yet. 

If I had my way it would be an early 1900 Western Australian logging line through the bush in 1:64. There is a group of locals here in Perth who produce engine and rolling stock kits and several layouts of prototype main line locations from around the South West of the state. Or maybe one of the wheat belt towns with the line running down the centre of the street and federation style pubs and colonial buildings. T grew up in Wagin so that could help.

Everything has to be scratch built to reflect the prototype. :roll:


Marty

Last edited on Wed Jan 16th, 2019 09:24 pm by Marty

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Ah!  I should have guessed it would not be something straight forward Marty!  Sounds wonderful though.

I'm not sure we have a local speciality cake - but a good line in cream teas!  Sorry, right out of Orange Pekoes, in the words of Basil Fawlty!

Regards

Michael

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Orange Pekoe! I thought my wife was the only one who drank that brew.

But that distracts me from the Headmaster's restaurant: WOW

Cheers
Evan

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hehe... it used to be earl grey... but it faded on the palette after a while  :shock:
Cream teas?!!  book me a ticket!

Marty

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The interior of the hotel is finished.  Just electrics to do.... these are lit up by a torch at the moment!


The drawing room....




The restaurant....



The bar.....



The library....




And finally one of the bedrooms



Michael

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Thanks Evan, although I do feel I must own up and not be a fraud!  The internal rooms are photographs which I have scaled down, not actual models.  I could only dream of modelling at that scale.... (I search for photos on the web, copy them and paste them into MSWord where I can scale them easily - I literally held up the windows to my computer screen and then resized the picture to match - nothing very technical!) 

I tend to curve the images, so there is a space between the window and the photo - in this case, about 2cm.  This seems to give the right sort of depth, although it is trial and error.  Some photos are not big enough, so I copy the same image - sometimes three times, to make them long enough.  Again, in Word, they are easily stitched together.  I might overlap them too to hide the joins.  Once they are in position, you do not notice that it is the same image used two or three times.  In my first picture of the restaurant, you might notice that there is a random half of a table, which I corrected for the finished version.  In Word you can choose to put individual images to the front or the back, which makes hiding things very easy.

I picked up a very useful technique, which is to print the scene on cheap printer paper, which is then mounted on clear plastic - in my case, acetate.  Lights behind shine through sufficiently to give a realistic glow and highlight the features.  Interestingly, if the photograph you use has some lights, like the chandelier in the restaurant, these really "pop" and look very realistic. This wasn't planned, but something I learned by experimenting.

So each room has a photo installed, which I think looks very realistic, but easy to do.  It takes a bit of trial and error, and some photos work better than others, but the overall effect is much better than trying to model all of the furniture and decoration. For me any way.
Regards
Michael

Last edited on Fri Jan 25th, 2019 01:26 am by Headmaster

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Sometimes a picture is worth a hundred words.  This is how I fitted the images.  In this case it is a bedroom.  To get the effect right, the wall of the room is vertical and the bed is actually horizonal on the floor.  So it is an L shape.  This helped with creating a 3D effect.  For the ground floor rooms, like the restaurant, I didn't need to do this.

I tried adding figures to the scenes, thinking this would add to the realism, but it did not, it actually detracted from the 3D effect.  So my hotel is open and ready for business, but no one is there..... or maybe it is just the wrong time of day!




Last edited on Fri Jan 25th, 2019 01:24 am by Headmaster

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Thanks for the tips, particularly using the acetate

Cheers
Evan

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You have answered a question i was going to ask you Michael regarding how far you set back your photos from the window. What you do there certainly adds to the realism of a building.


Brian

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Brian, It rather depends on the picture  and the size of the window, so I just move it around while looking through the window until it looks right.  I have also put a printout on the floor, so that the white of the foamboard does not show through when looking down on the model.  In this case it is just plain floorboards, although carpets or rugs work just as well.

Michael

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This is the development of the Orangery for the hotel.  It will be like a conservatory at one end




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Something like this....




I plan to have some tables and chairs inside, perhaps this time with people!!  And I shall attempt to model a vine growing inside.  A very dear friend of mine had a beautiful house with a conservatory with a 200 hundred year old vine in it, producing wonderful grapes.  Experts from Kew came to look after it.  It would be a nice remembrance on the layout.

No idea how to do it well though!  Any suggestions?

The Orangery will have a flat roof, with a feature centre piece which I hope will set it off.

Michael

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I've just noticed the door!  This will actually lead into the Orangery - it isn't one of those classic design faults!!

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Progress on the track has ground to a halt since I decided to include a turntable as I am now having a major re-think of what will go where.  In my original plan, the creek was going to be at the end, with a few sidings and warehouses - a small, but busy rendition of one of the quays.  But now that I want to put a turntable in, there is even less room and things were not quite working..... the feature was being restricted.  So, I have decided to relocate the hotel to the end, near the Abbey ruins - which makes much more sense, and will give me more space to create the gardens, perhaps with a jetty into the creek.  This will create a much more coherent scene.  So, the main run of the track will now feature the creek, perhaps representing two of the quays, with a simpler set of sidings which will provide a nice shunting puzzle.  This will then lead to the edge of the town, which is more prototypical overall.  The return of the loop was originally going to be nothing more than a fiddle yard, but this could now be landscaped so that I have a good run of countryside, which is something I wanted.  I will be able to set up a number of trains so that I can run a passenger and freight timetable when I finally get to the point of running trains.  

I will have to take up some of the existing track to make the changes... so I am laying things out in a multitude of different ways to make sure I get it right this time.

A wise modeller on this site advised that it is alright to change your plan as you progress.... and the contributors who have inspired me the most here have all changed things, so I hope I am in good company.

The one thing that I am really pleased about by making the changes is that I will have room to model more than one boat and I should now have room to include the boat builder's yard, which has a long tradition in Faversham.  Other things will have to go..... but this is the Creek railway, so that ought be the main feature, didn't it?

Please, anyone else who has changed their track plan after building, let me know I am doing the right thing!!

Michael.

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Michael

Changes are great.  The final paragraph in the Peter Denny book "Buckingham Great Central";

"One of the greatest joys in railway modelling is, I find, in being able to alter the picture; it is rather like the painters of old who worked changes on to their canvasses, the only difference being that I cannot go back and uncover what was there before."

Rule 1 my friend, Rule 1.  If you like it, it's good.

BTW love the Orangery - a twisted wire armature for the vine and a load of patience with flock/scatter material would make the leaves.  Scale grapes?  I'm afraid that might be going a little too far but some of your people sitting at the tables with wine glasses would be good!

Mine's a Merlot please.

Barry

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What a great quotation, Barry.  Very inspiring!  And very reassuring  Thank you so much.  I had not thought of it terms of the great painters, but they did, and do it all of the time.
  
I saw the Hockney exhibition, using an ipad for his painting..... he kept changing things... angles, positions, colours, details until he was happy.  It was marvellous.  I had not thought of it like that until your post.  So thank you


I had not intended to model the grapes… but who knows what people might come up with.  I have made trees with twisted wire.... I might well have a go for the vine.  Foliage is the tricky part.

Michael



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The original Riverbank sidings on Newcastle Emlyn we’re ripped up and completely rebuilt as Llandyfriog Junction. I too agonised over the change but I’m much happier with it and thoroughly enjoyed the upgrade. Only added 6 months to the build.... which at my glacial pace is a mere snip in time :shock:.
Rule 1. It’s your railway...do what the little voices in your head tell you to do.

Marty

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Hi Michael. Your work is excellent, but, even if I could build the models to your standards they would be too big for my modules/ planks, or there wouldn’t be any space remaining for the track and trains. Best wishes Kevin 

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Its surprising how much space a turntable actually requires but certainly worth adding when trying to qualify doing certain things that require scrapping certain scenic things i tend to take the view i am building a model railway not a model village.

Brian

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Thank you gentlemen for your replies  and wisdom.  I think I am ready to take the plunge to change the plan and start pulling up some of the laid track.  Maybe I've subconsciously known the original plan wasn't quite right which is why track laying has ground to a halt.  I hope there aren't tears at bedtime!!

Kevin, before I got going on Faversham, I built a couple of small 4x2 modules - mainly to just learn some skills.  Originally I thought I might join these modules together to form a layout, but that changed and I ended up ripping them up and salvaging some things.  But even on the small modules I managed to have a few buildings, even if not quite to the size of the Abbot's Hotel, which is easily the largest thing I have built to date.  I learned a lot from making those early models, enjoyed building them and the finished pieces added to the module - even if some of them were low relief.  But for me, one of the main reasons for having the layout is to make models, rather than having lots of track or even running trains - but we all have our own reasons for the hobby.  

Michael

Last edited on Sun Jan 27th, 2019 10:06 pm by Headmaster

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Thanks Brian - you have hit the nail on the head in terms of having to make certain compromises.  I enjoy making the models a bit more than I enjoy laying track, if I'm honest!

Michael

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Most of the sections for the Orangery are complete, so a few pics.  Not glued together yet as I am waiting for a delivery of internal furniture and I need to make the grape vine, but the test fitting is working well..... a few pictures:
















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Nice work! The weathered roof was so natural that I didn’t notice it until I had admired the repurposing of the materials for the cap and finial. Both the stained glass and tiled floor look spot on too. Bravo.
Marty

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Ah! But I bet you can't guess what was repurposed, Marty!!  I'm not actually sure about it to be honest - I'll see what it is like when it is fixed in place and any gaps filled.
No prizes for guessing, except the title of "I Know How You Did It!" Champion!!!

Michael

Last edited on Sat Jan 26th, 2019 10:26 pm by Headmaster

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And no ball point pens were harmed in the making of this model...…!

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A little more work on the Orangery.  The ancient grape vine is in place, and in fruit......





The roof has been changed a little - much happier now.  And some people have arrived for afternoon tea...





and another view....




And a final one...





Michael

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Looking smart Michael your grapevine looks really good.

As its an orangery you need a few orange trees in pots


Brian

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hmmm.... not much room left.... I might manage to squeeze one into the corner!

Michael

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OK, Brian.... an orange bush!



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So, I have been rethinking the track plan in light of having a turntable.  My original location for the TT will work, but I think I can make better use of it elsewhere, and I have mentioned previously relocating the hotel, which will necessitate moving the TT

Here is my question:  I have an idea to model some of the sidings in the prototype which I was previously going to ignore.  To do this, I think I will need a "diamond" crossing..... is there a problem with wiring?  I have done a bit of research and it seems to complicate matters.  Any advice?

Michael

Last edited on Sun Feb 3rd, 2019 11:16 pm by Headmaster

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Love the orange tree Michael now you have real Orangery.

Re the diamond crossing they are a piece of pee to wire you just treat it like you would 2 lengths of track + &- doing one side of the diamond + &- on the other side thats it no special wiring.

Brian

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Thank you Brian.  Excellent news on the crossing!

Michael

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For diamonds. see https://brian-lambert.co.uk/Electrical_Page_3.html work your way down

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Thanks Sol, that's where I first looked.  But I think I will go for insulfrog to avoid the wiring problems!  Or I may avoid the crossing altogether... I'm still playing around with the track plan

Michael

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I had a break from the Hotel this evening and had a go at adapting some figures I had, to create this motley crew....Hopefully they are recognisable!


Last edited on Tue Feb 5th, 2019 01:01 am by Headmaster

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They look better from a little further away!



Michael

Last edited on Tue Feb 5th, 2019 01:00 am by Headmaster

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And today, the finishing piece and the whole gang is back together!


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Look pucker Michael
Ok i give up i cant see where that goes on the layout?

Brian

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Thank you Brian.  I mentioned at the start of this thread that I would I have a theme running through the layout based on books I have read.  This is to give me a bit of a structure to the cameo scenes and pull everything together and to make it interesting to anyone who sees it..... not that I will be taking it out of the loft and I'm sure it is not exhibition standard.... maybe one day.

I loved Tintin books as a child and was adamant that the characters would feature on the layout.  I have hacked a number of little people to create the characters and am pleased with how they have come out, although they look a bit dodgy close up.

They will probably appear at he northern end of the layout, in the market scene, where Tintin spots the model of the ship Unicorn, and the Thompson Twins try to catch a pickpocket - so more modelling opportunities.  I have one novel featured so far (Virgin and the Gypsy), and the basis of a second, so it is working out.

The buildings, from the last photo, will possibly appear on the backscene near the station - I will see if it works.

I am not a very methodical modeller, which is strange because my day job requires me to be very methodical - maybe it is my escape.  So I tend to jump around based on my interests and ideas.  I am very envious of your approach to modelling and the structure and speed of your work - it puts my efforts to shame.

I shall now return to the hotel to finish off the south east corner...….

Regards

Michael


Last edited on Tue Feb 5th, 2019 10:54 pm by Headmaster

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I can see who all the characters are now Michael  all you need is snowy the dog perhaps you can hack a sheep around to make him.
Thats what building a layout is all about adding whatever you want not what others may dictate to you.

Only the other day i was thinking whether or not to have a church somewhere on the layout and while thinking i thought i could say to people i know do you want a gravestone in my churchyard LOL  i don't know how many would take up the offer.

I am relative quick at doing things i think thats because i still work and really i tend to give working on the layout  a work ethic by planning the jobs and cracking on with them and not allowing myself to be distracted to much.

Brian

Last edited on Wed Feb 6th, 2019 05:50 pm by Briperran

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Snowy has arrived!


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Great idea about the tombstones Brian!  You could get them sponsored, which extra cost for a statue!  

Michael

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Nice work on both the Tintin crew and the orangery Michael! 
I recognised them straight away. Favourites of mine from my childhood...  er... um... and not childhood too!

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Great to see Snowy in the scene Michael you made a good job of him he certainly dont look Ruff.

Brian

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Hahaha Brian... Now the gang is properly together.....


Back to the hotel, time for the electrics..



Roof to do, then painting.....

Michael

Last edited on Fri Feb 8th, 2019 12:56 am by Headmaster

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Thank you Marty.  My eldest brother worked in a bookshop when I was young - my "pocket money" was a Tintin book, every so often - I must have read them all a hundred times, or more.  You can't buy models at 4mm scale, so I had to have a go at making them myself.  I can probably do the paintwork better - it's actually my first effort at painting little people - I've only ever used a few pre-painted ones before.  But I hope they at least conjure the image of the Herge cartoons.  They were always going to have to feature somewhere.  My favourites were the two-parters - Destination Moon and Explorers on the Moon, and The Secret of the Unicorn and Red Rackham's Treasure.  I opted for the latter for the scene and have attempted a model of the model of the Unicorn.....





Still a fan!

Michael



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Wonderful modelling here in every respect and the orangery is superb.


(How did I find out about this?   "I heard it on the Grapevine"!!!).  :lol:


Ken.

Last edited on Fri Feb 8th, 2019 09:03 am by Ken

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Hahaha, thank you Ken, very kind.  I'm no expert and learn more from my failures than my successes, but I'm glad you like it.

Regards

Michael

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Work begins on the hotel roof.  Linka roofing can be a bit thick when it is cast, so I have used Wills tiles.   






I wanted a fancy ridge tile, but couldn't find any, so carved a bit of the tiling to create this....



Last edited on Tue Feb 12th, 2019 08:41 pm by Headmaster

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Here it is with the ridge tile fitted and the attic window in place



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This is a slightly better photo.  Started to prepare it for painting and gable ends fitted and gutters in place

It measures 36 cm across, so quite a big build for me...



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That hotel looks gorgeous!

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Why, thank you Zelda!  We are taking reservations....!

Michael

Last edited on Tue Feb 12th, 2019 10:39 pm by Headmaster

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Looking good, what have you used for the gutters? Commercial or home made?

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I can see you spent some hours producing that Ridge Michael and it was certainly worth it, did you have a topping out ceremony when you fitted it

Brian

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Thank you Andy - these are old commercial ones which came with the original linka set, although I have made some which featured on the warehouse.

Michael

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Hi Brian

It was quite therapeutic to be honest, something to do while watching a bit of TV.  No ceremony until the whole thing is finished!!

Michael

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The main painting of the hotel is now complete.  I will let this cure for a day or two.  I know acrylics dry quickly, but I have found they need a good day or two to properly harden.  Sometimes more.

Then I will add the finishing touches - chimneys are made but need to be fixed, drainpipes, details on the doors, some weathering powders all over to pull things together....

It has taken quite a while to build, but mostly it has been a case of doing a little in the evening after I have finished schoolwork, so it's really been a case of how much time I have had available. And this is my third attempt at the hotel, so if you take that into account, it has taken me forever!  But this will be quite a feature at the east end of the layout (I keep calling it the south end in my head, but geographically it is east) so it is worth taking the time.  If I manage to improve my skills at all, I may look at it in a year or two's time and cringe and start again, but for now I am happy!











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Here is the scenic board the hotel sits on.  There will be a terrace area from the door, which will disguise the gap between the building and the base board.  This will have a balustrade running around it, with steps down to the lawn and formal gardens in front of the hotel.  The raised terrace will have a wall around it at grass level to hide the foam board. To the right is the walled vegetable, fruit and herb garden - you can see where the plots have been prepared.  This will also have a shed or two and some greenhouses.  This will run down to the edge of the creek, perhaps with a small boathouse and jetty for the hotel visitors to enjoy a little boating fun.

Base colours are done, but I will be using a variety of scenic techniques to finish the gardens, static grass, flowers, vegetables etc.  I need to get back to casting some  linka for the walls!











Michael

Last edited on Sat Feb 16th, 2019 10:01 pm by Headmaster

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I was going to mention chimneys, it looks a little odd without them. So glad you have them in hand. It looks fabulous so far and sits imposingly in its anticipated surroundings. Once you finish it off and weather it in I doubt that you will ever have second thoughts about the build, it really is very good.

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Thank you very much Marty, very kind.  Hopefully no other buildings will take quite so long!

Michael

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Thats stunning Michael. You have every right to feel very pleased with the end result. I doubt very much If you will change your opinion in the future.It will make a splendid and realistic focal point on your layout
Definitely merits one of Max’s elephant stamps if only I can find one:thumbs

Best wishes

Last edited on Sun Feb 17th, 2019 04:42 pm by John Dew

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There you go, John.


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Oh my!  What can I say? Two of the modellers who inspired me to get going and have a go at this modelling lark with such praise.  Thank you John!  The only downside is the TT is waiting to be fitted at the other end of the layout now!  I unpacked and tested it, then carefully put it away until I am ready.

Still a lot to be done on this scene, with the gardens and detailing. I'm going to try to put into practice what I have seen on your layout with the eye for detail and small cameo scenes to bring a model to life - we will see how I get on!

Regards

Michael

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Thank you Max - I'm chuffed!

Regards

Michael

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Well done Michael you have made a marvelous job of it, withought a doubt  certainly will be a focus point on the layout.

You should be admitted to the Master craftsmen of Linka moulds guild now.

Brian

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MaxSouthOz wrote: There you go, John.



Thanks Max.....you are a star

Again well earned Michael.....elephant stamps are quite rare.:lol:

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A champagne moment!

:cheers

Michael

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Time for some details on the hotel... first up some drainpipes...







A weather vane...



And television (as well as a chimney stack) has arrived at the hotel...



Steps down to the vegetable garden...



And the external wall and vegetable garden paving



Regards

Michael

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Very nice little details Michael it took me a while to realise the orientation of the photo of the vegetable garden i now realise the brown rectangular patches are vegetable beds not boarded up windows :)

Brian

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Yes, sorry about that, Brian.  I take the photos on my phone and there is no rhyme or reason to the orientation when I upload them.  Even if I rotate them, they come out the same way!

Michael

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Had a bit of an experiment today.  I wanted to make a formal hedge for the end of the garden, and don't like the shop bought option or the use of that green scourer stuff.  Readers of this thread will know I have been using moulds for buildings, so I had a go with using the same idea for some scenery.  Delighted with the results.....




If anyone is interested, I'll explain how I made it...

And the chimneys are finished Marty!

Michael

Last edited on Wed Feb 20th, 2019 08:41 pm by Headmaster

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I also started on the vegetable garden..... Sorry Brian - same problem with the orientation!







This one is better....




These are my attempts with Fimo clay.  Need to think of a way of making leafy vegetables, like potatoes and onions....

Michael

Last edited on Wed Feb 20th, 2019 09:19 pm by Headmaster

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The Hotel is looking really good.

I found some information on making plants and vegetables on the link below as I am also now in the process of making the back gardens for my latest cottages.

http://www.009.cd2.com/members/how_to/plants.htm

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Like the hedge Michael those scorers have done the trick.
Your collywobbles look good a lot better than the seed ones i planted for my wife they ended up looking more like flowers than a proper collwobble.

Brian

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Thanks Brian.  The hedges aren't scourers, they are a mix of hanging basket liner, herb leaves and glues, , pressed into a mould with fine foliage over the top.  


It is just details on the hotel now, so I can get back to finishing track laying at the Creek and that end will be done, but for the scenery.  Then I can start on the middle section of sidings and onto to the town.  Looking forward to a bit of track laying again.


Michael

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Granddaughter has chicken pox and has been with us the last couple of days, so not much work done on the layout. (She is 2, not yet amazed by modelling a cauliflower!)  A few additions to the hotel: the second hedge, gate to the vegetable garden, water fountain, greenhouses and additional planting.  These photos from the Faversham Archive will be the last of the hotel for a while, while I crack on with some other scenic work and the track. Probably no more updates until that is all completed.

Happy modelling










Michael


Last edited on Fri Feb 22nd, 2019 11:13 pm by Headmaster

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Proper job Michael.
The chimneys make all the difference.

What did you use as the mould for the hedge. I have kilometres of hedging to do on NE.

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Hi Michael. Don’t get me wrong,but, isn’t the scenery a bit “ over the top “ and detracting from the main event?I admit that I have never been a scenery man, more a trainman, up until now that is . And  after playing/ operating since I returned to the hobby, even I am having a go.   Best wishes Kevin 

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That's the great thing about this hobby, Kevin, different people have different interests and things they like to focus on.  I will say this quietly, but I'm not much of a train man!  I don't know a Collet from a Ford Capri - but I do enjoy making a miniature world in which trains live.

Each to their own, Kevin

Regards

Michael

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Thanks Marty, very pleased with it.  Worth all the time taken.  I think I mentioned earlier what I used as the mix, for the mould I used a piece of old cable trunking I had lying around.  Turned out to be a very good size!

The chopped up liner.....





the herbs added - these helped to bind it together, I think.  Or they may not be necessary!





This is the trunking I used.  I did give it a coat of releasing wax, but again, I don't think it was necessary because I released the "hedge" before it had dried, and let it dry in the open air.  It certainly dried quicker that way.




The mix in the mould.  I used a very cheap PVA mix - from a £1 shop.  A better PVA might have been better, but it did the job and I've been wanting to use it up!






On went the top of the trunking and I left it to dry. I used the pliers to get it to snap shut. Unfortunately, or maybe fortunately in this case, I am impatient waiting for things to dry.  After about an hour I opened it up to check it and the hedge was drying, but looked like it might take forever to fully cure so I released it by sliding a long wooden coffee stirrer underneath...…








Unfortunately it broke when I took it out.   But when it dried it was easy to glue them back together with some cheap (pound shop) super glue


And with the fine leaf foliage added after I had given it a haircut..  I did drip some more superglue through the whole hedge before I added this, which made the whole thing very hard and robust.  May not be necessary, but it worked for me.



Overall length of this first attempt was about 25cm, but I could have made it longer.  It has a nice square shape and different sizes of trunking would give a nice range of hedge sizes.  This one is about 1.8 cm high.

For the second hedge, I tried just cutting a strip of rubberised basket liner and covering that with fine leaf foliage.  Obviously much quicker, but it isn't as uniform and was harder to get it to stay together at this size.  Also not as square and neat.  I will have a gardener trimming it so that it looks like one has been freshly cut and the other is being done.  But I prefer my moulding method.  Just need to find a little person with sheers!

Hope this is all clear Marty

Regards

Michael







Last edited on Sat Feb 23rd, 2019 08:23 am by Headmaster

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Campaman wrote: The Hotel is looking really good.

I found some information on making plants and vegetables on the link below as I am also now in the process of making the back gardens for my latest cottages.

http://www.009.cd2.com/members/how_to/plants.htm


Sorry for the late reply Andy and thanks for the link.  What a great layout.  I love the attention to detail, but don't think I will be going as far as modelling specific plants and flowers that are in season for the time of year I am modelling!  The ideas for creating the vegetable garden were useful - I hadn't thought of using paper for leaves of cabbages.  Might have been easier and better than my clay modelling!

There is also a useful page on modelling wild hedges.

Thanks again,

Michael

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Nice hedges Michael, clever idea :thumbs :thumbs :thumbs


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Briperran wrote: Well done Michael you have made a marvelous job of it, withought a doubt  certainly will be a focus point on the layout.

You should be admitted to the Master craftsmen of Linka moulds guild now.

Brian


Sorry Brian - I missed this post, so apologies for my tardy reply.  I am certainly enjoying making it, but I am not so sure I will be making all of my buildings out of Linka.  It is definitely very time consuming.  I have made a Wills plastic goods shed and I have an engine shed to construct, so that may take over as my preferred medium.  However, seeing some of the brilliant card modelling people do here, I may give that another go. I have made some scalescenes models in the past so I may go back to those to get my eye in.  It might prove to be a good medium for the town scene at the other end of the layout.  My problem is that I am very poor at waiting for everything to dry properly - I must be more disciplined!

Regards
Michael

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Thanks Ed, one of the few of my experiments that actually worked!

Michael

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Headmaster wrote: That's the great thing about this hobby, Kevin, different people have different interests and things they like to focus on.  I will say this quietly, but I'm not much of a train man!  I don't know a Collet from a Ford Capri - but I do enjoy making a miniature world in which trains live.

Each to their own, Kevin

Regards

Michael



The same goes for me Michael and I really try to re-create the Devonshire countryside where I now live.


Ken.

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Ken wrote: Headmaster wrote: That's the great thing about this hobby, Kevin, different people have different interests and things they like to focus on.  I will say this quietly, but I'm not much of a train man!  I don't know a Collet from a Ford Capri - but I do enjoy making a miniature world in which trains live.

Each to their own, Kevin

Regards

Michael



The same goes for me Michael and I really try to re-create the Devonshire countryside where I now live.

Ken.

Hi All.  I don’t have the luxury of wide open spaces in my modern home. If I did, then the “ World would be my Lobster “. Best wishes Kevin 

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Kevin, my first three "layouts" were 4x2 planks and they were still 4/5ths buildings and scenery!

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Thankfully there are a few of us around, especially on this Forum, Ken. I love Coombe Hinton - your card buildings are amazing and lovely countryside.  I really don't know how you N gaugers do it!

Michael

Last edited on Sat Feb 23rd, 2019 10:06 am by Headmaster

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Nice hedge how to Michael

I use rubberised horsehair to make my bushes which is great for irregular bushes as you can cut it and pull it apart and trim bits but as you say for a uniform hedge like you have made not the best medium to use for that.

Kevin
Many people have different interests in Model railways one of the best known realistic looking layout makers in the Uk actually hates having to run trains Whereas others cant be bothered with scenery and are only interested in operations. Its a case of each to their own.

Brian

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Hi Brian. Thank you for your reply. But, before we go on another marathon, I thought that was how the Inglenook came about “ Shunting Manouvers “ , being more entertaining? rather than running around in ever decreasing circles ? all day, and disappearing :mutley:mutley:mutley into a tunnel. Best wishes Kevin 

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“Hope this is all clear Marty
Regards

Michael”



Perfectly described and illustrated. Thank you.


Noted that this method produces more of a formal garden hedge, once suitably trimmed, and those I mostly require on NE are of the wild and spiky type required to keep stock in the fields that they are originally put in! There will be one or two trimmed hedges along the road near the village however and I will experiment with your method.


Where does one get the release wax from?


I too have found judicious use of CA in the correct place can stiffen up a structure or tree remarkably well.


Once again, thank you for the “how I dun it”, most educational.

Last edited on Sun Feb 24th, 2019 02:21 am by Marty

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Ah! Yes Marty, it was how to make a more formal hedge which was puzzling me.  I got the release wax online, because I need it when casting Linka in resin.  To be honest, unless you leave the hedge to set rock solid in the mould, I don't think it is needed.

I am no scenery expert, but for more countryside styles of hedge I have tried a variety of techniques with mixed success.  Although they looked ok, they never quite looked right.  I then read a helpful article about creating different heights and gaps in hedges.  It also said that most hedges that mark a border - perhaps of a farmer's field - would be made mostly of the same type of plant or tree, cultivated into hedge form, so this basic structure would not vary too much in colour.  The variation would come from the additional wildlife growing around and through it.  So this is my first attempt at that, which will be going behind the hotel and in front of the track.  I will add some ground cover once it is in place, which will be of a darker green.  I'm always tempted to throw in some flowers, but to be honest, hedgerows don't have many flowers in them around here - hawthorn blossom and cow parsley seem to be the extent, so I will resist on this occasion!



Last edited on Sun Mar 3rd, 2019 09:36 pm by Headmaster

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I started off by cutting a length of this wire, to create a sort of fence/frame for the hedge.  It was just something I had lying around - you might have an alternative.  The advantage of the wire frame is that it can be bent and curved to fit the terrain quite easily.




I then used a spray adhesive to add bits of a plant liner, teased apart, which I painted green once dry, and gave it a bit of a trim of the more obvious straggly bits.  I was going to power up the airbrush, but in the end just did it with a brush, leaving the brown of the matting showing through in places.  In the past I have put these fibres on too thickly so that by the time I have added other greenery it has turned into a monster of a hedge  - so I kept it much sparser this time and I think it already looks quite good.  I think I could have added some foliage and a bit of ground cover and it would work as a boundary hedge.  





Instead, I started to add some seafoam pieces of varying heights and sizes.  I continued to use the spray adhesive as it was all going to be covered up by foliage. But actually, the spray dried clear (often spray glue doesn't, especially the cheap stuff). 





And here it is finished, with the darker ground cover added, which is just clump foliage.  There is an old tree I made for one of my planks in the middle, which is too heavy for the small foam board base the hedge is sitting in, so that will either be planted separately when I fix the hedge in place, of it will go completely.  I will see how it looks.  It's the one that has fallen over in the photo




I do think the old "less is more" is good advice for hedging.

If anyone has any other tips, please add them.


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OK, I know I said no more hotel updates, but I couldn't resist one more photo, so humour me!

I will be starting on making flowers and finishing off some detailing and I am waiting for a couple of deliveries, so definitely no more updates for a while, I promise!





Michael

Last edited on Sun Feb 24th, 2019 06:44 pm by Headmaster

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Very nice indeed Michael

When will you be taking bookings?

Brian

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Thank you Brian, a freebie stay for you!  Bring St Piran's flag and I'll fly it from the tower....

Michael

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Great work on the hotel Michael, not to mention the hedgetastic how-to.

I'm looking forward to the next update!

Bill :thumbs

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Yes, I might end up making use of that hedge idea myself.

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Imposing and looks the part. Brideshead revisited, maybe not quite Chatswood yet.

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Thanks Bill.  I do worry that I might be boring people because it has been slow progress, but I'm pleased with the outcome

Regards

Michael

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Hi Zelda.  I suppose one could use any rectangular shape and cover it with fine foliage.  In fact, for the small box hedges, I'm experimenting with covered foam - it will bend to  shape very easily. But I do like the way some bare patches of the liner show through so I think I will use it again somewhere in the town scene.  Let me know if you make any modifications or improvements

Regards

Michael

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Thank you Marty - fit for the Abbot of Faversham was all I was going for!  I don't think I will be taking on a similar challenge again....

Regards

Michael

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The hotel is finished apart from a few more detailing bits, so here are a couple of pictures of it in situ.





And busy in the garden....




Michael

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Wow, how absolutely splendid Michael and the toffs now have a croquet lawn to play with. How posh!

The whole scene is quite delightful and a credit to your skill.

The sunflowers, which are a regular summer crop here, are a fine touch, which sets the season rather nicely.

Best,

Bill






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Superb Michael it looks really smart and the gardener figures really bring the scene to life.

Have you made all the flowers and Veg as i remember you made cauliflowers.

I know you are well known for your interior pictures are we going to see some X rated scenes in hotel bedrooms :mutley


Brian

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Excellent work! Why, you could mistake that first photo for one of a real building!

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Thank you Chaps!  Much appreciated!   In truth, I am very much learning as I go with this modelling lark, and the final hotel is the result of two previous failed attempts.  I think I would have given up before, but the inspiration of so many other modellers here, and the encouragement have kept me going - so thank you all for my small contribution to the forum.

Michael

Last edited on Sun Mar 3rd, 2019 08:43 pm by Headmaster

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Thanks Bill - A froggy Good Work is genuinely appreciated and valued. Well spotted on the croquet lawn, it was the only pastime I could think of which would  fit the scene.  I pondered having people playing, but think I will go with the scene as it is, it might not look too contrived.

I am no gardener, and have no idea if the flowers are properly in season, but it is supposed to be a summer scene, so I am pleased the sunflowers indicate that.

Thank you again for the stamp - I am really chuffed!

Regards

Michael

Last edited on Sun Mar 3rd, 2019 09:41 pm by Headmaster

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Thanks Brian, while our layouts are very different in size and location, I feel we are both facing similar challenges, so it is great to see your progress and learn from you in the process.

I'm not aware of any reputation for my photo interiors, but I did ponder something of an assignation in a hotel room but decided 1: Probably not a good idea to search for such an image (!) and 2: This is an English country hotel - very unlikely such antics would be going on..... Now if I were modelling the continent, it would be a no brainer!!

The whole scene, when completely finished will get a good spray of matt varnish to take off some of the shine on the figures, but I am pleased with how they have come out.  My painting of them definitely improved, so it is a case of practice helps.

The veg garden is mostly hand made, with a few Busch kits.  The flowers are also a mix, but mostly busch kits.  Very fiddly and frustrating - bits pinged off never to be found when I was cutting/gluing them!  The grass is standard static grass, the stripes are just two different shades of grass.  The figures are from Dart castings - white metal - and nicely detailed - very impressed with them and will certainly order more.

Regards

Michael

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Thank you Zelda - high praise indeed!  I have seen so many excellent modellers here and think the same thing - so it is all down to their inspiration and advice.  Hopefully future buildings will not need so many failed attempts.  I am really no expert and have very limited experience, I have to acknowledge the advice and guidance of others here.

But being told it could look like a photo of a real building is more than I could hope for.  Thank you

Regards

Michael

Last edited on Sun Mar 3rd, 2019 08:57 pm by Headmaster

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You're welcome!

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Michael, I can only echo everything that has been said as it really is wonderful modelling - you'll have your work cut out doing the weeding though! :)


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Hi Ken, and thank you very much - greatly appreciated.  no problem - the wife does the weeding!

Regards

Michael

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Not much being posted at the moment, so a quick update on Faversham Creek.....

Track laying is progressing OK, points and motors all finished, just need to finish off the goods sidings.  The buildings here are Metcalf brewery ones, in card - salvaged from a previous plank I made.They are just there to give me an idea of what it will look like with my actual buildings.  The platform is still unfinished, although the parts are cast, so just a matter of gluing it all up and finishing the painting.




Dawn breaks at the hotel, and the early morning Orient Express makes its way to the coast - a non-stopping service at the Creek!




Regards

Michael





Last edited on Sat Mar 9th, 2019 05:19 pm by Headmaster

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Good progress Michael tracklaying with all the wiring and point motors always takes time.

I note its only posh coaches going past the hotel no 3rd class suburbans.

Brian

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Thanks Brian, I am certainly not the quickest at track laying, especially when I am working it out as I go - within a general that plan is.

Well spotted on the coaches, although I am amazed that you could, and impressed that you know!  I don't really know that side of things at all.  This was a Hornby set I bought, ooh about ten years ago, with the plan to fulfil a life long dream of having a model railway.  But then everyone's advice was to start small, so I made two or three dioramas and then two 4x2 planks, hence the  delay in getting started on the "proper" layout.  I am glad I took the advice because I learned a lot (mostly how not to do things!) and it kept me going.  I fear I would have given up if I had gone straight in with a larger model.

But I am still very much a novice.  This is my first foray into DCC, so I am learning a lot about that as I go, and I know next to nothing about trains, so am having to learn that as well.  And the electrics are new and challenging too so I have plenty of scope for disasters along the way.

In my original plan I wanted to be able to run steam and early electrics, although that isn't really my era.  We travelled everywhere by bus and train, as my parents didn't drive, and what I really remember is blue British Rail with slam shut doors - corridor and open carriages and luggage racks made from thick string.  I have very little rolling stock at the moment, so I could change things if I wish to.  Maybe blue with the occasional steam excursion train which have regularly run through Faversham.  Although the Creek line was closed by that time, but maybe in an alternative history it has continued to flourish with select imports and exports.  Whatever, clearly I will have to be on my toes with the trains with the experts watching!!

Thanks for viewing and taking the time to respond - much appreciated.

Regards

Michael

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With such a flash hotel I'm surprised that the Orient Express doesn't stop at the Creek. Looks like a destination to me!
Bravo for pushing on out of your comfort zones... I've really enjoyed the hobby for the things that it has taught me... let alone the "liddle" trains going round and round.

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Thanks Marty.  I certainly enjoy all of the new things I am learning and get inspired by other layouts shown here which also keeps me going - along with all of the useful advice of course!

Michael

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I haven't updated recently, mainly because I am in development mode.  However I have successfully laid the route for the cyclists - one is shown here, and that is all working.  It will be two moving characters in front of the hotel, when it is all finished.....  If I can work out how to post a video, I will show it in action!  Obviously I need to do some landscaping, and I need to make some decent tress.  Eventually I will fit the creek and there will be some water - although that will take a few tests too, I am sure.



And I've been making Busch flowers to finish off the hotel detailing.  They are painstaking!!!





FinallyI have been running some tests for auto uncoupling.  I've also finalised track positioning at the quayside and have been researching some buildings to make and doing some preliminary sketches.... Hopefully everything will come together over the next couple of weeks and I will see some progress!

Michael

Last edited on Sun Mar 24th, 2019 12:16 am by Headmaster

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Congratulations on your work on those flowers! And on the bicyclist!

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Thank you Zelda - but nothing like your card models!!

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This all sounds very technical Michael with moving characters in front of the hotel.
Are the cyclists also going to be moving along a cycle track aswell ?


The uncoupling will keep you busy you will think you have cracked it then you put a different  truck on and dam it wont work. :lol:

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Flowers are all planted and lights wired up (although not connected up yet), so I have started on the landscaping at the front.  Yes Brian, the cyclist is on a track and will cycle through the countryside near the Creek.  





Michael

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So, the cyclist successfully travels around - with a bit of a surprise!

I need to do a bit of work on my filming, but this video will at least give you an idea of how it will look - I just apologise for the quality of the camera work!  I cannot claim credit for it, and I'm sure most of you will recognise it.  But it does look cool when it works!


https://youtu.be/baS28IshPpk

Regards

Michael

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My first feature tree for the front of the layout is made.....


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It looks good!

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Smart Tree Michael is that one of those Woodland scenic tree kits?


Brian

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Thank you gents.  The trunk is an old woodland scenic one I had kicking around.  I will have to do a little more work on the trunk.  The leaves are a mixture of things, but mostly seafoam covered in flock.  I built the seam foam up into the shape.  I always admire other people's trees that appear a little sparser on the foliage, but never seem to manage it myself!  Maybe the next one!

Michael

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I found another woodlands scenic armature, so I glued on some seafoam and began the foliage.  I am going to try to keep the foliage a little sparser this time.  Try!



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Nice trees, Michael.

What great materials we have available today.  :thumbs

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We do indeed!  And it is good that there are companies out there developing them - definitely keeping the hobby going

Michael

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Looks smart Michael the sea foam really sets it off you can add more leaf foliage if you want just b using spray glue then sprinkling or dipping it. What glue did you use to affix the sea foam?

Brian

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Thanks Brian.  Yes, the addition of different foliage does bring them to life.

I glue the seafoam on with something called Hi-Tack very sticky glue.  It is great in both hot and cold conditions, so ideal for my loft.  Sometimes I add a small dot of Gorilla super glue gel, just to give it a bit of permanence.  I attach the foliage with extra strong hairspray from Superdrug - It cost a little over a pound, and goes a long way.  I have started on some apple trees - I will get some photos up when they are finished...

Michael

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Well, I haven't updated recently, mainly because I have been experimenting and practising a few things - with mixed success!  Anyway, the sidings at the creek end, next to the hotel are laid, wired, point motors fixed and programmed (not difficult, but I always forget how to do it).  Uncoupling magnets fitted and seem to be working - at least with my limited rolling stock.  The actual creek will be fitted to the front of the baseboard once everything is finished, otherwise I won't be able to easily reach the rear of the scene for further work.

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So, Faversham Creek began with a small cameo scene in the corner, based on the novel, The Virgin and the Gypsy.  The warehouses at the Creek, and the working sidings have finally arrived..... over a year later, I think!






These may not be the final buildings, nor their location, but it gives a flavour of how it might start to look

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Looking down the newly fixed tracks.....



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And a little rolling stock has arrived.  A Q1, ventilated wagon for fresh fruit and vegetables from the Garden of England and a Shepherd Neame wagon taking Spitfire to London..... 



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The small goods area, next to the hotel - which has seen some grass grow around it


Last edited on Mon Apr 8th, 2019 09:51 pm by Headmaster

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And finally a view from the Abbey ruins, looking across the hotel to the goods yard.  In its heyday in the 1800s, this would have been a busy and noisy place.  But by the 1960s, it is a much more serene place.  Fishing, shrimping and oyster …(fishing? Collecting?  not sure what the term is!) are still important, but "imports and exports" are now greatly reduced and something of a welcome spectacle for visitors to the hotel.....



Last edited on Mon Apr 8th, 2019 09:51 pm by Headmaster

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Very nice Michael.

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Tomorrow I will add some more grass to the scene and low level weeds and bushes.  Then plant some trees and make my new cyclists to pedal through the countryside.  I have some fencing to fit and I need to make another hedge as a boundary from the rose garden.  I need to make a road from the hotel, which will also be used by traffic to the goods yard and decide on how I will surface the remaining area.  I had planned on using clay and scribing cobbles or paving - like I have done with surfaces at the hotel - but it now seems like a lot of space to fill.  And I need to think of some scenes to create around the buildings and lineside.  I wish I had John Dew's eye for details.....  Finding appropriate figures is proving tricky.  

I'm getting a bit ahead of myself, but I also want a fishing boat for the creek.  As it will be centre stage and in the foreground, it will need to be quite detailed and authentic.  There doesn't seem to be much available at OO gauge scale.....  Faversham still builds and restores Thames Barges, which were a main feature of the creek (I believe we are the only place offering apprenticeships in the art of Thames Barge building, but I may have believed the town hype!) There is a Billings model at scale 1/64 - would that be too large? That might be an alternative to a fishing boat.

Well, that is it for the update for now  - all feedback, good and bad gratefully received.

Michael




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Thank you Sol.  The kadees and magnets have taken a bit of time to get right.  Rolling stock with metal wheels and weights caused some frustration, which I have solved by putting a small piece of sponge against the axle to act like a brake. Having decided to go with magnets under the track, positioning proved essential.  I should have gone with your 5 magnets between the rails..... Planning tracks and buildings together takes me a bit of time and waiting for things to dry properly always takes longer than I imagine.  But I am making slow and steady progress

Regards

Michael

Last edited on Mon Apr 8th, 2019 11:02 pm by Headmaster

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Very good progress there Michael the grass looks great looks like a lot of hours of work developing the sidings.
I dont know if its the photo angle but it seems a long reach across to your corner from your standing area?
What next a sound decoder for the Q1

Brian

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Headmaster wrote: Tomorrow I will add some more grass to the scene and low level weeds and bushes.  Then plant some trees and make my new cyclists to pedal through the countryside.  I have some fencing to fit and I need to make another hedge as a boundary from the rose garden.  I need to make a road from the hotel, which will also be used by traffic to the goods yard and decide on how I will surface the remaining area.  I had planned on using clay and scribing cobbles or paving - like I have done with surfaces at the hotel - but it now seems like a lot of space to fill.  And I need to think of some scenes to create around the buildings and lineside.  I wish I had John Dew's eye for details.....  Finding appropriate figures is proving tricky.  

Well, that is it for the update for now  - all feedback, good and bad gratefully received.

Michael

 

Hi Michael

I think the sweeping panorama shot of the Hotel and ground combined with the goods yard is stunning. The hotel garden is a masterpiece. 

I like the track layout in the yard and the way the buildings have been positioned. They look just right.....no suggestion of being plonked

There is quite a lot of detail needed in the yard of course**. The challenge will be setting it up so that it conveys a sense of a once active yard but is now something of a backwater. You probably only need a few selected cameos to suggest some movement and equally important establish to the casual visitor your selected era....a definite time stamp.

You have to do this without it looking "busy". There is a wonderful sense of space about the layout which you dont want to lose. The late John Flann always used to tell me that " less is more".  Sound advice which I am afraid I sometimes ignored! Ido  tend to over detail but I can to some extent get away with it in an industrial setting.

You ask about figures......here is a list (usual disclaimer) which may be helpful

Initially I used Airfix/Dapol ....... they are inexpensive and quite well detailed but everyone has them and they are readily identifiable........useful in the backgound and for crowd scenes (which you dont want)

Monty's Models (part of Dart Castings) have a large range of well detailed white metal figures. There are lots on Granby and until a year ago they were my first call.

Now I tend to buy from Modelu ......3d resin printed from live scans. Some of the facial detail is less precise than Montys but the overall effect is more realistic. There are some super footplate figures leaning over cab sides for instance. The downside for me is the difference between diets in 2019 and 1947 is sometimes rather apparent! 

I have a number of cameos from Langley Models .......the castings are cruder but there is more interesting variety........the on line catalogue is worth looking at.....I have a vague memory of some models playing croquet........they certainly have a cricket team.

** Post is too long already ....my apologies........but I could give a few suggestions for yard detail if you wish.

Best wishes

John

ps thank you for the compliment :lol:
 










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Thank you Brian.... I've added some longer grass today which has also toned down the green colour.  The sidings are very simple, and better modellers than me would have done it all much quicker, I'm sure.  But I was also learning about magnets and kadees  and thinking about buildings.  At the actual creek, the buildings are in rows and I want to try to capture that.  The far corner is tough to reach from the edge of the board, although I can reach all of the track and have been able to clean it so for most practical issues it will be fine.  If there is a real problem, I can actually get to it from behind.  The angled backscene is actually held in place by magnets and clips - although I would have to repair the corners, if that  happened.

Sound???   I am only just getting to grips with DCC....I'm happy if I can get a decoder into a DCC ready loco.  Maybe one for the more distant plans.

Michael

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Hi John - many thanks for your reply and the kind words.  

In the prototype, a lot of the Creek trade had moved to Whitstable harbour.  The creek transported all sorts of products (either in or out), from plant based goods, meat, livestock, milk, fertiliser, canned goods ,beer, bricks, cement.....but by the 60s it was all but over.  This has always been a re-imagining... (although I often think of having it as a modern day preserved line and tourist attraction - old buildings re-purposed and the creek offering pleasure rides.....)  Assuming I stick with the original idea, then you have it right.  There will be a bit of fishing, but most freight will be quite light.  So I need to try to capture the sense of a once busy place now at the start of its decline.  Perhaps the yard will not be as tidy as it once was... maybe a closed and boarded up warehouse or shed.... wildlife encroaching.  

But I do still want there to be some work going on.  I have good resources to deal with the quayside, boats (if I can find one!) and the fishing and oyster and shrimp dredging. But as to the rest of the yard, I don't really know... so I would genuinely welcome any suggestions and guidance.

Most freight on the Southern Region travelled at night - that won't go down well with the hotel customers!

I have airfix figures (some were converted to the Tintin characters mentioned earlier in the thread) and have used those you mention.  I will trawl back through the websites.  

Warm regards

Michael

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I forgot to mention John, I don't really intend to model open space, it just sort of happens.  I look at the business of your layout and wish I could do something similar!  No pleasing us is there?  But in this part of Kent it is a mixture of open countryside and small towns, so maybe that is why it is coming out the way it is!

Michael

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Hallelujah!  A day of testing track, points and uncoupling has proved very successful.  A few tweaks here and there and one disaster resolved..... but all working a treat now.  My very limited dancing skills now include the Kadee shuffle.  I never really realised how much fun shunting could be!! Certainly more skill involved than I anticipated.  I have been happily coupling and uncoupling, pushing and pulling wagons to different locations and even a bit of switching.  Great fun!

My heartfelt thanks to all of the contributors who have directly and indirectly helped me on my way and aided in me in discovering some new "skills" (I won't tempt fate by suggesting I have mastered anything yet.)  I really wouldn't have the beginnings of a model railway if it were not for everyone here   :cheers

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I also managed a bit of scenic work.  The hotel has progressed from this....



To this....








The first four apple trees have sprung up and a nice bike ride …..



Michael

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Headmaster wrote:


 

That looks absolutely bl@@dy wonderful, how do I book a room :thumbs :thumbs :thumbs


Ed

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Thank you very much Ed
Michael

Last edited on Thu Apr 11th, 2019 07:34 am by Headmaster

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Planning begins for the small goods yard.  I am just using some old card models to give me an idea of size - these are not the finished pieces! (Although the linka warehouse and Wills goods shed will feature here).  I will use the precise location of buildings to locate the uncoupling points.  

I am quite fortunate that I only have one vertical beam in layout area of the loft, and this is it.  Any thoughts on how I might disguise it?  I had thought of perhaps designing a building around, it using a photograph of one.  Not sure if that will work.  I may experiment with giving the upper part a sky colour - although that may look odd!

It's probably something I will just have to live with - but there may be a clever idea out there.....





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Hi Michael

You could just saw the wooden post off..........

On the other hand, here is a pic of my shed support (not stuck out in the middle I admit) but masked by a simple wall/bothy with a lamp-post, poster and tree to draw the eye away.  The top is painted sky colour  so your suggestion is a good one.


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Scalescenes have recently announced some small trawlers, you could either build as they come or use them as templates to scratchbuild.

The Hotel scene is looking great, keep it coming.

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Try a building round the vertical beam Michael, it should work as it attracts the eye to the building and not the beam

I had a similar problem with a gas pipe in the garage on my old layout which I put a chimney round, but unfortunately I couldn't really paint the rest of the pipe due to gas regulations.




Ed

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Thanks folks.

 I did consider a saw...….but I had visions of the layout ending up in the bedroom - as the roof collapsed.  

The chimney looks great around the pipe and it certainly takes your eye away from it, and I like the simple wall idea too.  Perhaps there is some mileage in building something around it after all.  I will have to think of something suitable and see if I can at least reduce the impact of it.


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Possibly stick mirror tile around it by way of camouflage?



Bill

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Now I was only reading something about  the use of mirrors the other day! That may work too.  Particularly higher up....

I knew I only had to ask here!

Michael

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Hi Michael

A bit late I am afraid. First off I would paint it out, either white or to tone with the sky colours in the back scene......probably the latter. That will give you a better idea of the best way to conceal the base. I am inclined to think of a building to complement the rather nice warehouse you made. The building (and extension?) to wrap around the post and extend beyond it.

Some suggestions for the yard in keeping with the concept of once busy but now a backwater.

Yard crane......or perhaps just the base

Weigh bridge and building........state of repair your choice

Stable block converted to garages or stores

Foundation only of a former building suggesting past glory

Loading gauge

Point levers and guards

Some of the secondary paths/roads/loading areas rather than having setts might be laid with compacted cinders and ash.........very common feature up to and including the sixties

The railway property would have been fenced off although it may be in a state of disrepair now.......you need to determine who owns or owned the road between the hotel and yard.

There would still be a number of cast iron legal signs regarding right of way, trespass, safety etc........some of these would be triplicated!   Pre grouping Company,  Southern Rly  British Railways.*

* Slight digression.... there was cinder path alongside the Liverpool-Southport line that lead to my Uncle's house
I remember even in the sixties you could trace the history of the line by the array of signs warning one about trespass :
Liverpool-Southport Rly   Lancashire and Yorkshire   London and North Western    LMS     British Rail

Probably lasted as long as the path did!

You have probably already thought of most of these but I thought I would scribble them out just in case any struck a chord

Cheers

John




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Thanks John - plenty to think about there - some I had considered, but mostly not.  I will have to see what I can fit in across the scene.

Michael

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You can tell its school holidays massive production at Faversham creek.

Hotel really looking the biz now Michael 

RE the support post i have a similar problem wouldnt suggest sawing it the roof may begin to sag .

I am planning to make a building 4/5 storey looking like warehouse sort of thing around it then sky above not ideal but i dont think there is an easy answer.

Brian

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Hi Brian - yes, yet another holiday for us "lucky teachers".  Although I've been into school everyday this week because we are doing the budget (don't get me started on that...!) And next week I'm going away with pupils, so no work on the railway..... I do an annual trip, either at Easter or in the summer.  We are off to Russia for a week - which is a trip I have done before.  A really interesting country, full of surprises.  St Petersburg is one of the most beautiful cities I have ever visited and full of history.  Next year is a summer trip to Ecuador and the Galapagos  Islands..... and yes, I have to pay! 

I saw that you also had some beams to contend with, so will be interested in how you go about it.  I am going to try a range of things, from the least destructive up.  I will see what mirrors do..... then I will try different paints.  I'm definitely going to create a building.  As my beam is vertical, not at an angle, I will make a flat roof structure and then experiment above it.

My brother, who is an engineer, told me I could move the beam, as it is only nailed into position and so is not load bearing...… but then recanted that after doing a bit of research, given the age of the house.  I could move it, but only to another awkward part of the layout - and as it would be where the Creek is, I would have no chance of hiding it.   So I will keep things as they are and see what I can do.  Strangely it has only become a problem now that I am working on that area.... I hadn't really noticed it before.  If it is the only scenic compromise I have to make, I suppose I can live with it.  I've tried wrapping an old card building around it and, as others have said, your eye is drawn to the building and the scene rather than then the beam, so your big warehouse will probably work a treat.  People have suggested going with a light colour, which I will try..... but my instinct is to go with black in an effort to "lose" it.  That will be my last attempt if all else fails.

I know it's the school holidays when my wife and I go out midweek! (She is a headmistress - our poor children!)

Regards

Michael


Last edited on Thu Apr 11th, 2019 09:52 pm by Headmaster

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Headmaster wrote:
As my beam is vertical, not at an angle


So that will be a column Michael, while a beam is a horizontal structural member, often used to support roofs or intermeadiate floors. Inclined members can be braces, struts or bearers and sometimes even beams if at less than 45 degrees, above that, I'll call them inclined columns, but rafters if in a roof construction, although generally columns are always vertical, so to best transfer loads more efficiently.

Oh the joys of building construction. I also enjoyed structural mechanics at college, although that was some 35 years ago now! Time certainly flies.

Cheers,

Bill

Last edited on Thu Apr 11th, 2019 10:06 pm by Longchap

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Mea Culpa!  Not a beam! Whatever.... it's in the way!!!  My brother tells me it isn't load bearing, but because it is keeping the shape.  My background is philosophy, so I will take his word for it! (He was probably making it easy for me!)

Thank you, I have learned something new...

Regards

Michael


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I'm learning something new all the time and if not, I must be getting lazy or relaxing too much!

This next week, I hope to be mainly practising with my new airbrush.

Have fun with that wonderfully developing layout.

Best,

Bill

Last edited on Thu Apr 11th, 2019 10:28 pm by Longchap

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Me too Bill, I learn something new all the time when I go through this forum.  Things which I wasn't ready for once become inspiration now.  I value everyone's input here because it is always done with such good grace and knowledge.  

I too have a new airbrush!  I'm a bit afraid to try it out, so I will be interested to see your work.  Is it a new airbrush, or are you new airbrushing?  I am a complete novice, so any tips you have will be gratefully received.

Regards

Michael

Last edited on Fri Apr 12th, 2019 12:24 am by Headmaster

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Hi Michael,

In reality, I'm new to airbrushing, but not to spray painting and my approach is a simple logical one, but helped by a splendid course I attended in February on this very subject. See post 10 on this thread:

http://yourmodelrailway.net/view_topic.php?id=15841&forum_id=21

I first used an airbrush 35 years ago on model car kits, an inexpensive Humbrol siphon bottle fed unit which I still have, served by a can of propellant. They are still available, but not ideal for serious finishes and subtle weathering.

I'll post something further on the above thread when I've cleared by work bench and set up the spray station and attended to some stock next week.

There are lots of YouTube videos on airbrushing, a multitude in fact and even some good ones amoung them. It's a simple and straightforward enough technique, but requires very strict attention to the basic principles to avoid a lot of clean-up to equipment and workpiece, but the results are most rewarding.

I think you will enjoy your airbrush with your well researched approach to modelling.

Right, back to laying a cement and sand screed in a storage outbuilding.

Bon weekend,

Bill

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Michael

In all probability its a purling support as its either slightly angled or  vertical that is what mine are.

You probably could remove it but you may find over a period of time the roof wood begin to sag.

It could be replaced with a steel bar or even a scaffold pole that would do the same job but obviously smaller.

I suppose technically it is not load bearing as the purling itself takes the load but that support ensures that the purling does not warp over a period of time.


Brian

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I'm not risking removal.... I've lived with it this long, I can work around it.  I definitely don't want anything sagging  :mutley

Michael

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Bill and Michael

May I refer you to my Yarslow thread which includes, latterly, my attempts at weathering and comments on what I found was good and bad.

The bottom line is - be brave and have a go on some old stuff because it's actually (a) easier than you think and (b) good fun.  If I can do it and get decent results with my budget Badger then I am sure than you guys can crack it.



Happy spraying

Barry

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Thanks for the heads up Barry - I think you are doing marvellously with your weathering!  I can definitely see your  technique developing - you will be a master in no time! And your hints and tips are most useful.   I might  even have a bit of practise myself....

Michael

Last edited on Sun Apr 21st, 2019 08:35 pm by Headmaster

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I was browsing in my local model shop and saw that they had a rake of CIWL coaches - those used on the Dover night time boat train.  They looked lovely.  But were HO scale.  Now I know these needed to be smaller than English rolling stock, but would HO coaches be too small for an otherwise OO layout?  I fear the loco pulling them would appear too big.... or the coaches too small.  Unfortunately I didn't have the chance to do any comparisons in the shop.  Any thoughts?

Michael

Last edited on Wed Apr 24th, 2019 10:41 pm by Headmaster

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Found these pictures on flickr Michael, not sure if they help.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/trainsandstuff/5308392766/in/photostream/


Ed

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Just to clarify the link I posted above, I don't have any accompanying text, I just found the picture in a search.

I believe the maroon coach on the left is a OO gauge LMS coach and the Intercity coach on the right is a Lima HO gauge coach.

http://www.limabritishho.co.uk/LBHO-Coaches.htm

Scroll down a bit.



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Hi Ed.  Thank you for your reply. On a par with the Triang GWR Clerestory coaches then, and I had a close look at the Bachmann/ Kernow DEMU’s, and even the much awaited product isn’t true to the Prototype? IMHO the sides are not quite flat enough to fit in the bodge job tunnel/ s, the reason for their existence.  Best wishes Kevin 

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Thanks Ed, a very useful comparison.  I won't be going back for them then!
Regards

Michael

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Headmaster wrote: I was browsing in my local model shop and saw that they had a rake of CIWL coaches - those used on the Dover night time boat train.  They looked lovely.  But were HO scale.  Now I know these needed to be smaller than English rolling stock, but would HO coaches be too small for an otherwise OO layout?  I fear the loco pulling them would appear too big.... or the coaches too small.  Unfortunately I didn't have the chance to do any comparisons in the shop.  Any thoughts?

Michael
Michael you are corect they will look slightly smaller than OO coaches but if you particularly like them putting something like a Terrier in front pulling them will actually not look that wrong.

Brian

Last edited on Thu Apr 25th, 2019 04:54 pm by Briperran

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Thanks Brian.  That had been my idea, but probably not a prototypical arrangement.  Not imperative, I just liked the look of them and liked the idea of the boat train passing through

Michael

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You mean like this Michael?



Brian

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I do indeed!

Michael

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Headmaster wrote: Another Linka experiment, this time a platform.  A few castings which I have had to chop about to make the right size.  Then painted in various grey tones and given washes of grey and dirty brown.  Finally adding the white edging.  





Out of interest, does anyone know when platforms started to be edged in white? Was it always the case, or did H and S step in at some time?

Michael  

Late on the scene, as usual, how did I miss this marvellous thread? Any how re above

Photographs of Cholsey & Moulsford [GWR} clerly show a white painted edge on the up and down main platforms in
 
'1940s'
 
1929
 
1927
 
Further, the lines do not extend down the platform ramps.
 
Whilst this does not answer the particular question posed by the O.P. it shows conclusively that Home Office W. War II instructions were not the cause in this case. :)
 
In contrast, the adjoining Wallingford branch platforms were not so adorned.

Further -

Great Eastern Railway dated September 12th 1913. (Instruction No. 1110, 1913.)  
Edges of Station Platforms To Be Kept Whitened During Foggy Weather.
 
Notice to Station Masters, Inspectors, Foremen-Porters and others concerned.
 
In future, as a precaution during foggy weather the edges of Station Platforms must be kept whitened with whitewash; the work to be perfomed by the Station Staff, as required.

Best wishes,

Douglas

Last edited on Fri Apr 26th, 2019 02:41 pm by Chubber

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Hmm, perhaps this was borrowed from Army practice, if it don't move, paint it!
Still sunny here,

Bill  :lol: 

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Thank you Douglas and welcome to my rather meandering thread and slow progress.....

I suppose this shows that the white lines were in use around the country, but that it was not standardised.  Maybe that is what the war office did.  By the 60s it was standard, so that is what it shall be at Faversham Creek.

Regards

Michael

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Longchap wrote: Hmm, perhaps this was borrowed from Army practice, if it don't move, paint it!
Still sunny here,

Bill  :lol: 

I'm glad that isn't true of everything or my youngest son, on holiday from university, would be coated in whitewash!

Still sunny here too

Michael

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Dougs right the white line thing has been around a long time but WW2 saw it being done almost everywhere.

Plus if you want it to look correct dont do a to good a job as apparently the whitewash was often applied with a mop brush so it wasnt exactly accurate painting.

Brian

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Well, it has been a little while since there was any sort of update.  In truth, I haven't had much time in the loft, but today I managed to crack on with a few things.  

I decided I didn't like the lay out of the sidings - specifically the one running to what will be the quayside, so I finally bit the bullet, pulled it up and moved the offending point, re-laid it, fitted the motor and the uncoupling magnets and gave a sigh of relief.  It isn't a huge change, but it is better operationally and gives me a bit more scope with buildings and … it just feels better.  I've been putting it off, but now that it is done I am much happier.




Last edited on Mon May 27th, 2019 09:07 pm by Headmaster

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The road to the hotel is done - it is also the access road to the goods area.  The real road in Faversham is just a surfaced track really so this works just fine.  Some surface texture (a mixture of chinchilla dust and casting powder), then a base grey with weathering powders on top, finished with a coat of dullcote matt varnish



Last edited on Mon May 27th, 2019 09:08 pm by Headmaster

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And I started on the pavers between the hotel and the track.  This is clay, with each paver individually stamped, like I did with the hotel.  It has had its first coat of paint, mixed with PVA to give it some structural strength.  I will finish off with a glaze and weathering powders before a coat of matte varnish.  The yard will be a mixture of pavers, ash and cinders and some concrete, and maybe some tarmac - which reflects the actual area it is broadly based on.  Although I want it to be relatively busy from an operational point of view, I also want to capture the sense that its decline is coming....




Last edited on Mon May 27th, 2019 09:11 pm by Headmaster

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And finally, the brewery warehouse in position at the rear and a likely position for buildings at the quayside.  Although the goods shed may move and I might make another warehouse.  There are three at the actual quay.

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Those cobbles look great. Might have to steal that idea if my ones don’t work out! Haha 

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Thanks Chris, although I think I stole the idea too!  I've seen others use a square shape to create the cobbles, but I experimented quite a lot and ended up making a tool out of a piece of wire that is just three sides of a square, or rectangle.  This allows me to vary the size of stones and is much easier to line up.  It works best of all with oven baked clay - like Fimo - but I couldn't do that on this part of the layout as I couldn't oven bake it.  I experimented with using a heat gun, but that didn't work - too near to plastic track..... elsewhere it might be ok.

I shall be interested in your own approach to cobbles!

Regards

Michael


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For mine I have the advantage that they are behind the station house and only in view if you really look for them.  So I think I can get away with the illusion of cobbles. 

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Good bit of progress there Michael
 The whole area there is beginning to take shape the cobbled area looks extremely good you have managed to capture that old run down look with that.

Brian

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Thank you Brian.  It has been good to be able to  spend a bit of time on the layout.  A recent health scare (it's ok, just need an operation, but I feared it might be worse) and the business of work - inspection looming - along with the normal domestic duties have kept me out of the loft for a while.  And I had hit a bit of a barrier because I needed to make some changes and hadn't really resolved the buildings dilemma.  But I have a plan now, the changes are made so hopefully I can crack on again.

Regards

Michael

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Hi Michael

I do like the adjustments you have made. The sidings seem to flow better and I can see that operationally it will be more satisfying. One of thoses cases where you were definitely right to bite the bullet.

The cobblestones or setts look very effective. Are you planning on a fence of some sort between the yard and the hotel property.........I think there would have something of the sort .....maybe a bit dilapidated for your era

Glad to hear your health issue can be resolved. Trust the operation goes well (and the inspection of course!)

Best wishes

John

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Thank you John.  It was seeing yourself and others making changes to your well established layouts that gave me the confidence and impetus to make the changes.  I am glad I did because I think it will suit my ideas for buildings better.  There will indeed be a fence.  I have some plastic railing fences which will suit. It will belong to the railway, rather than the hotel, so will not be in the best state of repair with some long grass and weeds and a bit of rust.  A bit of greenery in the cracks of  the paving too, which will add to the tiredness of the scene. And plenty of signs, re your previous suggestion

And thank you for your kind thoughts about impending op and dreaded inspection!

Regards

Michael

Last edited on Thu May 30th, 2019 10:48 pm by Headmaster

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Beginning work on the  Scalescenes warehouse for the goods yard.  My, this is a bit of a monster build.  Perhaps will stretch my card modelling skills.  I've made Metcalf models and a couple of Scalescenes - a small free goods shed and the country pub, but this is far more complicated than those. 



Michael

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I am aiming to disguise the upright roof beam a little, so it will need a bit of kit bashing.  I know I can't hide the whole beam, but I am hoping the building will at least draw the eye down.



Michael

Last edited on Sat Jun 8th, 2019 02:02 pm by Headmaster

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Similar idea to what i will be doing Michael a good way to disguise a problem you are not in a position to do anything about unless one is happy with a bending roof.

Brian

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Ah!, Although I suspect you will make a better job of it than me.  I think I will have to do a bit of weathering to disguise my mistakes on this build.  I've learned a lot about card modelling making it - and it isn't even finished. I have made lots of mistakes which I didn't realise were mistakes until I started putting things together.  Hopefully the three foot rule will apply.

Michael

Last edited on Sat Jun 8th, 2019 11:33 pm by Headmaster

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Although with a bit of even very basic photo editing, I can make the beam problem go away!!




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Having made all of the panels for the warehouse, it is now a simple (!) job of fixing them together.  I realised that the end panel, which will be facing on-coming trains, looked a bit bare, so tonight I played with some editing software and the Scalescenes PDFs and came up with this.....


It isn't yet fixed in position, and I know it isn't that ground breaking, but it is quite a step forward for me!  A bit of a faff, I'm sure there are better ways of doing it, but it seems to have worked.  Some enamel advertising boards below and I think it will look a bit prettier!

Michael

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I also stared to experiment with some photo interiors.... I will model 3D items where the doors are and on the loading platform…..  This is just with the loft light shining through, LEDs will be a little more controlled.....



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So this is where I have got to so far.  I have to say, the building is a very clever design and open to all sorts of modifications.  In time I might be a genuine convert.  A few more scalescenes buildings for the goods yard should do it...




I suppose I ought add that this is a totally fictitious building.  The real Provender is closer to the town and dates from the 1500s, now the Sea Cadets HQ.  But the model serves a purpose and being a general warehouse, I can drop or collect all sorts of goods! Rule number 1 strictly applied!

Michael

Last edited on Sat Jun 8th, 2019 11:27 pm by Headmaster

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Thats excellent Michael........I found it very difficult and I had previously built a number of warehouses from his previous design......which to be honest I prefer. The flexibility one gets from the modular design is great but the accurate assembly of all those modules is very tricky.....any minor cutting errors which normally you can get away with tend to accumulate and reveal themselves....I was tempted to rename mine Bodgit and Bodgit Ltd.
I think you have done a great job or you are brilliant with photoshop because I couldnt see any obvious errors. Its a perfect cover for the post...exactly what I envisaged.

I dont imagine you are going to bother with any of the different sky light options but the parapet wall is a nice finishing touch you might consider....says he diffidently.

Regardless its a very nice build and looks great.....I do like the interiors

Best wishes

John


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Hi John, I hope all is well and you are looking forward to the European vacation.  Yes, I will add the parapets.  I am wondering whether to build them around the whole building or to divide the roofs in two and have parapets running down the middle.  There is a bit of a gap between them, which I know I can cover with the roof cover panels, but I think the extra parapets will reinforce things as well as hide the gap.

I went for the flat roof option because of the beam.  I thought any sort of skylights would look odd.

Despite my errors (which I have clearly disguised well!) I am pleased with the outcome.  I have forced myself to be more patient in waiting for things to dry (a rule I did not manage to keep all the time) and the model benefits from that.  I was sure I had made a major mistake, until I saw your own thread again and I realised that when I finished the panels it would be ok.  

Now onto the electrics and I can go about finishing it off.

Regards
Michael

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The holiday is certainly approaching fast.....spent most of the day trying to get some form of irrigation system sorted.....worse than fault finding on the railway.....plenty of water but not always where I want it.
You were right to forget about skylights...far too much fret. I agree a continuous parapet will be best

I learned the hard way that Patience is definitely a virtue with Scalescene.....for instance when making those 4 ply laminated pillars I glue them in pairs and let them dry overnight before finally glueing the pair together.

You probably know this already ,but in case you dont ,this is a useful tip Doug (Chubber) gave me for executing folds:

Before cutting out ,prick the blue fold marks , turn the sheet over and using a bodkin (or similar ) and ruler lightly scribe a line between the two marks. Then cut out and fold....super sharp crease marks.

Last tip...far too late of course ,you are finished.... To prevent fading John Wiffen tells you to spray the finished model.......I find its better to spray each sheet the moment it comes off the printer

Best wishes

John

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My modified warehouse
http://yourmodelrailway.net/view_topic.php?id=9727&forum_id=101&jump_to=236882#p236882

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Michael, might I suggest painting the beam a sky blue colour to lessen its impact on the eye?


Regards,


Terry

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Thank you gentlemen.  thanks for the tips John.  Everything got sprayed as I printed, so hopefully some protection.  Great tip about folding - I have read Doug's tips on here somewhere.... that one had escaped my memory.  There are certainly things I would do differently if I were making it again.

A very smart modification of the building, Sol.  That gives me an idea for the town end of the layout where London brick may feature more heavily.

Yes Terry, I have been wondering about what to do with the rest of the beam, including painting blue.  I might try some experiments.

Regards

Michael

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You could do a wrap around brick only with doors building on the roof of the warehouse Michael to get a bit more of the beam covered then do blue above that a bit like an elevator building or crane house.


Brian

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Thanks Brian - that is another idea!  To be honest, it is going to look a bit odd, whatever I do.  I guess it's the price of loft dwelling.  It certainly isn't as bad as some loft layouts I've seen and I'm pretty used to it now.  If I want to do special photographs, I now know I can edit it out.  The beam and the sloping roof are the only compromises to get an extra 2 square metres of train space, so I can live with it.  For now anyway!

Michael

Last edited on Sun Jun 9th, 2019 09:03 pm by Headmaster

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I'm just sorting out the lighting for the warehouse.  I bought some resistors off the internet a while ago ….. How do you know which is the cathode and which is the anode if the legs are the same length?  And does it matter?  I test wired a set of lights and the lights worked whichever way round...….  And I can never remember which is positive and which is negative.  It's like a foreign language, I know the words but have no idea what they mean! (Does anyone have a way of remembering, like a mnemonic or something?  That always helps me...…. Did you know mnemenos is Greek for tomb - a way of remembering someone?  Very educational, me! The classics I can do.... anything practical, not so good!)

I have a multimeter and a brand new battery - never used either of them!  Any advice, please treat me like the boy who always used to ask stupid questions in class....

Michael

Last edited on Sun Jun 9th, 2019 10:43 pm by Headmaster

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Resistors are not polarity conscious so you can connect them in any lighting leg any direction.

Bulbs/globes don't have anode & cathode but LEDs do
https://www.hobby-hour.com/electronics/ledcalc.php  which also has  how to identify cathode from anode



Multimeters - https://www.ifixit.com/Guide/How+To+Use+A+Multimeter/25632

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Thanks Sol, a perfect answer!!  Muddling up my LEDs and resistors and the guides are really helpful. 

Cheers!
Michael

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Well, folks, I just discovered that my home town of Faversham has a model railway club.  It doesn't advertise itself in the town and I had no idea there was one.  I know a few modellers in the town, but no one has ever mentioned a club.  
Now, I must admit that I am a bit reluctant to go, my skills really are either: basic, slow, or - more often - trial and (a lot of) error.  But it might help.  Especially as the chairman is the oft quoted Brian Lambert!!  Meetings of the club clash with my school governor meetings at the moment, but I can change that for the future!

Michael

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Brian Lambert has his own forum & website full of good electrical topics.

https://www.favershammrc.org.uk/

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Easiest way to find out if its for you is go to one of the meets and see how you get on.

We have one locally that I sometimes go to but not as often as others as I find its not really my scene.

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As Andy said Michael

Go along to one of their evenings and get the feel of what its like.
It may suit your needs i have gone to a couple of them years back and i find its not really me.
I know some people really enjoy the club atmosphere and enjoy working on club projects  and the exhibition side of things.
Plus of course you can get hands on help if there are areas you feel you are weak in.

I was heavily involved in the big YMRC exhibition we did years ago which was a success but i decide back then thats the first and last i would ever get involved in.

In a way here and other forums are a bit like clubs although virtual ones where people with a common interest meet and try to help each other when they can.

Brian

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Wise advice Campaman and Brian. I may well do that.

You are right, YMRC is very much a virtual club, and I have learned pretty much everything I know here.  You only have to see people's responses to questions - including my dumb ones! - and the patience people show, to know that, and I think I may prefer that to a weekly meeting working on a club layout that may not be of interest to me.  I spend my working day surrounded by people, the railway is a bit of "me" time and therapy...I'm not sure I would enjoy sharing it!  But I might visit in the summer holiday to see what it's like. I'll admit, I'm not overly hopeful, but nothing ventured, nothing gained.

I decided to do a temporary wire up of the few building lights I have, to see how they look in situ.  The buildings'
LEDs are all 12v and I was sure, in my head, that the hotel lampposts were too.  They were not.  Now dead!  No problem, I have spares...… Except I remember that when I drilled the hole for the wires, they ran under the hotel board a little. This was because the lights sat on a baseboard join and cross members...which meant I couldn't just replace them.  .

And, it is situated where the roof slopes, so I cannot get a drill in to makea new hole, not even at an angle.  Probably, when I put it all together I told myself not to forget putting in a resistor before I wire up.... but that was months ago now and of course I forgot.  Thankfully I have a Dremel with a flexi shaft attachment and with a bit of persuasion I managed to get a suitable drill bit to make a hole at an extreme angle to avoid the baseboard supports and insert the replacement wiring.  I just have to do a bit of a repair job on the clay tiling on the hotel, but that is ok.  So all lighting is now working, although the warehouse leaks a bit around the beam - I think I can fix that with some decorators calk.

Why oh why do I make these silly mistakes?!!  

The warehouse is almost finished, just need to do the platform area and make some doors (I really didn't like the doors in cardboard, so will make some wooden ones) and fit the final end panel, once I have weathered it a bit.  I really like the scalescenes kit, but having made it, I can see all the mistakes I made and can definitely see me making it again for the final model. I have printed off my next model, the goods shed and am just awaiting delivery of matt varnish before I set off on that one.  I am very pleased that the card models blend in quite nicely with both the plastic models and Linka.  The art teachers at my school would be delighted with my mixed media!
Regards

Michael

Last edited on Wed Jun 12th, 2019 08:51 pm by Headmaster

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I managed to replace the lamp posts and get it all rewired.  Phew!  I do like the way the interiors show up




I really must glue the fountain down, and in the centre.... 

Last edited on Thu Jun 13th, 2019 08:17 pm by Headmaster

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That looks great!

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Thank you, Chris.  This was my third build of the hotel, but my first experiment with photographic interiors and my first attempt at lighting a building, so I am very pleased.  I do envy those people who get it right first time.....  Lights and interiors took a few attempts to get right.

Michael

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The warehouse is progressing slowly.  One half of the roof is now complete and I have made the wooden doors. I just need to finish the roof, attach the end wall permanently, fix the platform area and then some building detail before finishing off with cameo details and it will be finished.  It has proven to be a thoroughly enjoyable build, although challenging .  I would change a few things if I made it again, but for now I am very pleased.

I have no links to Scalescenes, benefit in no way whatsoever, but like many here, I can only praise the quality of the kits.  I will simply say this about them:  If you are a novice, like me, with patience and following the detailed instructions, you can make a decent model.  And then, as your skills develop the kits (and ability to kit bash) just gets better and better. Just a brief search of the warehouse kit alone, here,  will give you an idea of what is possible.

And it has done a decent job of drawing the eye away from the beam.  So job done!











Regards

Michael

Last edited on Tue Jun 18th, 2019 12:38 am by Headmaster

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I would agree with Michael in relation to Scalescenes.
Yes you have to do a bit of work but with the comprehensive instructions even a complete novice can produce a very pleasing model.


Tony.

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Cracking job Michael.  The sheer size and detail of the warehouse takes your eye away from the famous post.
Barry

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Thank you Barry.  I must admit I was surprised by the size of the model, but I am pleased enough with the outcome.  As always, I see things I could improve, but as John Dew wisely pointed out, they are things that are only known to the model maker.  A bit more weathering and finish off the final parts and I think it will look the part in the yard.  A bit of action around it with goods and figures and I hope it will be a suitable feature.  I can always make it again - the joy of scalescenes kits!

Michael

Last edited on Wed Jun 19th, 2019 09:07 am by Headmaster

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You could always build one 10 storeys higher to completely hide the post.
:mutley :mutley

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Hahahaha.  John Dew is the master of a tall warehouse!  But believe me, I did consider it.  Or maybe a huge industrial chimney.....  The warehouse will have to do!!

Michael

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Well now.... although most of my posts are about buildings and scenery, this is still actually a model railway.  And, as I have said many times, I don't actually know much about railways.  But I am getting to a point where I can actually run something at the creek - just a bit of freight and switching for now.  But I don't have much rolling stock or, indeed, any idea of what I ought be running.  But I have been saved.  I purchased a book - Modelling the Southern Region (Kindle Edition) and it has been so helpful that I have ordered some rolling stock!  Now I know my Bulleids from my Maunsells and my mark 1 and 2s!!  I even know about 8 plank wagons built at Ashford and different types of freight stock.  It would seem the Southern Region of British Rail had a certain...… reputation!!  I just remember travelling around Kent and Sussex in summer holidays on trains.

Here is my dilemma.  Do I model the period 1963 - 65, when steam was still in evidence on the East Coast of Kent, where Faversham sits, or move to 65 onwards when it is electric and BR grey blue has arrived?  Once upon a time, I couldn't find a model of the trains of the 70s that I knew, but now they are being modelled...…

Or maybe I could be a little flexible and have a real transition period.... 

What do you think?

Michael

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And.... was there a time when BR stock was blue, not blue and grey?  In my  hazy memory, I seem to remember travelling on coaches which were blue, and then coaches which were blue and grey.  but memory plays tricks, doesn't it?
I have seen discontinued models in blue - was it vary short lived?  I can't seem to find any all blue evidence for coaches.
I'm thinking of the transition to electric, with very limited steam and the very first BR blue arriving....


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Have it multi era Michael have steam diesels electrics its your railway so you have whatever you want one week steam next week diesels then electrics. Its plausible to do the layout like that as a lot of the infrastructure did not change that much over a long period of time pick a 20 year period say 60 to 80 as yours is a rural layout things were very slow to be changed.
For example here in Cornwall we still have a lot of semaphore signals today.

Brian

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As always Brian, wise advice!  That would work for the trains.  Some detailing might be a small problem, but I can live with that. 

Regards

Michael

Last edited on Sun Jun 23rd, 2019 12:11 am by Headmaster

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Headmaster wrote: As always Brian, wise advice!  That would work for the trains.  Some detailing might be a small problem, but I can live with that. 

Regards
Michael
There's no such thing as problems, only challenges.

They're much easier to resolve 😊

Bill

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The mammoth build which was the warehouse is now complete.  You can just about make out the goods in storage - photographs again, like the hotel.  













I am getting myself prepared to make the Scalescenes goods shed and will then have a go at scratchbuilding a smaller warehouse more typical of the Victorian warehouses actually at the Creek. The big warehouses more like this are actually in the town.  The largest is now a Tesco.

Given how many layouts have warehouses and goods sheds, there is a dearth of figures appropriate for such scenes in OO or 4mm.  And those that do exist seem to be just standing around or drinking tea.  I want to avoid HO figures, the difference in scale does show up unless they are in the distance.  I may have to have another go at chopping people up. 

Regards

Michael

Last edited on Sat Jun 22nd, 2019 09:33 pm by Headmaster

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Looks really smart Michael your becoming a bit of a scalescenes expert on the quiet.

The bit of wood at the top of the warehouse could be a lift shaft housing.


Brian

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Thanks Brian.  I am not very happy with the end wall, or the scalescenes capping - will have to do something about both of those.

Definitely no expert.  I was taught an "ex" is a has been, and a "spurt" is a drip under pressure!  Let's say a bit of a convert. Like so many things, it is  a learning curve.

What I really need to do is make a model, make notes as I go along, then make it again, avoiding all of the mistakes I made the first time.  And then probably make a third version avoiding the mistakes of the second build.  A bit like my Linka hotel!!!  I must admit, the warehouse is definitely... "it'll do" rather than I am really pleased with it.  There are too many niggly things.  I'm not a perfectionist - far from it - but I do feel that if I know there is a problem, then there really is a problem! 

Michael

Last edited on Sun Jun 23rd, 2019 10:27 pm by Headmaster

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A slight change of plan, while I still remembered making the Scalescenes warehouse, I decided to kit bash another.  This time in London Brick (which Faversham produced in large quantities and is evident in much of the town).  I needed to make this one a little narrower, to fit the track spacing.  The windows are scaleglaze, as an alternative to the black ones.  Like others here, I must say how impressed I am with them.

I have added the first floor interior too, but need to sort out lights before the building can progress.
















Regards

Michael

Last edited on Mon Jun 24th, 2019 11:29 pm by Headmaster

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This is the normal way I add interiors, something I continue to refine....  However, this only works if there is one set of viewing windows.  The warehouse has windows on the end wall as well....





 So I added another interior, looped for the end wall, but not clashing with the front wall.... 





And this is the effect...




I am now slowing working through detailing.... sills and window arches, before I add the lighting and can then glue all of the panels together.  And then think about a roof for it!

Regards

Michael

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and while things dry on the warehouse, progress has begun on the goods shed



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Cooking on gas Michael with this card building now all looking very smart.


Brian

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Thanks Brian - it is definitely something I am getting a little beter at with practise.  Close up photos can be a bit harsh, but they certainly look ok from the normal viewing range.

Regards

Michael

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detailing of the building is finally done.....





And some produce arriving in very small crates, ready to decorate the warehouses.  These came in a kit form and although a bit fiddly, I think they look very good.  You can probably see my first mangled effort, but once I got the hang of it, they came out well.  I have some larger crates to complete....





I have aborted the goods shed.... it didn't fit the scene in the end, so I am back to the drawing board on that one....

Michael

Last edited on Wed Jun 26th, 2019 11:34 pm by Headmaster

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Looks the part OK Michael.

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Thanks Sol.  Like so many things with this hobby, I am discovering that with a bit of patience and practice, things get a little bit better with each new effort.  Although still  a few disasters along the way.  

Michael

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Looks smart Michael another successful scalescenes build the produce in the crates look very good is that one of those laser cut kits?

Brian

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Thanks Brian.  Yes, laser cut ones.  These are from Scale Model Scenery, the first time I've tried them.  Quite impressed.

Michael

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Always amazed at the detail you go to! The detailing inside the warehouse is brilliant!

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Thank you Chris.... I'm not entirely sure it's worth it, as you have to get pretty close to see it.... but at least it is there.  And a photo is a lot easier than trying to make everything.  The current boxes and freight will be to detail outside the two warehouses, to give the scenes a bit of life.

I have mentioned several times - and here is another! - that I am not good at visualising things in 3D, In my plans, the sidings were working fine, but once you add in the buildings it can all go a bit wrong.  However, disaster is averted and with a couple of minor changes I think I can get the effect I want.

The thing I love about Teasel Bay is that everything appears very natural, and things just fit...  I'm trying to get that in the yard....

Regards

Michael

Last edited on Thu Jun 27th, 2019 11:13 pm by Headmaster

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Well what you have done looks great to me. I know nothing about real railways either, I’m just making it up as I go. 
My general rule for Teasel is that unless it is the track nothing is flat! There has to be some type of relief. Also look at Penhayle on here as it was an amazing layout!!!

Last edited on Fri Jun 28th, 2019 09:20 pm by TeaselBay

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Thank you Chris.

Yes, Penhayle is great, and John Dew also knows how to create a scene.... in fact there are loads of great examples here, with people willing to share their skills and knowledge, which is why I joined.  Even then it took me a couple of years to get started and risk posting my efforts!

I'm glad I'm not the only railway ignoramus here, although I am trying to learn a little bit.  I want the trains to reflect the southern region of BR, but to paraphrase Eric Morecombe, they will be the right trains, just not in the right order!

And despite my best efforts to plan, I am definitely making it up as I go along.  Only last night I realised I had no idea as to how as I am actually going to fit the Creek scene I have planned.....  Oh well, another challenge!

Regards

Michael

Last edited on Fri Jun 28th, 2019 09:03 pm by Headmaster

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Which one is Jon? I had to check as there is another Jon (Stuckey) who does this one which I like: https://www.facebook.com/groups/576313559060209/?ref=share

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John Dew of Granby Junction - you can't have missed it here!

Michael

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Headmaster wrote: John Dew of Granby Junction - you can't have missed it here!

Michael


You called? :lol:

Last edited on Sat Jun 29th, 2019 05:44 pm by John Dew

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Hi Michael

Couldnt resist the one liner.  Thank you for all the recommendations......I think you flatter me somewhat.

I have been meaning to write for a few days to congratulate you on the second warehouse. It looks brilliant. I do agree with you about replacing the printed doors with scratch built plasticard...........they look so much better. Scalescene printed woodwork never looks entirely convincing.

I am very impressed at the speed with which you are producing these high quality models. It takes me for ever as I drift from project to project. I do admire your focus.

What jarred with the Goods Shed. I have never made the model but it looked very good in your photos. It must have been frustrating to can it after all that work. Will you be able to use it somewhere else on the layout? It would be shame to waste all that precision cutting.

Best wishes

John

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Praise where praise is due John!

For one thing, all of the goods shed's walls butted at the corners and there was a strange part in the cover layers.  I thought I had done it wrong, but no.....

Secondly, while in my head the buildings would all go together, it started to look cluttered.... and I was filling space and losing the overall effect I wanted.  But it's ok, I have shortened on of the sidings a little to give the warehouse a bit of space and I have repurposed a platform to give me an opportunity to do some detailing and try to bring the scene to life.  

I  might be able to use it elsewhere, so hopefully not wasted.... but then I learn something new with each new model I make.

Regards

Michael

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Headmaster wrote: John Dew of Granby Junction - you can't have missed it here!

Michael

Ah yes, indeed!

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The warehouse build is completed and interiors and lights are finished.  Roof is fitted and so on with the tiling.  This is one I made myself from free textures downloaded and then simply scaled and stitched together in Word, then printed off on photo paper.  I have done this a few times.  Some of the walls and the vegetable garden flooring at the hotel were made in the same way.  At least this way, it makes a building kit a little individual.....



One side done, and trimmed.  When it is fully dry I will cut in the individual tiles.



And detailing stock is almost ready..... once I have a platform!  Some figures are on order, but I'm disappointed at the lack of choices....




Michael

Last edited on Sun Jun 30th, 2019 10:39 pm by Headmaster

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I've been experimenting with backscenes too. I haven't managed to find something I like yet.... although this one is getting there.  It's not quite as focussed as my previous one, but I think I quite like that.  It will have to do a 5 metre run, with an incline, so it is going to be tricky.  But I think it will give the right overall effect, even if it isn't great quality




Michael

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Well done Michael its looking pucker.

The backscenes are always going to be a compromise especially as you have the same problem as me the angled roof i think the secret is if you have the space you need to put trees bushes etc to act a transition area between 3d layout and 2d backscene.

Brian

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Hi Brian

Thankfully on this run of the layout, there are no slopes.  I printed the same back scene as I have at the creek end, just to get an idea, and because it is in good quality photograph, it is very photorealistic.  But, when I started to put models and trees in front of it I had two visual problems:

1. The difference in scale shows up quite significantly.  I could disguise it on the slope, but the grass at the front and bushes would be very, very tall!  I also need to get some extra height - it I raise the photo on the backscene, it is really out of scale.

2. The second is actually a bigger problem.  The models - whether scenery, or buildings or people look like..... models, compared to the backscene.  At first it looks quite good, but then I start to notice the backscene more than the model.

So I am experimenting with using a lower quality photograph... it is still a photograph, but not quite so obviously one and I'm hoping it will complement the scenes rather than dominate them.  We will see!

Michael

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Great workmanship Michael .  jolly well done.   Thanks for sharing. :thumbs

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Thank you Reg!

Michael

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Tiles have  been individually cut now, and weathering added.



And a dusting for the rest of the model.  I use artist pastel chalks.  A light dusting, then work in with brushes.  Any white lines from the window arches are therefore easily disguised.



While not a copy, this is the sort of building at Faversham Creek that I am aiming for.....





Michael

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Headmaster wrote: Praise where praise is due John!

For one thing, all of the goods shed's walls butted at the corners and there was a strange part in the cover layers.  I thought I had done it wrong, but no.....

Secondly, while in my head the buildings would all go together, it started to look cluttered.... and I was filling space and losing the overall effect I wanted.  But it's ok, I have shortened on of the sidings a little to give the warehouse a bit of space and I have repurposed a platform to give me an opportunity to do some detailing and try to bring the scene to life.  

I  might be able to use it elsewhere, so hopefully not wasted.... but then I learn something new with each new model I make.

Regards

Michael

Butt joints?  Thats not like John Wiffen, he normally goes to great lengths to conceal them. Not sure if you have seen his updates to the Scratch builders Building Materials? They use to be just sheets of bricks or dressed stone.......very handy for patching etc but a bit limited.......now they are a 4 page kit with all manner of matching trim for doors and windows......and a possible solution for you.......quoins....perfect for hiding joints

If you havent done so already its worth checking out.

Sorry to hear you are still struggling to get working people for the warehouse. Who did you opt for in then end?

Best wishes

John




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Hi John

I went for some figures from Modelu and Hardy's Hobbies in the end.  Workmen and shop keepers!  I think they will work...…

The roof is now finished, the platform added, guttering done and the doors have been made to look a little more individual.

Just need to do the downpipes, finish the wall at the front of the platform and can then get it in place.







Michael

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Thats excellent......you have every right to be very proud of that build
Cheers

John

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And here it is, pretty much finished.


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Cracking good stuff Michael.  Loving the contents of the crates - fruit and veg?  I have used the laser cut crates and, like you, find them to be super little models although a it fiddly!!

I was going to suggest Modelu for figures - they seem to do poses that others don't.  I would also consider looking into the wargames world where I have found that figures such as artillery crews offer up useful poses.  There is a company called Zvezda (Russian I think) who do sets of 3 or 4 figures for their "board" game wargame.  The sets are supposed to represent a troop type and cost about £5.  Careful selection is required to avoid your goods yard looking like a military coup!!

This is a German 105mm gun crew - (apologies for the poor quality photo) - some of the guys just in shirt sleeves are firemen on some of my locomotives.  Not sure that the local Locomotive Superintendent has found out yet!


Barry

Last edited on Mon Jul 1st, 2019 09:45 pm by Barry Miltenburg

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Excellent - thanks Barry. It strikes me that there are a lot of scenes railway modellers make (perhaps especially in the UK) that do not have corresponding OO figures.  (I had some HO figures I thought I could use, but they just made the warehouse and freight look enormous. Or the freight made them look small!)

Dock scenes - how many different 4mm figures?  Pubs - how many people drinking?  Brewery - the occasional man with a barrel.... I could go on!  

And another thing, most models I have seen are set in at the very least, a warm seasonal climate, yet most figures are in coats carrying umbrellas....  well, you know what I mean.....  Maybe this is for room 101, but it is frustrating that the options are so limited.

Rant over!

Michael

Last edited on Mon Jul 1st, 2019 10:58 pm by Headmaster

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Very nice Michael, I notice that you've left out the overhang parts of the building.

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Thank you Phil.  I wasn't really making that particular building, it was more a reference for colour and location.  I do plan to make it to sit beside the creek, when I eventually get to it.

Michael


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Great work. I think you should have a garden railway! ;)

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Readers of this thread may remember I built this goods shed, on the left - A Wills kit.  Well, I decided to repaint it in a weathered London Brick finish, add some lights and a photographic interior.... so it went from this...




To this...




Michael

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Just starting to decorate the buildings, working from the rear of the layout.  This is for the Faversham Brewery store...





And in place.  The figures are some HO white metal ones.  Not great detail but they don't really need it being at the rear of the yard scene.



Ignore the backscene here, it is a test piece which was propped up but has  fallen forward!

The warehouse will hide some of this scene, except when looking down the track between buildings.  I've done a test fit and I think it will look quite good in the background.



Michael

Last edited on Thu Jul 4th, 2019 02:09 pm by Headmaster

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And the waitress is now serving afternoon tea on the terrace...






Last edited on Thu Jul 4th, 2019 09:47 pm by Headmaster

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Followers of this thread will know I have a wooden post to hide.  I originally had a warehouse covering it, but I wasn't particularly happy with the build.  It was my first attempt at the Scalescenes model and I generally need to have a go at a model a couple of times to get it right.  Following some advice from John Dew and his warehouse builds, I did a bit of kit bashing and have now created a slightly larger version which will hide more of the wood and I've done some tests with adding a sky line above it, so may give that a go too.  Here is the current progress.  The left hand end wall cannot be fitted until it is ready to be put into position.  So just working on some detailing which is easier to do away from the layout.





This is the cut for the beam.  To make it a little more complicated, the beam is at a slight angle, so the cut out has had to compensate for that so that the platform will run parallel to the track.  Lighting has been fitted, but I cannot finish the roof until it is in place.





Michael

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The top of the roof is finished although not fixed in place as it is too high for the cross beam in the loft.  I will have to fit the warehouse in place and then glue these on after.  

I find the scalescenes capping less than convincing, so have cut down Metcalfe paving slabs for the capping here.  These are also textures I created, more in keeping with the rest of the building and I could make them long enough for the full length of the warehouse.  I say created, I really mean sourced, through a website I use for all sorts of architectural features.  I just put it all together in Word.

The doors are in place too.....






Last edited on Sun Jul 14th, 2019 01:24 am by Headmaster

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I've also made a crossing for the road entry to the goods yard.  It was a kit - not my own!! It's laser cut one, just paint it and glue parts together.



Last edited on Sun Jul 14th, 2019 08:53 am by Headmaster

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This photo clearly shows the angle needed for the cut out for the wooden post.  I didn't think about this until I tried to fit the platform to the original warehouse.  It would have needed to be an odd shaped platform.  Although I could have gone with that, my own aesthetics required the warehouse and platform to be square to the track, hence the cut out.

I'm sure there is  a proper way of working out the angles, but I did it by trial and error with waste card templates until it was right!








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You really have sorted the post problem with the new warehouse Michael thats time well spent.

I must say that laser cut kit of the crossing gates is very good and you have painted and weathered them very well.

Do you have more than one post to sort?

Brian

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Hi Brian, and thank you.  Thankfully just the one post to hide, but it is quite a prominent place. 

Michael

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Hi Michael,

Real "CAD" then.  (Cardboard Aid....).

Nigel

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The warehouse is now in position and mostly finished apart from some detailing and the platform.  Then to disguise the rest of the wooden post.

The original name of the company was Faversham Co-Operative and Engineering Society Company Limited.  I shortened it! 









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Brian suggested adding a small building on top, perhaps as a lift shaft or something like that.  I have done that, in red brick as though it was a later addition.  This means the rest of the post can be sky blue to disguise it further.  I will try that tomorrow....


Last edited on Mon Jul 15th, 2019 11:00 pm by Headmaster

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The platform is made and painted...... 



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And the first workmen are painted...


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The scene is beginning to take shape now Michael. What was a problem with the post not long ago is now starting to look really good.


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Thanks Brian.  The building has certainly done much to disguise the post - or at least have it so that it doesn't appear to be part of the scenery.  The blue sky above..... hmmm not sure it is working for me at the moment.  I will give it a few days to get used to it and assess.  From the point of view of taking pictures and my enjoyment, it is much improved.

Michael

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Managed some ground work in the loft, so while it dries I tried a Wills yard crane...







A nice little kit.  I might be able to concoct my own version from bits I have around.....

Last edited on Wed Jul 17th, 2019 10:57 pm by Headmaster

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Looks amazing as always!

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Thank you Chris.  For once something I made which I didn't have to do again because I bodged it the first time!!

Michael

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Well, I have to accept that a post in the middle of a scene is.... a post.  And a cross beam is..... a large bit of wood!  I had thought about lowering the height of the layout, as this is the lowest end of the loft.  I'm glad I didn't as it is a lovely height to stand and work on.  So there had to be a compromise.  But now I have covered the wood and painted it blue, it looks less like a loft, if not exactly invisible!!




This warehouse is now fixed and I have "ballasted".  It is supposed to be ash and cinders rather than ballast as it is a small local siding.  It looks quite like the photos I was working from, but I am not sure I have it quite right.




The blue above the post-hiding warehouse needs touching up.... but the unit is fixed and the road behind it is completed.  I need to ballast this. The idea was to do an ash and cinder mix again....





And I always check things with a black and white photo.....



None of the detailing is done yet - the freight  has just been scattered on one platform...…

I have one more building to make - I have found a lovely small goods shed to model in the town and then I can concentrate on finishing the ground areas, filling in missing bits of foam board.  This is mainly because I changed my mind about building layout and track position.  It isn't a problem - I had to do the same with the road area which has now taken a different direction.  Once I get a covering on top, any joins disappear.

Michael

Last edited on Thu Jul 18th, 2019 09:57 pm by Headmaster

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I need to fix some buffer stops. Has anyone successfully made them, or do people just buy the ready made/kit versions.  I have a Hornby one from years ago, but it looks very toy like and doesn't seem to have changed.  I'm not particularly bothered about working lights on them, just a reasonable representation.

Cheers

Michael

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